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179 Agricultural Resources

Misc. - Numbers

5 Reasons People Are Suddenly Concerned About Brazilian Beef
Are you having beef for dinner? Do you know where it came from? No, not the grocery store down the street, but where the cow was raised? Most of us probably can't answer those questions, and that's a growing concern for health advocates, retailers, and lawmakers amid reports that some meatpackers in Brazil -- one of the world's largest exporters of beef -- are shipping out rotten, salmonella-tainted beef.
March 22, 2017
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7 Things we Learned from new 'Frontline' About State of the Seafood Industry
While a growing number of Americans are paying close attention to traditional livestock -- demanding more organic meat, cage-free eggs, and grass-fed beef -- not as much attention has been paid to the massive global market for seafood, and the ethical, financial, and environmental impact it has.
April 25, 2017
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Misc. - A

A better way to farm algae
Scientists have long known of the potential of microalgae to aid in the production of biofuels and other valuable chemicals. However, the difficulty and significant cost of growing microalgae have in some ways stalled further development of this promising technology. Bendy Estime, a biomedical and chemical engineering Ph.D. candidate, has devoted his research to this area, and developed a new technology for energy efficient cultivation and harvesting of microalgae.
January 30, 2017
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A better way to predict the environmental impacts of agricultural production
Consumer goods companies often rely on life-cycle assessments (LCA) to figure out the potential consequences of how they design products and source ingredients. this kind of assessment, while sophisticated, often lacks detail about how the products affect natural resources such as land, water and biodiversity.
April 21, 2017
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A 'bionic leaf' could help feed the world
In the second half of the 20th century, the mass use of fertilizer was part of an agricultural boom called the "green revolution" that was largely credited with averting a global food crisis. Now, the challenge of feeding the world looms again as the population continues to balloon
April 3, 2017
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A fertilizer dearth foiled animal evolution for eons?
End of phosphorus dearth in ocean shallows coincides with evolutionary surge in study of 3.5 billion years of Earth's history
December 21, 2016
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A nano form of iron for fortification of foods
Around 1.2 billion people worldwide suffer from iron deficiency, with women worse affected than men. In Europe, one in five women around the age of 20 suffers from iron deficiency. Typical symptoms include diminished work performance, fatigue, anaemia and headaches.
April 25, 2017
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A possible alternative to antibiotics
A combination of metals and organic acids is an effective way to eradicate cholera, salmonella, pseudomonas, and other pathogenic bacteria, researchers report. The combination also works on bacteria that attack agricultural crops.
May 23, 2017
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ABC News Settles 'Pink Slime' Defamation Case With Beef Company
Well, that was quick: Just a few weeks after Beef Products Inc. and ABC News squared off in the opening arguments of the trial over the broadcaster's use of the phrase "pink slime" to describe an ingredient in some ground beef, the two sides have agreed to put the whole thing to rest.
June 28, 2017
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Agribuild
offers personal coaching and strategic planning advice to farmers and agricultural contractors.
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Agricool raises $9.1 million to grow fruits and vegetables in containers
French startup Agricool is using containers to grow strawberries around big cities. The company just raised a $9.1 million (€8 million) funding round from Jacques-Antoine Granjon, Thibault Elziere as well as existing investors Henri Seydoux and Daphni.
July 11, 2017
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An eBay for grain trading, FarmLead, raises $6.5 million Series A
Farmers work to feed the world. Yet somehow, corn, wheat and rice sales are still happening at a local level through antiquated paperwork and phone negotiations. Now, an Ottawa-based startup called FarmLead has raised $6.5 million in venture funding to connect grain producers and buyers automatically online, and help farmers get fair prices for what they grow. the platform is something like an eBay for grains.
March 19, 2017
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Another species of Varroa mite threatens European honeybees
A sister species of the Varroa destructor mite is developing the ability to parasitize European honeybees, threatening pollinators already hard pressed by pesticides, nutritional deficiencies and disease, a study says.
November 17, 2016
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Ant agricultural revolution began 30 million years ago in dry, desert-like climate
World's first sustainable, industrial-scale agriculture began when crops became dependent on their ant farmers
April 12, 2017
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App reveals constituents
A new app looks directly inside objects and displays specific constituents. It has numerous uses: for instance, apples can be scanned for pesticide residues. Applications will be added successively following the Wikipedia principle.
February 6, 2017
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Arable raises $4.25 million to demystify farming with sensors and data
Arable has raised $4.25 million for solar-powered sensors and software to help farmers produce more food with fewer resources, and more accurately predict their yields. Middleland Capital and S2G Ventures led the Series a investment in Arable, joined by Chasefield, Spark Labs and Cantos VC.
March 27, 2017
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At mealtime, honey bees prefer country blossoms to city blooms
Urban beekeeping could suffer as a result, study authors say
March 14, 2017
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"Atypical" mad cow disease detected in Alabama
USDA stresses that it does not pose a threat to humans or our food.
July 19, 2017
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Misc. - B

