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1,122 Environmental Resources

Misc. - Numbers

2D materials clean up their act
Two-dimensional materials such as graphene may only be one or two atoms thick but they are poised to power flexible electronics, revolutionise composites and even clean our water.
August 2, 2017
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19 of the coolest images from NASA's Operation IceBridge
Ice Ice Baby
May 12, 2017
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100% renewable by 2050: the technology already exists to make it happen
Most of the world could switch to 100% renewable energy by 2050, creating millions of jobs, saving millions of lives that would otherwise be lost to air pollution, and avoiding 1.5°C of warming. That's the bold claim of a major new study by Stanford professor Mark Jacobson and his colleagues, published in the journal Joule ("100% Clean and Renewable Wind, Water, and Sunlight All-Sector Energy Roadmaps for 139 Countries of the World").
August 23, 2017
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100% renewable energy sources require overcapacity
Germany decided to go nuclear-free by 2022. a CO2-emission-free electricity supply system based on intermittent sources, such as wind and solar - or photovoltaic (PV) - power could replace nuclear power.
January 25, 2017
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2017 is set to be among the three hottest years on record--and that's even worse than it sounds
It's the hottest year without an El Niño boost.
November 8, 2017
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15,000 scientists in 184 countries warn about negative global environmental trends
Human well-being will be severely jeopardized by negative trends in some types of environmental harm, such as a changing climate, deforestation, loss of access to fresh water, species extinctions and human population growth, scientists warn.
November 13, 2017
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Misc. - A

A 14th-century plague helped reveal just how long humans have polluted the planet
Before the Black Death, there was lead in the air.
September 25, 2017
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A battery-inspired strategy for carbon fixation
Scientists working toward the elusive lithium-air battery discovered an unexpected approach to capturing and storing carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere. Using a design intended for a lithium-CO2 battery, researchers have developed a way to isolate solid carbon dust from gaseous carbon dioxide, with the potential to also separate out oxygen gas through the same method.
August 9, 2017
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A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling?
E. coli bacteria shown to be excellent at CO2 conversion
January 8, 2018
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A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling?
Scientists at the University of Dundee have discovered that E. coli bacteria could hold the key to an efficient method of capturing and storing or recycling carbon dioxide.
January 8, 2018
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A changing climate, changing wine
To adapt to warmer temperatures, winemakers may have to plant lesser known grape varieties, study suggests
January 2, 2018
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A Cooler Future May Hinge on Removing CO2 from the Air
Climate pollution equal to about 27 times humans' 2015 carbon dioxide emissions may have to be removed from the atmosphere and locked underground forever in order to keep the globe from warming beyond 1.5°C (2.7°F) above preindustrial levels, according to a new study.
April 20, 2017
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A Curious Plan to Save the Environment With the Blockchain
Magic Internet Money--also known as cryptocurrency--is at an all-time high. The experts who watch this stuff predict that one bitcoin (the most famous cryptocurrency) will soon be worth $2,000.
May 22, 2017
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A decade of monitoring shows the dynamics of a conserved Atlantic tropical forest
Characterized with high levels of biodiversity and endemism, the Atlantic Tropical Forest has been facing serious anthropogenic threats over the last several decades. Having put important ecosystem services at risk, such activities need to be closely studied as part of the forest dynamics. Thus, a Brazilian team of researchers spent a decade monitoring a semi-deciduous forest located in an ecological park in Southeast Brazil.
August 16, 2017
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A drier south: Europe's drought trends match climate change projections
Researchers published new findings that suggest European drought trends are lining up with climate change projections, pointing to decreases in drought frequency in the north and increases in drought frequency in the south.
October 26, 2017
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A 'geoengineering cocktail' is the latest last-ditch proposal to reverse climate change
Humans have been accidentally geoengineering for centuries. At what point should we do it on purpose?
September 27, 2017
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A green nanocatalyst for refining chemicals in plant waste
The fight against climate change is a call-to-arms for industry. We currently rely on fossil fuels, a major source of the greenhouse gas CO2, not only for energy but also to create chemicals for manufacturing. To ween our economies off this dependency, we must find a new source of "green" raw materials so that factories and laboratories can run without producing and emitting CO2.
November 6, 2017
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A History of Global Warming, In Just 35 Seconds
Last year, there was the temperature spiral. This year, it's the temperature circle that's making the trend of global warming crystal clear.
August 2, 2017
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A hotter planet might make hurricanes more destructive
Here's how.
June 22, 2017
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A key government report on climate change is out. Here's what you need to know
The New York Times published a draft of the report on Monday night.
August 8, 2017
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A look at the new battery storage facility in California built with Tesla Powerpacks
After just 6 months of planning and building, a substation in CA can supply 80MWh.
January 31, 2017
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A massive solar storm could cost the US economy $40 billion per day
Over the past few years, we've written several stories about solar storms, coronal mass ejections, the 1859 Carrington Event, and how a modern-day repeat of this phenomenon could be nothing short of disastrous for the US and world economies.
January 23, 2017
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A material inspired by a sea worm changes according to the environment
The gelatinous jaw of a sea worm, which becomes hard or flexible depending on the environment around it, has inspired researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to develop a new material that can be applied to soft robotics. Despite having the texture of a gel, this compound is endowed with great mechanical resistance and consistency, and is able to adapt to changing environments.
April 28, 2017
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A metal-organic framework solution for storing renewable energy
Scientists have long searched for the next generation of materials that can catalyze a revolution in renewable energy harvesting and storage.
October 12, 2017
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A mission to Mars could make its own oxygen thanks to plasma technology
Plasma technology could hold the key to creating a sustainable oxygen supply on Mars, a new study has found. It suggests that Mars, with its 96 per cent carbon dioxide atmosphere, has nearly ideal conditions for creating oxygen from CO2 through a process known as decomposition.
October 18, 2017
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A more than 100% quantum step toward producing hydrogen fuel
Efforts to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels are advancing on various significant fronts. Such initiatives include research focused on more efficient production of gaseous hydrogen fuel by using solar energy to break water down into its components of hydrogen and oxygen.
April 25, 2017
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A more than 100% quantum step toward producing hydrogen fuel
Efforts to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels are advancing on various significant fronts. Initiatives include research focused on more efficient production of gaseous hydrogen fuel by using solar energy to break water down into components of hydrogen and oxygen. Scientists have now reported a key breakthrough in the basic science essential for progress toward this goal.
April 25, 2017
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A Mysterious Stranding Left Nearly 100 Dead Dolphins Off the Coast of Florida
Scientists Aren't Sure Why they Stranded Themselves In the Mangroves
January 17, 2017
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A NASA satellite that monitors CO2 is revealing the inner workings of our planet
That's key to figure out how our world will respond to climate change
October 12, 2017
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A Nebraska-Sized Area of Forest Disappeared in 2015
A Nebraska-sized chunk of the world's forests was decimated in 2015 because of wildfire, logging and expanding palm oil plantations, according to a new study. The loss is part of a continuing trend of deforestation that could have devastating implications for the climate.
July 24, 2017
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A new approach to forecasting solar flares?
The emerging discipline of space meteorology aims to reliably predict solar flares so that we may better guard against their effects. Using 3D numerical models , an international team headed by Etienne Pariat, a researcher at LESIA (Observatoire de Paris / CNRS / Universite Paris Diderot / UPMC), has discovered a proxy that could be used to forecast an eruptive event.
May 22, 2017
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A new catalyst for water splitting
Hydrogen is one of the most promising clean fuels for use in cars, houses and portable generators. When produced from water using renewable energy resources, it is also a sustainable fuel with no carbon footprint.
May 3, 2017
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A new grant to advance seaweed energy production
In the future, our homes and vehicles could be powered by fuel made from seaweed grown at large-scale offshore farms. Researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) are working to help make that scenario a reality sooner with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E).
October 6, 2017
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A new material emits white light when exposed to electricity
Scientists at Nagoya University have developed a new way to make stimuli-responsive materials in a predictable manner. They used this method to design a new material, a mixture of carbon nanorings and iodine, which conducts electricity and emits white light when exposed to electricity. The team's new approach could help generate a range of reliable stimuli-responsive materials, which can be used in memory devices, artificial muscles and drug delivery systems, among other applications.
July 24, 2017
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A radical approach to methane oxidation into methanol
Researchers convert methane to valuable chemicals using clean, low-temperature radical reaction
December 19, 2017
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A river in Canada just turned to piracy because of global warming
Yo-ho-ho and a melting glacier
April 17, 2017
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A step toward renewable diesel
MIT engineers have genetically reprogrammed a strain of yeast so that it converts sugars to fats much more efficiently, an advance that could make possible the renewable production of high-energy fuels such as diesel.
January 17, 2017
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A stinging report: Climate change a major threat to bumble bees
New research is helping to explain the link between a changing global climate and a dramatic decline in bumble bee populations worldwide.
September 29, 2017
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A Texas-size chunk of Antarctica partially melted last year
It could be a sign of more damage to come.
June 16, 2017
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A Warming Arctic can actually make our winters colder
Can you say polar vortex?
September 25, 2017
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Achieving sustainable resource use attainable through science of cooperation
Societies can achieve environmental sustainability by nurturing cooperation, according to researchers.
December 18, 2017
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Add Greenland to the growing list of countries on fire
Reminder, this isn't normal
August 8, 2017
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Add Nitrous Oxide to the List of Permafrost Melt Concerns
Melting permafrost is among the biggest climate change issues. That's because it contains billions of tons of carbon that, if it melts, will be released in the form of carbon dioxide and methane, an even more potent greenhouse gas.
May 30, 2017
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Added Arctic data shows global warming didn't pause
Improved datasets show that Arctic warmed six times faster than the global average during 'global warming hiatus'
November 20, 2017
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After a brief pause, carbon emissions are back on the rise
Time to turn words into action.
November 13, 2017
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Aggressive emissions cutbacks would drop heat waves in half in 20 years
Extremely hot weather events would become half as likely to happen.
April 7, 2017
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AI for Earth can be a game-changer for our planet
On the two-year anniversary of the Paris climate accord, the world's government, civic and business leaders are coming together in Paris to discuss one of the most important issues and opportunities of our time, climate change.
December 11, 2017
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Air pollution can make kids behave badly
Tiny particles in car exhaust can directly impact the brain.
December 13, 2017
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Air pollution casts shadow over solar energy production
Hardest-hit areas are big solar investors: China, India, Arabian peninsula
June 26, 2017
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Algae growth reduces reflectivity, enhances Greenland ice sheet melting
New research shows algae growing on the Greenland ice sheet, the Earth's second-largest ice sheet, significantly reduce the surface reflectivity of the ice sheet's bare ice area and contribute more to its melting than dust or black carbon. The new findings could influence scientists' understanding of ice sheet melting and projections of future sea level rise, according to the study's authors.
December 20, 2017
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All in one against CO2
A "self-heating" boron catalyst that makes particularly efficient use of sunlight to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) serves as a light harvester, photothermal converter, hydrogen generator, and catalyst in one.
April 11, 2017
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Almost every country in the world can power itself with renewable energy
The planet is pretty much ready to go 100 percent renewable by 2050.
August 23, 2017
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Alphabet Turns to Molten Salt to Store Clean Energy
Using giant vats of molten salt and antifreeze under the codename 'Malta,' Google's parent company Alphabet is joining Tesla and smaller companies that are developing ways to store wind and solar power affordably to expand renewables and combat climate change.
August 2, 2017
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Amazon floodplain trees emit as much methane as all Earth's oceans combined
New research solves mystery of missing methane source in the Amazon Rainforest.
December 5, 2017
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Amazon River carbon dioxide emissions nearly balance terrestrial uptake
Amazon River emits as much carbon as the forest stores with major implications for global climate policy
May 10, 2017
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Amazon's newest initiative brings solar panels to its Fulfillment Center rooftops
Sustainability and environmentally friendly energy production are two major aspects of today's society that impact a variety of commercial sectors, the tech industry included. Amazon has reiterated its commitment to tackling these two with today's announcement.
March 3, 2017
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Amazon's recovery from forest losses limited by climate change
Deforested areas of the Amazon Basin have a limited ability to grow new trees because of changes in climate, according to a study.
November 15, 2017
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Americans Have Somehow Helped the Environment Without Even Trying
Climate change is bad, beef is bad, everything is bad, yadda yadda. But Americans ate less beef between 2005 and 2014, which kept a lot of greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere, according to a new study. Maybe cutting back on those hamburgers is actually doing something good for the environment.
March 27, 2017
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Among 'green' energy, hydropower is the most dangerous
Many governments are promoting a move away from fossil fuels towards renewable energy sources. However, in a study published today (Trends in Ecology and Evolution, "How Green is 'Green' Energy?"), scientists highlight some of the ecological dangers this wave of 'green' energy poses.
October 25, 2017
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An Alarmingly Early Spring is Sweeping Across the Southern United States
Spring is well ahead of schedule across much of the southern United States, in some cases by at least two to three weeks. An early spring may sound nice, but it comes with serious consequences–both to human health and the environment.
February 24, 2017
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An efficient way to convert renewable resources into energy
As Europe strives to position itself as a world leader in renewable energy, one challenge it must solve is the often inefficient process of converting renewable resources into energy. for example, due to a mismatch between the solar spectrum and the spectral response of solar cells, the process of converting solar radiation into electricity is highly inefficient.
January 23, 2017
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An Old Coal Mine May Become the Largest Solar Farm In Kentucky
The U.S., particularly the Appalachian region, still gets a lot of its power from coal. Today, however, the shift from coal to renewables is well under way... even in the heart of coal country.
April 20, 2017
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Anatomy of a wildfire
The 2011 Las Conchas wildfire was big even before it blew up on June 27.
June 21, 2017
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Anheuser-Busch InBev Pledges to Brew Using Only Renewable Energy
In case you weren't aware, it's National Beer Day. Seems like a perfectly good time to share some major environmental news from the world's largest brewer, doesn't it?
April 7, 2017
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Antarctic bottom waters freshening at unexpected rate
Shift could disturb ocean circulation and hasten sea level rise, researchers say
January 25, 2017
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Antarctic Modeling Pushes Up Sea-Level Rise Projections
Antarctic ice sheet models double the sea-level rise expected this century if global emissions of heat-trapping pollution remain high, according to a new study led by Dr. Robert Kopp of Rutgers University and co-authored by scientists at Climate Central.
December 13, 2017
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Antarctic Surface Melt More Widespread Than Thought
Since the days of the great early 20th century polar explorers, scientists have noticed the unbelievably bright blue ponds and streams of meltwater that can form on the glaciers and ice shelves of Antarctica and were even crucial to the recent collapse of one ice shelf.
April 19, 2017
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Antarctica Just Shed a Manhattan-Sized Chunk of Ice
The growing crack in the Larsen C ice shelf is the most dramatic example of change in Antarctica right now. But it isn't the continent's only frozen feature changing in a warming world.
February 15, 2017
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Antarctica's Blood Falls: not so mysterious, but still freaky as heck
Just some "blood" gurgling out of the ice, nothing to see here.
April 28, 2017
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Antarctica's 'Dragon Skin' Ice is Incredible
Dragon skin ice sounds like something you'd encounter beyond the Wall in the Game of Thrones fantasy realm. But good news nerds, you can find this magical-sounding stuff right here on Earth--though you've gotta be lucky, and willing to travel to some of the most hostile environments on the planet. Like the team of Antarctic scientists who came across vast expanses of the bizarre, scaly ice in the Ross Sea last week.
May 9, 2017
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Antarctica's Ice-Free Areas to Increase By 2100
Climate change will cause ice-free areas on Antarctica to increase by up to a quarter by 2100, threatening the diversity of the unique terrestrial plant and animal life that exists there, according to projections from the first study examining the question in detail.
July 4, 2017
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Anti-smoking tactics might help us fight climate change
We put warnings on cigarettes. Why don't we put them on cars?
December 13, 2017
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Apple is more environmentally-friendly than Facebook, Google and Microsoft
Greenpeace has crowned Apple the most environmentally-friendly tech company for the third year in a row. the Cupertino, Calif.-based giant is well ahead of most of the big players in the field, being one of just three companies to get an "A" grade from the NGO, alongside Facebook and Google.
January 10, 2017
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Apple wants one million acres of forest to be responsibly managed by 2020
For the latest in its series of environmental videos, Apple offers up some details on its forest conservation efforts. Once again narrated by Lisa Jackson, the head of the company's environmental efforts, the video talks about how Apple plans to make sure that one million acres of forest are responsibly managed by 2020.
July 27, 2017
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Apple will return heat generated by data center to warm up homes
A new Apple data center being built in Denmark is focused on returning to the community.
April 20, 2017
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Apple's 2016 supplier sustainability report shows labor, environmental improvements
Apple requires its suppliers to meet specific human rights, health, and environmental standards each year.
March 27, 2017
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Apple's Lisa Jackson to talk about the environmental and social role of tech companies at Disrupt SF
The tech industry has become so big that it now plays a much bigger role than just enabling productivity and fostering economic growth. Apple VP of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives Lisa Jackson knows this perfectly well as she's responsible for making sure that Apple doesn't make any compromise in favor of unrestrained growth.
July 28, 2017
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Arctic Sea Ice Continues Its Astonishing Streak of Lows
Here's your monthly reminder: something just isn't right in the Arctic. February continued a string of record or near-record monthly sea ice lows.
March 6, 2017
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Arctic Sea Ice Sets Record-Low Peak for Third Year
Constant warmth punctuated by repeated winter heat waves stymied Arctic sea ice growth this winter, leaving the winter sea ice cover missing an area the size of California and Texas combined and setting a record-low maximum for the third year in a row.
March 22, 2017
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Artificial leaf goes more efficient for hydrogen generation
A team of international researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently engineered a new artificial leaf that can convert sunlight into fuel with groundbreaking efficiency.
January 4, 2017
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Artificial snow might save a glacier in the Swiss Alps
But It Can't Save Us from Climate Change
May 3, 2017
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Artificial photosynthesis gets big boost from new catalyst
A new catalyst created by U of T Engineering researchers brings them one step closer to artificial photosynthesis -- a system that, just like plants, would use renewable energy to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into stored chemical energy. By both capturing carbon emissions and storing energy from solar or wind power, the invention provides a one-two punch in the fight against climate change.
November 20, 2017
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Artificial photosynthesis gets big boost from new catalyst
System takes inspiration from plants to convert electrical energy to chemical energy at 64 percent efficiency, the highest yet reported for renewable carbon fuels
November 20, 2017
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Artificially cooling planet 'risky strategy'
Proposals to reduce the effects of global warming by imitating volcanic eruptions could have a devastating effect on global regions prone to either tumultuous storms or prolonged drought, new research has shown.
November 14, 2017
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As climate warms, mice morph
Biologists document changes in teeth and skull structure in two species in southern Quebec over past 50 years
November 27, 2017
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As climates cool, adaptation heats up
Body size changes more rapidly when the planet cools than when it heats up.
April 24, 2017
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As energy markets change, GE, blockchain hope to provide economic solutions
New additions to the Predix platform are targeted at energy traders and grid managers.
June 16, 2017
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As ice retreats, frozen mosses emerge to tell climate change tale
Dating of plants suggests summer's hotter now than it's been in at least 45,000 years, if not longer
October 26, 2017
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As sea levels rise, where will all the people go?
Climate change could do a number on inland cities
April 17, 2017
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As the Arctic gets warmer, our winters get colder
And our plants take a hit.
July 10, 2017
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Asphalt-based filter now advanced to sequester greenhouse gas at wellhead
Adding a bit of water to asphalt-derived porous carbon greatly improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, at natural gas wellheads, report scientists. The filter is highly selective for carbon dioxide while letting methane pass through.
December 11, 2017
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Australia's Great Barrier Reef Has Been Valued at a Whopping $42 Billion
With the Great Barrier Reef under unprecedented environmental stress, a new report is raising the alarm in terms of its potential economic loss. Valued at Aus$56 billion (US$42 billion), the largest living structure on Earth is now deemed "too big to fail."
June 26, 2017
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Australian leaders pledge funds for energy storage after billionaire Tweet bet
But lawmakers also propose new gas-fired plants to solve future energy crises.
March 16, 2017
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Misc. - B

Bacteria as factories of the biobased economy
In the nearby future, the raw materials for plastics and fibres that are currently derived from petroleum could be obtained from renewable green resources such as corn straw or wood. the work will be done by bacteria that function as microscopic factories. In his inaugural lecture on 23 March, Richard van Kranenburg, special professor of Bacterial Cell Factories, explained how the bacteria will contribute to the new biobased economy . Prof. Van Kranenburg's chair is funded by Corbion.
April 3, 2017
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Bacteria under pressure run reaction in reverse to sequester carbon
An enzyme that normally digests formic acid will happily make it.
December 28, 2017
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Beginning of the End of CA Drought, But What's Next?
After a week of being walloped by major storms that have dumped copious rain and snow on the state, California is finally emerging from a deep, years-long drought.
January 13, 2017
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Behind the iron curtain: how methane-making microbes kept the early Earth warm
Using mud pulled from the bottom of a tropical lake, researchers at have gained a new grasp of how ancient microbes made methane in the complex iron chemistry of the early Earth.
April 17, 2017
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Bio-inspired energy storage: a new light for solar power
Graphene-based electrode prototype, inspired by fern leaves, could be the answer to solar energy storage challenge
March 31, 2017
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Bio-inspired robotic fish for environmental monitoring
Researchers from Universidad PolitPokemon Go cnica de Madrid and University of Florence are developing a bio-inspired robot equipped with special chemical sensors able to detect the pH of water.
May 10, 2017
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Biochar could clear the air in more ways than one
Health, economic benefits of capturing agricultural nitric oxide outlined in study
July 27, 2017
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Biofuel matchmaker: Finding the perfect algae for renewable energy
A dozen glass cylinders containing a potential payload of bright green algae are exposed to hundreds of multi-colored lights, which provide all of sunlight's natural hues. the tiny LEDs brighten and dim to mimic the outdoors' constantly changing conditions. to further simulate a virtual cloud passing overhead, chillers kick in and nudge the algae a little cooler.
January 13, 2017
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Biofuels reduce soot emissions from aircraft
A fuel blend with 50 percent biofuel reduces soot particle emissions of the aircraft by 50 to 70 percent compared to conventional fuel, according to a study published in the scientific journal Nature.
March 16, 2017
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Biodegradable cleaning products and eco-friendly plastics from mushroom waste
More than 50,000 tonnes of mushroom waste are generated in Europe each week, posing an environmental challenge for the main industries that market this product worldwide. The new European project Funguschain aims to obtain high antimicrobial and antioxidant substances from these residues applicable to sectors as varied as food, cleaning or plastics.
June 28, 2017
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Bioplastic derived from soya protein which can absorb up to forty times its own weight
Researchers are testing the strength of a new organic material as a dispenser of micronutrients in crops. This new product, which is organic and biodegradable, is environmentally friendly. For that reason, the experts are exploring its use in the area of horticulture, specifically as a raw material from which to make agricultural nutrient dispensers.
June 27, 2017
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Bioplastics: use and misuse
The prefix "bio" for plastics doesn't mean that they are all easily degradable. Confusion over words often means people don't recycle their waste properly
October 18, 2017
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Bioreactors on a chip renew promises for algal biofuels
For over a decade, companies have promised a future of renewable fuel from algae. Investors interested in moving the world away from fossil fuel have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the effort, and with good reason. Algae replicate quickly, requiring little more than water and sunlight to accumulate to massive amounts, which then convert atmospheric CO2 into lipids (oils) that can be harvested and readily processed into biodiesel.
September 29, 2017
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Birth of a storm in the Arabian Sea validates climate model
Extreme cyclones that formed in the Arabian Sea for the first time in 2014 are the result of global warming and will likely increase in frequency, warn scientists. Their model showed that the burning of fossil fuels since 1860 would lead to an increase in the destructive storms in the Arabian Sea by 2015, marking one of the first times that modeled projections have synchronized with real observations of storm activity.
December 6, 2017
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Bitcoin mining and transactions use more electricity than Ireland and 19 other European countries
When Bitcoin hits the headlines, it tends to be because its value is rocketing, or because there has been a token theft. Now, however, the financial cost of mining the cryptocurrency has been revealed.
November 27, 2017
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Bitcoin's insane energy consumption, explained
One estimate suggests the Bitcoin network consumes as much energy as Denmark.
December 6, 2017
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Blasting aerosol into the sky to cool the planet might lead to drought and hurricanes
Drought in the south, hurricanes in the north
November 14, 2017
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Boron nitride foam soaks up carbon dioxide
Rice University materials scientists have created a light foam from two-dimensional sheets of hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) that absorbs carbon dioxide.
August 16, 2017
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Brazilian ethanol can replace 13.7 percent of world's crude oil consumption
Expansion of sugarcane cultivation for biofuel in areas not under environmental protection or reserved for food production could also reduce global emissions of carbon dioxide by up to 5.6%, according to a study by researchers in Brazil, the US and Europe
November 28, 2017
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Breakthrough paves way for smaller electronic devices
Queen's University Belfast researchers have discovered a new way to create extremely thin electrically conducting sheets, which could revolutionise the tiny electronic devices that control everything from smart phones to banking and medical technology.
June 14, 2017
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Breathing Fire
As climate change fuels large wildfires, the pollution they're releasing is making Americans sick and undermining decades of progress in cleaning the air.
November 7, 2017
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Bridging the gap: Potentially low-cost, low-emissions technology that can convert methane without forming carbon dioxide
A potentially low-cost, low-emissions technology has been designed that can convert methane without forming carbon dioxide.
November 21, 2017
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Butterfly wing inspires photovoltaics: Light absorption can be enhanced by up to 200 percent
Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that help absorbing light over a wide spectrum far better than smooth surfaces. Researchers have now succeeded in transferring these nanostructures to solar cells and, thus, enhancing their light absorption rate by up to 200 percent.
November 14, 2017
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By 2100, we could be recreating a 50 million-year-old climate
420 million years of CO2 history provide some interesting context for the present.
April 6, 2017
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Misc. - C