Backyard Chicken Trend can be Risky
A growing number of chickens and other live poultry are moving from farms to backyards across the United States -- as pets, producers of fresh eggs, and, if you really want to get your hands dirty, as providers of fertilizer (think chicken poop).
July 19, 2016
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Barley genome sequenced
Research could lead to better beer, single malt Scotch whiskey
April 26, 2017
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'Bee' informed: Public interest exceeds understanding in bee conservation
Survey reveals need for public education, outreach about bees
September 5, 2017
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Better way to predict the environmental impacts of agricultural production
Many companies want to know how the creation of their products affects the environment. Scientists have now found a way to better predict and quantify environmental impacts.
April 21, 2017
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Biochar could clear the air in more ways than one
Health, economic benefits of capturing agricultural nitric oxide outlined in study
July 27, 2017
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Bioengineered rice fights off drought
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have developed strains of rice that are resistant to drought in real-world situations. Published in Plant Biotechnology Journal ("Overexpression of an Arabidopsis thaliana galactinol synthase gene improves drought tolerance in transgenic rice and increased grain yield in the field"), the study reports that transgenic rice modified with a gene from the Arabidopsis plant yield more rice than unmodified rice when subjected to stress brought by natural drought.
April 4, 2017
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Brakke Consulting
offers services to the animal health, agricultural, veterinary, pet, and specialty chemical product industries including executive search, market studies, and professional management services.
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Breeding highly productive corn has reduced its ability to adapt
Researchers wanted to know whether the last 100 years of selecting for corn that is acclimated to particular locations has changed its ability to adapt to new or stressful environments. By measuring populations of corn plants planted across North America, they could test how the corn genomes responded to different growing conditions.
November 9, 2017
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Butter Is So Popular Right Now, It's Causing A Croissant Shortage In France
If you're traveling to France in the near future and have dreams of picking apart the delicate, flaky layers of authentic croissant, be warned that these beloved pastries may be in short supply when you get there. Why? Apparently because people are eating more butter.
October 25, 2017
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Misc. - C

Camelina: Where you grow what you grow
Camelina's varied response to location
May 24, 2017
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Can sub-Saharan Africa produce enough food to meet growing demand?
Without massive cropland expansion, possibly not.
December 16, 2016
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Ceres Imaging scores $2.5M to bring machine learning-powered insights to farmers
Agtech has largely seemed underserved by emerging startups, though farmers have largely proven more receptive to adopting new tech than most might assume.
November 1, 2017
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Chicken May Get More Expensive Because Birds Are Too Old And Fat To Breed
Years of very precise breeding means that modern poultry grow to massive sizes very quickly -- sometimes in a matter of weeks. While this results in more meat in less time, it's also causing a problem: Some birds are so top-heavy that they may not be all that interested in breeding, and there's now an older breeding population of roosters and hens that are less likely to produce viable eggs.
June 19, 2017
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Climate Change Will Hit the Poorest the Hardest in the U.S.
Union County is tucked in northern Florida, half an hour north of Gainesville and an hour west of Jacksonville. It's Florida's smallest county, a mostly unremarkable landlocked stretch of pine forest interspersed with lakes.
June 29, 2017
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Climate change will make your coffee cost more and taste worse
Over half of Ethiopia's crop is in peril, and the same goes for other coffee-producing countries.
June 21, 2017
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Climate insurance is rarely well thought out in agriculture
Researchers reveal unwanted developments and make recommendations for improvement
September 25, 2017
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Commercial agriculture is preventing wildfires--and that's not good news
We need more scorched earth.
June 29, 2017
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Common crop chemical leaves bees susceptible to deadly viruses
A chemical that is thought to be safe and is, therefore, widely used on crops -- such as almonds, wine grapes and tree fruits -- to boost the performance of pesticides, makes honey bee larvae significantly more susceptible to a deadly virus, according to researchers.
January 16, 2017
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Conservation agriculture improves crop production and farmer's livelihood In Bangladesh
Bangladesh, one of the densest countries in terms of population with about 1000 people living per square kilometre, has always been under huge pressure to feed its growing population. Intensive agricultural practice, which involves mono-cropping and use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, helped boost productivity initially.
December 30, 2016
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Corn better used as food than biofuel, study finds
Corn is grown not only for food, it is also an important renewable energy source. Renewable biofuels can come with hidden economic and environmental issues, and the question of whether corn is better utilized as food or as a biofuel has persisted since ethanol came into use. For the first time, researchers have quantified and compared these issues in terms of economics of the entire production system to determine if the benefits of biofuel corn outweigh the costs.
June 19, 2017
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Could Underwater Farming Feed the World?
Ocean-Bound Entrepreneur Envisions Ecological Restoration and Economic Revival.
December 5, 2016
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Cracking the code of megapests
For the first time, researchers have mapped the complete genome of two closely related megapests potentially saving the international agricultural community billions of dollars a year.
August 3, 2017
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Crop yield gets boost with modified genes in photosynthesis
Plant biologists have bumped up crop productivity by increasing the expression of genes that result in more efficient use of light in photosynthesis, a finding that could be used to help address the world's future food needs.
November 18, 2016
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Crops that kill pests by shutting off their genes
Plants are among many eukaryotes that can 'turn off' one or more of their genes by using a process called RNA interference to block protein translation. Researchers are now weaponizing this by engineering crops to produce specific RNA fragments that, upon ingestion by insects, initiate RNA interference to shut down a target gene essential for life or reproduction, killing or sterilizing the insects.
July 27, 2017
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Culture: a Farming Tale
A building needs a foundation. A foundation comes from a plan, which comes from a vision or dream. When music is written, it comes from inspiration or a muse. Wisdom comes from Truth which is built on facts and data.
November 7, 2017
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Misc. - D

Dairy Industry Says 48% Of Americans Don't Know Where Chocolate Milk Comes From
Even though the term "chocolate milk" may seem pretty self-explanatory, a large number of people apparently think there is some secret alchemy involved in brewing this mysterious elixir.
June 15, 2017
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Deer eaten alive in Florida signals reappearance of devastating parasite
Authorities frantically battle infestations that could devastate livestock.
November 28, 2016
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Denzil Phillips International Ltd.
introduce, conserve, propagate, cultivate, harvest, process, evaluate, and market useful plants from around the world.
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Desert Basins Could Hold 'Missing' Carbon Sinks
Deserts across the globe may contain some of the world's "missing" carbon sinks -- land masses scientists had not previously identified that absorb carbon from the atmosphere, according to researchers at China's Lanzhou University.
June 19, 2017
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Drone software gives offline farmers real-time images
Drones can send images to iOS devices in the field using edge computing.
April 18, 2017
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Misc. - E

Eco-label in exchange for less chemicals on rice fields
What are the incentives for Taiwan's farmers to produce in a more environmentally friendly manner?
June 2, 2017
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Engineering rice to waste less fertilizer
Most of the phosphorus fertilizer goes to the seeds, ends up wasted.
December 21, 2016
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EPA Taken to Court for Ignoring Its Own Science In Deciding to not Ban Pesticide
When Scott Pruitt recently took over as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, one of his first decisions was to deny a petition seeking a ban on a controversial pesticide -- only months after scientists of the agency said it poses a significant health risk. now the EPA is being taken to court for its decision to ignore its own recommendation.
April 6, 2017
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Exploring an ancient event in pumpkin, gourd and melon evolution
Recently, scientists have making great strides in better understanding with the genomes sequenced of cucumber, watermelon, and melons. With these projects completed, a research team has performed the first large comparative genomics exploration of their genome structures and evolution. After reconstructing evolutionary trees and extensive comparisons of common genes between Cucurbitaceae plants, unexpectedly, the research team has found the first evidence of an ancient whole genome duplication event.
September 28, 2017
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Exposure to neonic pesticides results in early death for honeybee workers and queens
Worker and queen honeybees exposed to field realistic levels of neonicotinoids die sooner, reducing the health of the entire colony, biologists have found. The researchers were also surprised to find that the neonicotinoid contaminated pollen collected by the honeybees came not from crops grown from neonicotinoid treated seeds, but plants growing in areas adjacent to those crops. This is season-long, field realistic research with typical exposure.
June 29, 2017
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Misc. - F

Farmers Business Network cultivates $40 million to help farmers buy seeds at favorable prices
GV (formerly known as Google Ventures) and DBL Partners co-led a $40 million investment in Farmers Business Network Inc., the company announced on Tuesday. FBN started out as something of a professional network for farmers and other agronomists. It allowed people working in agriculture to anonymously share information about what they were paying for seeds, fertilizers, and other "inputs" that they need to raise healthy crops.
March 7, 2017
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Farming needs technology to feed the globe
Farmers need to embrace advanced technologies such as the IoT in the next few years in order to support the growing human population, new research has claimed.
June 12, 2017
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Five-G Consulting
custom design of livestock handling facilities.
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Food Scientists Trying to develop Kale Aimed at Picky American Palates
We all know that kale is trendy, but if it were up to some American consumers, it wouldn't be, well, quite so kale-y.
November 28, 2016
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Food webs entangle humans in complex relationships with animals, crops and the environment
Reconstructed food webs from the Ancestral Puebloan southwestern United States show the complexity and interconnectedness of humans, other animals, crops and the environment, in an area of uncertain climate and resources, according to researchers, who think climate change and human decisions then, may shed light on future human choices.
April 10, 2017
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Future rice yield losses due to climate change could be extreme
Climate warming poses a major threat to rice's role in our global food security.
January 9, 2017
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Misc. - G

Genetic map reveals heat tolerance traits in peas
As the global climate changes and temperatures continue to rise, heat stress is becoming a major limiting factor for pea cultivation. A new study indicates that pea plants with some specific traits -- such as longer flowering time and higher pod numbers -- may be more resistant to heat stress. The researchers also gained new insights into the genetics of heat tolerance in pea.
August 23, 2017
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Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millions
Scientists discover way to reduce animal feed and food production costs by increasing a key nutrient in corn
October 9, 2017
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Genetically modified insects could disrupt international food trade
Genetically modified organisms for pest control could end up as contaminants in agricultural products throughout the globe
February 1, 2017
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Global methane emissions from agriculture larger than reported, according to new estimates
Global methane emissions from agriculture are larger than estimated due to the previous use of out-of-date data on carbon emissions generated by livestock, according to a new study.
September 29, 2017
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Greater efforts are needed to promote biopesticides
There are a number of environmental and economic reasons to promote the development and use of biological compounds as pesticides. a new analysis finds that there are fewer biopesticides registered in the European Union (EU) compared with the United States, India, Brazil, and China.
May 4, 2017
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Misc. - H

Hand-picked specialty crops 'ripe' for precision agriculture techniques
Precision agriculture techniques could have substantial financial benefits for producers of hand-picked specialty crops, according to a new paper. a researcher has developed a mathematical model that determined the optimal time for transporting a grower's strawberries from the field to cold storage.
March 2, 2017
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Harvesting next-gen technologies for the farm
It's entirely possible – even probable – that the evolutionary, cutting-edge developments in the 21st century world of agriculture over the past few years have slipped under your radar. Fair enough, you're busy. we get that. But that doesn't mean that a massive and relatively stealthy disruption isn't happening as we speak.
December 6, 2016
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Harvests in US to suffer from climate change
Some of the most important crops risk substantial damage from rising temperatures. to better assess how climate change caused by human greenhouse gas emissions will likely impact wheat, maize and soybean, an international team of scientists now ran an unprecedentedly comprehensive set of computer simulations of US crop yields. Importantly, the scientists find that increased irrigation can help to reduce the negative effects of global warming on crops -- but this is possible only in regions where sufficient water is available.
January 19, 2017
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How plant cells regulate growth shown for the first time
Researchers have managed to show how the cells in a plant, a multicellular organism, determine their size and regulate their growth over time. the findings overturn previous theories in the field and are potentially significant for the future of agriculture and forestry -- as it reveals more about one of the factors which determine the size of plants and fruits.
January 23, 2017
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How to actually remove pesticides from your fruit
Assuming that you should be worried about them in the first place.
October 25, 2017
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How to wash pesticides off apples, according to science
Baking soda is better than bleach for washing them apples
October 26, 2017
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Misc. - I