Carbon nanotubes turn electrical current into light-emitting quasi-particles
Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University (Germany) and the University of St Andrews (Scotland) used light-emitting and extremely stable transistors to reach strong light-matter coupling and create exciton-polaritons. These particles may pave the way for new light sources, so-called electrically pumped polariton lasers, that could be manufactured with carbon nanotubes.
July 24, 2017
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Calif. Snowpack Healthy Again, but Warming Looms Large
When Gov. Jerry Brown of California walked out onto the Phillips Station snow course near Lake Tahoe on April 1, 2015, for the annual end-of-winter snow survey, he stepped only on bare ground. this year, surveyors were greeted with a much more welcome sight: a sizable snowpack that accumulated over the winter thanks to a spate of storms that nearly wiped out the deep, devastating drought that has plagued California over the past five years.
April 3, 2017
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California court revokes US EPA approval of nanosilver product
A federal appeals court in California has revoked the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) conditional approval of a nanosilver product used in a wide range of consumer products -- including a variety of household, office, plastic and textile products, such as clothing, cell phones, computers, and office supplies -- as an antimicrobial agent.
June 19, 2017
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California Farmers Use Floodwater to Replenish Aquifers
As dam managers were draining water from a Northern Californian reservoir this week to avert what could have been one of the worst flood disasters in the state's history, Southern California farmer Don Cameron was doing something different with the watery winter excess.
February 17, 2017
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California utility augments 1,800 air conditioning units with "ice battery'
Ice Energy says IceBear 30 units can eliminate up to 10,000 lbs of CO2 per year.
May 4, 2017
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California's Snowpack is Good News for the Parched State–For Now
It's Still Early In the Season, and the Drought isn't Ending
January 20, 2017
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Can corals adapt to climate change?
Corals can persist if nations control emissions
November 1, 2017
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Can corals survive climate change?
Coral reef experts deliver urgent recommendations for future research
September 1, 2017
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Can it be too cold to snow?
No, but you're on to something
January 5, 2018
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Can the 'greening' be greener?
New evidence shows that the 'Ecological Focus Areas' introduced under the EU's Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) greening rules can provide a lot more, for both nature and farmers
January 11, 2017
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Car and House Windows that Stay Warm in Winter and Cool in Summer
A car sitting in the sun on a Summer's day is scorching and this indeed is a fact that has been acknowledged almost throughout the whole world. However, this truth could soon be challenged by a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Santa Fe, New Mexico-based IR Dynamics.
September 1, 2017
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Carbon Dioxide Could Reach 410 PPM this Month
A never-ending stream of carbon pollution ensures that each year the world continues to break records for carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. this year will be no different.
March 6, 2017
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Carbon Dioxide is Rising at Record Rates
The main driver of climate change is carbon dioxide. So the fact that it is rising at rates unseen in the instrumental record -- and likely much longer than that -- is cause for alarm.
March 10, 2017
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Carbon Emissions Factor Into Major Oil Sands Shakeup
As global companies abandon the Canadian oil sands at a time of low oil prices and huge losses, some of them are also concerned that producing one of the world's most carbon-laden fossil fuels may be bad business in a warming world.
April 13, 2017
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Carbon intensity is falling in industrial, electric power sectors
Numbers from the EIA show progress in some areas of the economy, not much in others.
May 1, 2017
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Carbon nanotube wools for greenhouse gas mitigation and bullet-proof clothing
Turning atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) into valuable products seems like a great idea to help remove this greenhouse gas to mitigate climate change.
July 18, 2017
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Caspian Sea evaporating as temperatures rise, study finds
Earth's largest inland body of water has been slowly evaporating for the past two decades due to rising temperatures associated with climate change, a new study finds. Water levels in the Caspian Sea dropped nearly 7 centimeters (3 inches) per year from 1996 to 2015, or nearly 1.5 meters (5 feet) total, according to the new study. The current Caspian Sea level is only about 1 meter (3 feet) above the historic low level it reached in the late 1970s.
August 29, 2017
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Catalyst mimics the z-scheme of photosynthesis
A new study demonstrates a process with great potential for developing technologies for reducing CO2 levels.
June 22, 2017
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Catalytic nanoparticles harness solar power to produce clean hydrogen from biomass
A team of scientists at the University of Cambridge has developed a way of using solar power to generate a fuel that is both sustainable and relatively cheap to produce. it's using natural light to generate hydrogen from biomass.
March 13, 2017
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Caterpillar found to eat shopping bags, suggesting biodegradable solution to plastic pollution
Scientists have found that a caterpillar commercially bred for fishing bait has the ability to biodegrade polyethylene: one of the toughest and most used plastics, frequently found clogging up landfill sites in the form of plastic shopping bags.
April 24, 2017
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Cause of Atlantic coastline's sea level rise hot spots now revealed
Seas rose in the southeastern US between 2011 and 2015 by more than six times the global average sea level rise that is already happening due to human-induced global warming, new research shows. The combined effects of El Niño (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both of which are naturally occurring climate processes, drove this recent sea level rise hot spot, according to the study.
August 9, 2017
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Cellulosic biofuels can benefit the environment if managed correctly
Could cellulosic biofuels -- or liquid energy derived from grasses and wood -- become a green fuel of the future, providing an environmentally sustainable way of meeting energy needs? In a new article, researchers say yes, but with a few important caveats.
June 29, 2017
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Chance find has big implications for water treatment's costs and carbon footprint
A type of bacteria accidentally discovered during research supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) could fundamentally re-shape efforts to cut the huge amount of electricity consumed during wastewater clean-up.
March 24, 2017
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Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land, say researchers
Study is first to look at landslide and climate change in Pacific Northwest
November 9, 2017
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Chaotic magnetic field lines may answer the coronal heating problem
Scientists show how chaotic magnetic field lines result in stronger current sheets and extreme heating of the sun's corona
August 9, 2017
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Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires
Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests.
December 28, 2017
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Cheap and simple detection of neurotoxic chemicals
Chemical contamination from pesticides is a serious problem. Detection methods can be complicated, difficult to implement, and expensive. However, researchers have discovered a method to reduce the cost and simplify the process for detecting a neurotoxin found in several pesticides called Nereistoxin. It is hoped that the method will bring about improved detection techniques.
August 1, 2017
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Cheaper, greener biofuels processing catalyst
Fuels that are produced from nonpetroleum-based biological sources may become greener and more affordable, thanks to new research that examines the use of a processing catalyst made from palladium metal and bacteria.
August 25, 2017
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Chemists ID catalytic 'key' for converting CO2 to methanol
Results will guide design of improved catalysts for transforming pollutant to useful chemicals
March 23, 2017
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Children who play outside more likely to protect nature as adults
Protecting the environment can be as easy as telling your kids to go outdoors and play, according to a new study.
March 17, 2017
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China just flew a 130-foot, solar-powered drone designed to stay in the air for months
The CH-T4 has already set a national flight record.
June 6, 2017
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Cities Are Already Suffering From Summer Heat. Climate Change Will Make It Worse
Tina Johnson has a sense of place. She's a fourth-generation New Yorker who lives in the same apartment in West Harlem's Grant housing development that her grandparents lived in. She calls that apartment her anchor and the nine buildings that make up the development towering above 125th Street ' home to roughly 4,400 residents spread across nine high rises ' a small town.
August 3, 2017
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Cities can cut greenhouse gas emissions far beyond their urban borders
Greenhouse gas emissions caused by urban households' purchases of goods and services from beyond city limits are much bigger than previously thought.
November 7, 2017
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Cities need to 'green up' to reduce impact of air pollution
The harmful impact of urban air pollution could be combated by strategically placing low hedges along roads in a built-up environment of cities instead of taller trees, a new study has found
May 16, 2017
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Cities taking narrow approach to start adapting to climate change see benefits
A new study led by a University of Kansas urban planning researcher sheds light on tradeoffs between taking a narrow approach focused on connections between climate change adaptation and reducing risks from hazards like Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, and taking a broader approach connecting adaptation to a wide array of city functions.
October 11, 2017
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City Snow May be Fouled by Pollution from Cars
As melting begins, chemicals can be released into air, soil and water, researchers suggest
April 7, 2017
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Clarifying perspectives to promote action on loss and damage from climate change
The hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria highlight the potential for the climate system to cause loss and damage. 'Loss and damage' is a phrase used in different ways by people who work on climate policy, negotiation and adaptation/resilience. A new study clarifies these different perspectives which is a key issue now that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, UNFCCC, is encouraging creation and implementation of actions to address loss and damage from climate change.
September 25, 2017
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Clean water from a plant-based membrane
A team of researchers has developed a plant-derived material that can be used to purify water potentially far more effectively than current petroleum-based membrane materials.
April 20, 2017
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Clear lakes disguise impaired water quality
Look at a hundred lakes in the United States' agricultural heartland and you'll likely see green lakes surrounded by green fields. Agricultural fertilizers that help crops grow also fuel growth of algae and cyanobacteria that in excess can turn lakes the color of pea soup.
October 10, 2017
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Clear summer skies are making Greenland's ice sheet melt even faster
The icy island is having a meltdown.
June 30, 2017
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Climate change already costs us all money, and it's going to get worse
When it comes to floods and wildfires, the damage is shared with the public.
December 6, 2017
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Climate Change Altering Droughts, Impacts Across U.S.
As a major drought devastated the West and Midwest beginning in 2012, farmers racked up billions of dollars in crop losses and water managers grappled with possible water shortages for millions of people as reservoirs dried up in the heat.
June 22, 2017
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Climate Change Altering the Arctic Faster Than Expected
Evidence continues to mount that climate change has pushed the Arctic into a new state. Skyrocketing temperatures are altering the essence of the region, melting ice on land and sea, driving more intense wildfires, altering ocean circulation and dissolving permafrost.
April 25, 2017
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Climate change could make severe turbulence even worse
Fasten your seatbelt
April 6, 2017
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Climate change could put rare bat species at greater risk
An endangered bat species with a UK population of less than 1,000 could be further threatened by the effects of global warming, according to a new study.
August 2, 2017
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Climate Change Could Take The Air Out Of Wind Farms
Big offshore wind farms power Europe's drive for a carbon-free society, while rows of spinning turbines across America's heartland churn enough energy to power 25 million US homes. But a new study predicts that a changing climate will weaken winds that blow across much of the Northern hemisphere, possibly leading to big drops in clean wind energy.
December 11, 2017
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Climate Change Could Threaten Human Health Worldwide
Heat waves, disease-spreading mosquitoes and weather disasters are among the many "unequivocal and potentially irreversible" effects of climate change already harming human health worldwide, a new report says.
October 31, 2017
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Climate change drove population decline in new World before Europeans arrived
Scientists report on dramatic environmental changes that occurred as Native Americans flourished and then vanished from the Midwestern United States before Europeans arrived. the researchers theorize that catastrophic climate change they observed, which doomed food production, was a primary cause of the disappearance.
January 31, 2017
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Climate change expected to increase premature deaths from air pollution
Most comprehensive study yet on climate change, air quality and premature death
July 31, 2017
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Climate Change-fueled storms could leave less water for drinking
Last Summer, Southern Florida nearly ran out of water. It wasn't drought--actually, the opposite. The state got way too much rain, which flushed nutrients from over-fertilized farms into its canals and reservoirs. All the extra food led to a massive algal bloom, a skim of blue-green slime that smells like rotten eggs and poisons humans. Governor Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in four counties.
July 27, 2017
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Climate Change is on Pace to Kill an Ice Age Remnant
Humans are in the process of changing the planet in a way that hasn't happened in 2.6 million years.
March 21, 2017
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Climate Change is the World's Biggest Risk, in 3 Charts
The rise of the machines isn't the biggest threat to humanity. it's climate change, extreme weather and other environmental factors.
January 12, 2017
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Climate change makes it difficult for sun's UV rays to kill pathogens
Increasing organic runoff as a result of climate change may be reducing the penetration of pathogen-killing ultraviolet (UV) sunlight in inland lakes, rivers, and coastal waters, according to a new study in the journal Scientific Reports. The findings, from a team including researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, points to the potential for an increase in waterborne pathogens.
November 2, 2017
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Climate Change Means More Fuel for Toxic Algae Blooms
For two days in early August 2014, the 400,000 residents in and around Toledo, Ohio, were told not to drink, wash dishes with or bathe in the city's water supply. A noxious, pea green algae bloom had formed over the city's intake pipe in Lake Erie and levels of a toxin that could cause diarrhea and vomiting had reached unsafe levels.
July 27, 2017
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Climate change predicted to increase Nile flow variability
Climate change could lead to overall increase in river flow, but more droughts and floods, study shows
April 25, 2017
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Climate change predicted to reduce size, stature of dominant Midwest plant, study finds
Researchers are involved in a study that found climate change may reduce the growth and stature of big bluestem -- a dominant prairie grass and a major forage grass for cattle.
October 11, 2017
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Climate change projected to significantly increase harmful algal blooms in US freshwaters
Harmful algal blooms known to pose risks to human and environmental health in large freshwater reservoirs and lakes are projected to increase because of climate change.
August 15, 2017
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Climate change responsible for the great diversity in horses
Environmental factors causing rapid expansion of species over the last 20 million years
February 9, 2017
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Climate Change Threatens American Agriculture
Will America's Breadbasket Go Stale?
January 20, 2017
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Climate change will make it feel even worse than it is
It's the heat and the humidity.
January 2, 2018
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Climate change will mean more rain for some--and none for others
We need to figure out who gets floods and who gets drought.
June 1, 2017
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Climate change, population growth may lead to open ocean aquaculture
A new analysis suggests that open-ocean aquaculture for three species of finfish is a viable option for industry expansion under most climate change scenarios -- an option that may provide a new source of protein for the world's growing population.
October 4, 2017
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Climate scientists create Caribbean drought atlas
Atmospheric scientists have developed the first-of-its-kind, high-resolution Caribbean drought atlas, with data going back to 1950. Concurrently, the researchers confirmed the region's 2013-16 drought was the most severe in 66 years due to consistently higher temperatures -- a hint that climate change is to blame.
August 1, 2017
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Climate scientists push back against catastrophic scenarios
In both the popular and academic press, scientists argue against worst cases.
July 12, 2017
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Climate shifts shorten marine food chain off California
Research counters earlier thinking that food chains remain constant through time
October 19, 2017
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Climate study: More intense and frequent severe rainstorms likely
No drop off expected
March 7, 2017
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Close connection between deep currents and climate
GEOMAR researchers publish long-term observational data from the Labrador Sea
April 3, 2017
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Cloud formation suppressed by biogenic organic emissions
Evidence has been found that near-ground biogenic emissions of organics suppress cloud formation in cool-temperate forests in autumn, providing clues to how global warming will affect cloud formation and the overall climate.
September 6, 2017
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CO2 Satellite: NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Mission in Photos
NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) will study atmospheric carbon dioxide from space. See images and photos from the carbon-hunting mission in this Space.com gallery. In this image, the OCO-2 satellite orbits the Earth in an artist's illustration.
October 12, 2017
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Coastal Cities Could Flood Three Times a Week by 2045
The lawns of homes purchased this year in vast swaths of coastal America could regularly be underwater before the mortgage has even been paid off, with new research showing high tide flooding could become nearly incessant in places within 30 years.
February 9, 2017
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Cocktail effects of pesticides and environmental chemicals
Researchers have addressed an international environmental problem by developing a model that can predict how certain chemicals amplify the effects of pesticides and other chemical compounds. Pesticide expert hopes that it will make environmental legislation easier.
December 13, 2017
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Cold conversion of food waste into renewable energy and fertilizer
Study shows bacteria in low-temperature environments could reduce Canada's carbon footprint
May 31, 2017
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Cold extermination: One of greatest mass extinctions was due to an ice age and not to Earth's warming
The Earth has known several mass extinctions over the course of its history. One of the most important happened at the Permian-Triassic boundary 250 million years ago. Over 95% of marine species disappeared and, up until now, scientists have linked this extinction to a significant rise in Earth temperatures.
March 6, 2017
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Cold-water corals: Acidification harms, warming promotes growth
Long-term study reveals combined effects of two climate change drivers
April 27, 2017
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Colorado River's connection with the ocean was a punctuated affair
New interpretation of how one of America's great rivers got linked to the ocean amid tectonic influences and changing sea level
November 15, 2017
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Commercial agriculture is preventing wildfires--and that's not good news
We need more scorched earth.
June 29, 2017
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Communities Retreat as Oceans Swell, Coasts Erode
Erosion, rising seas, ferocious storms and other coastal perils have prompted the resettlement of more than 1 million people worldwide, with an exhaustive new analysis highlighting an emerging migration crisis that's worsening as global warming overwhelms shorelines.
March 27, 2017
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Companies are realizing that renewable energy is good for business
When will individuals follow suit?
November 16, 2017
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Computer simulations first step toward designing more efficient amine chemical scrubbers
A proof-of-concept molecular modeling study that analyzes the efficiency of amine solutions in capturing carbon dioxide is the first step toward the design of cheaper, more efficient amine chemicals for capturing carbon dioxide -- and reducing harmful CO2 emissions -- in industrial installations.
March 7, 2017
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Conservationists' eco-footprints suggest education alone won't change behavior
A new study shows that even those presumably best informed on the environment find it hard to consistently 'walk the walk,' prompting scientists to question whether relying solely on information campaigns will ever be enough.
October 10, 2017
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Controlling a vortex using polymers
Although ubiquitous in the environment, vortices have proven difficult to capture and study in the laboratory. Recently, researchers created a way to examine these small-scale whirlpools with the aid of a device specially developed for this purpose. Their recent paper examines the formation of vortices in fluids with and without added polymers.
November 28, 2017
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Coral reefs are bleaching way more frequently because of global warming
It 'is mind-boggling and very frightening when you consider what that means for the future of coral reefs'
January 4, 2018
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Coral reefs might be in more trouble than we thought
A giant die-off suggests our predictions are overly-optimistic
March 24, 2017
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Cost of wind keeps dropping, and there's little coal, nuclear can do to stop it
An annual look at the costs of generating power.
November 6, 2017
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Could brighter clouds make hurricanes less destructive?
Ever-so-slightly more reflective clouds could, theoretically, slow down storms.
November 6, 2017
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Could San Francisco Get The Oil Industry To Pay For Climate Change?
When a raindrop falls in San Francisco, it has two choices: flow east into the San Francisco Bay, or west into the Pacific Ocean. A ridgeline divides the city into two, slicing through the Presidio, hugging the eastern edge of Golden Gate Park, and skirting Twin Peaks.
October 19, 2017
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Could the Neolithic Revolution offer evidence of best ways to adapt to climate change?
The behavior of the human population during the last intense period of global warming might offer an insight into how best to adapt to the current challenges posed by climate change, a study suggests.
November 1, 2017
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Court Rules California Climate Payments Aren't Taxes
State judges told the California Chamber of Commerce on Thursday that its members don't have a right to pollute, rejecting claims by its attorneys that payments required to release greenhouse gases under a marquee climate program are a kind of tax.
April 7, 2017
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Crystallization method offers new option for carbon capture from ambient air
Scientists have found a simple, reliable process to capture carbon dioxide directly from ambient air, offering a new option for carbon capture and storage strategies to combat global warming.
January 9, 2017
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Cuantec: new force in the fight against food waste
CuanTec is a start-up company with a positive and practical solution to the disposal of seafood waste, which exacts a heavy cost, both financially and environmentally.
March 21, 2017
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Cultural evolution has not freed hunter-gatherers from environmental forcing
Cultural evolution has made humans enormously potent ecosystem engineers and has enabled us to survive and flourish under a variety environmental conditions. Even hunter-gatherers, who obtain their food from wild plant and animal resources using seemingly simple technologies, have been able to extract energy in harsh arctic and desert conditions and compile vast knowledge on medical plants to fight against pathogens in the tropics.
January 3, 2018
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Curbing climate change
Study finds strong rationale for the human factor
January 1, 2018
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Cutting the cost of ethanol, other biofuels and gasoline
Biofuels like the ethanol in U.S. gasoline could get cheaper thanks to experts at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Michigan State University.
July 4, 2017
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Misc. - D

Dams on the Amazon River could have widespread, devastating impacts--and we keep building more of them
Dam crazy.
June 15, 2017
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Decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide key to ancient climate transition
A decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels led to a fundamental shift in the behavior of the Earth's climate system around one million years ago, according to new research led by the University of Southampton.
November 27, 2017
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Deep sea tourism could become a thing soon
Stockton Rush is kind of like the Jeff Bezos of the ocean
April 17, 2017
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DeepMind's Go-playing AI doesn't need human help to beat us anymore
The company's latest AlphaGo AI learned superhuman skills by playing itself over and over
October 18, 2017
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Delhi becomes "gas chamber" as air pollution reaches ludicrous levels
With calm winds, seasonal crop burns, and the usual vehicle and industrial emissions, an extremely thick, toxic fog of pollution has settled on Delhi, choking and sickening residents.
November 9, 2017
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Delhi smog levels drop from severe to very poor--you know, half-marathon weather
Despite doctors' desperate objections, runners raced amid extreme air pollution.
November 20, 2017
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Department of Energy Head Says CO2 Isn't Main Driver of Climate Change
Climate change is real. We know it. We can see it. It's obvious. The evidence is well beyond overwhelming. There is no real debate in the scientific community, and just about every counter argument from solar output to our relative position in the galaxy has been roundly and thoroughly debunked. And yet, Energy Secretary Rick Perry said this week that he didn't believe carbon dioxide was the main component of global climate change, stating that the oceans and the environment are "most likely" the culprits.
June 26, 2017
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Desert critters avoid noisy wind farm turbines
Scientists Seek to Reduce Wind Energy's Impact Upon Predators
May 10, 2017
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Despite Summer Snow, Greenland Is Still Melting
Recent summers on the vast, white expanse of the Greenland ice sheet have featured some spectacular ice melt, including an alarming period in 2012 when nearly the whole surface showed signs of melt. But this summer has instead seen several bouts of snow, staving off a big summer melt. So what gives?
July 25, 2017
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Device pulls water from dry air, powered only by the sun
Imagine a future in which every home has an appliance that pulls all the water the household needs out of the air, even in dry or desert climates, using only the power of the sun.
April 13, 2017
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Diesel vehicles in oil sands operations contribute to regional pollution
Wildfires, cigarette smoking and vehicles all emit a potentially harmful compound called isocyanic acid. The substance has been linked to several health conditions, including heart disease and cataracts. Scientists investigating sources of the compound have now identified off-road diesel vehicles in oil sands production in Alberta, Canada, as a major contributor to regional levels of the pollutant.
December 6, 2017
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Digital sustainability: Digital transformation's next big opportunity
There's an opportunity for digital transformation to help all industries meet sustainability goals and reduce their carbon footprints.
February 21, 2017
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Discarded cigarette butts: The next high performing hydrogen storage material?
Discarded cigarette butts are a major waste disposal and environmental pollution hazard. But chemists have discovered that cigarette butt-derived carbons have ultra-high surface area and unprecedented hydrogen storage capacity.
October 31, 2017
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Discovering the third generation of bioplastics
The ongoing revolution in packaging is the use of 100% organic materials obtained from the leftovers of agricultural production. An expert from the Italian National Research Council (CNR) says that in the early 2020s these bioplastics may become as competitive as traditional ones, even if not suitable for all uses.
July 4, 2017
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Discovery of new transparent thin film material could improve electronics and solar cells
A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class. the new material could lead to smaller, faster, and more powerful electronics, as well as more efficient solar cells.
May 5, 2017
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Distributed energy sources can reduce cost of electricity up to 50%, study says
Traditional grids will have to change. Modeling can help find the best way forward.
July 18, 2017
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Diverse landscapes are more productive and adapt better to climate change
Ecosystems with high biodiversity are more productive and stable towards annual fluctuations in environmental conditions than those with a low diversity of species. They also adapt better to climate-driven environmental changes. These are the key findings environmental scientists made in a study of about 450 landscapes harboring 2,200 plants and animal species.
September 4, 2017
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Do not Buy the House Science Committee'S Claim that Scientists Faked Data Until you Read This
No Credible Evidence Supports that Noaa Fabricated Data; Evidence Still Points to Climate Change
February 6, 2017
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Does doom and gloom convince anyone about climate change?
New York magazine article brings teachable moment on communicating climate change science
July 28, 2017
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Does the weirdly warm weather mean spring is already here?
Why it isn't so nice that the weather's so nice
February 24, 2017
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Don't believe our planet is warming up? Look at this.
Yes, it's happening.
June 19, 2017
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Don't Let That Global Warming Sleep Study Keep You Up at Night
Climate change is bad--it's causing sea levels to rise, it's exacerbating heat waves, it's damaging coral reefs, the list goes on. But that doesn't mean every time researchers find a correlation between some bad thing and the temperature, we should freak out about how global warming is going to make everything on this round Earth a whole lot worse.
May 30, 2017
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Drone tech offers new ways to manage climate change
An innovation providing key clues to how humans might manage forests and cities to cool the planet is taking flight. Cornell researchers are using drone technology to more accurately measure surface reflectivity on the landscape, a technological advance that could offer a new way to manage climate change.
August 8, 2017
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Drones will fly into the path of the eclipse to study weather
As the sky goes dark, robots will conduct atmospheric science.
August 17, 2017
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Drought, Weather Fuel Record Oklahoma Wildfires
Wildfires fueled by gusting winds, hot, dry weather, and desiccated plant life have burned nearly 900,000 acres of Oklahoma so far this year, a record, as well as parts of Kansas and Texas. the blazes have destroyed dozens of buildings and killed seven people as well as hundreds of cattle.
March 24, 2017
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During El Niño, the tropics emit more carbon dioxide
The phenomenon creates warmer, drier conditions in some tropical regions that mimic future climate change
October 12, 2017
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Dynamic catalytic converters for clean air in the city
Reducing pollutant emission of vehicles and meeting stricter exhaust gas standards are major challenges when developing catalytic converters. A new concept might help to efficiently treat exhaust gases after the cold start of engines and in urban traffic and to reduce the consumption of expensive noble metal.
October 26, 2017
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Misc. - E

Early bloomers: Statistical tool reveals climate change impacts on plants
Statistical 'trick' that extracts meaningful measures of phenological change from disparate sources
November 6, 2017
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Early Heat Wave Bakes India, Sign of What's to Come
Temperatures across northern India, including the capital new Delhi, are set to soar well above 100°F (37.8°C) through the weekend and into next week thanks to a pre-monsoon heat wave that has set in somewhat earlier than normal.
April 13, 2017
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Earning a living in a changing climate: The plant perspective
Some of the world's plants are using 'last-stand' strategies to survive rather than thrive as global climate change gathers apace. Ecologists assessed plant strategies in less suitable climates by tapping into big data collated from 16 different countries in 3 different continents over the past 50 years.
June 14, 2017
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Easing the soil's temperature
Cover crops shield soil from extreme temps
November 8, 2017
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EPA bans research grant recipients from advising agency on science
Scott Pruitt selecting new advisers without this "conflict of interest."
November 1, 2017
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EPA intends to form "red team" to debate climate science
Agency head reported to desire "back-and-forth critique" of published research.
June 30, 2017
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Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysis
Wireless sensor networks have many applications, ranging from industrial process automation to environmental monitoring. Researchers have recently developed a time synchronization technique and have carried out experimental performance testing. the method developed learns the behavior of the sensor clocks, making it particularly efficient in terms of energy and computational resources.
January 24, 2017
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Effective restoration of aquatic ecosystems
Despite having increased human wellbeing in the past, intense modifications by multiple and interacting pressures have degraded ecosystems and the sustainability of their goods and services. For ecosystem restoration to deliver on multiple environmental and societal targets, the process of restoration must be redesigned to create a unified and scale-dependent approach that integrates natural and social sciences as well as the broader restoration community, say researchers.
May 24, 2017
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Effects of climate change could accelerate by mid-century
Environmental models are showing that the effects of climate change could be much stronger by the middle of the 21st century, and a number of ecosystem and weather conditions could consistently decline even more in the future.
December 14, 2017
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Efforts are needed to enrich the lives of killer whales in captivity
Keeping Killer whales in zoos and aquariums has become highly controversial. In a new article, experts outline several novel ideas for improving the lives of Killer whales in zoological institutions by enhancing the communication, feeding, environment, and health of the animals in order to elicit natural behaviors seen in the wild.
January 5, 2017
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El Nino Again? This Is Why It's Hard to Tell
The tropical Pacific Ocean is once again carrying on a will-it-or-won't-it flirtation with an El Nino event, just a year after the demise of one of the strongest El Ninos on record.
May 18, 2017
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El Nino and global warming combine to cause record-breaking heat in Southeast Asia
A devastating combination of global warming and El Niño is responsible for causing extreme temperatures in April 2016 in Southeast Asia, scientists have found.
June 6, 2017
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El Nino swept away huge chunks of the west coast last winter
And climate change could make it worse
February 15, 2017
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Electricity generated from low-cost biomaterial
Irish researchers squeeze low-cost electricity from sustainable biomaterial
December 4, 2017
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Energy crop production on conservation lands may not boost greenhouse gases
Growing sustainable energy crops without increasing greenhouse gas emissions, may be possible on seasonally wet, environmentally sensitive landscapes, according to researchers.
March 10, 2017
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Energy from toilet wastewater
Wastewater is considered to be of no use -- quite wrongly! Washing water has an average temperature of 30°C. Toilet water might not only be used to produce biogas or fertilizers, but also valuable resources that otherwise would enter the sewer system unused. and even worse: Annually, more than 2 million people die from diarrheal diseases due to the wrong use of wastewater. Experts of the "Water-Energy Group" of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) study possibilities to eliminate these problems.
March 23, 2017
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Energy harvested from evaporation could power much of U.S.
In the first evaluation of evaporation as a renewable energy source, researchers at Columbia University find that U.S. lakes and reservoirs could generate 325 gigawatts of power, nearly 70 percent of what the United States currently produces.
September 26, 2017
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Energy-efficient cleaning robot
State-of-the-art solar cells are efficient -- but are even more so when they are kept clean. A cleaning robot enables solar panels to deliver at full capacity.
June 14, 2017
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Engineers develop novel nanofiber solution for clean, fresh air
A research team from the National University of Singapore has successfully concocted a novel nanofibre solution that creates thin, see-through air filters that can remove up to 90 per cent of PM2.5 particles and achieve high air flow of 2.5 times better than conventional air filters. as an added bonus, this eco-friendly air filter improves natural lighting and visibility while blocking harmful ultraviolet rays.
March 19, 2017
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Environmental policy, pollution and economic growth
New study finds regulation reduces pollution without negatively affecting GDP
August 9, 2017
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Environmental pollutants in large Norwegian lakes
Scientists have discovered the presence of contaminants in the pelagic food chains in the lakes Mjøsa, Randsfjorden and Femunden in Norway, and in supplementary material of fish from Tyrifjorden and Vansjø, sampled in 2015. Mercury and persistent organic pollutants (cVMS, PCBs, PBDEs, PFAS) were analyzed in samples of fish from all lakes, as well as pelagic crustaceans in Mjøsa.
May 19, 2017
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Environmental researchers are developing new biosensors for testing water
Biologists are part of an interdisciplinary team which has developed novel biosensors that enable pharmaceutical products to be detected more effectively in water. These sensors can measure two types of pharmaceutical substances — beta-blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — in real-time and in low concentrations.
March 9, 2017
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Environmentally friendly, almost electricity-free solar cooling
Also serves as a heat pump
March 13, 2017
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Environmentally friendly, almost electricity-free solar cooling
Demand and the need for cooling are growing as the effects of climate change intensify. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and German company ZAE Bayern have built an emission-free, solar-powered chiller; a pilot system has been tested in Finland and Germany. the potential market is world-wide, particularly in warm countries.
March 13, 2017
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Environmentally safe red glare rocket changes fireworks, soldier technology
Researchers have developed an environmentally friendly red light flare popular in fireworks displays and among Soldiers who use them in training and battlefield operations as signaling devices.
January 3, 2018
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EPA boots at least 5 scientists off board, may favor replacements from industry
The Interior Department is also freezing advisory board and committee meetings.
May 8, 2017
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EPA chief says wind tax credits should be eliminated
Makes no mention of subsidies fossil fuel industry enjoys.
October 10, 2017
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EPA nanotechnology information gathering rule extension and guidance
EPA extended the effective date of the recently-issued TSCA section 8(a) Nanotechnology Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Rule from May 12, 2017 to August 14, 2017.
May 15, 2017
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EPA Scientists Worry Their new Boss Doesn't Want Science
Scott Pruitt, Oklahoma's attorney general, is probably going to be the head of the Environmental Protection Agency. the full Senate will almost certainly vote to confirm him to the cabinet-level job this week. and that has the scientists who work for the EPA freaking out.
February 6, 2017
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EPA Taken to Court for Ignoring Its Own Science In Deciding to not Ban Pesticide
When Scott Pruitt recently took over as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, one of his first decisions was to deny a petition seeking a ban on a controversial pesticide -- only months after scientists of the agency said it poses a significant health risk. now the EPA is being taken to court for its decision to ignore its own recommendation.
April 6, 2017
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Equation helps to explain plant growth
Study has important implications in an era of climate change
March 7, 2017
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Europe's most dangerous pathogens: Climate change increasing risks
The impact of climate change on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases could be greater than previously thought, according to new research
August 2, 2017
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Evaluating cultural value of landscapes using geotagged photos
A new method has been devised for assessing the cultural value of landscapes using geotagged photos shared on a social-networking service. Data obtained with this method could help determine which locations should be used for tourism or targeted for environmental protection.
April 12, 2017
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Everything you need to know about geoengineering
Scientists may finally put some of the basic principles to the test in 2018--and not everyone is happy about that
April 18, 2017
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Everything you need to know about the Keystone XL pipeline
Guess who's back?
March 24, 2017
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Evolutionary advantage of the common periwinkle
Adding one heavy-metal-binding domain in a cysteine-rich protein may be one of the sea snail's adaptations to metal stress
March 24, 2017
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Explained: Greenhouse gases
When hearing the words "greenhouse gas," most people think immediately of carbon dioxide. this is indeed the greenhouse gas that is currently producing the greatest impact on the Earth's rapidly changing climate. But it is far from the only one making its mark, and for mitigating climate change it's important to be able to compare the effects of the various gases that contribute to warming the planet.
January 30, 2017
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Extreme Heat Will Hit India's Most Vulnerable the Hardest
A flurry of studies in recent months have laid bare the significant threat posed by extreme heat in a warming world. Perhaps nowhere is this threat more apparent than in India and other parts of South Asia, where intense heat waves collide with a large, vulnerable population.
August 2, 2017
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Extreme light trapping with nanomaterials
A silicon solar cell harvests the energy of the sun as light travels down through light-absorbent silicon. To reduce weight and cost, solar cells are thin, and while silicon absorbs visible light well, it captures less than half of the light in the near-infrared spectrum, which makes up one-third of the sun's energy.
October 19, 2017
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Extreme Sea Level Rise and the Stakes for America
Should a newly published sea level rise scenario come to pass, hundreds of American landmarks, neighborhoods, towns and cities would be submerged this century, at least in the absence of engineering massive, costly and unprecedented defenses and relocating major infrastructure. Ocean waters would cover land currently home to more than 12 million Americans and $2 trillion in property.
April 26, 2017
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Extreme weather has already cost the US $350 billion -- and climate change is going to add to the bill
How do you afford your rock n roll lifestyle
October 24, 2017
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Exxon, under pressure from investors, prosecutors, commits to methane reduction
Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and feds have walked away from regulation.
September 25, 2017
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Misc. - F