I've got a brand new combine harvester and I'll give you the API key
Yes, you can stick IoT sensors on tractors - and John Deere's been doing it for 20 years
January 25, 2017
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Identification of genes controlling mouthpart development key to insect diversity
Research reveals functions of mouthpart-controlling genes in development of enlarged mandibles in the stag beetle
March 7, 2017
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If Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Freaked you Out, you Won't Like What's Coming
Over the past few years, as people have been freaking out about a plan to release genetically modified mosquitoes in the Florida Keys, the company behind those mosquitoes has been quietly toiling away on another project.
December 13, 2016
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In search of the wild fava bean
Seeds from a site in Northern Israel are the ancestors of today's fava beans, report researchers. Understanding the ecology of the wild plants' environment and the evolution they underwent in the course of domestication is crucial to improving the biodiversity of the modern crop.
April 10, 2017
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Increasing the water table in agricultural peatland could hold key to reducing UK's greenhouse gas emissions
Increasing the water table in agricultural peatland could hold key to reducing UK's greenhouse gas emissions, suggest researchers.
February 6, 2017
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Industrial farming disrupts burn-regrowth cycle in grasslands
The world's open grasslands and the beneficial fires that sustain them have shrunk rapidly over the past two decades, due to a massive increase in agriculture, according to a new study.
June 29, 2017
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Insecticide-resistant flies unskilled at courting females
Insecticide resistance sounds like a superpower for the average male fruit fly -- but there's a catch. Scientists have found that the single genetic change which protects the flies from the pesticide DDT also makes males smaller, less aggressive and 'rubbish' at courting females.
May 8, 2017
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Insecticides aren't just killing bees, they're acting as contraceptives too
There is a major concern at the moment over the impact of neonicotinoids -- a class of neuro-active insecticides that are chemically very similar to nicotine and used heavily in agriculture. they have been linked to the collapse of bee colonies, both honey bee and bumble bee. There's multiple problems that lead to death, including rendering the bees unable to forage, navigate or to learn properly, as well as making them more susceptible to mites and pathogens.
August 1, 2016
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Into the wild for plant genetics
Scientists sequence a whole genome on a Welsh mountainside to identify a plant species within hours
August 21, 2017
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IRB Barcelona scientists reveal role of Dpp gene in wing growth of fruit flies
Researchers working in the Development and Growth Control Lab at IRB Barcelona reveal that the Dpp gene (BMP in humans) plays a double role in the structural organization and growth of the wings of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This study, which has been published in the journal eLife, demonstrates that Dpp is necessary for tissue growth but that "its gradient does not direct wing growth," explains Marco Milán, ICREA research professor and head of the study.
July 4, 2017
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Misc. - K

Key to better asparagus identified in evolution of sex chromosomes
Working with an international team of breeders and genome scientists, plant biologists have sequenced the genome of garden asparagus as a model for sex chromosome evolution.
November 2, 2017
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Misc. - L

'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips
There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. the substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds -- organophosphate nerve agents -- can be used as deadly weapons. now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable 'lab-on-a-glove.'
March 22, 2017
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Larger swaths of tropical forest being lost to commercial agriculture
Satellite images show half of all forest loss from 2000-12 was industrial expansion
May 9, 2017
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'Lost city' used 500 years of soil erosion to benefit crop farming
Researchers working on a 700-year-old abandoned agricultural site in Tanzania have shown that soil erosion benefited farming practices for some 500 years.
August 21, 2017
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Lost genes that boost tomatoes' flavor identified
Domestication has not retained the genes that give tomatoes their deliciousness.
January 26, 2017
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Misc. - M

Making cows more environmentally friendly
Research reveals vicious cycle of climate change, cattle diet and rising methane
March 29, 2017
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Man Charged With Stealing Nearly $1 Million Worth Of Bees
Maybe you weren't aware, but bees are big business: With bee colonies mysteriously vanishing, hive owners can make a good income renting out their insects to farmers who need extra help with pollination. Those beekeepers will be happy to hear that authorities in California have busted a man suspected of stealing almost $1 million worth of bees and equipment.
May 17, 2017
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Mapping functional diversity of forests with remote sensing
Productivity and stability of forest ecosystems strongly depend on the functional diversity of plant communities. Researchers have developed a new method to measure and map functional diversity of forests at different scales -- from individual trees to whole communities -- using remote sensing by aircraft. Their work paves the way for future airborne and satellite missions to monitor global plant functional diversity.
November 13, 2017
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Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc. Consulting Foresters.
specializing in timberland management, forest inventories, timber harvest planning, appraisals, forest economics and policy analysis, and special studies.
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Mercury Levels Dropping in North Atlantic Tuna
Study suggests industry emission controls may lead to healthier fish
November 23, 2016
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Micro delivery service for fertilizers
Plants can absorb nutrients through their leaves as well as their roots. However, foliar fertilization over an extended period is difficult. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German researchers have now introduced an efficient delivery system for micronutrients based on biohybrid microgels. Special peptides anchor the "microcontainers' onto the leaf surface while binding sites inside ensure gradual release of the "cargo'.
May 22, 2017
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Middle East Breeders and Technologies Ltd
offers livestock breeding consultancy services to government organisations, private sector, and individual breeders.
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Middle Eastern seed bank re-deposits backups into Svalbard's doomsday vault
Just two years after tumultuous withdrawal
February 22, 2017
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Millions may face protein deficiency as a result of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions
If CO2 levels keep rising as projected, the populations of 47 countries may lose more than 5 percent of their dietary protein by 2050 due to a decline in the nutritional value of rice, wheat, and other staple crops, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers. They estimate an additional 250 million people may be at risk of protein deficiency because of elevated CO2 levels. This is the first study to quantify this risk.
August 2, 2017
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More to the bunch: Study finds large chromosomal swaps key to banana domestication
A banana reference genome was completed in 2012. Now, researchers wanted to more finely explore the banana genome with an ultimate goal of helping breeding programs produce hardier, more disease resistant bananas. The significance of their findings are important for agriculture, highlighting a substantial contribution of a new chromosome structure in half the world's banana crops.
May 31, 2017
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Most fish turned into fishmeal are species that we could be eating
A person growing up in Peru in the 1970s or 1980s probably didn't eat anchoveta, the local species of anchovies. the stinky, oily fish was a food fit only for animals or the very poor. the anchoveta fishery may have been (and still is, in many years) the world's largest, but it wasn't one that put food on the table.
February 27, 2017
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Misc. - N