Fast, low energy, and continuous biofuel extraction from microalgae
As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, biodiesel extracted from microalgae is an increasingly important part of the bioenergy field. While it releases a similar amount of CO2 as petroleum when burned, the CO2 released from biodiesel is that which has recently been removed from the atmosphere via photosynthesis meaning that it does not contribute to an increase of the greenhouse gas.
April 28, 2017
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February's Warmth, Brought to you by Climate Change
A bonanza of heat records fell throughout February in almost all quarters of the U.S. and research released on Wednesday shows that this pervasive spring-like warmth was made possible by climate change.
March 8, 2017
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Field trips of the future?
A biologist examines the benefits and drawbacks of virtual and augmented reality in teaching environmental science.
October 19, 2017
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Fifty-years of data from a 'living' oxygen minimum lab could help predict the oceans' future
Researchers have released 50 years' worth of data chronicling the deoxygenating cycles of a fjord off Canada's west coast, and detailing the response of the microbial communities inhabiting the fjord. The mass of data, collected in two related articles, could help scientists better predict the impact of human activities and ocean deoxygenation on marine environments.
November 2, 2017
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Fighting Climate Change, And Building A World To Withstand It
This past year, 2017, was the worst fire season in American history. Over 9.5 million acres burned across North America. Firefighting efforts cost $2 billion.
December 28, 2017
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Fighting global warming and climate change requires a broad energy portfolio
Can the continental United States make a rapid, reliable and low-cost transition to an energy system that relies almost exclusively on wind, solar and hydroelectric power? While there is growing excitement for this vision, a new study describes a more complicated reality. Researchers argue that achieving net-zero carbon emissions requires the incorporation of a much broader suite of energy sources and approaches.
June 19, 2017
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Filtration of nanoparticles from traffic should become a key criterion of building ventilation
Air filters that efficiently expel nanoparticles should be adopted in buildings. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Tampere University of Technology have developed a comparison technique which has detected marked differences between the nanoparticle-capturing performance of air filters.
November 16, 2017
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Firebricks offer low-cost storage for carbon-free energy
Firebricks, designed to withstand high heat, have been part of our technological arsenal for at least three millennia, since the era of the Hittites. Now, a proposal from MIT researchers shows this ancient invention could play a key role in enabling the world to switch away from fossil fuels and rely instead on carbon-free energy sources.
September 6, 2017
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First EPA-approved outdoor field trial for genetically engineered algae
Scientists at the University of California San Diego and Sapphire Energy have successfully completed the first outdoor field trial sanctioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for genetically engineered algae.
May 4, 2017
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First EPA-approved outdoor field trial for genetically engineered algae
Experiment pushes toward the promise of algae as a clean, renewable food and fuel source
May 4, 2017
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Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene
As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced 'wonder' material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind, the research group has developed a cleaner and more environmentally friendly method to isolate graphene using carbon dioxide in the form of carbonic acid as the electrolyte solution.
August 16, 2017
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Flights worldwide face increased risk of severe turbulence due to climate change
Flights all around the world could be encountering lots more turbulence in the future, according to the first ever global projections of in-flight bumpiness.
October 4, 2017
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Florida's climate might--maybe--save a handful of America's ash trees
But populations are splintering.
September 25, 2017
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Fluorescence dyes from the pressure cooker
Researchers are working toward a dye synthesis in nothing but water instead of using toxic solvents, by developing a highly efficient and environmentally friendly synthesis for organic pigments.
January 30, 2017
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Focus on Carbon Removal a 'High-Stakes Gamble'
The manmade emissions fueling global warming are accumulating so quickly in the atmosphere that climate change could spiral out of control before humanity can take measures drastic enough to cool the earth's fever, many climate scientists say.
May 18, 2017
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For Scientists Predicting Sea Level Rise, Wind Is The Biggest Unknown
FROM THE AIR, the largest glacier on the biggest ice sheet in the world looks the same as it has for centuries; massive, stable, blindingly white. But beneath the surface it's a totally different story.
November 1, 2017
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Forest resilience declines in face of wildfires, climate change
The forests you see today are not what you will see in the future. That's the overarching finding from a new study on the resilience of Rocky Mountain forests.
December 12, 2017
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Forests fight global warming in ways more important than previously understood
Trees' role extends beyond carbon consumption, study finds
March 28, 2017
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Four Radical Plans To Save Civilization From Climate Change
Smug Eco-Warriors May think they're curbing global warming with their vegan diets, charged-up Teslas, and rooftop solar panels. But according to Peter Wadhams, head of the Polar Ocean Physics Group at the University of Cambridge, we're barely staving off disaster. He should know: The pessimistic professor has been studying sea ice for nearly 50 years. "
September 4, 2017
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Four-stroke engine cycle produces hydrogen from methane and captures CO2
When is an internal combustion engine not an internal combustion engine? When it's been transformed into a modular reforming reactor that could make hydrogen available to power fuel cells wherever there's a natural gas supply available.
February 16, 2017
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Fossil coral reefs show sea level rose in bursts during last warming
Reefs near Texas endured punctuated bursts of sea-level rise before drowning
October 19, 2017
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Fracking pollution stays in waterways long after the fracking is done
Do you have to let it linger?
July 18, 2017
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Freshwater from salt water using only solar energy and nanotechnology
A federally funded research effort to revolutionize water treatment has yielded an off-grid technology that uses energy from sunlight alone to turn salt water into fresh drinking water. The desalination system, which uses a combination of membrane distillation technology and light-harvesting nanophotonics, is the first major innovation from the Center for Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT), a multi-institutional engineering research center based at Rice University.
June 19, 2017
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From heat stress to malnutrition, climate change is already making us sick
'When a doctor tells us we need to take better care of our health we pay attention, and it's important that governments do the same.'
October 30, 2017
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From Kumbaya to Battleground: How'd the EPA get so political?
The EPA used to enjoy bipartisan support
March 3, 2017
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From moo to goo: Cooperating microbes convert methane to alternative fuel source
Oil and gas wells and even cattle release methane gas into the atmosphere, and researchers are working on ways to not only capture this gas but also convert it into something useful and less-polluting.
April 13, 2017
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Fujino Spirals
Specializing in the field of pollution control dealing in Fujino spirals, Media based sewage treatment plants, Manufacturers of spirals media, industrial wastewater treatment india.
Provides Information
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Future climate change will affect plants and soil differently
A new study has found that soil carbon loss is more sensitive to climate change compared to carbon taken up by plants. In drier regions, soil carbon loss decreased but in wetter regions soil carbon loss increased.
March 7, 2017
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Future volcanic eruptions could cause more climate disruption
Climate change reduces oceans' ability to buffer impacts
October 31, 2017
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Misc. - G

Geologic evidence is the forerunner of ominous prospects for a warming Earth
Slightly warmer temperatures and moderate CO2 concentrations over a hundred thousand years ago led to dramatic superstorms and sea-level rise in the western Atlantic Ocean
October 12, 2017
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Getting a better handle on methane emissions from livestock
Cattle, swine and poultry contribute a hefty portion to the average American's diet, but raising all this livestock comes at a cost to the environment: The industry produces a lot of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Just how much gas the animals release, however, is the subject of debate. Now, one group reports that a new approach could shed light on how accurate current data are.
November 29, 2017
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Getting the measure of mud
Researchers have found a way to chart changes in the speed of deep-ocean currents using the most modest of materials -- mud
September 25, 2017
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Gigawatts of planned natural gas plants despite low electricity prices
Especially in the northeast, shale proximity balances out low electricity prices.
December 28, 2017
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Glass with switchable opacity could improve solar cells and LEDs
Using nanoscale grass-like structures, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania have created glass that lets through a large amount of light while appearing hazy. This is the first time that glass has been made with such high levels of haze and light transmittance at the same time, a combination of properties that could help boost the performance of solar cells and LEDs.
December 11, 2017
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Global carbon emissions continue to stabilize, US has 3% drop
Plunging coal use is key driver in keeping emissions flat as economies grow.
March 17, 2017
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Global growth of ecological, environmental citizen science is fueled by new technology
Scientists have revealed the diversity of ecological and environmental citizen science for the first time and showed that the changing face of citizen science around the world is being fueled by advances in new technology.
April 4, 2017
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Global Heat Continues with Second-Hottest February
February was the second hottest on record for the planet, trailing only last year's scorching February -- a clear mark of how much the Earth has warmed from the accumulation of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
March 16, 2017
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Global methane emissions from agriculture larger than reported, according to new estimates
Global methane emissions from agriculture are larger than estimated due to the previous use of out-of-date data on carbon emissions generated by livestock, according to a new study.
September 29, 2017
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Global ocean de-oxygenation quantified
The first in-depth study on the observed global ocean oxygen content was just published by Kiel scientists in Nature
February 15, 2017
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Global road-building explosion could be disastrous for people and nature, say scientists
The global explosion of new roads is rife with economic, social, and environmental dangers, according to a new study.
October 26, 2017
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Global warming accounts for tripling of extreme West African Sahel storms
Global warming is responsible for a tripling in the frequency of extreme West African Sahel storms observed in just the last 35 years, an international team of experts has reported.
April 26, 2017
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Global warming doesn't stop when the emissions stop
Our climate is out of balance: Increasing accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere has caused the Earth's temperature to increase by 0.8°C since the beginning of the industrial revolution.
October 3, 2017
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Global Warming Is Fueling Arizona's Monstrous Monsoons
Summer in Arizona and throughout the Southwest is monsoon season, which means a daily pattern of afternoon thunderstorms, flash floods, dramatic dust clouds and spectacular displays of lightning over the desert.
August 4, 2017
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Global warming is not 'leveling off', so stop saying it is
Look to the satellite data.
May 25, 2017
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Global warming making oceans more toxic
Climate change is predicted to cause a series of maladies for world oceans including heating up, acidification, and the loss of oxygen. a newly published study demonstrates that one ocean consequence of climate change that has already occurred is the spread and intensification of toxic algae.
April 24, 2017
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Going 'green' with plant-based resins
Airplanes, electronics and solar cells are all in demand, but the materials holding these items together -- epoxy thermosets -- are not environmentally friendly. Now, a group reports that they have created a plant-based thermoset that could make devices 'greener.'
August 16, 2017
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Gold-plated crystals set new standard for natural gas detectors
New metamaterials-based technology could replace infrared sensors used for gas leaks, agriculture and recycling
April 6, 2017
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Google is mapping out air pollution levels on Google Earth
Google has undertaken yet another initiative that aims to raise awareness of the importance of protecting the environment. The company has teamed up with envirotech firm Aclima to measure air pollution levels in California and map out the findings on its Earth platform.
November 7, 2017
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Google Maps can tell you how bad the pollution is in Oakland, block-by-block
Google Maps has just launched its first map showing the air quality right down to the block you are standing on in Oakland, California.
June 5, 2017
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Graphene Membranes Could Mean Greener and Cheaper Nuclear Power
Graphene-based membranes which act like super-fine sieves could economically transform the nuclear industry by reducing the energy costs associated with producing heavy water meaning greener and cheaper nuclear power.
May 11, 2017
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Graphene sieve turns seawater into drinking water
Graphene-based membranes have attracted considerable attention as promising candidates for new filtration technologies. now the much sought-after development of making membranescapable of sieving common salts has been achieved.
April 3, 2017
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Great tits aren't the only things evolving to adapt to humans. Here are 12 others.
People are a great and terrible influence on the world.
October 23, 2017
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Green infrastructure in cities could reduce harmful impact of air pollution
The harmful impact of urban air pollution could be combated by strategically placing low hedges along roads in a built-up environment of cities instead of taller trees, a new study has found.
May 16, 2017
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Greenhouse Gases Are Rapidly Changing the Atmosphere
Humanity's grand experiment in the atmosphere continues, and a new report documents just how far it's gone.
July 13, 2017
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Greenhouse gases: First it was cows, now it's larvae
A certain species of larva uses methane to propel itself, and it is even possible that this mechanism is accelerating the release of gases into the atmosphere and magnifying global warming, scientists have discovered. the research demonstrates the negative role played by the larvae not just in global warming but also in disturbing the sedimentary layers at the bottom of lakes.
March 14, 2017
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Greenpeace announces its latest report about the environmental impacts of cloud
Apple, Google, Facebook and Switch (who?) top the list.
January 19, 2017
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Groundwater loss tracked during drought in California's Central Valley
Adding to the severity, the drought coincided with a transition from row crops to more thirsty tree crops
May 18, 2017
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Misc. - H

Half of your bread's environmental impact comes from fertilizer
Your morning loaf holds a C02 intensive surprise
February 28, 2017
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Harnessing nature's chemistry expertise for greener industrial production
Modern society relies greatly on industrial chemistry products to maintain its quality of life, as well as its economic activities. However, the conventional procedure for transforming raw materials into everything from pharmaceuticals to plastics is typically energy intensive and involves high-temperatures, making it frequently inefficient. Additionally, the process uses hazardous substances (such as corrosive chemicals and toxic metals) and generates harmful waste.
April 10, 2017
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Harvard Scientists Taking Geoengineering Into the Field
Geoengineering has been a topic on the fringe of climate discussions for more than a decade, but it's been edging ever closer to the mainstream as carbon pollution rises.
April 18, 2017
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Harvesting clean energy from hot pavements
Samer Dessouky, professor of civil and environmental engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio, has received $298,000 through the Strategic Alliance between the Texas Sustainable Energy Research Institute and CPS Energy, established in 2010, to generate power from hot pavements.
November 7, 2017
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Hawaiian biodiversity has been declining for millions of years
Shrinking land area crowds species, leading to long-term diversity loss on older islands
March 16, 2017
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'Heat island' effect could double climate change costs for world's cities
Overheated cities face climate change costs at least twice as big as the rest of the world because of the 'urban heat island' effect, new research shows.
May 29, 2017
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Hematite nanowire structures to enhance solar-to-fuel conversion in photoelectro-chemical water splitting
ICN2 researchers led by ICREA Prof. Jordi Arbiol, in collaboration with the IREC and ICIQ, have produced a material for use in photoelectrochemical water splitting that is not only cheaper than existing alternatives, but increases both the efficiency and output of the process.
October 13, 2017
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Here's How Climate Change Could Turn U.S. Real Estate Prices Upside Down
If Florida gleaned anything from Hurricane Andrew, the intensely powerful storm that tore a deadly trail of destruction across Miami-Dade County almost exactly 25 years to the day that Hurricane Harvey barreled into the Texas coastline, it was that living in areas exposed to the wrath of Mother Nature can come at a substantial cost.
September 5, 2017
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Here's How Climate Change is a 'Death Sentence' in Afghanistan's Highlands
The central highlands of Afghanistan are a world away from the congested chaos of the country's cities. Hills roll across colossal, uninhabited spaces fringed by snow-flecked mountains, set against blistering blue skies.
August 29, 2017
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Here's how you can actually help stop climate change
It takes more than turning off the lights, but it's all doable.
July 12, 2017
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High-rise forests in Italy are fighting air pollution
How the team behind Milan's Bosco Verticale used over 11,000 plants to improve air quality and increase housing
August 9, 2017
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Higher environmental impact from cookstove emissions
Millions of Asian families use cookstoves and often fuel them with cheap biofuels to prepare food. But the smoke emitted from these cookstoves has a definite, detrimental environmental impact, particularly in India. New research offers a clearer picture of the topic's true scope.
January 2, 2018
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Highly flexible organic flash memory for foldable and disposable electronics
The memory exhibits a significantly-long projected retention rate with a programming voltage on par with the present industrial standards.
November 7, 2017
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Historical wildlife trends reliable for predicting species at risk
Scientists have shown that using historical wildlife data provides a more accurate measure of how vulnerable certain species might be to extinction from climate change.
August 2, 2017
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Holey pattern boosts coherence of nanomechanical membrane vibrations
Researchers have introduced a new type of nanomechanical resonator, in which a pattern of holes localizes vibrations to a small region in a 30 nm thick membrane. The pattern dramatically suppresses coupling to random fluctuations in the environment, boosting the vibrations' coherence. The researchers' quantitative understanding and numerical models provide a versatile blueprint for ultracoherent nanomechanical devices.
June 22, 2017
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Hospitals are helping make us all sick
Greenhouse gas emissions from health care will be responsible for the loss of thousands of years of life.
November 6, 2017
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Hot news from the Antarctic underground
Study bolsters theory of heat source under West Antarctica
November 7, 2017
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House Science Committee holds hearing on "Making EPA Great Again"
Continued accusations against NOAA climate scientists were also on the agenda.
February 8, 2017
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How 139 countries could be powered by 100 percent wind, water, and solar energy by 2050
The latest roadmap to a 100 percent renewable energy future outlines infrastructure changes that 139 countries can make to be entirely powered by wind, water, and sunlight by 2050 after electrification of all energy sectors. Such a transition could mean less worldwide energy consumption due to the efficiency of clean, renewable electricity; and a net increase of over 24 million long-term jobs.
August 23, 2017
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How a wildfire kicked up a 45,000-foot column of flames
In 2011, a New Mexico wildfire went from normal to nuclear. Three local scientists set out to learn why.
June 21, 2017
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How atmospheric waves radiate out of hurricanes
Atmospheric gravity waves that spiral outward could be used to monitor storms
May 16, 2017
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How Boring Old Pension Funds Might Curb Global Warming
If civilization still exists a century from now, Earth ought to throw a parade for pension funds. For all their fiscally conservative stodginess, the people tasked with safeguarding your nest egg are forcing the financial world to pay attention to climate change
May 18, 2017
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How California is saving rainwater for a sunny day
Meet Helen Dahlke, a water banker
March 23, 2017
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How climate change may reshape subalpine wildflower communities
An unseasonably warm, dry summer in 2015 on Washington state's Mount Rainier caused subalpine wildflowers to change their bloom times and form 'reassembled' communities, with unknown consequences for species interactions among wildflowers, pollinators and other animals.
November 7, 2017
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How Close is 1.5°C? Depends When you Measure From
Most scientists studying global warming compare today's temperatures to those of the late 19th century because that is as far back as quality temperature observations go. But a new study makes the case for a better comparison period, one that includes the warming that had already resulted by the middle of the 1800s and shows how close the world already is to breaching international warming targets.
January 25, 2017
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How do fishes perceive their environment?
Fish perceive changes in water currents caused by prey, conspecifics and predators using their lateral line. the tiny sensors of this organ also allow them to navigate reliably. However, with increasing current velocities, the background signal also increases. Scientists have now created a realistic, three-dimensional model of a fish for the first time and have simulated the precise current conditions. the virtual calculations show that particular anatomical adaptations minimize background noise.
May 3, 2017
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How drone swarms could help protect us from tornadoes
Eyes in the sky
May 1, 2017
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How fires are changing the tundra's face
Climate change takes a heavy toll on the tundra, increasing the probability of extreme droughts. As a result, the frequency of fires in forests, bogs and even wetlands continues to rise. In addition, the northern areas of the tundra have also become more accessible and negatively impacted by human activities in recent years.
December 12, 2017
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How forests balance the books in a changing climate
Plusses: more carbon dioxide and humidity. Minuses: more heat and drought.
September 1, 2017
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How harmful are nano-copper and anti-fungal combinations in the waterways?
A recently published article in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry explores the risks to the smallest creatures in aquatic communities posed by increased use of the anti-fouling wood treatment. Copper salts have a long history of use as a wood preservative.
October 26, 2017
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How much can 252-million-year-old ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lot
During the late Permian, the equator was dry and desert-like, yet surprisingly a hotspot for biodiversity, new paleontological research shows. Similarly to modern rainforests, equator ecosystems were home a unique diversity of species, including those both anciently and newly evolved.
December 11, 2017
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How humans have fought over--and weaponized--water
A timeline of all the reasons we've gone to battle over the H2O.
April 18, 2017
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How Rising Seas Drowned the Flood Insurance Program
Long Beach Island is the largest and richest barrier island in New Jersey, an oasis of sprawling oceanfront retreats and second homes located midway down the state's heavily developed coast, a two-hour drive from the metropolitan centers of New York City and Philadelphia. On a clear day, visitors in the southern end can see the shiny facades of the Atlantic City casinos rising like obelisks across Great Bay.
May 29, 2017
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How the Pacific Ocean changes weather around the world
Our current understanding of the El Nino Southern Oscillation
February 10, 2017
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How to dispose of bio-based plastics?
Bio-based plastics can be treated in different recycling and recovery streams. The preferred solution depends on the waste management infrastructure available in your country or region and the acceptance of the stakeholders along the value chain.
July 19, 2017
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How to recycle an old laptop hard drive
Before you throw away an old laptop hard drive, think about recycling it instead!
April 13, 2017
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How to recycle and use your old hard drives with a docking station
Pick up one of these external docks and recycle your old hard drives rather than throw them away.
January 24, 2017
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How to Recycle Plastic at Home
Break Down and Recompress Trash to Make new Things
January 5, 2017
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How to survive a tsunami
We asked experts how to live through one of nature's most powerful disasters.
June 27, 2017
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How we know that climate change is happening--and that humans are causing it
It's a matter of how, not if
March 9, 2017
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How well have climate models done in the upper atmosphere?
Digging into the differences between models and satellite data.
June 21, 2017
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How Zero Mass is using solar panels to pull drinkable water directly from the air
Zero Mass' ambitious plan to change water
November 28, 2017
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HP Is Making Ink Cartridges From Trashed Pop Bottles
Most of the news you read about ink cartridges is bad, and understandably so. Ink is one of the priciest liquids around by volume, printers waste unknown amounts to keep printheads "healthy,' and they quit working way before all the ink gets used up.
June 16, 2017
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Huge carbon sink in soil minerals: New avenue for offsetting rising greenhouse gases
Soil holds more than three times the carbon found in the atmosphere, yet its potential in reducing atmospheric carbon-dioxide levels and mitigating global warming is barely understood. A researcher has discovered that vast amounts of carbon can be stored by soil minerals more than a foot below the surface. The finding could help offset the rising greenhouse-gas emissions helping warm the Earth's climate.
November 8, 2017
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Huge permafrost thaw can be limited by ambitious climate targets
Nearly 4 million square kilometers of frozen soil -- an area larger than India -- could be lost for every additional degree of global warming experienced, warn scientists. Global warming will thaw about 20% more permafrost than previously thought, they add -- potentially releasing significant amounts of greenhouse gases into the Earth's atmosphere. But these investigators also suggest that the huge permafrost losses could be averted if ambitious global climate targets are met.
April 10, 2017
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Human activity has polluted European air for 2,000 years
A new study combining European ice core data and historical records of the infamous Black Death pandemic of 1349-1353 shows metal mining and smelting have polluted the environment for thousands of years, challenging the widespread belief that environmental pollution began with the Industrial Revolution in the 1700s and 1800s.
May 31, 2017
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Human caused warming likely intensified Hurricane Harvey's rains
New research shows human-induced climate change increased the amount and intensity of Hurricane Harvey's unprecedented rainfall.
December 13, 2017
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Human impacts on forests and grasslands much larger and older than previously assumed
Human biomass utilization reduces global carbon stocks in vegetation by 50%, implying that massive emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere have occurred over the past centuries and millennia. The contribution of forest management and livestock grazing on natural grasslands to global carbon losses is of similar magnitude as that of deforestation.
December 21, 2017
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Human water use is draining the world's saline lakes
Rising temperatures might not be helping, but overuse is the real problem.
October 25, 2017
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Human-caused warming increasing likelihood of record-breaking hot years
A new study finds human-caused global warming is significantly increasing the rate at which hot temperature records are being broken around the world.
November 8, 2017
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Human-made fossil methane emission levels larger than previously believed
A team of researchers spent seven weeks in Antarctica collecting and studying 2,000-pound samples of glacial ice cores that date back nearly 12,000 years. The ancient air trapped within the ice revealed surprising new data about methane that may help inform today's policymakers as they consider ways to reduce global warming.
August 23, 2017
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Humans are responsible for the vast majority of wildfires in the U.S.
Only you can prevent forest fires. for real.
February 27, 2017
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Humans Blamed for Starting Most Wildfires in the U.S.
A campfire lit near a waterfall grew into the fatal Soberanes Fire, destroying 57 Californian homes last summer. Two teens were accused of starting the Gatlinburg fire in the fall, which killed 14 in eastern Tennessee. Canadian investigators blamed human firestarters for the wildfire that forced the evacuation of 90,000 from Fort McMurray.
February 27, 2017
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Hydrogen production: protein environment makes catalyst efficient
The interaction of protein shell and active center in hydrogen-producing enzymes is crucial for the efficiency of biocatalysts. A team specifically analyzed the role of hydrogen bonds in certain enzymes from green algae, the hydrogenases.
December 14, 2017
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Hydrological implications of rapid global warming
Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events. The findings indicate some of the likely implications should current trends of rising carbon dioxide and global warming continue.
November 20, 2017
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Misc. - I

Ice-spraying balloons are the latest climate idea because we are running out of climate ideas
It's not a good situation
March 24, 2017
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Identifying optimal adaptation of buildings threatened by hurricanes, climate change
The need for adaptation strategies to reduce the threat of hurricanes to society is of critical importance, as evidenced by the recent damage to coastal regions in the U.S. and the Caribbean this past year. The fact that the number of residential buildings in coastal areas has increased significantly combined with the increasing risks of impacts of due climate change means that the cost of damage to coastal developments are likely to continue to rise.
November 27, 2017
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If the EPA doesn't believe in science, what is it good for?
What's left when the Environmental Protection Agency throws facts out the window?
March 10, 2017
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If you live in the South, climate change could kill your economy
Northern states might actually profit as the planet warms.
June 29, 2017
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IFTTT's Data Access Project brings government data to you
The digital automation service now connects users to info from agencies and institutions like the Library of Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Defense.
June 22, 2017
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Illuminate your House with Anker's Solar-Powered Spotlights, No Wiring Required
Without any wiring to futz with, Eufy's solar-powered, motion-sensing spotlights are the easiest way to illuminate your front porch or lawn, and you can get one for $20 today, half its usual price, and an all-time low.
January 17, 2017
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Important things found in Antarctica this week: 91 volcanoes and also a fruitcake
And what they can tell us about the mysterious southern continent.
August 15, 2017
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Improved representation of solar variability in climate models
For upcoming climate model studies, scientists can use a new, significantly improved data set for solar forcing. An international science team led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía in Granada has now published the details of the new reconstruction of this reference dataset in the journal Geoscientific Model Development.
July 4, 2017
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Improving prognoses for a sustainable future
Whether it's electric automobiles, renewable energy, carbon tax or sustainable consumption, sustainable development requires strategies that meet people's needs without harming the environment.
January 23, 2017
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Improving the biodiversity of green roofs
Using living organisms such as bacteria or fungi, as an alternative to chemical fertilizers, can improve the soil biodiversity of green roofs, according to new research.
March 1, 2017
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In a Montana town, a record-breaking 103-degree swing in 24 hours
Loma's weather in January 1972 is a fascinating exemplar of sudden temperature spikes and drops.
June 22, 2017
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In Cities, It's The Smoke, Not The Fire, That Will Get You
NO ONE KNOWS what sparked the violent fires ablaze in the hills of California wine country. In the last five days, the flames have torched more than 160,000 acres across Napa and Sonoma counties, reducing parts of Santa Rosa to piles of cinder and ash and leaving more than 20 dead and hundreds missing.
October 12, 2017
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In March, wind and solar generated a record 10% of US electricity
And stationary storage batteries had a booming quarter, too.
June 14, 2017
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In photos: 100 years of Denali National Park
Archival Shots Of, On, and Around North America's Tallest Peak.
May 3, 2017
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In photos: Dubai's massive desalination plant
Where they tame the undrinkable ocean
February 17, 2017
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In the deep ocean, these bacteria play a key role in trapping carbon
The organisms oxidize the nitrogen compound nitrite to "fix" inorganic carbon dioxide.
November 28, 2017
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Increased water availability from climate change may release more nutrients into soil in Antarctica
Increases in phosphorus load in soil and aquatic ecosystems may allow for more abundant life
March 13, 2017
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Inexpensive soy filters could lead to better air purification
Air pollution is a major public health issue worldwide. Filters can help improve the quality of the air we breathe, but they also contribute to landfill when they are finished with and thrown away, as they are often made of plastic. Could bio-based filters be the answer?
October 4, 2017
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Insane Light System Blasts the Energy of 10,000 Suns
German scientists have constructed a powerful new light system that can focus energy equivalent to the radiation of 10,000 suns onto a single spot. Eventually, they hope, this "artificial sun" could be used to produce environmentally-friendly fuels.
March 23, 2017
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Insect eyes inspire new solar cell design
Packing tiny solar cells together, like micro-lenses in the compound eye of an insect, could pave the way to a new generation of advanced photovoltaics, say Stanford University scientists.
August 31, 2017
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Inside an investigation into Exxon Mobil's climate change misinformation
How Exxon sowed doubt about climate change, according to an author of a new study
August 23, 2017
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Inside Salt Lake City's dreary, dangerous smog dome
How it's fighting a perennial pollution problem.
August 2, 2017
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Insight into enzyme's 3-D structure could cut biofuel costs
Using neutron crystallography, a Los Alamos research team has mapped the three-dimensional structure of a protein that breaks down polysaccharides, such as the fibrous cellulose of grasses and woody plants, a finding that could help bring down the cost of creating biofuels. The research focused on a class of copper-dependent enzymes called lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs), which bacteria and fungi use to naturally break down cellulose and closely related chitin biopolymers.
May 18, 2017
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Integrating two types of crop models to predict the effect of climate change on crop yields
Scientists now have a new tool to predict the future effects of climate change on crop yields. Researchers are attempting to bridge two types of computational crop models to become more reliable predictors of crop production in the U.S. Corn Belt.
January 3, 2018
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Into the DNA of a coral reef predator
Researchers have sequenced and decoded for the first time the genome of the crown-of-thorns starfish, paving the way for the biocontrol of this invasive predator responsible for the destruction of coral reefs across Indo-Pacific oceans.
April 5, 2017
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Invasive plants have unprecedented ability to pioneer new continents and climates
These species pose greater global risk than previously thought
December 4, 2017
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Invention produces cleaner water with less energy and no filter
The same technology that adds fizz to soda can now be used to remove particles from dirty water. Researchers at Princeton University have found a technique for using carbon dioxide in a low-cost water treatment system that eliminates the need for costly and complex filters.
May 15, 2017
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Invention uses bacteria to purify water
A University of British Columbia-developed system that uses bacteria to turn non-potable water into drinking water will be tested next week in West Vancouver prior to being installed in remote communities in Canada and beyond.
April 4, 2017
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Investigating the Use of Nanotechnology to Remove Toxic Chemicals from Soil
Nanotechnology has a significant role in eliminating toxic chemicals from the soil. At present, over 70 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund sites are adopting or investigating the use of nanoparticles to degrade or eliminate environmental pollutants.
October 25, 2017
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Ionic 'solar cell' could provide on-demand water desalination
Modern solar cells, which use energy from light to generate electrons and holes that are then transported out of semiconducting materials, have existed for over 60 years. Little attention has been paid, however, to the promise of using light to drive the transport of oppositely charged protons and hydroxides obtained by dissociating water molecules. Researchers report such a design, which has promising application in producing electricity to turn brackish water drinkable.
November 15, 2017
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Is a vegetarian diet really more environmentally friendly that eating meat?
Beef from Brazil, avocados from Mexico, lamb from new Zealand, wines from South Africa and green beans from Kenya -- food shopping lists have a distinctly international flavour. and with many questioning the sustainability of importing so much food from so far away, we are beginning to ask if switching to a vegetarian diet to cut emissions caused by meat production is as sustainable as one might think.
January 26, 2017
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Is Agung going to blow?
Predicting volcanic eruptions is tricky science
November 28, 2017
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Is climate change responsible for record-setting extreme weather events?
After an unusually intense heat wave, downpour or drought, climate scientists inevitably receive phone calls and emails asking whether human-caused climate change played a role.
April 25, 2017
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It's June. California Is Still Covered in Snow
The summer solstice is just around the corner, but someone forgot to tell California's snowpack.
June 16, 2017
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It's not In your Head: the Weather is Weirder, and Climate Change is the Reason Why
But don't Point Any Fingers at One Particular Flood. Or Drought. Or Hurricane. Or Heatwave.
January 19, 2017
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It looks like we're in for another La Niña winter. What does that mean?
A quick refresher on what "the little girl" actually is.
October 16, 2017
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Misc. - J

Japan's Biggest Coral Reef Devastated by Bleaching
Almost three-quarters of Japan's biggest coral reef has died, according to a report that blames its demise on rising sea temperatures caused by global warming.
January 16, 2017
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Japanese coastal species rode tsunami debris to the US
Some animals went through multiple generations as their debris rode the currents.
September 29, 2017
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Jena Experiment: Loss of species destroys ecosystems
15 years of biodiversity research in review
November 29, 2017
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July Was Record Hot for Parts of Alaska and the West
The northernmost city in the United States just had its hottest July on record, as other spots in Alaska had their hottest month overall. Heat records also fell in a few western cities, as well as the fearsomely hot Death Valley, where July was the hottest month ever recorded on Earth.
August 8, 2017
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Just 20 percent of e-waste is being recycled
Each year, the world tosses a million tons of chargers alone.
December 13, 2017
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Just some cool new pictures of the time Greenland was on fire
Ice and fire.
September 26, 2017
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Misc. - K

Kenyan Homes Enjoy an Alternative and Sustainable Way to Cook
Samsung Electronics announced today that, in partnership with Green Development SA, it will deliver 10,000 bioethanol stoves to 10,000 households in Mombasa, Kenya. By supplying these eco-friendly stoves, Samsung Electronics aims to address climate change and improve the health and safety of the residents of Kenya's second largest city while providing them with economic sustainability.
November 7, 2017
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Kestrels' strategies for flight and hunting vary with the weather
Even so, these small raptors expend a constant amount of energy per foraging trip
June 7, 2017
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Key to speeding up carbon sequestration discovered
Scientists at Caltech and USC have discovered a way to speed up the slow part of the chemical reaction that ultimately helps the earth to safely lock away, or sequester, carbon dioxide into the ocean. Simply adding a common enzyme to the mix, the researchers have found, can make that rate-limiting part of the process go 500 times faster.
July 17, 2017
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Kuang-Chi invests $5 million in SkyX, a maker of drones to monitor oil and gas pipelines
Shenzhen-based Kuang-Chi Group is investing $5 million in SkyX Systems Corp., according to the drone tech startup's founder and CEO Didi Horn. A former fighter pilot with the Israeli Air Force, Horn started SkyX in 2015 to help public and private companies monitor energy infrastructure from on high, using increasingly powerful drones and big data analytics.
May 22, 2017
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Misc. - L

La Paz adapts to a world without water
The city is high and dry after losing its glaciers
February 21, 2017
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Lakes in the northeast are getting dangerously salty, and it's our fault
Ice-free roads come with a cost
April 10, 2017
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Large Iceberg Poised to Break Off from Antarctica
A rift that has been wending its way across Antarctica's massive Larsen C ice shelf just made another leap forward, growing by more than 10 miles, scientists monitoring it reported Thursday.
January 6, 2017
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Largest grid-tied lithium ion battery system deployed today in San Diego
CA Public Utilities Commissioner: "We are far in advance of where we expected to be."
February 24, 2017
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Leader of House Science Committee Says Climate Change is Awesome
Texas Representative Lamar Smith is now in charge of the House, Space, Science, and Technology committee. He also believes that climate change is a good thing.
July 28, 2017
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Leaked EPA Memo: not Even the EPA Knows What'S Going on with the EPA
An Internal Email Encourages Epa Staff to Ignore the Press
January 30, 2017
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LED lighting could have major impact on wildlife
LED street lighting can be tailored to reduce its impacts on the environment, according to new research.
February 6, 2017
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Life on the edge prepares plants for climate change
Genetic variability supports plant survival during droughts
December 19, 2017
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Life on the ice: For the first time scientists have directly observed living bacteria in polar ice and snow
The new evidence has the potential to alter perceptions about which planets in the universe could sustain life and may mean that humans are having an even greater impact on levels of CO2 in Earth's atmosphere than accepted evidence from climate history studies of ice cores suggests.
December 20, 2017
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Life's building blocks observed in spacelike environment
Where do the molecules required for life originate? It may be that small organic molecules first appeared on earth and were later combined into larger molecules, such as proteins and carbohydrates.
December 12, 2017
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Light pollution is getting worse
We're killing the night, and that's going to kill us.
November 27, 2017
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Limited sign of soil adaptation to climate warming
While scientists and policy experts debate the impacts of global warming, Earth's soil is releasing roughly nine times more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than all human activities combined.
January 30, 2017
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Little growth observed in India's methane emissions
Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas and concentrations are rising in the atmosphere. Because of its potency and quick decay in the atmosphere, countries have recognized that reduction of methane emissions are a means toward mitigating global warming.
October 10, 2017
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Lizards might lose their gut bacteria to climate change--and that's not great
A Lizard's Health is In Its Gut
May 9, 2017
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London's social impact accelerator BGV plans seed fund
London-based 'social impact" accelerator, Bethnal Green Ventures, which backs pre-seed startups with ideas for using tech to tackle social and/or environmental problems, has taken £1.3 million in funding from three social tech and innovation funders: Big Society Capital, Nominet Trust and Nesta.
March 27, 2017
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Long-distance survival: Effects of storage time and environmental exposure on soil bugs
Are soil organisms still risky after a year in the sun? International researchers placed trays of soil in and around sea containers, as well as in cupboards, to count the creatures in them every few months. they showcase some of the risks presented by soil contamination, while observing which unwanted microbes, insects and plants died faster when exposed, and which -- when protected in closed cupboards.
January 5, 2017
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Loss of Arctic sea ice impacting Atlantic Ocean water circulation system
Arctic sea ice is not merely a passive responder to the climate changes occurring around the world, according to new research. Scientists say the ongoing Arctic ice loss can play an active role in altering one of the planet's largest water circulation systems: the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).
July 31, 2017
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Low cost, scalable water splitting fuels the future hydrogen economy
The "clean energy economy" always seems to be a few steps away but never quite here. Most energy for transportation, heating and cooling and manufacturing is still delivered using fossil fuel inputs. But with a few scientific breakthroughs, hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, could be the energy carrier of a future clean energy society.
May 31, 2017
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Low-cost imaging system detects natural gas leaks in real time
Infrared device enables reliable monitoring under a range of environmental conditions
February 6, 2017
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Low-cost monitoring device uses light to quickly detect oil spills
Simple sensing device could make cleanup easier by identifying the type of oil involved in a spill
March 6, 2017
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Low-cost 'solar absorber' promising for future power plants
Researchers have shown how to modify commercially available silicon wafers into a structure that efficiently absorbs solar energy and withstands the high temperatures needed for "concentrated solar power" plants that might run up to 24 hours a day.
April 5, 2017
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Misc. - M

Machine Crushes Beer Bottles Into Sand to Save new Zealand Beaches
Drink beer, save the environment. That's the rallying cry of DB Breweries, a new Zealand-based company helping to combat the global sand shortage.
March 3, 2017
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Making cows more environmentally friendly
Research reveals vicious cycle of climate change, cattle diet and rising methane
March 29, 2017
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Making renewable power more viable for the grid
Wind and solar power are increasingly popular sources for renewable energy. But intermittency issues keep them from connecting widely to the U.S. grid: They require energy-storage systems that, at the cheapest, run about $100 per kilowatt hour and function only in certain locations.
October 11, 2017
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Manufacturing, global trade impair health of people with no stake in either
Expert helps map migration of air pollution risk to regions far from factories
March 29, 2017
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Mapping the global impact of shrinking glaciers on river invertebrates
River invertebrates react the same way to decreasing glacier cover wherever in the world they are, say scientists who have evaluated more than one million of them in diverse regions with shrinking glaciers, to determine the impact of global environmental change.
December 18, 2017
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March was Second Hottest on Record Globally
The exceptional global heat of the past few years continued last month, with March ranking as the second hottest on record for the planet. It followed the second hottest February and third hottest January, showing just how much Earth has warmed from the continued buildup of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
April 14, 2017
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Marine bacteria produce an environmentally important molecule with links to climate
Scientists have discovered that tiny marine bacteria can synthesize one of Earth's most abundant sulfur molecules, which affects atmospheric chemistry and potentially climate. this molecule, dimethylsulfoniopropionate is an important nutrient for marine microorganisms and is the major precursor for the climate-cooling gas, dimethyl sulfide.
February 13, 2017
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Marine species threatened by deep-sea mining
Underwater mining poses a great danger to animals inhabiting the seafloors. A new research study describes the most abundant species, a sponge, which can now be used to regulate mining operations and help us better understand their environmental impacts.
October 25, 2017
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Mass Bleaching is Hitting the Great Barrier Reef Again
After suffering through the most severe bleaching event ever recorded last year, the Great Barrier Reef is once again being savaged by a marine heat wave.
March 10, 2017
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Massachusetts May Overlook Climate Impacts of Biofuels
Massachusetts is considering a plan that would classify wood pellets and other tree products as sources of renewable energy, allowing the logging industry to contribute to the state's climate goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions.
August 7, 2017
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Measurements by school pupils paved way for key research findings on lakes and global warming
With their measurements and samples, nearly 3,500 schoolchildren have assisted a research study on lakes and global warming. the results show that water temperatures generally remain low despite the air becoming warmer. this helps to curb the emission of greenhouse gases.
March 10, 2017
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Mechanochemistry paves the way to higher quality perovskite photovoltaics
For several years, tension has been rising in line with the approaching commercialization of perovskite photovoltaic cells. Now, there has been another small earthquake: it turns out that devices based on these materials can convert solar energy into electricity even more efficiently!
November 7, 2017
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Megafaunal extinctions driven by too much moisture
Studies of bones from Ice Age megafaunal animals across Eurasia and the Americas have revealed that major increases in environmental moisture occurred just before many species suddenly became extinct around 11-15,000 years ago. the persistent moisture resulting from melting permafrost and glaciers caused widespread glacial-age grasslands to be rapidly replaced by peatlands and bogs, fragmenting populations of large herbivore grazers.
April 18, 2017
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Melting snow unleashes toxic cocktail of pollutants into the environment
With spring finally here and warmer temperatures just around the corner, snow will slowly melt away, releasing us from the clutches of winter. However, that's not the only thing that the melting snow will release. Researchers from McGill University and ecole de technologie superieure in Montreal have found that urban snow accumulates a toxic cocktail from car emissions - pollutants that are in turn unleashed into the environment as the weather warms up.
April 4, 2017
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Metal-ion catalysts and hydrogen peroxide could green up plastics production
Researchers are contributing to the development of more environmentally friendly catalysts for the production of plastic and resin precursors that are often derived from fossil fuels. The key to their technique comes from recognizing the unique physical and chemical properties of certain metals and how they react with hydrogen peroxide.
June 5, 2017
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Metallic Nanostructures Could Triple the Efficiency of Solar-Based Hydrogen Fuel Generation
Hydrogen gas is a vital synthetic feedstock that is set to contribute considerably in renewable energy technology. While this is true, its capabilities are underplayed because most of this gas is presently being sourced from fossil fuels, for example natural gas.
August 29, 2017
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Methane emissions from trees
Tree trunks act as methane source in upland forests
March 30, 2017
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Methane emissions tackled with gas-guzzling bacteria
Methane-oxidizing bacteria -- key organisms responsible for greenhouse gas mitigation -- are more flexible and resilient than previously thought, an international research has shown.
August 30, 2017
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Methane from tundra, ocean floor didn't spike during previous natural warming period
The last ice age transition to a warmer climate some 11,500 years ago did not include massive methane flux from marine sediments or the tundra, new research suggests. Instead, the likely source of rising levels of atmospheric methane was from tropical wetlands, authors of the new study say.
August 23, 2017
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Methane hydrate dissociation off Spitsbergen not caused by climate change
Post-glacial processes as main reason
January 8, 2018
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Methane hydrate is not a smoking gun in the Arctic Ocean
Methane hydrate under the ocean floor was assumed to be very sensitive to increasing ocean temperatures. But a new study shows that short term warming of the Arctic ocean barely affects it.
August 22, 2017
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Methane levels have increased in Marcellus Shale region despite dip in well installation
Researchers find elevated levels of the greenhouse gas over the last 3 years
February 9, 2017
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Methane-eating microbes may reduce release of gases as Antarctic ice sheets melt
A lake beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet contains large amounts of methane. New research describes how methane-eating microbes may keep the climate-warming gas from entering the atmosphere.
July 31, 2017
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Methane-munching microbes living in the deep biosphere for 400 million years: An analogue for extra-terrestrial life
It is becoming more and more appreciated that a major part of the biologic activity is not going on at the ground surface, but is hidden underneath the soil down to depths of several kilometres in an environment coined the "deep biosphere". Studies of life-forms in this energy-poor system have implications for the origin of life on our planet and for how life may have evolved on other planets, where hostile conditions may have inhibited colonization of the surface environment.
May 9, 2017
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Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula reveals a cryptic methane-fueled ecosystem in flooded caves
In the underground rivers and flooded caves of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, where Mayan lore described a fantastical underworld, scientists have found a cryptic world in its own right.
November 28, 2017
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Miami Just Had Its Hottest Month on Record
Summers in Miami are always hot and humid, but this summer has been one for the record books. July was the hottest month ever recorded for the city, with temperature archives going back to 1896, and capped off what has been the hottest year-to-date.
July 31, 2017
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Microbes measure ecological restoration success
The success of ecological restoration projects around the world could be boosted using a potential new tool that monitors soil microbes, say scientists.
March 14, 2017
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Microbial ecosystem at Laguna La Brava may contain novel microorganisms
Lack of cyanobacteria suggests other microorganisms may be precipitating minerals
November 15, 2017
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Microgrids: Energy independence (and money saved) for companies
Microgrids and their related renewable energy can help businesses shave energy costs and bolster the aging infrastructure
April 17, 2017
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Microreactor made to study formation of methane hydrate
Team is now able to measure how by how much transport phenomena affect crystal propagation rates
August 22, 2017
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Microsoft announces AI for Earth, to help "solve global environmental challenges"
Last year, Microsoft announced the formation of a new Artificial Intelligence and Research Group, with over 5,000 computer scientists. At the time, the company said it intended to "build the world's most powerful AI supercomputer with Azure and make it available to anyone, to enable people and organizations to harness its power".
July 12, 2017
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Microsoft announces one of the largest wind deals in the Netherlands with Vattenfall
Microsoft will purchase 100 percent of the wind energy generated by project in Wieringermeer Polder
November 2, 2017
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Microsoft commits $50 million to its AI for Earth program
Back in June, Microsoft announced its AI for Earth program, an initiative to help "solve global environmental challenges". This included offering AI tools, technologies, and cloud-based resources to researchers and organizations, in order to find solutions to issues related to biodiversity, climate change, and water.
December 11, 2017
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Microsoft launches AI for Earth to give $2M in services to environmental projects
After helping to launch the Partnership on AI with Google, Facebook and others; and doubling down on AI research, today Microsoft unveiled a new initiative that points to how it plans to target specific verticals in what can potentially be a very nebulous field -- while also raising the public image of AI as some grow concerned about the implications of its encroaching influence.
July 12, 2017
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Microsoft Pledges $50M to Fight Climate Change With AI
Microsoft last week announced a $50 million investment to help fight climate change with artificial intelligence.
December 19, 2017
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Microsoft pledges another $50 million for its AI for Earth initiative
Microsoft pushing forward with another investment in its AI for Earth program.
December 11, 2017
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Microsoft puts $50 million into fighting climate change with AI
The tech giant seeks to use AI to convert massive amounts of raw data about climate, water, agriculture and biodiversity into useful information.
December 18, 2017
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Microsoft wants to tackle environmental issues with new AI for Earth program
As part of its extensive efforts with artificial intelligence (AI), Microsoft today announced a new "AI for Earth" program. Through the program, Microsoft is hoping to leverage AI to help solve some of the "biggest environmental challenges of our time."
July 12, 2017
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Migration to America took long enough for evolution to happen on the way
Similarities in Native American genomes suggest adaptation in ancient history
February 17, 2017
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Millennials regret opioid use, prefer lifestyle changes to manage pain
Often spending their days hunched over phones, tablets or computers and their free time at spin class or playing sports, millennials are the next generation poised to experience chronic pain. Even at their young age, millennials say acute and chronic pain are already interfering with their quality of life.
August 30, 2017
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Mimicking two natural energy processes with a single catalyst
Researchers produce metal complex catalyst that can perform as both a fuel cell and a solar cell
October 11, 2017
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MIT engineers devise automated approach to monitor neurons
Recording electrical signals from inside a neuron in the living brain can reveal a great deal of information about that neuron's function and how it coordinates with other cells in the brain. However, performing this kind of recording is extremely difficult, so only a handful of neuroscience labs around the world do it.
August 30, 2017
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Models, observations not so far apart on planet's response to greenhouse gas emissions
How hot our planet will become for a given amount of greenhouse gases is a key number in climate change. as the calculation of how much warming is locked in by a given amount of emissions, it is crucial for global policies to curb global warming.
April 20, 2017
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Modern alchemy creates luminescent iron molecules
Scientists have made the first iron-based molecule capable of emitting light. this could contribute to the development of affordable and environmentally friendly materials for e.g. solar cells, light sources and displays.
March 30, 2017
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MOF nanomaterials show promise for chillers
About 15 percent of all energy usage in the U.S. goes toward cooling. New research from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory may ultimately help lower energy consumption for air conditioning by engineering tiny porous materials to hold onto a large amount of refrigerant gases.
July 28, 2017
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MOFs provide a better way to remove water from gas
The conventional view that metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) cannot be stable in water has been overturned by the development of an MOF that can selectively and effectively adsorb water to dry gas streams.
May 18, 2017
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Molecular system for artificial photosynthesis
A molecular system for artificial photosynthesis is designed to mimic key functions of the photosynthetic center in green plants -- light absorption, charge separation, and catalysis -- to convert solar energy into chemical energy stored by hydrogen fuel.
June 2, 2017
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Molecules form gels to help cells sense and respond to stress
Specific protein is highly sensitive to threatening changes in the cell's environment and triggers a reversible, adaptive phase separation process
March 9, 2017
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More Evidence Exxon Misled The Public About Climate Change
Two years ago, Inside Climate News and Los Angeles Times investigations found that while Exxon Mobil internally acknowledged that climate change is man-made and serious, it publicly manufactured doubt about the science.
August 23, 2017
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More Heatwaves Ahead
Without interventions, three-quarters of planet's inhabitants will suffer, study suggest
June 19, 2017
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More Hot Days Are Coming With Climate Change. Our Choices Will Decide How Many
Summer still has a month to go, but extreme heat has been a major storyline through June and July. Sweltering temperatures have grounded planes, sparked wildfires and set records from coast-to-coast.
August 3, 2017
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More iron in lakes is making them brown, study shows
The iron concentration in lakes is increasing in many parts of northern Europe. This has been shown in a study in which researchers in Sweden examined 23 years of data from 10 countries. High iron levels contribute to browner water; furthermore, iron binds environmental toxins such as lead and arsenic.
October 23, 2017
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More-severe climate model predictions could be the most accurate
The climate models that project greater amounts of warming this century are the ones that best align with observations of the current climate, according to a article. Their findings suggest that the models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, on average, may be underestimating future warming.
December 6, 2017
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Mosses used to evaluate atmospheric conditions in urban areas
Researchers have developed a method to evaluate atmospheric conditions using mosses (bryophytes) in urban areas, a development that could facilitate broader evaluations of atmospheric environments.
August 16, 2017
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Most groundwater is ancient but contains surprising human fingerprint
Tritium from atomic bombs detected in half of "fossil' aquifers.
April 27, 2017
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Motorized molecules driven by light to cut into cancer cells
Researchers have developed a novel technique where molecules would be motorized using light and these would be used to drill holes in the membranes of individual cells such as the cancer cells. This could bring the treatment molecule into the cancer cell directly and cause them to die.
August 30, 2017
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Mysterious double 'whirlpools' are popping up in the ocean
These rare masses of water may capture small critters while on the move.
December 26, 2017
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Mysterious geoglyphs can teach us about the Amazon's past---and its worrisome future
Enormous shapes etched onto the Earth
February 8, 2017
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Misc. - N