Nanoparticle drug-delivery method holds promise for controlling crop parasites
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University are applying drug-delivery technology to agriculture to control parasitic roundworms more effectively and safely.
May 31, 2017
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Nanoparticle fertilizer could contribute to new 'green revolution'
The 'Green Revolution' of the '60s and '70s has been credited with helping to feed billions around the world, with fertilizers being one of the key drivers spurring the agricultural boom. But in developing countries, the cost of fertilizer remains relatively high and can limit food production. now researchers report a simple way to make a benign, more efficient fertilizer that could contribute to a second food revolution.
January 25, 2017
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Nanoparticle fertilizer could contribute to new 'green revolution'
The "Green Revolution" of the '60s and '70s has been credited with helping to feed billions around the world, with fertilizers being one of the key drivers spurring the agricultural boom. But in developing countries, the cost of fertilizer remains relatively high and can limit food production.
January 25, 2017
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Nanoparticles could be the future of agriculture
South Australian researchers are working on a number of novel uses for engineered nanoparticles including efficient fertilisers, agricultural 'amendments' and a unique way to clean-up contaminated land.
February 22, 2017
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Nanosensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Forgot to water that plant on your desk again? It may soon be able to send out an SOS.
November 8, 2017
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Nanotechnology tool enables food authentication with the naked eye
Is the food on the shelf really that what is written on the label? Its DNA would give it away, but the DNA barcoding technology, which can be used for this purpose, is labor-intensive. Now, in the journal Angewandte Chemie, Italian scientists have introduced a simplified assay coined NanoTracer.
June 14, 2017
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NASA bets the farm on the long-term viability of space agriculture
A new plant habitat is on its way to the space station
February 9, 2017
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Nature plants a seed of engineering inspiration
Humidity-responsive burrowing of seeds inspires scientists to model the mechanism and find more efficient ways to penetrate soil for agricultural applications
April 25, 2017
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Neonicotinoids detected in drinking water in agricultural area
Concern over the use of neonicotinoid pesticides is growing as studies find them in rivers and streams, and link them with declining bee populations and health effects in other animals. now researchers report that in some areas, drinking water also contains the substances -- but they also have found that one treatment method can remove most of the pesticides.
April 5, 2017
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Neonics are damaging bumblebees' vibes, study shows
Bumblebees' ability to produce the buzzing -- or vibration -- that enables them to pollinate key commercial food crops may be harmed by the controversial pesticides neonicotinoids, according to new research.
December 13, 2016
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New lettuce genome assembly offers clues to success of huge plant family
A treasure-trove of genetic information has been unlocked about lettuce and related plants, completing the first reported comprehensive genome assembly for lettuce and the massive Compositae plant family.
April 12, 2017
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New method makes bioethanol from waste -- in existing plants
It is possible to produce bioethanol from agricultural and industrial waste in existing plants in a socioeconomically sustainable way, according to new research from Sweden.
October 30, 2017
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New study of water-saving plants advances efforts to develop drought-resistant crops
As part of an effort to develop drought-resistant food and bioenergy crops, scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered the genetic and metabolic mechanisms that allow certain plants to conserve water and thrive in semi-arid climates.
December 5, 2016
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New study shows early signs of resistance among bed bugs to two commonly used insecticides
Pest management professionals battling the ongoing resurgence of bed bugs are wise to employ a well-rounded set of measures that reduces reliance on chemical control, as new research shows the early signs of resistance developing among bed bugs to two commonly used insecticides.
April 10, 2017
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New system could remove two water pollutants from agricultural fields
Algae blooms in the Gulf of Mexico use up the majority of the oxygen in the water, leading to massive "dead zones" that cannot support fish or other wildlife. The culprit? Nitrate, running off agricultural fields through tile drainage systems. But nitrate is only part of the problem. Algae in freshwater lakes and ponds flourishes when exposed to a different pollutant, phosphorus, and the tiniest amount is enough to trigger a bloom.
July 31, 2017
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Nitrogen foraging ability of plants relies on mobile shoot-root hormone signal
Research uncovers molecular shoot-to-root signal in nitrogen-starved plants, revealing role for mobile plant hormone
March 27, 2017
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Nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is crucial for legume plant microbiome assembly
New findings from a study of legumes have identified an unknown role of nitrogen fixation symbiosis on plant root-associated microbiome, which agriculture may benefit from in the future.
November 21, 2016
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Novel transdisciplinary study uncovers microbes that may one day deter major grape disease
Researchers have conducted a novel transdisciplinary study to characterize the microbial communities within the vascular system of grapevines and their connections with Pierce's disease, an economically significant disease of the California grape industry. Through the study, the researchers found potentially beneficial microbes that could one day be used as a deterrent to Xylella fastidiosa, the pathogen that causes Pierce's disease.
October 23, 2017
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Misc. - O

On-the-range detection technology could corral bovine TB
A research breakthrough allowing the first direct, empirical, blood-based, cow-side test for diagnosing bovine tuberculosis (TB) could spare ranchers and the agriculture industry from costly quarantines and the mass slaughter of animals infected with this easily spread disease.
April 12, 2017
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Optimizing feeding is necessary to maintain milk production in organic herds
Decisions on pasture use and feed management affect greenhouse gas emission, according to a new study
June 15, 2017
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Oral health key to understanding humanity's past, study says
Oral health of modern day African tribe transitioning from hunting and gathering to agricultural diet challenges long held presumptions about our Stone Age ancestors.
March 16, 2017
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Misc. - P

Parasitic nematodes that cause greatest agricultural damage abandoned sex
The plant pests owe their success to large, hybridized genomes that help them adapt
June 9, 2017
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Parrot develops drones for firefighting and farming
Parrots latest drones are different to its previous fly for fun orientated products, as it has decided it now wants to start helping professionals like firefighters, building inspectors, and farmers.
October 25, 2017
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Persistently high pesticide levels found in small streams
Small watercourses are contaminated with large numbers of herbicides, fungicides and insecticides. a study shows that the legal requirements specified for water quality are not met in any of the five Swiss streams investigated; thresholds for acute toxicity to aquatic organisms were also exceeded.
April 4, 2017
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Plants sacrifice 'daughters' to survive chilly weather
Plants adopt different strategies to survive the changing temperatures of their natural environments. This is most evident in temperate regions where forest trees shed their leaves to conserve energy during the cold season. In a new study, a team of plant biologists found that some plants may selectively kill part of their roots to survive under cold weather conditions.
June 23, 2017
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Policy like EPA's Clean Power Plan would mean higher crop yields
Ozone-producing pollution harms crops around power plants.
December 22, 2016
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Probing the stability of photosynthesis
Synthetic systems that reveal and reproduce some of the secrets of how nature uses sunlight to split water have been developed by RIKEN researchers.
March 10, 2017
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Probiotics could improve survival rates in honey bees exposed to pesticide, study finds
Probiotics can potentially protect honey bees from the toxic effects of pesticides, new research indicates.
June 19, 2017
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Promising peas' potential in big sky country
Researchers identify peas good for consumers, bottom line
June 14, 2017
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Protein produced with electricity and carbon dioxide
A batch of single-cell protein has been produced by using electricity and carbon dioxide in a joint study by the Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Protein produced in this way can be further developed for use as food and animal feed. The method releases food production from restrictions related to the environment. The protein can be produced anywhere renewable energy, such as solar energy, is available.
July 19, 2017
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Pruitt chooses not to ban pesticide after scientists find neurotoxicity
Chlorpyrifos, already banned from most household products, affects memory, learning.
March 30, 2017
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Public willing to pay to reduce toxic algae, but maybe not enough
A collaboration of universities and government agencies has identified three key agricultural management plans for curtailing harmful algal blooms. they have also identified a looming funding gap for enacting those plans.
December 12, 2016
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Misc. - R

Report: Monsanto Skipped Important Testing On Weed Killer That's Now Killing Cropsc
There's a problem in farm country this year: Acres of crops are unexpectedly withering away, but it's not due to drought or natural blight. Instead, the crisis seems to be related to a new herbicide from Monsanto. Users of the recently released plant-killer didn't realize it would spread beyond their fields, because -- according to a new report -- Monsanto skipped over tests that would have highlighted this problem.
August 9, 2017
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Research for an oil (palm) change
New research equips oil palm growers to better manage land and crop
June 8, 2017
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Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
Scientists show that parasitic nematodes hijack vascular stem cell pathways to attack their hosts
February 13, 2017
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Researchers find potential bugs to eat invasive cogongrass
Cogongrass displaces pasture grass, golf course greens and valuable ecosystems. now researchers are focusing on the Orseolia javanica midge that causes cogongrass to produce linear galls at the expense of leaves.
February 22, 2017
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Rice crops that can save farmers money and cut pollution
New study identifies rice crops that are more efficient at using nitrogen
July 29, 2016
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Misc. - S