Nano-sized hydrogen storage system increases efficiency
Lawrence Livermore scientists have collaborated with an interdisciplinary team of researchers including colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories to develop an efficient hydrogen storage system that could be a boon for hydrogen powered vehicles.
February 24, 2017
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Nanocatalyst cleans toxic nitrates from drinking water
Engineers at Rice University's Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT) Center have found a catalyst that cleans toxic nitrates from drinking water by converting them into air and water.
January 5, 2018
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Nanocomposite material uses solar energy to remove man-made dye pollutants from water
A novel composite material has been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University which shows promise as a catalyst for the degradation of environmentally-harmful synthetic dye pollutants, which are released at a rate of nearly 300,000 tonnes a year into the world's water.
June 29, 2017
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Nanocubes of this metal can generate fuel from CO2 using only sunlight
Researchers from Duke University have discovered a way to use nanocubes of rhodium as a cheap solar-powered catalyst, converting carbon dioxide into methane quickly and with high efficiency. the development stands to see use in fields as diverse as space travel and environmental chemistry.
March 7, 2017
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Nanoengineered solar steam generation devices
Engineers at the University of Maryland have created a new technological solution to the pressing global challenge of water scarcity by creating a suite of solar steam generation devices that are at once efficient, easily accessible, environmentally friendly, biodegradable, and extremely low cost.
October 10, 2017
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Nanoengineers squeeze every drop of fresh water from waste brine
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside have developed a new way to recover almost 100 percent of the water from highly concentrated salt solutions. The system will alleviate water shortages in arid regions and reduce concerns surrounding high salinity brine disposal, such as hydraulic fracturing waste.
May 29, 2017
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Nanoleaf Aurora review: the coolest lights on the whole damn planet
It turns out the smart lights I've wanted all along aren't lightbulb shaped.
March 17, 2017
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Nanopore filter may be a match for fracking water
A new superhydrophilic filter has proven able to remove greater than 90 per cent of hydrocarbons, as well as all bacteria and particulates from contaminated water produced by hydraulic fracturing (fracking) operations at shale oil and gas wells, according to researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute at Swansea University in collaboration with researchers at Rice University.
September 25, 2017
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Nanostructured dark materials squeeze green fuel from sunlight
Hydrogen gas, an important synthetic feedstock, is poised to play a key role in renewable energy technology; however, its credentials are undermined because most is currently sourced from fossil fuels, such as natural gas.
August 28, 2017
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NASA Animation offers a Freakishly Accurate Look at this Year's Coast-to-Coast Eclipse
On August 21st, a shadow produced by a total solar eclipse will travel from the USA's Pacific coast right through to the Atlantic coast–something that hasn't happened in nearly 100 years. a new NASA animation shows where you'll need to be to catch this once-in-a-lifetime event.
January 5, 2017
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NASA Satellite Reveals Source of El Niño-Fueled Carbon Dioxide Spike
For every ton of carbon dioxide emitted by a power plant's smokestack or a car's exhaust pipe, some portion will stay in the Earth's atmosphere, raising global temperatures, while the rest is absorbed by the oceans or ecosystems on land.
October 12, 2017
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NASA satellite tracks ozone pollution by monitoring its key ingredients
Ozone pollution near Earth's surface is one of the main ingredients of summertime smog. It is also not directly measurable from space due to the abundance of ozone higher in the atmosphere, which obscures measurements of surface ozone.
November 6, 2017
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NASA's CO2-Tracking Satellite Deconstructs Earth's Carbon Cycle
This much scientists know: Humans pump about 40 billion tons of CO2 into the atmosphere every year. Less clear is where the planet puts it.
October 12, 2017
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National Park Service Changes Its Tune, Ends Ban On Disposable Water Bottle Sales In Parks
In a move meant to "expand hydration options" for visitors to national parks, the National Park Service is reversing a six-year-old policy that allowed parks to ban the sale of bottled water.
August 17, 2017
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Natural gas facilities with no carbon dioxide emissions
How can we burn natural gas without releasing carbon dioxide (CO2) into the air? This feat is achieved using a special combustion method: chemical looping combustion (CLC). In this process, CO2 can be isolated during combustion without having to use any additional energy, which means it can then go on to be stored. This prevents it from being released into the atmosphere.
May 24, 2017
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Neighborhoods subjected to deadly air quality can finally fight Back
New Devices Let Citizen Scientists Detect Local Pollutants
May 11, 2017
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Nearly ideal performing regions in perovskite films could boost solar cells
Solar cells made from specialized compounds, with the crystal structure of the mineral perovskite, have captured scientists' imaginations. The cells are inexpensive and easy to make.
May 30, 2017
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New additive allows two most common plastics to be recycled together
A linker molecule brings together two otherwise unrelated plastics.
February 27, 2017
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New analysis shows Brazil slows deforestation with land registration program
Brazil's environmental land registration program has been successful in slowing down the rate of deforestation on private land, according to a new study.
November 1, 2017
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New biofuel technology significantly cuts production time
New research from a professor of engineering at UBC's Okanagan Campus might hold the key to biofuels that are cheaper, safer and much faster to produce.
July 12, 2017
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New breakthrough makes it easier to turn old coffee waste into cleaner biofuels
Future Americano, cappuccino and latte drinkers could help produce the raw material for a greener biofuel that would reduce our reliance on diesel from fossil fuels.
May 10, 2017
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New breed of supermolecule 'hunts down' harmful drugs, removes them from water
An effective, environmentally friendly way to monitor and remove pharmaceuticals from water has been discovered by a team of scientists.
April 10, 2017
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New carbon nanotube-reinforced filters remove heavy metal toxins from water
A newly developed filter, which removes more than 99 percent of heavy metal toxins from water, shows potential for water remediation in developing nations around the world.
July 27, 2017
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New carbon nitride material coupled with ruthenium enhances visible-light CO2 reduction in water
A hybrid photocatalyst exhibits specifically high activity for the reductive conversion reaction of carbon dioxide to formic acid under visible light irradiation, new research has found.
June 13, 2017
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New catalyst for making fuels from shale gas
Methane in shale gas can be turned into hydrocarbon fuels using an innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst, according to new research.
January 8, 2018
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New catalyst paves way for carbon neutral fuel
Scientists have paved the way for carbon neutral fuel with the development of a new efficient catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air into synthetic natural gas in a 'clean' process using solar energy.
June 21, 2017
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New coral bleaching database to help predict fate of global reefs
A research team has developed a new global coral bleaching database that could help scientists predict future bleaching events. the new database contains 79 percent more reports than previous, widely used voluntary databases.
May 1, 2017
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New efficient catalyst for key step in artificial photosynthesis
Process sets free protons and electrons that can be used to make fuels
October 3, 2017
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New electrochemical method can remove extremely low levels of pollutants from water
When it comes to removing very dilute concentrations of pollutants from water, existing separation methods tend to be energy- and chemical-intensive. Now, a new method developed at MIT could provide a selective alternative for removing even extremely low levels of unwanted compounds.
May 10, 2017
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New Findings Show How Climate Change Is Influencing India's Farmer Suicides
A suicide epidemic among India's farmers has shaken the country and contributed to a doubling of the nation's suicide rate since 1980.
August 11, 2017
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New fractal-like concentrating solar power receivers are better at absorbing sunlight
Sandia National Laboratories engineers have developed new fractal-like, concentrating solar power receivers for small- to medium-scale use that are up to 20 percent more effective at absorbing sunlight than current technology.
October 25, 2017
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New light-activated catalyst grabs CO2 to make ingredients for fuel
Scientists have developed a light-activated material that can chemically convert carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide without generating unwanted byproducts. The achievement marks a significant step forward in developing technology that could help generate fuel and other energy-rich products using a solar-powered catalyst while mitigating levels of a potent greenhouse gas.
July 28, 2017
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New liquid-metal membrane technology may help make hydrogen fuel cell vehicles viable
While cars powered by hydrogen fuel cells offer clear advantages over the electric vehicles that are growing in popularity (including their longer range, their lower overall environmental impact, and the fact that they can be refueled in minutes, versus hours of charging time), they have yet to take off with consumers.
August 28, 2017
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New mechanism mediating environment-microbe-host interactions
Researchers have uncovered a new mechanism showing how microbes can alter the physiology of the organisms in which they live.
April 24, 2017
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New membrane makes separating methane and carbon dioxide more efficient
To make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the carbon dioxide. This involves the use of membranes: filters that stop the methane and let the CO2 pass through. Researchers in Belgium have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much more effective.
October 18, 2017
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New metamaterial can cool roofs, structures with zero energy consumption
A team of University of Colorado Boulder engineers has developed a scalable manufactured metamaterial -- an engineered material with extraordinary properties not found in nature -- to act as a kind of air conditioning system for structures. It has the ability to cool objects even under direct sunlight with zero energy and water consumption.
February 9, 2017
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New method can selectively remove micropollutants from water
When it comes to removing very dilute concentrations of pollutants from water, existing separation methods tend to be energy- and chemical-intensive. Now, a new method developed at MIT could provide a selective alternative for removing even extremely low levels of unwanted compounds.
May 10, 2017
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New method can selectively remove micropollutants from water
Electrochemical method can remove even tiny amounts of contamination.
May 10, 2017
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New nano photocatalyst speeds up the conversion of carbon dioxide into chemical resources
DGIST's joint research team has developed a new titania photocatalyst that converts carbon dioxide into methane three times more efficiently than the existing photocatalyst by manipulating its surface (Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, "Efficient solar light photoreduction of CO2 to hydrocarbon fuels via magnesiothermally reduced TiO2 photocatalyst").
May 26, 2017
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New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater
Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions
October 4, 2017
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New Off-Grid Desalination NanoTechnology Uses Solar Energy to Convert Salt Water into Drinking Water
An off-grid technology using only the energy from sunlight to transform salt water into fresh drinking water has been developed as an outcome of the effort from a federally funded research.
June 19, 2017
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New plastic banknote plans now upsetting environmental campaigners
This time it's palm oil instead of a single dead cow
March 30, 2017
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New polymer additive could revolutionize plastics recycling
When Geoffrey Coates, a professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Cornell University, gives a talk about plastics and recycling, he usually opens with this question: what percentage of the 78 million tons of plastic used for packaging - for example, a 2-liter bottle or a take-out food container - actually gets recycled and re-used in a similar way?
February 24, 2017
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New report gives the lay of the land on grazing livestock's climate impact
An international research collaboration has shed light on the impact that grass-fed animals have on climate change. Its new study adds clarity to the debate around livestock farming and meat and dairy consumption.
October 3, 2017
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New self-sustained multi-sensor platform for environmental monitoring
A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has engineered a self-sustaining sensor platform to continuously monitor the surrounding environment without having an external power source.
April 24, 2017
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New self-sustained multi-sensor platform for environmental monitoring
A research team has engineered a self-sustaining sensor platform to continuously monitor the surrounding environment without having an external power source.
May 4, 2017
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New standards for better water quality in Europe
Researchers present recommendations for revision of the EU Water Framework Directive
February 27, 2017
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New study: We're outpacing the most radical climate event we know of
Lots of carbon got dumped into the atmosphere 56 million years ago.
August 31, 2017
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New tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
The rollout of Sweden's first wireless charging buses earlier this month was coupled with something the rest of the world could use -- namely, a tool for cities to determine the environmental and financial benefits of introducing their own electrified bus networks.
January 9, 2017
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New York City isn't ready for the catastrophic floods in its future
We're running out of time to figure this out.
December 19, 2017
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New York City's closest nuclear power plant will close in five years
The plant wasn't making enough money to stay open
January 6, 2017
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New York City's future storm risk dominated by sea level rise
New analysis says hurricanes will mostly pass offshore as oceans keep rising.
October 24, 2017
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Next-gen solar cells could be improved by atomic-scale redesign
Researchers have uncovered the exact mechanism that causes new solar cells to break down in air, paving the way for a solution.
May 12, 2017
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Nitrogen fixation research could shed light on biological mystery
New process could make fertilizer production more sustainable
May 30, 2017
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Nitrogen oxide from diesel vehicles killed a lot of people in 2015, study says
Real-world testing and more stringent regulations would turn those numbers around.
May 15, 2017
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NOAA predicts an above average hurricane season for 2017
Get ready now.
May 26, 2017
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NOAA Predicts More Hurricanes Than Usual This Year
Stock up on your canned beans and galoshes, folks: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook dropped this morning, and for the first time in years, the weather monitoring agency is predicting more hurricanes than average.
May 25, 2017
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NOAA's new Satellite Sent back Its First Amazing Images
The GOES-R satellite was one of the most eagerly anticipated satellites in recent memory. the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration launched it in November 2016 with the promise to revolutionize weather forecasting in the U.S.
January 23, 2017
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Non-native species do not make native fish more vulnerable to pollution in Mediterranean rivers
The presence of exotic fish in rivers does not alter the native fish response to the environmental pollution, according to an article.
October 25, 2017
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Non-toxic flame retardant enters market, study suggests
Chemists have developed and patented an environmentally friendly way to produce flame retardants for foams that can be used in mattresses and upholstery. Unlike previous flame retardants made of chemicals containing chlorine, the new material is non-toxic and effective, researchers say.
September 28, 2017
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Norway leads the way in CO2 capture
This week, scientists from all over the world meet in Trondheim to learn about the technology of CO2 capture.
June 14, 2017
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Now climate change is coming for our sea turtles
Frigid winter waters and scorching beaches could put them in peril, but people are fighting back.
August 11, 2017
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Nuclear power plant north of New York City to close by 2021
Power plant has been a cause of concern, greenhouse gas-free source for years.
January 9, 2017
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Nuclear power policy in the '80s caused low birth weights after coal stepped in
Researcher says a more measured approach to nuclear fears may have produced better outcomes.
April 3, 2017
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Misc. - O

Of course, all our plastic crap ends up in the Arctic
It isn't freaking Narnia
April 21, 2017
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Off-grid power in remote areas will require special business model to succeed
Low-cost, off-grid solar energy could provide significant economic benefit to people living in some remote areas, but a new study suggests they generally lack the access to financial resources, commercial institutions and markets needed to bring solar electricity to their communities.
January 6, 2017
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Oil and gas wells as a strong source of greenhouse gases
New study demonstrates methane leaks around North Sea boreholes
August 28, 2017
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Oil fields: Alternative to wasteful methane flaring
Reactor could save energy, lower carbon footprint
August 1, 2017
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Oil giant Shell calls for move to clean energy
Fossil fuel industry admits it must address global warming
March 10, 2017
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Once they start composting, people find other ways to be 'green'
With new city program, residents increased energy, water conservation
December 5, 2017
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One of the largest icebergs ever is about to break off Antarctica
2,500 square miles, about the size of Delaware
July 5, 2017
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One source of potent greenhouse gas pinned down
Results suggest more methane may be released into atmosphere than thought
November 20, 2017
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Only An End to Global Warming can Save the Great Barrier Reef
The survival of the Great Barrier Reef hinges on urgent moves to cut global warming because nothing else will protect coral from the coming cycle of mass bleaching events, new research has found.
March 21, 2017
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Optical fingerprint can reveal pollutants in the air
More efficient sensors are needed to be able to detect environmental pollution. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have proposed a new, sophisticated method of detecting molecules with sensors based on ultra-thin nanomaterials. the novel method could improve environmental sensing in the future.
March 15, 2017
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Optimal amount of rainfall for plants
Researchers have determined what could be considered a 'Goldilocks' climate for rainfall use by plants: not too wet and not too dry. But those landscapes are likely to shrink and become less productive in the future through climate change.
December 6, 2017
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Order Anti-Air Pollution Smart Masks For the Whole Family
In late 1990, President George H. W. Bush signed into law the Clean Air Act, designed to curb major threats to humans and the environment.
June 19, 2017
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Ore Systems Consulting
geological consulting firm specializing in VMS deposits.
Provides a Service
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Our rivers and lakes contain a scary number of pesticides and pharmaceuticals
And they only tested for a fraction of the 85,000 known chemicals
April 12, 2017
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Misc. - P

Pacific Island countries could lose 50 -- 80% of fish in local waters under climate change
Many Pacific Island nations will lose 50 to 80 percent of marine species in their waters by the end of the 21st century if climate change continues unchecked, finds a new study. This area of the ocean is projected to be the most severely impacted by aspects of climate change.
November 15, 2017
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Paintings, sunspots and frost fairs: Rethinking the Little Ice Age
The whole concept of the 'Little Ice Age' is 'misleading,' as the changes were small-scale, seasonal and insignificant compared with present-day global warming, a group of solar and climate scientists argue.
April 4, 2017
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Panning for nanosilver in laundry wastewater
Silver nanoparticles are being used in clothing for their anti-odor abilities but some of this silver comes off when the clothes are laundered. The wastewater from this process could end up in the environment, possibly harming aquatic life, so researchers have attempted to recover the silver.
December 20, 2017
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Park rangers recall their most dangerous encounters with nature
Daring tales from the field.
June 29, 2017
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Participating in #NoRedOctober is good. Meatless Mondays are better.
It's just basic math.
October 4, 2017
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Past and future of sea ice cover in the Arctic
Despite the high temperatures, geologists and climate researchers find evidence that there was sea ice at the North Pole during the last interglacial
August 29, 2017
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Peacock colors inspire 'greener' way to dye clothes
"Fast fashion" might be cheap, but its high environmental cost from dyes polluting the water near factories has been well documented. to help stem the tide of dyes from entering streams and rivers, scientists report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a nonpolluting method to color textiles using 3-D colloidal crystals.
February 1, 2017
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Periodic table of ecological niches could aid in predicting effects of climate change
A group of ecologists has started creating a periodic table of ecological niches similar to chemistry's periodic table. It will be a critical resource for scientists seeking to understand how a warming climate may be spurring changes in species around the globe.
August 31, 2017
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Petrified tree rings tell ancient tale of sun's behavior
Variations in growth rate match today's 11-year solar cycle, study claims
January 17, 2017
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Plant pollen and fungal spores can be found at variable elevations, study shows
Plant pollen and fungal spores can be found at variable heights in the air, even at elevations up to 2000 meters. this is the conclusion of a report by researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Technical University of Munich together with Greek colleagues, which was published in the journal 'Scientific Reports'. Hitherto it was assumed that such allergens are mainly present close to where they are released, namely near ground level.
April 3, 2017
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Plants Are Gobbling Up Our Carbon Emissions, But not Fast Enough
It's one of the biggest mysteries in this global experiment we're conducting by pouring 10 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year: What'll happen to the plants? will the relentless burning of fossil fuels prompt our leafy green friends to suck down more CO2, tapping the brakes on climate change? Or are the trees unable to bail Earth's atmosphere out this mess?
April 7, 2017
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Plot twist in methane mystery blames chemistry, not emissions, for recent rise
Falling levels of a molecule that destroys the greenhouse gas may be behind increasing concentrations since 2007
April 20, 2017
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Policies to curb short-lived climate pollutants could yield major health benefits
Controlling soot, methane, hydrofluorocarbons would yield immediate effects
May 4, 2017
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Pollutants in the Arctic environment are threatening polar bear health
A new analysis has found that although the risk of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Arctic environment is low for seals, it is two orders of magnitude higher than the safety threshold for adult polar bears and even more (three orders of magnitude above the threshold) for bear cubs fed with contaminated milk.
January 5, 2017
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Pollution from Canada's Oil Sands May be Underreported
Canadian scientists have found that the standard way of tallying air and climate pollution from Alberta's oil sands vastly understates pollution levels there by as much as 4.5 times, according to a Canadian government study published Monday.
April 24, 2017
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Pollution kills nine million people a year
This doesn't feel like progress.
October 23, 2017
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Pollution Tied to 9 Million Deaths Worldwide
Dirty air and water aren't the only culprits, new report says
October 20, 2017
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Poor outlook for biodiversity in Antarctica
The popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world has been brought into question in a new study.
March 29, 2017
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Poplar trees fortified with probiotic effectively clean up polluted sites
Trees have the ability to capture and remove pollutants from the soil and degrade them through natural processes in the plant. It's a feat of nature companies have used to help clean up polluted sites, though only in small-scale projects. Now, a probiotic bacteria for trees can boost the speed and effectiveness of this natural cycle, providing a microbial partner to help protect trees from the toxic effects of the pollutants and break down the toxins plants bring in from contaminated groundwater.
August 14, 2017
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Post-glacial history of Lake of the Woods
The extent and depth of lakes in glaciated regions of North America are controlled by climate and the influence of differential isostatic rebound of the land's surface that began when Pleistocene ice melted from the continent. This relationship and the post-glacial history of Lake of the Woods -- one of the largest lake complexes in North America and the source of water for the city of Winnipeg -- is presented for the first time in a new study by five Canadian researchers.
August 9, 2017
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Potential for Collapse of Key Atlantic Current Rises
The large, looping Atlantic Ocean current that keeps northwestern Europe fairly warm and influences sea levels along the U.S. coast is a key component of the Earth's climate system. But because of global warming, it may be more likely to substantially slow down – or even collapse – than previously thought, according to two new studies.
January 5, 2017
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Potentially explosive methane gas mobile in groundwater, poses safety risk: U of G study
Methane that leaks into atmosphere a powerful greenhouse gas
April 5, 2017
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Precision control of superconductivity in atomic layers using magnetic molecules
A research team led by Shunsuke Yoshizawa, ICYS researcher, NIMS, Takashi Uchihashi, leader of the Surface Quantum Phase Materials Group, MANA, NIMS, Emi Minamitani, assistant professor, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Toshihiko Yokoyama, professor, IMS, NINS, and Kazuyuki Sakamoto, professor, Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, succeeded in precisely controlling the transition temperature of atomic-scale-thick superconductors using magnetic organic molecules.
May 12, 2017
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Predicting insect feeding preferences after deforestation
Understanding how parasitoids and hosts interact, and how their interactions change with human influence, is critically important to understanding ecosystems. New research finds mathematical models can predict complex insect behavioral changes using a simple description of insect preferences.
October 6, 2017
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Predicting the movement and impacts of microplastic pollution
Marine circulation and weather conditions greatly affect microplastic aggregation and movement. Microplastics, which are particles measuring less than 5 mm, are of increasing concern. they not only become more relevant as other plastic marine litter breaks down into tiny particles, they also interact with species in a range of marine habitats.
April 25, 2017
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Presenting facts as 'consensus' bridges conservative-liberal divide over climate change
New evidence shows that 'social facts' highlighting expert consensus changes perceptions across US political spectrum -- particularly among highly educated conservatives. Facts that encourage agreement are a promising way of cutting through today's 'post-truth' bluster, say psychologists.
December 11, 2017
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Preservation of floodplains is flood protection
The silting of rivers and streams leads to problems for fish, mussels, and other aquatic organisms because their habitats disappear. However, not only intensive agriculture and erosion are destroying these habitats. Now a study refutes this widespread view. In order to save the species living in the river basin -- and protect people from the threat of floods -- rivers need more space, diversity, and freedom.
September 27, 2017
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Preventing deforestation might be expensive, but it will cost us more if we don't
Can you put a price on a forest?
December 5, 2017
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Printable solar cells just got a little closer
A University of Toronto Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. this alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator.
February 16, 2017
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Progressive Consulting Engineers, Inc
specializing in the water supply area and providing services to public and private agencies.
Provides a Service
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Project to save the Belize coast provides valuable framework
A coastal zone management plan designed to safeguard Belize's natural assets has produced a win-win opportunity for people and the environment, providing a valuable framework for other coastal nations around the world where overfishing, development, and habitat degradation are increasingly serious problems.
July 27, 2017
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Proposed Illinois coal rule favors cost-cutting over emissions control
What are we optimizing for as the energy grid changes?
September 27, 2017
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Protecting life's tangled ecological webs
By combining biodiversity modelling and network analysis, researchers show how important it is to keep habitats connected
May 9, 2017
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Protein 'intentionally' terminates own synthesis by destabilizing synthesis machinery -- the ribosome
Cell biologists have discovered that a protein, during its synthesis, may destabilize the structure of the ribosome and end its own synthesis prematurely, and found that this phenomenon is used for adapting the cell to its environment.
November 20, 2017
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Puerto Rico in talks with Tesla for batteries; Sonnen to help build microgrids
But few details are available as 90% of the island is still without power.
October 9, 2017
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Pulverizing electronic waste to nanodust is green, clean - and cold
Researchers at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science have an idea to simplify electronic waste recycling: Crush it into nanodust.
March 21, 2017
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Purple plant is on the defensive
Lavender is more than just a nice smelling and calming plant
September 27, 2017
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Misc. - Q

Q&A: Professor Phil Jones
Phil Jones is director of the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia (UEA), which has been at the centre of the row over hacked e-mails.
 
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Quantum reservoir for microwaves
In a recent experiment at EPFL, a microwave resonator, a circuit that supports electric signals oscillating at a resonance frequency, is coupled to the vibrations of a metallic micro-drum. by actively cooling the mechanical motion close to the lowest energy allowed by quantum mechanics, the micro-drum can be turned into a quantum reservoir - an environment that can shape the states of the microwaves.
May 15, 2017
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Misc. - R

Rains from Thunderstorms Rising Rapidly in Europe, Asia
Across a vast swath of Europe and Asia, rain is increasingly falling in the short, localized bursts associated with thunderstorms, seemingly at the expense of events where a steady rain falls over many hours, a new study finds.
January 26, 2017
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Rainstorm generator assesses watershed rainfall under climate change simulations
The Colorado River tumbles through varied landscapes, draining watersheds from seven western states. This 1,450-mile-long system is a critical water supply for agriculture, industry and municipalities from Denver to Tijuana.
October 11, 2017
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Rare Earth element mineral potential in the southeastern US coastal plain
Rare Earth elements have become increasingly important for advanced technologies, from cell phones to renewable energy to defense systems. Mineral resources hosted in heavy mineral sand deposits are especially attractive because they can be recovered using well-established mechanical methods, making extraction, processing, and remediation relatively simple.
May 15, 2017
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Rare earth recycling
Rare earth metals, including the lanthanide series, scandium, and yttrium, are critical components in permanent magnets, electric vehicles, smartphones, and more. the elements occur naturally as mixtures in ores and must be purified prior to use. However, the mining and separation of the mineral ore is challenging, in addition to being energy and waste intensive.
March 15, 2017
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Reactive lignin for reducing the environmental impacts of wood products
Technology known as "CatLignin" has been created to produce reactive lignin from pulp industry side streams to be used as a replacement for toxic phenol compounds in wood adhesives that are widely used in wood products and furniture.
February 14, 2017
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Real-time monitoring of irradiated materials
Technique will enable continuous measurement of damage to materials in high-radiation environments
May 30, 2017
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Recycling air pollution to make art
On a break from his studies in the MIT Media Lab, Anirudh Sharma SM '14 traveled home to Mumbai, India. While there, he noticed that throughout the day his T-shirts were gradually accumulating something that resembled dirt.
November 27, 2017
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Reducing environmental impact of idling buses and delivery trucks
Researchers have developed a system for service vehicles that could reduce emissions and save companies and governments millions of dollars per year in fuel costs.
June 16, 2017
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Remains of early, permanent human settlement in Andes discovered
Examining human remains and other archaeological evidence from a site at nearly 12,500 feet above sea level in Peru, the scientists show that intrepid hunter-gatherers -- men, women and children -- managed to survive at high elevation before the advent of agriculture, in spite of lack of oxygen, frigid temperatures and exposure to elements.
June 28, 2017
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Removing nitrate for healthier ecosystems
For agricultural nitrogen, slow it down, buff it out
September 27, 2017
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Renewable energy generation in the US dramatically exceeds 2012 predictions
It's a testament to falling prices, incentives but also reflects conservative estimates.
May 30, 2017
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Repetition can make sounds into music
New research shows that listeners perceive repeated environmental sounds as music.
December 4, 2017
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Research aims to help renewable jet fuel take flight
Airplanes zoom overhead, wispy-white contrails streaming behind them. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) handled 43,684 flights, on average, every day last year, and U.S. military and commercial flights together used over 20 billion gallons of jet fuel
October 30, 2017
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Research aims to help renewable jet fuel take flight
The International Air Transport Association predicts that 7.2 billion passengers will fly in 2035, nearly doubling the 3.8 billion in 2016. So how do we make flying easier on the environment? Instead of petroleum, researchers have now developed new processes to ramp up production of bio-based fuel made from corncobs and wood chips.
October 30, 2017
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Research in ancient forests show link between climate change and wildfires
Researchers studying centuries-old trees in South America have found a tight correlation between wildfires and a warm weather fluctuation that has become more frequent in recent decades -- and will continue to be more frequent as the climate warms.
August 29, 2017
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Researcher uncovers influence of microorganisms on soil carbon storage
Critical information about tiny organisms under our feet has now been uncovered. Although small, these organisms can have a huge impact on the environment.
January 17, 2017
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Researchers advance asphalt-based filter to sequester greenhouse gas at wellhead
Rice University scientists have found a way to make their asphalt-based sorbents better at capturing carbon dioxide from gas wells: Just add water.
December 11, 2017
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Researchers design coatings to prevent pipeline clogging
A new coating could prevent methane clathrate clogs and blowouts in oil pipelines, potentially stopping a buildup of hydrate ices that slow or block oil and gas flow.
April 14, 2017
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Researchers develop eco-friendly concrete
In the future, wide-ranging composite materials are expected to be stronger, lighter, cheaper and greener for our planet, thanks to an invention by Rutgers' Richard E. Riman.
February 13, 2017
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Researchers develop Innovative Nano-Capillary Rise Model to Decipher Fracking
In the last decades, hydraulic fracturing or "fracking," a method of oil and gas extraction, has taken the global energy industry by storm. In this technique, small gas and oil deposits that are trapped inside stone formations are drawn out by fracturing the rock.
March 22, 2017
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Researchers develop new material that scrubs iodine from water
Researchers at Dartmouth College have developed a new material that scrubs iodine from water for the first time. The breakthrough could hold the key to cleaning radioactive waste in nuclear reactors and after nuclear accidents like the 2011 Fukushima disaster.
June 7, 2017
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Researchers discover potentially harmful nanoparticles produced through burning coal
Environmental scientists led by the Virginia Tech College of Science have discovered that the burning of coal produces incredibly small particles of a highly unusual form of titanium oxide.
August 8, 2017
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Researchers identify cheaper, greener biofuels processing nanocatalyst
Fuels that are produced from nonpetroleum-based biological sources may become greener and more affordable, thanks to research performed at the University of Illinois' Prairie Research Institute that examines the use of a processing catalyst made from palladium metal and bacteria.
August 25, 2017
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Researchers offer novel method for calculating the benefits of renewable energy
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics (HSE) have developed a novel system for assessing the potential of renewable energy resources. this method can help to assess the future exploitable technical potential of wind and solar PV energy, as well as their capacity to replace exiting generation assets.
April 4, 2017
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Researchers offer novel method for calculating the benefits of renewable energy
A novel system for assessing the potential of renewable energy resources has now been developed by researchers. this method can help to assess the future exploitable technical potential of wind and solar PV energy, as well as their capacity to replace exiting generation assets. Furthermore, it can forecast fossil fuel savings and facilitate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.
April 4, 2017
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Researchers roll the dice on perovskite interfaces
Perovskites are a type of mineral and class of materials, and have been attracting a great deal of attention for their potential applications to technologies such as those used in solar cells.
October 26, 2017
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Researchers Review Ways to Enhance Metal-Induced Visible Light Photocatalysis
Photocatalysis through sunlight has been of significant interest to researchers to enable highly efficient solar energy conversion and for challenges in environmental remediation problems.
April 28, 2017
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Researchers say we have three years to act on climate change before it's too late
If we want a smooth transition into a sustainable future, we need to act fast.
June 28, 2017
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Researchers test a cooling system that works without electricity
It looks like a regular roof, but the top of the Packard Electrical Engineering Building at Stanford University has been the setting of many milestones in the development of an innovative cooling technology that could someday be part of our everyday lives. Since 2013, Shanhui Fan, professor of electrical engineering, and his students and research associates have employed this roof as a testbed for a high-tech mirror-like optical surface that could be the future of lower-energy air conditioning and refrigeration.
September 5, 2017
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Researchers working to mimic giant clams to enhance the production of biofuel
Alison Sweeney of the University of Pennsylvania has been studying giant clams since she was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Santa Barbara. These large mollusks, which anchor themselves to coral reefs in the tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans, can grow to up to three-feet long and weigh hundreds of pounds. But their size isn't the only thing that makes them unique.
November 2, 2017
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Researchers Use Confined Nanoparticles to Enhance Hydrogen Storage Materials Performance
The concept of going small to win big was applied in an approach developed by a multilab, interdisciplinary team in which they used nanoparticles and a unique nanoconfinement system to formulate a method to modify hydrogen storage properties.
February 27, 2017
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Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future
A new class of carbon nanotubes could be the next-generation clean-up crew for toxic sludge and contaminated water, say researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology.
March 29, 2017
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Reusable ruthenium-based catalyst could be a game-changer for the biomass industry
Researchers have developed a highly efficient reusable catalyst for the production of primary amines. By cutting the amount of undesired by-products, the catalyst is set to revolutionize the production of bio-based fuels, pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals and more.
September 1, 2017
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Reusable sponge for mitigating oil spills
A new foam called the Oleo Sponge was invented that not only easily adsorbs oil from water but is also reusable and can pull dispersed oil from an entire water column, not just the surface.
May 30, 2017
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Right kind of collaboration is key to solving environmental problems
Society's ability to solve environmental problems is tied to how different actors collaborate and the shape and form of the networks they create, says a new study.
August 18, 2017
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Rising sea levels creating first Native American climate refugees
Rising sea levels and human activities are fast creating a 'worst case scenario' for Native Americans of the Mississippi Delta who stand to lose not just their homes, but their irreplaceable heritage, to climate change.
October 23, 2017
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Risk of tree species disappearing in central Africa 'a major concern,' say researchers
Human disturbance may often be criticized for harming the environment, but new research suggests a persistent lack of human attention in the central African forest could actually cause some tree species to disappear.
January 17, 2017
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Risky business: calculating climate change losses in major European coastal cities
A new study that assesses potential future climate damage to major European coastal cities if, as currently, global carbon emissions continue to track the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's worst emission scenario
March 1, 2017
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River channels on three worlds reveal a history of shifting landscapes
Earth, Mars, and Titan all have channels, but different geologic pasts.
May 19, 2017
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Robotics principles help wave energy converters better absorb power of ocean waves
Compared to wind and solar energy, wave energy has remained relatively expensive and hard to capture, but engineers from Sandia National Laboratories are working to change that by drawing inspiration from other industries.
October 30, 2017
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Samsung Will Announce Renewable Energy Strategy and Target
At Samsung Electronics, we take our environmental responsibilities extremely seriously and know that reducing our impact on the environment is critical for all of our futures.
November 30, 2017
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Samsung's Commitment to the Environment Around the World
Protecting the environment has never been as important to safeguarding our future, and the World Environment Day on June 5 is a day when citizens around the world celebrate the preservation of the earth that we all share. For its part, Samsung Electronics has been making concerted efforts to reduce the environmental impact of its array of world-class products which we shared about here. In addition, Samsung employees around the world are also engaged in various environmental initiatives, and in celebration of World Environment day, we provide a snapshot in this article:
June 5, 2017
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Santa Fe enlists Rubicon Global to curb waste and ramp up recycling
Humans, especially Americans, are kind of slobs. we mess up the Earth by throwing out about 4.5 pounds of garbage per person on average every day. Two-thirds of that waste could be composted, but isn't. and half of the rest of it could be recycled, according to research from the Duke Nicholas School of the Environment, corroborated by studies from the Global Footprint Network and others.
March 17, 2017
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Scientist invents way to trigger artificial photosynthesis to clean air
A chemistry professor in Florida has just found a way to trigger the process of photosynthesis in a synthetic material, turning greenhouse gases into clean air and producing energy all at the same time.
April 25, 2017
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Scientists are enrolling trees in a wet bark contest to understand the effects of ice storms
Making the perfect ice storm.
December 14, 2017
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Scientists are scrutinizing city sewage to study our health
It's not just useless crap.
July 5, 2017
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Scientists should be super modelers
Scholars and conservationists want to aim for the right future to preserve biodiversity and plan sustainable environments. One of those scholars is calling for due diligence to make sure the right data, not conventional wisdom, shapes that target.
December 26, 2017
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Scientists begin to unlock secrets of deep ocean color from organic matter
Picocyanobacteria found to be a substantial source of marine colored dissolved organic matter
May 17, 2017
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Scientists call for more research on how human activities affect the seabed
Extensive research has been released into how industry and environmental change are affecting our seafloors. Researchers say more work is needed to help safeguard these complex ecosystems and the benefits they provide to people for the future.
September 25, 2017
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Scientists Create Graphene Sieve Capable of Turning Sea Water into Drinking Water
There has been considerable attention placed on graphene-oxide membranes as potential candidates for new filtration technologies. Now, researchers at the University of Manchester have successfully created membranes that are capable of sieving common salts.
April 4, 2017
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Scientists engage holography in express estimating impurities in water and lube
Optical engineers from ITMO University in Saint Petersburg developed an express method for estimating the distribution of particles in optically transparent media, based on correlation analysis of holograms. as a big part of the study, they had created an algorithm capable of image processing in a few seconds.
April 20, 2017
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Scientists Engineer Nanomaterial for Efficient Harvesting of Sunlight
In the future, with the help of nanomaterials, sunlight can be used more efficiently to stimulate chemical reactions such as artificial photosynthesis.
March 29, 2017
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Scientists Got a new Look at the Growing Larsen C Crack
It's summer in Antarctica, which has scientists scurrying around the seventh continent carrying out various research experiments. that includes monitoring the massive crack that has spread across the Larsen C ice shelf, located on the Antarctic Peninsula.
February 21, 2017
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Scientists identify a new approach to recycle greenhouse gas
Led by Yilin Hu, UCI assistant professor of molecular biology & biochemistry at the Ayala School of Biological Sciences, the researchers found that they could successfully express the reductase component of the nitrogenase enzyme alone in the bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii and directly use this bacterium to convert CO2 to CO.
January 6, 2017
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Scientists issue new 'Warning to Humanity'
Twenty-five years after the first warning, over 15,000 scientists sign a notice that raises a red flag about overpopulation and environmental destruction.
November 14, 2017
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Scientists Just Confirmed the Great Barrier Reef Bleached
Climate change is putting one of the wonders of the world in a vice. for an unprecedented second year in a row, Great Barrier Reef coral have been decimated by a wave of warm water.
April 10, 2017
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Scientists lay foundations for new type of solar cell
An interdisciplinary team of researchers has laid the foundations for an entirely new type of photovoltaic cell. In this new method, infrared radiation is converted into electrical energy using a different mechanism from that found in conventional solar cells.
January 24, 2017
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Scientists monitor Silicon Valley's underground water reserves -- from space
Aggressive conservation helped the region's aquifer rebound quickly after one of the worst droughts in state history, researchers find
September 25, 2017
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Scientists see electron bottleneck in simulated battery
As the appetite grows for more efficient vehicles and mobile devices based on cleaner, renewable energy sources, so does the demand for batteries that pack more punch, last longer, and charge or discharge more quickly. The compound vanadium pentoxide has grabbed the spotlight as a way to improve lithium-ion batteries. However, it's less-than-stellar behavior has been problematic.
May 30, 2017
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Scientists Sharply Rebut Influential Renewable-Energy Plan
Nearly two dozen researchers critique a proposal for wind, solar, and water power gaining traction in policy circles.
June 19, 2017
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Scientists to EPA head: you don't know what you're talking about
"Just as there is no escaping gravity... there is no escaping the warming."
March 14, 2017
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Scientists: Earth is Screwed
The big push for those people trying to prevent the apocalypse is to limit global climate change to a mere two degrees Celsius. To be clear, this is still absolutely disastrous. Increases of three or even four degrees could happen, but if we can limit it to just two, then we dodge a lot of the really bad stuff. The problem? Well, it seems like that we'll be lucky if it rises by two degrees. Oh boy.
August 1, 2017
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Scientists: Get Used to Wildfires in a Warming World
Communities across the Western U.S. and Canada may have to adapt to living with the ever-increasing threat of catastrophic wildfires as global warming heats up and dries out forests across the West, according to a University of Colorado study published Monday.
April 17, 2017
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Scottish badgers highlight the complexity of species responses to environmental change
In a new study researchers have found that although warmer weather should benefit badger populations, the predicted human population increase in the Scottish highlands is likely to disturb badgers and counteract that effect. These results emphasize the importance of interactive effects and context-dependent responses when planning conservation management under human-induced rapid environmental change.
May 8, 2017
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Sea Ice hits Record Lows at Both Poles
Arctic temperatures have finally started to cool off after yet another winter heat wave stunted sea ice growth over the weekend. the repeated bouts of warm weather this season have stunned even seasoned polar researchers, and could push the Arctic to a record low winter peak for the third year in a row.
February 13, 2017
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Seafood quality may not be adversely affected by future ocean acidification, global warming
The eating qualities of UK oysters may not be adversely affected by future ocean acidification and global warming, new research has suggested.
October 31, 2017
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Seaweed could hold key to environmentally friendly sunscreen
A compound found in seaweed could protect human skin from the damaging impact of the sun without causing harm to marine ecosystems.
December 5, 2017
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Self-cleaning membranes for sustainable desalination
An advanced water treatment membrane made of electrically conductive nanofibers developed at Masdar Institute was highlighted by Dr. Raed Hashaikeh, Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Masdar Institute, in his keynote speech during the 3rd International Conference on Desalination using Membrane Technology held last week in Spain.
April 13, 2017
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Semitransparent and Flexible Solar Cells Created Using Atomically Thin Sheet
A team of Researchers from Tohoku University have formulated an innovative technique for fabricating semitransparent and flexible solar cells with atomically thin 2D materials.
September 26, 2017
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Separating methane and CO2 will become more efficient
To make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the CO2. This involves the use of membranes: filters that stop the methane and let the CO2 pass through. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much more effective.
October 18, 2017
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Severity of North Pacific storms at highest point in over 1,200 years
Warmer tropical waters impact weather from Alaska to Florida
August 23, 2017
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Sharp Rise in Flooding Ahead for World's Poorest
Coastal residents of poor and fast-growing tropical countries face rapid increases in the numbers of once-rare floods they may face as seas rise, with a new statistical analysis offering troubling projections for regions where sea level data is sparse.
May 18, 2017
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Sharp Uptick in Wildfires Strains Great Plains Agencies
The Great Plains had long been spared the agony of frequent wildfires -- until recent years.
June 16, 2017
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Should we mine the deep ocean?
Behind the deep sea "gold rush" for increasingly rare minerals
February 21, 2017
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Shrimp price fluctuations help pinpoint the economic effects of pollution
New method could be useful for quantifying the effects of marine pollution.
February 3, 2017
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Shunned by microbes, organic carbon can resist breakdown in underground environments
Organic matter whose breakdown would yield only minimal energy for hungry microorganisms preferentially builds up in floodplains, illuminating a new mechanism of carbon sequestration, a new study reveals.
May 1, 2017
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Siberian volcanic eruptions caused extinction 250 million years ago, new evidence shows
The Great Permian Extinction, which occurred approximately 250 million years ago, was caused by massive volcanic eruptions that led to significant environmental changes, new evidence shows.
October 2, 2017
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Simple green nanoparticle synthesis is a breath of fresh air
Nanoparticles of controllable composition and size have great potential in electrical, optical and chemical devices, but they must be created in a safe and cost-effective way.
November 6, 2017
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Six irrefutable pieces of evidence that prove climate change is real
Here's everything you need to know
March 9, 2017
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Six volcanoes to watch in 2018
Scientists weigh in on where things will heat up.
January 2, 2018
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Small streams have a big influence on our lives
Importance of headwater streams in securing freshwater resources described
August 7, 2017
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Smart buildings: energy efficiency at what price?
Automating heating and other environmental controls can bring huge savings to commercial buildings. to what extent is it possible to achieve the same results in residential homes? what is the difference between so called domotics and inmotics?
February 21, 2017
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Smog-Filtering Screens will Make Our Polluted Future Slightly More Tolerable
As our newly-elected leaders do everything they can to roll back environmental regulations, the future is looking more and more like a smog-filled dystopia. But not all scientific progress has ground to a halt. Scientists at National University of Singapore have created a transparent smog-filtering window screen that could make our lives a little less wheezy.
March 23, 2017
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Solar energy has plunged in price--where does it go from here?
A look forward to how we get to Terawatts of solar power capacity.
April 13, 2017
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Solar energy: Prototype shows how tiny photodetectors can double their efficiency
New research invokes quantum mechanical processes that occur when two atomically thin materials are stacked together
October 9, 2017
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Solar hydrogen production by artificial leafs: Scientists analysed how a special treatment improves cheap metal oxide photoelectrodes
Metal oxides are promising candidates for cheap and stable photoelectrodes for solar water splitting, producing hydrogen with sunlight. Unfortunately, metal oxides are not highly efficient in this job. A known remedy is a treatment with heat and hydrogen. Scientists have now discovered why this treatment works so well, paving the way to more efficient and cheap devices for solar hydrogen production.
August 28, 2017
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Solar-Thermal System Purifies 500 Gallons of Water a Day
Easy access to clean water is something that most of us take for granted. for hundreds of millions of people around the globe, however, things are much different.
February 28, 2017
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'Solarsack' cleans water with heat from sunlight, cheaply and effectively
Students have developed "SolarSack" for inexpensive and environmentally friendly water purification. The concept was tested in villages, refugee camps and slums in East Africa where it will be marketed.
June 26, 2017
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Some Google StreetView Cars Now Tracking Pollution
While we've grown used to the idea of Google's StreetView cars zooming around town snapping photos for mapping purposes, some of those vehicles have been equipped with a pollution monitoring system to help researchers get a better picture of what is in the air we breathe every day.
June 5, 2017
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Some marine species more vulnerable to climate change than others
Certain marine species will fare much worse than others as they become more vulnerable to the effects of climate change, a new study has found.
September 26, 2017
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South Asia could face deadly heat and humidity by the end of this century
Climate predictions show extreme future temperatures in India and Pakistan
August 2, 2017
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Space weather model simulates solar storms from nowhere
A kind of solar storm has puzzled scientists for its lack of typical warning signs: they seem to come from nowhere, and scientists call them stealth CMEs. Now, scientists have developed a model simulating their evolution.
May 8, 2017
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Special star is a Rosetta Stone for understanding the sun's variability and climate effect
Scientists have found a star that can help shed light on the physics underlying the solar dynamo. Researchers combined observations from the Kepler spacecraft with ground-based observations as far back as 1978, thereby reconstructing a 7.4-year cycle in this star. The star is almost identical to the Sun, except for the chemical composition. That makes it a Rosetta Stone for the study of stellar dynamos.
January 5, 2018
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Sponges innocent of producing a toxic industrial chemical
We now know whodunnit, but we have no idea why this toxin is being made.
March 28, 2017
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States Betting on Giant Batteries to Cut Carbon
Some states and electric power companies are rolling out a new weapon against fossil fuels -- giant batteries.
June 28, 2017
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Stop pretending that all Americans could ever go vegan
There are more realistic ways to combat climate change.
November 16, 2017
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Street lamps are hurting pollination by distracting insects
And pollination during the day can't compensate
August 2, 2017
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Strengthening citric fruit to better resist climate change
Researchers have identified the genes within citric fruit that biotechnology could improve to face climate change. Work is progressing in the understanding of the signaling pathway of a plant hormone that will make plants more resistant to stress by flooding.
January 5, 2018
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Strong interaction between herbivores and plants
New study reveals an important mechanism responsible for biodiversity in natural ecosystems
March 23, 2017
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Study employs dye to identify lost ocean microplastics
A study conducted at the University of Warwick found a novel, inexpensive and innovative technique using a fluorescent dye to effectively identify the smallest microplastics in oceans, which go largely undetected and are potentially harmful.
November 28, 2017
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Study refutes findings behind challenge to Sierra Nevada forest restoration
Ecologists have found significant flaws in the research used to challenge the US Forest Service plan to restore Sierra Nevada forests to less dense, and less fire-prone, environments.
May 9, 2017
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Study reveals ways collegiate sports venues can achieve 'zero waste'
A new study analyzing waste and recyclables during Mizzou's 2014 home football season demonstrates that by implementing several recommendations the team developed, such as offering better recycling receptacles and better sorting options for waste, sporting venues could be well on their way to achieving environmental benefits that exceed the standards for 'zero-waste' operations.
August 31, 2017
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Study settles prehistoric puzzle, confirms modern link of carbon dioxide and global warming
Fossil leaves from Africa resolve a prehistoric climate puzzle and confirm the link between carbon dioxide and global warming. Research previously found conflicting data on high carbon levels and its link to climate change about 22 million years ago. But a new study found the link existed then as now. The finding sheds light on recent and future increases in atmospheric carbon and its impact on our planet.
November 14, 2017
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Successful prediction of multi-year US droughts and wildfire risk
Longer-term forecasts will benefit agriculture and natural resource management
August 1, 2017
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Summer could be one long heatwave if planet hits 2 degrees Celsius
How heatwaves will change around the world for every 1°C increase in global average temperatures
September 28, 2017
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Summer heat for the winter
Can thermal solar energy be stored until wintertime? Within a European research consortium, scientists have spent four years studying this question by pitting three different techniques against each other.
January 10, 2017
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Sun: Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling
Recent images have revealed the emergence of small-scale magnetic fields in the lower reaches of the corona researchers say may be linked to the onset of a main flare.
March 28, 2017
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Sunlight and 'right' microbes convert Arctic carbon into carbon dioxide
A new study outlines the mechanisms and points to the importance of both sunlight and the right microbial community as keys to converting permafrost carbon to CO2.
October 4, 2017
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Sunnier Skies Driving Greenland Surface Melt
In the past two decades, the Greenland ice sheet has become the biggest single contributor to rising sea levels, mostly from melt across its vast surface. That surface melt is, in turn, driven mostly by an uptick in clear, sunny summer skies, not just rising air temperatures, a new study finds.
June 28, 2017
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Support for tidal energy is high among Washington residents
A new study found that people who believe climate change is a problem and see economic, environmental and/or social benefits to using tidal energy are more likely to support such projects. This is the first US study to look broadly at residents' beliefs and feelings about tidal energy and one of only a few worldwide to take a social science approach to examining this young industry.
May 31, 2017
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Surf and earth: how prawn nanocomposite shopping bags could save the planet
Bioengineers at the University of Nottingham are trialling how to use shrimp shells to make biodegradable shopping bags, as a 'green' alternative to oil-based plastic, and as a new food packaging material to extend product shelf life.
January 10, 2017
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Sustainable irrigation may harm other development goals
Pursuing sustainable irrigation without significant irrigation efficiency gains could negatively impact environmental and development goals in many areas of the world, a new study has found.
October 9, 2017
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Swiss Plant Sucks CO2 Out out of Air to Repackage, Sell
One man's waste is another man's product: A Swiss carbon capture plant has started sucking CO2 out of the air to repackage and sell.
June 2, 2017
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Swiss Voters Embrace Shift to Renewable Energy
Swiss voters backed the government's plan to provide billions of dollars in subsidies for renewable energy, ban new nuclear plants and help bail out struggling utilities in a binding referendum on Sunday.
May 22, 2017
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'Switchable' smart windows reduce energy consumption significantly
Smart windows that act as blinds in the summer and let all the sunlight through in the winter. That's the idea of the reflective windows Hitesh Khandelwal developed during his doctoral research at TU/e, that are able to reflect invisible infrared light but allow visible light through. In addition these windows can be 'switched on and off'. this new technology cuts the energy consumption for cooling and heating buildings by 12%. Khandelwal received his PhD for this innovation, on the basis of organic liquid crystals, on Thursday 11 May at Eindhoven University of Technology.
May 15, 2017
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Sydney Harbor emissions equivalent to 200 cars on the roads
Journal publishes 1st CO2 footprint of growing megacity icon on World Environment Day
June 2, 2017
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Temperature May Affect Pollen Color
While studies on flowers' petal-color variation abound, new research looks at differences in the performance of pollen under varied environmental conditions based on its color.
January 5, 2018
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Temperatures in Alaska Warmed So Fast This Year, NOAA Had to Rewrite its Algorithms
As scientists continue to track changes in global temperature, data from places like Barrow, Alaska is vital. This northern-most United States is on the front lines of global warming, but researchers recently found their data collection was turning up nothing -- no data at all. It turns out the temperatures in barrow warmed so quickly, NOAA's algorithms filtered out all the data because it looked fake.
December 13, 2017
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Temperatures rising: Achieving the global temperature goals laid out in the Paris Climate Agreement is unlikely, according to research
The Paris Climate Agreement of 2016, which saw 195 nations come together in the shared goal of ameliorating climate change, set forth an ambitious goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius. Since then, many have wondered, is that even scientifically possible? Unfortunately, the odds aren't looking good.
August 4, 2017
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Tenfold jump in green tech needed to meet global emissions targets
The global spread of green technologies must quicken significantly to avoid future rebounds in greenhouse gas emissions, a new Duke University study shows.
January 3, 2017
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Tesla becomes utility, battery storage supplier to Hawaii's Kauai
New power station uses 55,000 solar panels to generate 13MW of electricity that's stored in 272 Tesla Powerpack batteries
March 21, 2017
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Tesla Joins Effort to Pair Batteries With Offshore Wind
Tesla and wind farm developer Deepwater Wind are planning to team up to create the largest project in the world that combines an offshore wind farm with large-scale electricity storage, the companies announced Tuesday.
August 1, 2017
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Tesla makes quick work of Puerto Rico hospital solar power relief project
Tesla CEO Elon Musk noted on Twitter that Tesla's solar team could indeed outfit Puerto Rico with power facilities that could be used to generate and store power reserves when the existing grid isn't available, as it has been after the U.S. territory faced the devastation of hurricane Maria.
October 24, 2017
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Tesla opens up preorders for its solar roof
A 2,000-square-foot home with solar roof would cost $50,000 to install
May 10, 2017
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Tesla opens up Solar Roof pre-orders, answers the most important question: how much will it cost you?
Back in October of last year, Tesla unveiled a new project it had been secretly cracking away at behind the scenes: solar roof tiles. Unlike traditional solar panels that sit on top of the roof, these solar tiles would replace your roof outright -- and, if all went to plan, they'd look as good as any other roof. Just... maybe a little shinier.
May 10, 2017
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Tesla starts pre-orders on solar roof for $1,000, rolls out calculator for costs
Tesla is banking on a "fully installed cost' to be attractive to home owners.
May 10, 2017
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Tesla wins bid to build world's largest lithium-ion battery for South Australia
Musk says Tesla can do it in 100 days or it's free
July 7, 2017
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Tesla's Solar Roof gets a price
Tesla is now accepting orders for its Solar Roof, and a calculator on its site can tell you how much yours will cost.
May 10, 2017
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The 2017 hurricane season is finally fading away. But what comes next?
In some ways, this year wasn't as bad as it could have been.
November 13, 2017
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The almond milk craze could be bad news for bees
A new study suggests common fungicides might kill pollinators
March 21, 2017
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The Amazon forest is the result of an 8,000-year experiment
Ancient peoples discovered agriculture by cultivating trees in the Amazon.
March 6, 2017
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The case of the disappearing insect. Boffin tells Reg: We don't know why... but we must act
'It's more dramatic than climate change'
October 20, 2017
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The climate change misinformation at a top museum is not a conservative conspiracy
A sign at the American Museum of Natural History has outdated information about climate change
January 8, 2018
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The conditions to blame for 2017's wildly destructive hurricane season
A perfect storm.
October 2, 2017
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The Creeping, Quiet Gaslighting of the EPA
THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Agency never plays the popular kid in Washington D.C.'s outsize high school drama. But lately, it's been bullied more than usual: President Trump proposed slashing the agency's budget, appointed career EPA-hater Scott Pruitt to lead it, and ordered it to reverse course or delay dozens of numerous ambitious environment-saving, climate change-fighting regulations.
March 9, 2017
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The early Earth wasn't green, but it did recycle itself
Some surprisingly old rocks give scientists a peek into the past
March 22, 2017
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The economics of energy generation are changing; more metrics favor solar, wind
The EIA tries to account for the cost of energy and the cost of replacing energy.
April 28, 2017
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The Ends of the World is a page-turner about mass extinction
Tale of deep geological time feels like a scientifically accurate disaster movie.
September 4, 2017
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The Envirobot robo-eel slithers along the shore for science
The next time you're swimming in Lake Geneva, don't be surprised when you feel something eel-like and yet artificial touch your leg. That would be Envirobot, the latest biomimetic creation from Swiss researchers that autonomously swims around bodies of water and tests them for toxins and other factors.
July 25, 2017
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The environment can become a noninvasive therapeutic approach to bolster white matter health
An 'enriched' environment can improve cognitive function for infants and children
August 22, 2017
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The environmental footprint of your pet is bigger than you think
Sorry, cat and dog lovers
August 4, 2017
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The environmental injustice of beauty
A commentary calls for policies to protect women, especially minority women, from exposure to toxic chemicals in beauty products.
August 16, 2017
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The EPA has a new leader, and the outlook for science is not good
Make the EPA Great Again?
February 17, 2017
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The Fingerprints of Global Warming on Extreme Weather
When climate scientists examine whether the warming of the Earth has made extreme weather events such as heatwaves or downpours more likely, they generally do it on a case-by-case basis. But a group led by Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh has aimed to develop a more global, comprehensive approach to investigating how climate change has impacted such extremes.
April 24, 2017
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The Flooding In California Won't End Its Three-Year Drought
We'Ll Have to Wait and See
January 12, 2017
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The Global Warming Hiatus Never Actually Happened
Yes, the Oceans Have Been Warming for the Past 75 Years
January 4, 2017
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The good, the bad and the algae
A new study is testing whether one of California's largest and most polluted lakes can transform into one of its most productive and profitable. Southern California's 350-square-mile Salton Sea has well-documented problems related to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural runoff. The research team intends to harness algae's penchant for prolific growth to clean up these pollutants and stop harmful algae blooms while creating a renewable, domestic source of fuel.
August 7, 2017
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The Government Might not Want Energy Star, But Industry Does
IF YOU'RE AN environmentally conscious consumer, you probably own more than a few devices bedazzled with an Energy Star logo. Every laptop or dryer or refrigerator that meets the logo's energy efficiency expectations—established by a program within the Environmental Protection Agency—gives you a tiny planet-saving dopamine spike.
March 8, 2017
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The Great Barrier Reef's latest unprecedented bleaching event could spell the end
In the face of climate change, experts are giving up hope.
April 10, 2017
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The key to drought-tolerant crops may be in the leaves
Leaf wax acts as the equivalent of 'lip balm' for plants, protecting them from the harmful effects of drought
August 15, 2017
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The Larsen C Ice Shelf Crack Just Sprouted a new Branch
Winter has descended on Antarctica. Even as cold and darkness blankets the bottom of the world, the region's most watched ice shelf is is continuing its epic breakdown.
May 2, 2017
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The Larsen C Iceberg Is Expected to Have Company
It's stressful being an iceberg hanging on by a thread. If you want proof, look no further than the Larsen C ice shelf.
July 7, 2017
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The Larsen C Iceberg Is on the Brink of Breaking Off
The saga of the Larsen C crack is about reach its stunning conclusion. Scientists have watched a rift grow along one of Antarctica's ice shelves for years. Now it's in the final days of cutting off a piece of ice that will be one of the largest icebergs ever recorded.
May 31, 2017
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The Larsen C Rift is Racing to Its Conclusion
A rift has torn the Larsen C ice shelf asunder and now the outside edge of the ice is moving at an unprecedented pace. When it breaks off, it will become one of the largest icebergs ever recorded.
June 28, 2017
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The March for Science is Heading to Greenland
Field research season is getting underway in Greenland. Scientists are racing to the island for the few months a year when the towering ice sheet is accessible.
April 20, 2017
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The nanoFate model assesses the risk of engineered nanomaterials in the environment
While there is currently no evidence that engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) pose a significant threat to the environment, many gaps in our knowledge remain with regard to ENM ecotoxicity. the lack of evidence should by no means be interpreted to imply that environmental damage cannot occur.
May 10, 2017
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The next step for EPA to relax fuel economy standards: Public comment period
Automakers wanted EPA's mpg targets relaxed, and they'll likely get their way.
August 11, 2017
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The oceans were colder than we thought
A team of researchers has discovered a flaw in the way past ocean temperatures have been estimated up to now. Their findings could mean that the current period of climate change is unparalleled over the last 100 million years.
October 26, 2017
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The Overlooked Risk of Levees as Rainfall Rises
Thousands of miles of levees stretch across the U.S., built to keep swollen waterways from inundating towns, farmland and critical infrastructure. But, as the residents of Pocahontas, Ark., found out this week when drenching rains caused the Black River to overtop and breach the local levee system, living behind a levee is not an absolute guarantee of protection.
May 5, 2017
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The proposed 2018 federal budget tells NASA to forget about Earth
The space agency does crucial research on our own planet
March 16, 2017
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The secret of successful marine protected areas? People.
Shocking: the reserves only thrive when properly staffed and funded
March 22, 2017
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The Sixth Mass Extinction of Wildlife Also Threatens Global Food Supplies
The sixth mass extinction of global wildlife already under way is seriously threatening the world's food supplies, according to experts.
September 27, 2017
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The Surge: A Walk in the Park expansion gets action-packed launch trailer
Dark Souls-like The Surge is set in a dystopian future as Earth nears the end of its life.
December 5, 2017
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The synchronized dance of skyrmion spins
In recent years, excitement has swirled around a type of quasi-particle called a skyrmion that arises as a collective behavior of a group of electrons. Because they're stable, only a few nanometers in size, and need just small electric currents to transport them, skyrmions hold potential as the basis for ultra-compact and energy-efficient information storage and processing devices in the future.
May 30, 2017
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The time window for the 1.5-degree target is closing
Earth's climate is out of balance: the planet has been warming since industrialization began, because CO2 increasingly collects in the atmosphere. Even an immediate stop of all emissions would not bring global warming to a sudden halt, reveals a study by Thorsten Mauritsen, Research Group Leader at the Hamburg-based Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, and his colleague Robert Pincus, a scientist at the University of Colorado in the US: in this case, in addition to previous warming of 0.8 degrees Celsius, another 0.3 degrees Celsius would be added by the end of this century alone.
August 11, 2017
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The US Flirts With Geoengineering To Stymie Climate Change
The thing about humans is, for all our faults, we're actually pretty good at fixing things we know we've screwed up. Lead in gasoline? Bad idea--let's ban lead in gasoline. Running out of oil to make gasoline? Let's switch to electric vehicles.
December 11, 2017
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The Vast Majority of the U.S. Had a Crazy Warm Winter
Meteorological winter is officially over, but it felt like it ended long before its Feb. 28 expiration date. Much of the U.S. basked in relentless warm weather throughout February, turning the clock forward to spring.
March 2, 2017
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The West Is on Fire As Heat Records Fall
From Phoenix to Boise, high temperature records fell like dominoes over the weekend as an impressive heat wave engulfed the western U.S., helping to fuel several wildfires.
July 10, 2017
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The world spent less money to add more renewable energy than ever in 2016
$241.6 billion in investment gets you 138.5 gigawatts of renewable energy
April 10, 2017
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The World's Soaring Co2 Levels Visualized As Skyscrapers
If you want an unusual but punchy telling of the world's explosion of climate-warping gases, look no further than this visualization of CO2 levels over the past centuries soaring like skyscrapers into space.
September 29, 2017
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There's a Wildfire Burning in West Greenland Right Now
It's not just the American West and British Columbia burning up. A fire has sparked in western Greenland, an odd occurrence for an island known more for ice than fire.
August 7, 2017
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There's actually no such thing as a natural disaster
Hazards are natural; disasters are manmade.
October 2, 2017
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These conservatives want to convince you that climate change is real
Understanding science doesn't make you liberal
May 1, 2017
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These Staten Islanders lost their neighborhood to Sandy. Here's why they're not taking it back.
A community goes back to nature.
October 23, 2017
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These U.S. Cities Are Most Vulnerable to Major Coastal Flooding and Sea Level Rise
In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy took a sharp left turn into the coasts of New Jersey and New York, leading to 157 deaths, 51 square miles of flooding in New York City alone, and an estimated $50+ billion in damage (Bloomberg 2013; Kemp and Horton 2013). The name "Sandy" was retired, but risks to coastal cities for Sandy-like flooding remain. On the five-year anniversary of the storm, Climate Central has ranked the U.S. cities most vulnerable to major coastal floods using three different metrics:
October 25, 2017
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These weather events turned extreme thanks to human-driven climate change
Scientists rule out natural chance in 2016 deadly heat, ocean warming events
December 14, 2017
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Thin ice: Vanishing ice only exacerbates a bad, climate change-fueled situation
How's the Earth's ice system changing? Look to the active cryosphere.
June 19, 2017
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Thin-film ferroelectrics go extreme
Scientists have greatly expanded the range of functional temperatures for ferroelectrics, a key material used in a variety of everyday applications, by creating the first-ever polarization gradient in a thin film.
May 10, 2017
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This App Shows what Sea Level Rise will Do
The oceans are rising and already creating problems from Boston to Miami. But the true scope of what the world is in for is hard to imagine.
April 20, 2017
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This device may pull water out of thin air, but not as well as we hoped
A clarification about our WaterSeer article
March 13, 2017
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This EPA unit fights terrorism with science
It's not all about hugging trees
March 21, 2017
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This Graphic Puts Global Warming in Full Perspective
To say the world is having a streak like no other is an understatement. Global warming has made cold scarce on a planetary scale.
April 19, 2017
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This is British Columbia's Second-Worst Wildfire Season. It's Far From Over
Poor air quality, blood-red sunsets and mountains swallowed by smoke are just a handful of the impacts of wildfires roaring in British Columbia.
August 4, 2017
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This is how much of the world is currently on fire
The 2017 fire season is a global phenomenon.
August 4, 2017
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This is what America looked like before the EPA cleaned it up
It wasn't pretty
February 24, 2017
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This Map Shows Warming's Fingerprints on Weather
The field of climate science that looks for the fingerprints of climate change on extreme weather events has been growing rapidly in recent years, making it hard to keep track of the dozens of studies that have been done.
July 11, 2017
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This remote island in the South Pacific is covered in 18 tons of our trash
Paradise Lost
May 15, 2017
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This solar-powered device harvests water from dry air
A tiny box produces fresh water using only sunlight for power. Could it help solve our global water crisis?
April 14, 2017
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Those who help each other can invade harsher environments
Through cooperation, animals are able to colonize harsher living environments that would otherwise be inaccessible, according to a new study. the research community has long believed this was the other way around -- that species in tough environments had to cooperate to survive. as a result the established view of why animals cooperate is turned upside-down.
February 20, 2017
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Three solar thermal plants in Chile could generate electricity 24 hours a day
Tamarugal project expected to theoretically generate 2,600 GWh of electricity annually.
March 14, 2017
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Three-quarters of the planet could face deadly heatwaves by 2100
And a third of us already do.
June 19, 2017
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Time-lapse photos show just how quickly the world's glaciers are disappearing
An elegy for ice
April 21, 2017
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Tiny chip-based methane spectrometer could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions
he process of extracting natural gas from the earth or transporting it through pipelines can release methane into the atmosphere. Methane, the primary component of natural gas, is a greenhouse gas with a warming potential approximately 25 times larger than carbon dioxide, making it very efficient at trapping atmospheric heat energy. A new chip-based methane spectrometer, that is smaller than a dime, could one day make it easier to monitor for efficiency and leaks over large areas.
October 26, 2017
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Tiny Nanoparticles Help Convert Carbon Dioxide into Fuel Using Ultraviolet Light as Energy Source
Duke University researchers have developed tiny nanoparticles that help convert carbon dioxide into methane using only ultraviolet light as an energy source.
February 24, 2017
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Tipping points are real: Gradual changes in carbon dioxide levels can induce abrupt climate changes
During the last glacial period, within only a few decades the influence of atmospheric CO2 on the North Atlantic circulation resulted in temperature increases of up to 10 degrees Celsius in Greenland -- as indicated by new climate calculations.
June 23, 2017
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To guard against climate change, Los Angeles is painting its streets white
They plan to lower the temperature by 3 degrees over the next 20 years.
September 6, 2017
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To improve dipstick diagnostic and environmental tests, just add tape
Simple paper-strip testing has the potential to tell us quickly what's in water, and other liquid samples from food, the environment and bodies -- but current tests don't handle solid samples well. Now researchers have developed a way to make these low-cost devices more versatile and reliable for analyzing both liquid and solid samples using adhesive tape.
November 29, 2017
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Today's Extreme Heat May Become Norm Within a Decade
When 2015 blew the record for hottest year out of the water, it made headlines around the world. But a heat record that was so remarkable only two years ago will be just another year by 2040 at the latest, and possibly as early as 2020, regardless of whether the greenhouse gas emissions warming the planet are curtailed.
July 14, 2017
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Tracking Antarctic adaptations in diatoms
Comparative genome analysis provides clues on how climate change might impact evolutionary adaptation limits
January 16, 2017
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Tracking the environmental exposure of the emerging nanomaterial industry
Safer sun cream, energy-storing plastics, non-stick surfaces, richer fertilisers and sweat-proof clothes -- the evolution of nanotechnology, which utilises the special properties of small clusters of atoms, has led to an abundance of new products. However, relatively little is known about what happens when these nanomaterials enter the environment.
August 30, 2017
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Transfer technique produces wearable gallium nitride gas sensors
A transfer technique based on thin sacrificial layers of boron nitride could allow high-performance gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on sapphire substrates and then transferred to metallic or flexible polymer support materials. The technique could facilitate the production of low-cost wearable, mobile and disposable sensing devices for a wide range of environmental applications.
November 9, 2017
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Transforming greenhouse gas CO2 into carbon nanotubes
The cement industry is one of the largest sources worldwide of carbon emissions, accounting for around five per cent of global emissions. Two thirds of these CO2 emissions are released during the chemical process of burning limestone for cement production and can only be cut by extracting the CO2 from the emissions in one form or another.
March 21, 2017
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Transforming last night's leftovers into green energy
In a classic tale of turning trash into treasure, two different processes soon may be the favored dynamic duo to turn food waste into green energy, according to a new Cornell University-led study.
June 19, 2017
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Transforming the carbon economy
Most strategies to combat climate change concentrate on reducing greenhouse gas emissions by substituting non-carbon energy sources for fossil fuels, but a task force commissioned in June 2016 by former U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz proposed a framework in December 2016 for evaluating research and development on two additional strategies: recycling carbon dioxide and removing large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
February 27, 2017
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Transparent tactile e-skin based on single-layer graphene
In a recent paper in Advanced Functional Materials, researchers from the University of Glasgow present a promising approach toward the development of an energy-autonomous, flexible, and transparent tactile skin based on single-layer graphene integrated onto a photovoltaic cell.
May 16, 2017
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Trash to treasure: How can we extract valuable resources from production waste?
For every ton of alumina, the Aluminium of Greece plant in Agios Nikolaos -- near the large bauxite deposits at Boeotia and Phocis -- produces a ton of bauxite residue, making around 2,000 tons of the heavy red mud every day.
August 11, 2017
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Trash to treasure: The benefits of waste-to-energy technologies
Instead of hauling food waste to landfills, we might want to use that organic waste to power garbage trucks, your car, truck or SUV while at the same time potentially helping the environment.
August 28, 2017
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Trashed Electronics Are Piling Up Across Asia
E-Waste Has Risen by 63 Percent In Just 5 Years
January 25, 2017
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TreeHugger.com
The Future is Green. Find it here.
 