Seafood quality may not be adversely affected by future ocean acidification, global warming
The eating qualities of UK oysters may not be adversely affected by future ocean acidification and global warming, new research has suggested.
October 31, 2017
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Scientists developed 'smart fertilizer'
According to the head of the works Tatiana Volova, Professor of SibFU and the Head of Laboratory in the Institute of Biophysics KSC of SB RAS, development of a new generation of drugs with the use of bio-decomposable materials which decompose under the influence of the microflora to innocuous products and provide a gradual release of the active principle into the soil, is the newest area of research in the field of agriculture.
September 5, 2017
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Scientists discover more effective, and potentially safer, crystallized form of DDT
A new crystal form of DDT that is more effective against insects than the existing one has been discovered by a team of scientists. Its research points to the possibility of developing a new version of solid DDT -- a pesticide that has historically been linked to human-health afflictions and environmental degradation -- that can be administered in smaller amounts while reducing environmental impact.
June 13, 2017
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Scientists identify optimal areas for conservation and agriculture in the tropics
Converting forests to agriculture not economically viable in most regions except the Atlantic Forest, areas around the Gulf of Guinea, and Thailand
July 27, 2017
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Scientists Reinstalling "Tasty" Genes In Supermarket Tomatoes
Researchers recently confirmed what food storage experts had long believed: Refrigerating tomatoes causes them to lose flavor. now scientists are hoping that some genetic tinkering will turn blah supermarket tomatoes into flavorful rivals to their farm-fresh cousins.
January 27, 2017
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Scientists Tweak Plant Genes to Enhance Photosynthesis and Increase Crop Yields
Pump Up the Yams
November 18, 2016
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Scientists work to develop heat-resistant 'cow of the future'
More than half the cattle in the world live in hot and humid environments, including about 40 percent of beef cows in the United States. By using genomic tools, researchers aim to produce an animal with superior ability to adapt to hot living conditions and produce top-quality beef.
June 23, 2017
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Self-Soiling 'Bionic' Leaf Could Curb Food Crisis
Researchers have created a self-soiling "bionic" leaf that uses bacteria, sunlight, water, and air to fertilize its own crops.
April 4, 2017
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Sticky gels turn insect-sized drones into artificial pollinators
As bees slip onto the endangered species lists, researchers in Japan are pollinating lilies with insect-sized drones. the undersides of these artificial pollinators are coated with horse hairs and an ionic gel just sticky enough to pick up pollen from one flower and deposit it onto another. the drones' designers are hopeful that their invention could someday help carry the burden that modern agricultural demand has put on colonies.
February 9, 2017
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Stink bugs: Free guide for agricultural integrated pest management
Insights for midwestern corn, soybean growers on managing various stink bug species
May 4, 2017
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Study explores risk of deforestation as agriculture expands in Africa
Multinational companies are increasingly looking to Africa to expand production of in-demand commodity crops such as soy and oil palm. a first-of-its-kind study highlights the real and potential impacts on the continent's valuable tropical forests.
April 5, 2017
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Study finds link between sugar signaling, regulation of oil production in plants
Even plants have to live on an energy budget. While they're known for converting solar energy into chemical energy in the form of sugars, plants have sophisticated biochemical mechanisms for regulating how they spend that energy. Making oils costs a lot. by exploring the details of this delicate energy balance, a group of scientists has identified a previously unknown link between a protein that maintains plant sugar balance and one that turns on oil production.
March 17, 2017
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Study paints a confused picture of how insecticides are affecting bees
Despite one weak study, there's more evidence that it's not good for bees.
June 30, 2017
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Study tracks 'memory' of soil moisture
First year of data from SMAP satellite provides new insights for weather, agriculture, and climate
January 16, 2017
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Super plants need super ROOTS
Agriculture consumes about 80 percent of all U.S. water. Making fertilizers uses 1 to 2 percent of all the world's energy each year.
February 28, 2017
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Misc. - T

Thanks to Policy Change, your Ground Beef May Include More Heart Than you Think
For nearly 40 years federal food safety regulators had prohibited the use of any part of the cow heart in making ground beef. with little fanfare, that policy has changed.
February 2, 2017
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The advent of 'green' cattle
Implications of livestock farming on climate change should not be drawn from aggregate statistics, reveals a study based on a new method of carbon footprinting for pasture-based cattle production systems that can assess the impacts of individual animals.
October 30, 2017
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The complex interplay of nanosilver and wheat roots
Scientists have hypothesized that silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) may act as "Trojan horses' entering living organisms and then releasing Ag+ over time, causing toxicity. this has been recently proposed as the mechanism by which Ag2S-NPs could be toxic to wheat and cowpea.
May 8, 2017
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The evolutionary story of the birch tree, told through 80 genomes
A study of the iconic tree uncovers genetic secrets of value to wood, paper industries
May 8, 2017
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The Fantastic Geometry Of Greece's Fish Farms 2000 Feet Up
MOst People Visit Greece to see its ancient ruins, idyllic beaches, and sweeping cliffs. Not Bernhard Lang. He goes for the fish farms.
July 27, 2017
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The Internet of Cows herds hackers to support the global cattle industry
Cows are generally not top of mind among those who call the animal pen, South of Market, San Francisco, home. But BovControl, a Brazilian startup building data analytics tools to support livestock operations, is working to close the gap between technologists and ranchers. Host of the Internet of Cows hackathon, in partnership with Google Launchpad and the Silicon Valley Forum, the startup put groups to work brainstorming solutions for monitoring herds, exporting goods and securing loans.
April 25, 2017
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The secret lives of ancient land plants
Cracking of the liverwort genome sheds light on land plant evolution
November 2, 2017
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There was an outbreak of cannibalism 10,000 years ago in Spain
Archaeologists find evidence that humans cooked and ate humans in an ancient cave.
March 19, 2017
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There's a better way to wash pesticides off your apples
A common kitchen ingredient can be a big helper when it comes to ridding your apples of pesticides, scientists discover.
October 26, 2017
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These pink greenhouses generate electricity and improve plant growth
Each year, greenhouses use a monstrous 18,000,000 kWh of electricity just to grow our food. To put that in perspective, that's equivalent to the amount of carbon emitted from driving around the world 391 times. Thankfully, researchers have developed new electricity-generating greenhouses that could solve this growing problem -- and better yet, they're pink.
November 8, 2017
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This Robot Tractor Is Ready To Disrupt Construction
Zipping around like a bumblebee, the little black-and-yellow tractor claws its bucket into one of San Francisco's few vacant lots, kicking up a puff of dust. Payload secured, it backs up--beep, beep, beep--whips around, and speeds to its dirt pile, stopping so quickly that it tips forward on two wheels. It drops its quarry and backs up--beep, beep, beep--then speeds back to its excavation for another bucketful.
October 19, 2017
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Turning pollen into a low-cost fertilizer
As the world population continues to balloon, agricultural experts puzzle over how farms will produce enough food to keep up with demand. One tactic involves boosting crop yields. Toward that end, scientists have developed a method to make a low-cost, biocompatible fertilizer with carbon dots derived from rapeseed pollen. The study found that applying the carbon dots to hydroponically cultivated lettuce promoted its growth by 50 percent.
August 16, 2017
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Tyson Foods launches new venture fund to back food and agriculture startups
Tyson Foods Inc., one of the world's largest makers and marketers of meat products, has announced the formation of a $150 million venture capital fund to back food and agriculture startups.
December 5, 2016
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Misc. - U