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Trees might actually make summer air pollution even worse
Talk about treeson
May 17, 2017
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Triple-layer catalyst does double duty
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen to produce clean energy can be simplified with a single catalyst developed by scientists at Rice University and the University of Houston.
July 26, 2017
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Tropical Forests are Vomiting CO2 into the Atmosphere
Wait... what? That doesn't make sense. Forests help, right? They suck out CO2 and gives us oxygen. That's just how it works, yeah? Well, not quite, unfortunately.
September 29, 2017
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Tungsten examined in extreme environments to improve fusion materials
A fusion reactor is essentially a magnetic bottle containing the same processes that occur in the sun. Deuterium and tritium fuels fuse to form a vapor of helium ions, neutrons and heat. as this hot, ionized gas -- called plasma -- burns, that heat is transferred to water to make steam to turn turbines that generate electricity. the superheated plasma poses a constant threat to the reactor wall and the divertor (which removes waste from the operating reactor to keep the plasma hot enough to burn).
March 7, 2017
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Tunneling a path to low cost, high efficiency solar cells
Lowering the cost of solar cell production and making it more affordable to individuals and businesses could be a game-changer for the energy sector.
September 5, 2017
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Turning chicken feces, weeds into biofuel
Chicken is a favorite, inexpensive meat across the globe. But the bird's popularity results in a lot of waste that can pollute soil and water. One strategy for dealing with poultry poop is to turn it into biofuel, and now scientists have developed a way to do this by mixing the waste with another environmental scourge, an invasive weed that is affecting agriculture in Africa.
May 3, 2017
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Turning homes into power stations could cut household fuel bills by more than 60 percent
Energy bills could be cut by more than 60 percent -- saving the average household over £600 a year -- if homes were designed to generate, store and release their own solar energy, a report has revealed. The concept has already been proven and is operating successfully on a building in the UK.
August 9, 2017
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Turning water into clean fuel
A pioneering research project between Masdar Institute and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a step closer to using sunlight to turn water into fuel in the form of hydrogen. the team have identified materials and developed unique structures that optimize the process that splits water into its component elements so the hydrogen can be captured and used as a fuel source.
February 28, 2017
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Turns Out Growing Weed Isn't Nice to the Environment
Crops cause a lot of problems. That's because for the past several thousand years, people have more or less been deciding what grows where on Earth. The other things that live on Earth, or, in other words, almost all live on the planet, isn't too keen on that.
October 31, 2017
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Turns out the Svalbard seed vault is probably fine
Deep breaths.
May 19, 2017
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Twistron Yarns Used to Produce Electricity from Oceanic Wave Motion
An international team of scientists headed by researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in South Korea have created high-tech yarns with the ability to produce electricity upon being twisted or stretched.
August 28, 2017
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Two graphs that explain why California's wildfires will only get worse
Risks are growing while environmental protections are disappearing.
October 24, 2017
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Two-thirds of Americans don't bother seeking out science news
Survey shows only 17 percent of US citizens are active consumers of science news.
September 26, 2017
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Misc. - U

U.S. Drought at Lowest Level in Nearly Two Decades
After years of intense, record-setting drought across the U.S., particularly in the Great Plains and California, the country is now experiencing its lowest level of drought in the 17 years since the U.S. Drought Monitor began its weekly updates.
May 9, 2017
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U.S. solar industry passes oil, coal and gas for job creation
Net power generation from coal sources declined by 53% between 2006 and September 2016
January 24, 2017
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UK climate report confirms 2016 was really hot
New findings are in line with NASA and NOAA estimates.
August 9, 2017
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UK has first coal-free power day since the Industrial Revolution
Over half of the energy comes from natural gas; another 21% is nuclear power.
April 24, 2017
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UK national weather service has new mainframes that can perform 23,000 trillion calculations a second
Met Office, the UK's national weather service, has a new IT solution, thanks to a partnership between the service, IBM and Computacenter. It will allow the Met Office to process greater volumes of weather data faster.
April 11, 2017
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Uncompromising on organic solar cells
Researchers developed a semi-transparent organic solar cell that achieves better efficiency and transparency than existing ones, according to a recent study in the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials ("Ternary semitransparent organic solar cells with a laminated top electrode").
March 7, 2017
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Uncovering essential enzymes for plant growth during nitrogen starvation
A study has found that two key enzymes in plants called PAH1 and PAH2 are critical for survival and growth under nitrogen-depleted conditions. The study sheds new light on how plants could be modified in future to boost tolerance to nutrient-poor environments.
November 20, 2017
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Understanding alternative reasons for denying climate change could help bridge divide
Scientists have explored alternative reasons for climate change denial, specifically economic, social or cultural influences on why individuals or entire communities remain skeptical of climate change.
August 15, 2017
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Understanding the climate impact of natural atmospheric particles
Scientists have quantified the relationship between natural sources of particles in the atmosphere and climate change. Their research shows that the cooling effect of natural atmospheric particles is greater during warmer years and could therefore slightly reduce the amount that temperatures rise as a result of climate change.
December 4, 2017
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Unfair share: Only one company's environmental record gets examined
And it's the one that's already doing more.
August 17, 2017
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Unplugging the cellulose biofuel bottleneck
A major bottleneck to producing cost-effective biofuels and many valuable chemicals is breaking down cellulose. Cellulose is an important structural component of plants.
November 15, 2017
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Unruly Antarctica could change sea-level outlook without much warning
These sea-level rise scenarios aren't new, but they are food for thought.
December 18, 2017
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Unsubsidized wind and solar now the cheapest source for new electric power
Between 2015 and 2021, China is expected to install 40% of all worldwide wind energy and 36% of all solar
April 17, 2017
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Update on popular fish model of development
Annual killifish are an excellent animal model for research on interactions between genes and the environment during development. a new article describes the development of one particular South American species of this fish in great detail and updates the classic embryo staging guide developed in 1972.
May 9, 2017
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Urban floods intensifying, countryside drying up
An exhaustive global analysis of rainfall and rivers shows signs of a radical shift in streamflow patterns, with more intense flooding in cities and smaller catchments coupled with a drier countryside
August 14, 2017
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Urbanization Is Now a Major Influence on Evolution
New data shows that cities might be one of the most powerful forces shaping evolution today. Some species are naturally pretty well suited to life in the city (e.g. raccoons, rats), but others have been forced to adapt to keep pace.
November 8, 2017
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US energy analysis sees renewable electricity passing coal by 2030
And the report is probably unrealistically conservative about wind power.
January 6, 2017
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US energy production dropped in 2016 for the first time in 6 years
No surprise here: Coal energy production fell 18 percent.
March 31, 2017
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US Government Accountability Office argues for acting on climate change
New report endorses a coordinated federal response to climate change.
October 25, 2017
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US government's grim climate summary draft gets unofficially published
Fate of congressionally mandated report uncertain in the face of Trump's disbelief.
August 8, 2017
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US ocean observation critical to understanding climate change, but lacks long-term national planning
The ocean plays a critical role in climate and weather, serving as a massive reservoir of heat and water that influences tropical storms, El Nino, and climate change
October 20, 2017
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US' power supply has capacity to adapt to climate change
Deeper assessment of US power supply vulnerabilities shows reliability will be affected by climate change but maintenance and commitment to cleaner, more efficient energy technology and infrastructure may result in a more resilient power grid
October 30, 2017
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US stands alone as Syria plans to join Paris climate accord
The only other holdout says it'll sign on to the worldwide effort to curb global warming.
November 7, 2017
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Using sunlight to the max with MXenes
Materials called transition-metal carbides have remarkable properties that open new possibilities in water desalination and wastewater treatment. A KAUST team has found compounds of transition metals and carbon, known as a MXenes but pronounced "maxenes", can efficiently evaporate water using power supplied by the sun.
June 19, 2017
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Misc. - V

Volcanic eruptions drove ancient global warming event
Warming event that took place 56 million years ago led to significant ecological disruption and could shed light on modern climate change
August 31, 2017
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Voltage-activated carbon monoxide sensor
The detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in the air is a vital issue, as CO is a highly toxic gas and an environmental pollutant. CO typically derives from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, such as cooking gas and gasoline; it has no odor, taste, or color and hence it is difficult to detect.
December 20, 2017
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Misc. - W

Want to minimize your home's carbon footprint? Go for solar, forget the battery
Battery inefficiencies waste energy, cut into savings from a solar system.
February 3, 2017
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Warm Arctic Fuels Second-Warmest April on Record
An unusually warm Arctic spring fueled the second-hottest April on record globally, with global warming and unusual weather conspiring to shrink sea ice and push up polar temperatures.
May 15, 2017
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Warmer Oceans Are now Linked to Dangerous Neurotoxins In Shellfish
New Research Could Help Forecast Deadly Toxin Outbreaks
January 9, 2017
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Warmer, wetter climate could mean stronger, more intense storms
High-resolution climate simulations suggest that extreme convective systems will increase in frequency under a warmer climate scenario
December 18, 2017
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Warming could disrupt Atlantic Ocean current
New simulations revise freshwater impact on circulation's stability
January 7, 2017
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Warming seas could lead to 70 percent increase in hurricane-related financial loss
Hurricane-related financial loss could increase more than 70 percent by 2100 if oceans warm at the worst-case-scenario rate predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, according to a new study. The study used a combination of hurricane modeling and information in FEMA's HAZUS database to reach its conclusions.
October 12, 2017
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Warming seas double snowfall around North America's tallest peaks
Unprecedented findings strengthen connections between winter storms and tropical waters
December 19, 2017
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Warming-Driven Glacier Melt Leads to 'River Piracy'
In the summer of 2016, the global warming-induced retreat of Kaskawulsh Glacier -- one of the largest glaciers in Canada -- altered the flow of its meltwater so substantially that it killed off one river and shunted its waters over to another, an abrupt geological act known as river piracy.
April 17, 2017
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Warming-Driven Heat Waves Could Tax U.S. Electrical Grid
When a searing heat wave sends the temperature soaring, Americans turn to their air conditioners for relief. But with heat waves becoming more intense and happening more often as the world warms, that air conditioner use on the hottest days will put substantially more demand on the nation's electricity grids, a new study finds.
February 6, 2017
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Wastewater Treatment by Using PEDOT-Coated Carbon Nanofiber Electrodes
Bioelectrochemical Engineers and Materials Scientists from the Cornell University might have developed what seems to be a new, cost-effective electrode material for eliminating pollutants from wastewater.
June 28, 2017
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Watch Shell's 1991 Video Warning of Catastrophic Climate Change
The oil giant Shell issued a stark warning of the catastrophic risks of climate change more than a quarter of century ago in a prescient 1991 film that has been rediscovered.
February 28, 2017
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Water striders illustrate evolutionary processes
How do new species arise and diversify in nature? Natural selection offers an explanation, but the genetic and environmental conditions behind this mechanism are still poorly understood. Researchers have just figured out how water striders (family Veliidae) of the genus Rhagovelia developed fan-like structures at the tips of their legs.
October 19, 2017
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Water-based, eco-friendly and energy-saving air-conditioner
All-weather friendly cooling technology works without mechanical compressors or chemical refrigerants, and generates drinking water
January 8, 2018
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We Couldn't Monitor Larsen C Without These Satellites
The iceberg-to-be is hanging on by a thread, with just eight miles of solid ice standing in the way of a rift that's spent years carving through the ice. Scientists can track the growth of the crack with precision during the summer season by flying over it, but even during the dead of Antarctic night, they're still able to see it clearly thanks to eyes in the sky.
June 23, 2017
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We may be closer to predicting the extreme rain events of the future
Why some Places Flood While Others Stay Dry
May 15, 2017
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We Might Finally Have a Good Way to Predict Dangerous Space Weather
Space weather forecasting--predicting the kind of energetic particles the Sun will throw at us--is years behind weather forecsting here on Earth. as solar physicist Scott McIntosh put it, "Our current model of space weather forecasting is, 'oh shit a sunspot happened eight minutes ago, now we have to figure out what's going to happen." it's a shame we're not better at predicting space weather, since it can bust up satellites and even electronics on Earth.
March 27, 2017
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We need to protect the world's soil before it's too late
Book Excerpt: the Ground Beneath Us
March 21, 2017
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We're scientists who turn hurricanes into music
Can listening to storms help us understand them better?
December 11, 2017
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West Coast Waters on Acid Trip; Fishing Industry in Peril
Hotspots of ocean acidification have been found in the waters that wash onto the shores of the West Coast, a major concern for the region's billion dollar fishing industry as well as the region's potentially fragile coastal ecosystems.
June 6, 2017
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Western Wildfires Undermining Progress on Air Pollution
Smoke pollution is leading to serious public health impacts as large wildfires across the American West become more frequent and destructive. These fires are undermining progress made during recent decades in reducing pollution from tailpipes, power plants, and other industrial sources. The increasing frequency and area burned by large fires is linked to human-caused climate change as well as other environmental changes.
November 7, 2017
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What caused the most toxic algal bloom ever observed in Monterey Bay?
In spring 2015, the West Coast of North America experienced one of the most toxic algal blooms on record. The bloom consisted of diatoms in the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, but researchers couldn't tell why these algae had become so toxic. A new article shows that, at least in Monterey Bay, this bloom became particularly toxic because of an unusually low ratio of silicate to nitrate in the waters of the bay.
June 5, 2017
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What counts as 'nature'? It all depends
A psychology professor describes 'environmental generational amnesia' as the idea that each generation perceives the environment into which it's born, no matter how developed, urbanized or polluted, as the norm. And so what each generation comes to think of as 'nature' is relative, based on what it's exposed to. He argues that more frequent and meaningful interactions with nature can enhance our connection to -- and definition of -- the natural world.
November 15, 2017
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What happens when you heat the Antarctic Ocean by a single degree?
Hint: it's nothing good.
August 31, 2017
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What if the United States exits the Paris Agreement on climate?
A rundown of the fallout
April 17, 2017
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What is EPA Open Data, and why would it shut down?
We don't know what we've got till it's (almost) gone
April 24, 2017
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What the frack is in fracking fluid?
Most of the ingredients are unknown
March 28, 2017
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What to do if you get caught in an avalanche
We Asked the Experts
May 16, 2017
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What would America be like without the EPA?
Why we created the Environmental Protection Agency–and why we still need it
February 24, 2017
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What's really going on with sea level rise
Even the best data can be presented in misleading ways.
August 1, 2017
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When a hurricane finally passes, it spreads deadly disease in its wake
The end of a storm can spell the beginning of a disaster.
October 4, 2017
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When and how is investing in a solar power plant worth it?
Scientists from the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum ft- und Raumfahrt; DLR), together with partners, have compiled a guide to calculate the yield from a solar power plant. for the first time, the guideline offers comprehensive and standardised calculation bases within the solar thermal industry that meet the high requirements of project financing.
January 11, 2017
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When continents break it gets warm on Earth
Rift zones released large amounts of CO2 from depth, which influenced global climate change
November 13, 2017
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When human illness rises, the environment suffers, too
A toxic environment is known to create health problems for people, but sick people can also create health problems for the environment. Around Kenya's Lake Victoria, a fishing community where locals battle high rates of disease and a depleted fish stock, scientists found that human illness exacerbates unsustainable fishing practices.
April 3, 2017
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Where a leaf lands and lies influences carbon levels in soil for years to come
Whether carbon comes from leaves or needles affects how fast it decomposes, but where it ends up determines how long it's available.
November 15, 2017
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Where the heck is autumn?
Falling away.
October 11, 2017
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Where will the future's water crises hit hardest?
Stressed out: gauging global water worries
March 21, 2017
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Why are scientists filing lawsuits against their critics?
When fellow scientists critiqued Mark Jacobson, he took their dispute to court
November 27, 2017
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Why green spaces are good for grey matter
Walking between busy urban environments and green spaces triggers changes in levels of excitement, engagement and frustration in the brain, a study of older people has found.
April 10, 2017
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Why Hawaii is trying to ban a common sunscreen
It's a coral reef killer
April 28, 2017
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Why is the Smog In China So Bad?
It's Getting Harder and Harder to Breathe
January 6, 2017
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Why we have more and more days without frost
Foot loose and frost-free.
May 23, 2017
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Why whales are back in New York City
The Cetaceans are back in town.
June 7, 2017
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Wildfire Season Is Scorching the West
The West is ablaze as the summer wildfire season has gotten off to an intense start. More than 37,000 fires have burned more than 5.2 million acres nationally since the beginning of the year, with 47 large fires burning across nine states as of Friday.
July 28, 2017
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Wind energy now on par with nuclear energy in Germany
Wind energy has become an integral part of the energy supply. A new milestone for the transformation of energy supply systems was reached last year with renewable energy now accounting for 29 percent of the gross energy consumption. That is more than the conventional nuclear and brown coal power plants.
May 29, 2017
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Winners and losers: Climate change will shift vegetation
Projected global warming will likely decrease the extent of temperate drylands by one-third over the remainder of the 21st century coupled with an increase in dry deep soil conditions during agricultural growing season.
February 21, 2017
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World Natural Hazards Website - Natural Disaster Management - Disaster Agency Hawaii
The Pacific Disaster Center's mission provides information about research and analysis support for the development of effective policies, institutions, programs and the information products for the disaster management and humanitarian assistance communities of the Asia Pacific region.
 