Unique wheat passes the test
A unique, patented wheat can have significant importance to agriculture, the environment and undernourished people in developing countries. Animal tests recently demonstrated that this special wheat increases P and Ca digestibility.
March 27, 2017
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Urban farming incubator Square Roots raises $5.4M
Square Roots isn't your normal startup incubator. Sure, the people who participate are entrepreneurs -- but instead of sitting at desks building new gadgets or smartphone apps, they're growing food in hydroponic farms housed inside long, metal containers.
August 23, 2017
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Misc. - W

Want more crop variety? Researchers propose using CRISPR to accelerate plant domestication
Out of the more than 300,000 plant species in existence, only three species -- rice, wheat, and maize -- account for most of the plant matter that humans consume, partly because in the history of agriculture, mutations arose that made these crops the easiest to harvest. But with CRISPR technology, we don't have to wait for nature to help us domesticate plants, argue researchers.
March 2, 2017
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Watching how plants make oxygen
In a new study, an international team of researchers made significant progress in visualizing the process how plants split water to produce oxygen. the results are published in Nature ("Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature").
November 21, 2016
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We need to protect the world's soil before it's too late
Book Excerpt: the Ground Beneath Us
March 21, 2017
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What is this Toxic Chemical Scott Pruitt Wants to Keep in your Food?
Throw aside your politics for a bit. Government scientists at the EPA concluded that a pesticide sprayed on crops was toxic. a few months later, a new guy comes into the agency, looks at the agency's petition to ban the substance, and denies it--he decides that, although the substance is poisonous, he'd rather keep spraying crops with it.
March 31, 2017
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What makes farmers try new practices?
Change is never easy. But when it comes to adopting new agricultural practices, some farmers are easier to convince than others. a group of researchers wanted to know which farmers are most likely to adopt multifunctional perennial cropping systems -- trees, shrubs, or grasses that simultaneously benefit the environment and generate high-value products that can be harvested for a profit.
March 14, 2017
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What silver fir aDNA can tell us about Neolithic forests
A new technique makes it possible to cost-effectively analyse genetic material from fossil plant and animal remains. Researchers have used this technique to examine the DNA of silver fir needles found in lake sediment in Ticino. they found clues as to how forests reacted to the emergence of agriculture.
May 8, 2017
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When every drop counts: Schneider Electric transforms agriculture with the Internet of Things for sustainable farming
On the grassy Canterbury Plains of New Zealand, Craig Blackburn raises cattle and sheep in a line of work with a long tradition, in which he keeps a close eye on crops, land, weather and water.
July 10, 2017
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Why did hunter-gatherers first begin farming?
The beginnings of agriculture changed human history and has fascinated scientists for centuries. Researchers have now shed light on how hunter-gatherers first began farming and how crops were domesticated to depend on humans.
May 16, 2017
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Will we be able to use zinc oxide nanoparticles as fertilizers?
Researchers from Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) and National Institute for Agricultural Research and Experimentation (INIA) have studied the effects of using zinc oxide nanoparticles on agriculture.
October 11, 2017
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Will we be able to use zinc oxide nanoparticles as fertilizers?
Researchers from Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) and National Institute for Agricultural Research and Experimentation (INIA) have studied the effects of using zinc oxide nanoparticles on agriculture.
October 11, 2017
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Win-win strategies for climate and food security
Efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture and forestry sectors could lead to increased food prices -- but new research identifies strategies that could help mitigate climate change while avoiding steep hikes in food prices.
October 2, 2017
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Winners, losers among fish when landscape undergoes change
As humans build roads, construct buildings and develop land for agriculture, freshwater ecosystems respond ? but not always in the ways one might expect.
February 21, 2017
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Wireless energy harvester for implants
Researchers in Korea demonstrate the self-powered wireless data transmission enabled by harvesting in vivo biomechanical energy with a high-performance piezoelectric energy harvester in a large animal model.
July 4, 2017
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Misc. - Y

You don't Need to Freak Out About the Olive Oil Apocalypse
Olive oil is clearly worse than butter, but the media's got bad news for those who have made the wrong choice about which form of grease to cover their bread with. An especially crappy year of bad weather and bacteria have sent every other news outlet panicking after the prices went up, like, a little bit.
February 22, 2017
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You Want Better Beer? Good. Here's a Better Barley Genome
The genome of barley--the grain that's the soul of beer and whiskey--is weird. the commodity crop has just seven pairs of chromosomes (compared to your 23, assuming you are a human being) but twice the size of your genome overall, with the vast majority of the sequences repeating themselves.
April 26, 2017
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Misc. - Z

Zwicker Consulting
source of information on Illinois agriculture featuring sections on commodities, crop conditions and weather reports.
Provides a Service
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