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World's First Commercial CO2 Capture Plant Goes Live
A Swiss company on Wednesday is set to become the world's first to commercially remove carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere and turn it into a useful product.
May 31, 2017
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Worldwide increase in methane bubbles due to climate change
Due to climate change, including rising temperatures, more and more methane is bubbling up from lakes, ponds, rivers and wetlands throughout the world. The release of methane -- a potent greenhouse gas -- leads to a further increase in temperature, thus creating a positive feedback loop (also known as a 'vicious circle').
November 22, 2017
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Worms that Eat Through Plastic Bags Could Help Cut Down on Pollution
Plastic bags clog up our gutters, landfills, and waterways, but researchers hope that plastic-munching worms may hold a secret to making these messes more manageable.
April 24, 2017
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Wound healing or regeneration -- the environment decides?
Flexible self-regeneration in ctenophores discovered
November 29, 2017
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Wyoming is Basically Trying to Outlaw Clean Energy
Solar and Wind Would be Penalized Under Proposed Law
January 16, 2017
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Misc. - Y

Yeast may be the solution to toxic waste clean-up
About 46,000 nuclear weapons were produced during the Cold War era, leading to tremendous volumes of acidic radioactive liquid waste seeping into the environment. A new study suggests yeast as a potentially safer and more cost effective way to help clean up these radioactive waste sites.
January 8, 2018
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You Can Eat This Straw When You're Done Slurping Your Drink
Plastic straws are an environmental nightmare. In the next 24 hours, Americans will throw away somewhere around 500 million plastic straws.
December 13, 2017
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Your air conditioning habit makes summer smog worse
As Temperatures Rise, Power Plants Pump Out More Emissions
May 3, 2017
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Misc. - Z

Zaria Forman Finds Beauty in the Things We're Losing
Loss is like a black hole, sucking everything nearby into its orbit. It shapes everything left behind, reframes relationships, leaves you grasping for memories as they peel away into the murky abyss of time.
April 5, 2017
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Solar Energy

Solar fuels: better efficiency using microwires
Researchers at the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology have made significant efficiency improvements to the technology used to generate solar fuels. This involves the direct conversion of energy from sunlight into a usable fuel (in this case, hydrogen).
January 15, 2018
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Solar fuels: better efficiency using microwires
Researchers have made significant efficiency improvements to the technology used to generate solar fuels. This involves the direct conversion of energy from sunlight into a usable fuel (in this case, hydrogen). Using only earth-abundant materials, they developed the most efficient conversion method to date. The trick was to decouple the site where sunlight is captured from the site where the conversion reaction takes place.
January 15, 2018
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Graphene foam can act as efficient solar thermal capture and conversion device
Researchers have demonstrated that a simple sheet of standalone graphene foam can act as efficient solar thermal capture and conversion device.
January 10, 2018
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Report: Tesla Manufacturing Solar Roof Panels in NY
Tesla is finally making good on the promise of premium solar roof tiles.
January 10, 2018
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Scientists look at how the molecular structures of organic solar cells form
Organic solar cells could be an inexpensive and versatile alternative to inorganic solar cells. However, their low efficiencies and limited lifetimes currently render them impractical for commercial use.
January 10, 2018
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Self-healing of solar cells ecplored with photoconductive AFM
A team of researchers have disclosed in which location self-healing occurs for the future solar cells through the use of Photoconductive Atomic Force Microscope.
January 10, 2018
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Remember solar roof? Tesla's making tiles in New York, installing them
Tesla employees got first solar roof installations, now reservation holders get theirs.
January 9, 2018
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Someone stole a piece of China's new solar panel-paved road less than a week after it opened
Putting solar panels into our roads isn't the craziest idea, but we may as well admit that it poses some unique challenges. For instance, people may want to walk away with pieces of it. That's what happened in China, anyway, just five days after authorities opened up what they claim is the world's first solar panel-paved highway.
January 5, 2018
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Laser evaporation technology to create new solar materials
Materials scientists at Duke University have developed a method to create hybrid thin-film materials that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to make. The technique could be the gateway to new generations of solar cells, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors.
January 3, 2018
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Standardizing perovskite aging measurements
Perovskite solar cells are an alternative to conventional silicon solar cells, and are poised to overtake the market with their high power-conversion efficiencies (over 22% now) and lower capital expenditure and manufacturing costs.
January 2, 2018
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Standardizing perovskite aging measurements
Scientists have produced a data-driven proposal for standardizing the measurements of perovskite solar cell stability and degradation. The work aims to create consensus in the field and overcome one of the major hurdles on the way to commercializing perovskite photovoltaics.
January 2, 2018
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Tweaking quantum dots powers-up double-pane solar windows
Engineered quantum dots could bring down the cost of solar electricity
January 2, 2018
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Tweaking quantum dots powers-up double-pane solar windows
Using two types of "designer" quantum dots, researchers are creating double-pane solar windows that generate electricity with greater efficiency and create shading and insulation for good measure.
January 2, 2018
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'Hot' electrons heat up solar energy research
Solar and renewable energy is getting hot, thanks to nanoscientists -- those who work with materials smaller than the width of a human hair -- at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory who have discovered new, better and faster ways to convert energy from light into energetic electrons.
December 21, 2017
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Halogens can increase solar cell performance by 25 per cent
New research shows that using halogens -- a class of elements that include fluoride, bromine, chlorine and iodine -- in a dye-sensitized solar cell can increase conversion efficiency by 25 per cent. The discovery could set the stage for improved solar cell designs.
December 20, 2017
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New technique allows rapid screening for new types of solar cells
Approach could bypass the time-consuming steps currently needed to test new photovoltaic materials.
December 20, 2017
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New technique allows rapid screening for new types of solar cells
The worldwide quest by researchers to find better, more efficient materials for tomorrow's solar panels is usually slow and painstaking. Researchers typically must produce lab samples -- which are often composed of multiple layers of different materials bonded together -- for extensive testing.
December 20, 2017
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Expanding solar energy without encroaching on potential farmland and conservation areas
As the world tries to combat climate change, sustainable forms of energy are on the rise. Solar energy is of particular interest, but arrays of photovoltaic panels take up a lot of space and can compete for prime food-producing land. Now researchers have found plenty of places to install solar devices without taking up arable land, while generating enough power to help regions meet their energy goals.
December 19, 2017
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Nontraditional sites for future solar farms
Equivalent of 183,000 football fields of nonagricultural land identified in study aiming to ease competition between farmers, conservationists, and energy companies.
December 19, 2017
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Climate conditions affect solar cell performance more than expected
Researchers can now predict how much energy solar cells will produce at any location worldwide. Surprisingly, they identified that two types of solar cells can vary in energy output by 5 percent or more in tropical regions. This gap occurs because solar energy can shift depending on local temperature and water in the atmosphere.
December 13, 2017
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Glass with switchable opacity could improve solar cells and LEDs
Nanoscale 'grass' structures also enable smart glass that switches from hazy to clear in presence of water
December 11, 2017
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Sustainable solvent platform for photon upconversion increases solar utilization efficiency
Scientists have developed a new low-cost, environmentally friendly photon upconversion platform that achieves high thermal stability using deep eutectic solvents. Deep eutectic solvents are an emerging class of solvents that are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative to ionic liquids.
December 4, 2017
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Sustainable solvent platform for photon upconversion increases solar utilization efficiency
The conversion of solar energy into electricity is currently restricted by a concept known as the Shockley-Quesser limit. This limitation allows only photons that have higher energies than those of the bandgap to be used, while those with lower energies are wasted. In an effort to obtain a solution to this problem and make solar energy conversion more efficient, the process of converting photons with lower energies into ones with higher energies, called photon upconversion, was developed.
December 4, 2017
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The Sun Exchange funds solar installations with micro-investments and bitcoin
Solar power could transform small communities around the world, but remote villages can't always scrape together the thousands of dollars required to install the requisite cells. The Sun Exchange wants to change that by leveraging the hearts and wallets of hobby investors who cover the installation costs and then have their share of the revenue trickle in for years to come. There's even a cryptocurrency!
December 4, 2017
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Photosynthesis without cells: Turning light into fuel
An entirely human-made architecture that converts light into fuel was built at the Center for Nanoscale Materials. This architecture combines tiny, nano-sized and artificial biological structures.
November 30, 2017
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Addition of tin boosts nanoparticle's photoluminescence
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed germanium nanoparticles with improved photoluminescence, making them potentially better materials for solar cells and imaging probes.
November 28, 2017
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Researchers develop highly efficient thermochromic windows
Thermochromic windows capable of converting sunlight into electricity at a high efficiency have been developed by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
November 28, 2017
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Switchable solar window developed
Demonstration device dynamically responds to sunlight by transforming from transparent to tinted while converting sunlight into electricity
November 28, 2017
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Radioactive land around Chernobyl to sprout solar investments
A one-megawatt installation is planned; gigawatt installations could follow it.
November 27, 2017
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Watching atoms move in hybrid perovskite crystals reveals clues to improving solar cells
A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has for the first time observed nanoscale changes deep inside hybrid perovskite crystals that could offer new insights into developing low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells.
November 21, 2017
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Watching atoms move in hybrid perovskite crystals reveals clues to improving solar cells
The discovery of nanoscale changes deep inside hybrid perovskites could shed light on developing low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells. Using X-ray beams and lasers, a team of researchers discovered how the movement of ions in hybrid perovskites causes certain regions within the material to become better solar cells than other parts.
November 21, 2017
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Glass microparticles enhance solar cells efficiency
Scientists from ITMO University suggested a new solar cell coating that combines features of an electrode and those of a light-trapping structure. The coating enabled researchers to cut down on reflected light and avoid solar cell overheating, thus increasing its overall efficiency by 20%.
November 20, 2017
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Butterfly Wings Inspire Photovoltaics Riddled with Holes
Micro- and nanostructures found in the wings of a jet black butterfly native to Asia help optimize light absorption, a principle which German scientists have applied to photovoltaics to boost their light harvesting ability and increase solar cell efficiency.
November 15, 2017
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Butterfly-inspired photovoltaics enhances light absorption by up to 200 percent
Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that help absorbing light over a wide spectrum far better than smooth surfaces.
November 14, 2017
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New Solar Panel Design Could Charge Your Phone With Ambient Light
Battery technology is still advancing at a sluggish rate in spite of intense research. The amount of energy you can carry around continues to limit what our mobile devices can do, and current methods of charging can only take us so far. A French solar power startup with the counterintuitive name of Dracula Technologies says it has developed a new type of solar panel that could be integrated into almost any device thanks to its thin, flexible design. It could be part of your backpack, your shirt, or even your phone.
November 14, 2017
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Twisting molecule wrings more power from solar cells
Inside a solar cell, sunlight excites electrons. But these electrons often don't last long enough to go on to power cell phones or warm homes. In a promising new type of solar cell, the solar-excited electrons have better odds going on to work.
November 14, 2017
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Researchers Find a Multifaceted Nanomaterial in Dendritic Fibrous Nanosilica
The use of dendritic fibrous nanosilica, or DFNS, has increased in many scientific fields such as solar energy harvesting (solar cells, photocatalysis, etc.), catalysis, surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based ultra-sensitive sensors, energy storage, CO2 capture, biomedical applications (protein and gene delivery, photothermal ablation, drug delivery, bioimaging, Ayurvedic and radiotherapeutics drug delivery, etc.), and self-cleaning antireflective coatings.
November 6, 2017
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Scientists elevate quantum dot solar cell world record
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) established a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells, at 13.4 percent.
October 31, 2017
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Scientists elevate quantum dot solar cell world record
Researchers have established a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells, at 13.4 percent.
October 31, 2017
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New fractal-like concentrating solar power receivers are better at absorbing sunlight
Engineers have developed new fractal-like, concentrating solar power receivers for small- to medium-scale use that are up to 20 percent more effective at absorbing sunlight than current technology.
October 25, 2017
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Report: Tesla fires hundreds more workers in its SolarCity unit
Tesla says the latest firings are part of its annual review process.
October 25, 2017
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Tesla lays off hundreds of SolarCity employees as part of broader housecleaning
An estimated 1,200 Tesla employees have been fired or laid off
October 25, 2017
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Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future'
See-through solar materials that can be applied to windows represent a massive source of untapped energy and could harvest as much power as bigger, bulkier rooftop solar units, scientists report in Nature Energy.
October 23, 2017
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Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future'
See-through solar materials that can be applied to windows represent a massive source of untapped energy and could harvest as much power as bigger, bulkier rooftop solar units, scientists report.
October 23, 2017
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Highly stable perovskite solar cells developed
Researchers have developed highly stable perovskite solar cells (PSCs), using edged-selectively fluorine (F) functionalized graphene nano-platelets (EFGnPs). The breakthrough is especially significant since the cells are made out of fluorine, a low-cost alternative to gold.
October 25, 2017
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Researchers develop highly stable perovskite solar cells
A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has presented a highly stable perovskite solar cells (PSCs), using edged-selectively fluorine (F) functionalized graphene nano-platelets (EFGnPs). This breakthrough has gotten much attention as it is made out of fluorine, a low-cost alternative to gold.
October 25, 2017
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Butterfly wings inspire a better way to absorb light in solar panels
Taking inspiration from nature
October 19, 2017
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Solar energy supports industrial processes
Whether it's drying, cleaning or pre-heating: There is a large number of heating processes used in the industrial and commercial sector which can be supported with solar thermal energy. In the long term, companies can use this energy to improve their CO2 balances and save on energy costs. The current BINE-Themeninfo brochure, "Solar process heat", presents potential areas of use and the particular technical features.
October 18, 2017
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Think laterally to sidestep solar cell production problems
Super thin photovoltaic devices underpin solar technology and gains in the efficiency of their production are therefore keenly sought.
October 16, 2017
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New materials may provide better ways to capture and store solar energy
A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), funded by two significant National Science Foundation (NSF) grants and an award from the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, is developing materials to generate and store more energy from the sun, which could make solar energy more efficient, less expensive, and more widely available.
October 11, 2017
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Laurene Powell Jobs' Emerson Collective invests in disruptive solar startup, Angaza
Off-grid rural villages in emerging markets must usually resort to solar panels and batteries, often donated by non-profit organizations and charities. The problem, however, is that charitable handouts aren't sustainable and don't scale. At the same time, people can take out small loans to buy solar products, but access to credit is low and the products themselves comparatively expensive.
October 2, 2017
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Magnetic electrodes increase solar cell efficiency
An international research group led by the Ikerbasque researcher Luis Hueso, leader of CIC nanoGUNE's Nanodevices Group -- and which has had the participation of the China Academy of Sciences, the Max Planck Institute (Germany) and nanoGUNE itself -- has developed a photovoltaic cell in which magnetic materials such as electrodes are used for the first time to provide current.
September 29, 2017
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Tesla updates referral program to include solar products
SolarCity's referral program will be phased out in favor of a more cohesive solution.
September 29, 2017
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Perovskite solar cells reach record long-term stability, efficiency over 20 percent
Scientists have greatly improved the operational stability of perovskite solar cells by introducing cuprous thiocyanate protected by a thin layer of reduced graphene oxide. Devices lost less than 5 percent performance when subjected to a crucial accelerated aging test during which they were exposed for more than 1,000 hours to full sunlight at 60°C.
September 28, 2017
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A little tension yields enormous solar crystals
New evidence of surface-initiated crystallization may improve the efficiency of printable photovoltaic materials.
September 26, 2017
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Wearable solar thermoelectric generator created
Engineers have introduced a new advanced energy harvesting system, capable of generating electricity by simply being attached to clothes, windows, and outer walls of a building.
September 26, 2017
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Atomically thin solar cell materials
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed an innovative method for fabricating semitransparent and flexible solar cells with atomically thin 2D materials. The new technology improves power conversion efficiency of up to 0.7% - this is the highest value for solar cells made from transparent 2D sheet materials.
September 25, 2017
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Semitransparent and flexible: Solar cells made from atomically thin sheet
A new method for fabricating semitransperant, flexible solar cells has greatly improved power conversion efficiency.
September 25, 2017
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Power company kills nuclear plant, plans $6 billion in solar, battery investment
Duke Energy Florida is just the latest utility to walk away from nuclear.
August 31, 2017
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The tricky trifecta of solar cells
Layering thin sheets of two-dimensional (2-D) perovskite materials creates a promisingly stable solar cell. However, the cell is not as efficient as its thicker, less stable three-dimensional (3-D) counterpart.
August 30, 2017
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Two for the price of one: Exceeding 100 percent efficiency in solar fuel production
In conventional systems for converting sunlight to chemical fuels, a single photon, no matter how energetic, leads to a single electron-hole pair and thus a single electron-hole pair's worth of chemical work. The one-to-one situation limits devices that use sunlight to create chemical fuels.
August 30, 2017
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Photosynthesis discovery could lead to design of more efficient artificial solar cells
A natural process that occurs during photosynthesis could lead to the design of more efficient artificial solar cells, according to researchers at Georgia State University.
August 29, 2017
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Photosynthesis discovery could help design more efficient artificial solar cells
A natural process that occurs during photosynthesis could lead to the design of more efficient artificial solar cells, according to researchers.
August 29, 2017
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Scientists power past solar efficiency records
The high potential of silicon-based multijunction solar cells has now been demonstrated through new research.
August 29, 2017
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Scientists power past solar efficiency records
Collaboration between researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM), and the ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) shows the high potential of silicon-based multijunction solar cells.
August 29, 2017
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A low-cost method for solar-thermal conversion that's simpler and greener
'Dip-and-dry' approach for selective solar absorbers exhibit high-performance and durability
August 28, 2017
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Importance of solar energy underestimated by a factor of three
The growth of solar energy has been grossly underestimated in the results of the models of the IPCC. Costs have dropped and infrastructures expanded much faster than even the most optimistic models had assumed.
August 28, 2017
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Perovskite solar cells go single crystal
Photovoltaic conversion is regarded as the ultimate solution to the mankind's ever growing demand for energy, yet the traditional silicon-based solar cells are expensive to produce, and the production itself involves intensive energy consumption.
August 28, 2017
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More solar power thanks to titanium
Modification of a hematite photoanode by a conformal titanium dioxide interlayer for effective charge collection
August 23, 2017
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The power of perovskite
Researchers improve perovskite-based technology in the entire energy cycle, from solar cells harnessing power to LED diodes to light the screens of future electronic devices and other lighting applications.
August 18, 2017
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A map of the cell's power station
Mitochondria are the cell's power stations; they transform the energy stored in nutrients so that cells can use it. If this function is disturbed, many different diseases can develop that often affect organs with a high metabolism, like the brain or the heart.
August 18, 2017
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Tesla and GE are installing solar rooftop systems on 50 Home Depots
Tesla's energy unit is working with GE's Current to install solar systems on 50 Home Depot locations in the U.S. The installation is part of a plan on Home Depot's part to move more of its stores to clean power, with a goal of generating 135 megawatts of clean energy from its locations by 2020, Bloomberg reports.
August 17, 2017
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At ITC hearing, two US solar manufacturers ask for tariffs on imported cells
Solar industry isn't with the manufacturers, says tariffs will kill US jobs.
August 15, 2017
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Nanotechnology gives green energy a green color
Solar panels have tremendous potential to provide affordable renewable energy, but many people see traditional black and blue panels as an eyesore. Architects, homeowners and city planners may be more open to the technology if they could install green panels that melt into the landscape, red panels on rooftops and white ones camouflaged as walls.
August 15, 2017
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Polystyrene makes next-generation of solar panels even cheaper
Researchers from The University of Manchester are using polystyrene particles rather than expensive polymers to make the next generation of solar cells, which are used to make solar panels, more stable and even cheaper.
August 15, 2017
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Solar panels: Nanotechnology gives green energy a green color
Researchers have created green solar panels using soft imprint lithography to print an array of nanocylinders that scatter green light
August 15, 2017
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South Australia okays giant solar thermal plant from SolarReserve
The 150MW plant will be completed by 2020, SA government says.
August 14, 2017
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Studying the Sun's atmosphere with the total solar eclipse of 2017
A total solar eclipse happens somewhere on Earth about once every 18 months. But because Earth's surface is mostly ocean, most eclipses are visible over land for only a short time, if at all. The total solar eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017, is different -- its path stretches over land for nearly 90 minutes, giving scientists an unprecedented opportunity to make scientific measurements from the ground.
August 14, 2017
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Will The Total Solar Eclipse Affect Solar Power?
You're ready for the eclipse on Aug. 21, with your non-counterfeit viewing glasses and travel plans set. Yet here's something that you may not have thought of: How will a total or even a partial solar eclipse affect homes and workplaces that use solar power?
August 11, 2017
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Power-to-liquid: 200 liters of fuel from solar power and the air's carbon dioxide
Production of liquid fuels from regenerative electric power is a major component of the energy turnaround. The first 200 l of synthetic fuel have now been produced from solar energy and the air's carbon dioxide by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis under the SOLETAIR project. Here, INERATEC, a spinoff of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), cooperates with Finnish partners. The mobile chemical pilot plant that can be used decentrally produces gasoline, diesel, and kerosene from regenerative hydrogen and carbon dioxide. It is so compact that it fits into a shipping container.
August 8, 2017
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Tesla tows tiny house around Australia with Model X
It's all in the name of touting its solar energy offerings.
August 14, 2017
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Hackers could exploit solar power equipment flaws to cripple green grids, claims researcher
Holes fixed after lengthy buck-passing party
August 7, 2017
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Simultaneous design and nanomanufacturing speeds up fabrication
Method enhances broadband light absorption in solar cells
August 4, 2017
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Elon Musk is one of the first customers of Tesla's Solar Roof
Tesla has started installing the first of its Solar Roofs, and Elon Musk is among the initial customers. The Tesla CEO said on a call with investors last night that he and JB Straubel, the company's CTO, have both installed the solar power roofs on their homes. Musk even claims that two photos released in Tesla's letter to investors are of one of their houses (though the home looks a little small for Musk).
August 3, 2017
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Solar glasses generate solar power
Semitransparent organic solar cells in eyeglasses to power microprocessor, example of future solar-powered mobile applications
August 2, 2017
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Solar sunglasses generate solar power
Organic solar cells are flexible, transparent, and light-weight -- and can be manufactured in arbitrary shapes or colors. Thus, they are suitable for a variety of applications that cannot be realized with conventional silicon solar cells.
August 2, 2017
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Tesla has completed its first ever Solar Roof product installations
Tesla has already completed the first installations of its Solar Roof products, which use integrated solar panels to gather energy. The solar tiles were first introduced last year, and are designed to look essentially indistinguishable from traditional roofing materials so that they present an aesthetically attractive option to consumers who might shy away from traditional panel designs.
August 2, 2017
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MIT Researchers Use Graphene to Create Transparent, Flexible Solar Cells
MIT has come up with a new flexible, transparent solar cell which would make it possible for solar cells to be used in numerous items around us in the near future -- in cell phones and laptops, on windows and walls, and more.
July 31, 2017
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Novel technique uses graphene to create solar cells to be mounted on surfaces
Imagine a future in which solar cells are all around us -- on windows and walls, cell phones, laptops, and more. A new flexible, transparent solar cell developed at MIT is bringing that future one step closer.
July 31, 2017
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Researchers seek to improve solar cell technology using new materials and nanowires
Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology are expanding solar cell technology using nanowires to capture more of the sun's energy and transform it into usable electricity. Comparable to ultra-thin blades of grass, nanowires added to today's conventional materials are capable of capturing more light and can be cost-effective solutions for adopting solar energy into the broader consumer market.
July 28, 2017
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Atomic movies may help explain why perovskite solar cells are more efficient
In recent years, perovskites have taken the solar cell industry by storm. They are cheap, easy to produce and very flexible in their applications. Their efficiency at converting light into electricity has grown faster than that of any other material -- from under four percent in 2009 to over 20 percent in 2017 -- and some experts believe that perovskites could eventually outperform the most common solar cell material, silicon.
July 26, 2017
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Non-toxic alternative for next-generation solar cells
Researchers have demonstrated how a non-toxic alternative to lead could form the basis of next-generation solar cells.
July 18, 2017
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Rooftop concentrating photovoltaics win big over silicon in outdoor testing
A concentrating photovoltaic system with embedded microtracking can produce over 50 percent more energy per day than standard silicon solar cells in a head-to-head competition, according to a team of engineers who field tested a prototype unit over two sunny days last fall.
July 17, 2017
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This Solar Cell Can Capture All Wavelengths of Solar Spectrum
Traditional solar cells harvest only a narrow sliver of the electromagnetic energy pouring down onto Earth, and that's one of the reasons it's been so challenging to get solar efficiency beyond 20-30 percent. A team of researchers from George Washington University has devised a new layered solar panel that can absorb light from a wider range of the spectrum, pushing the efficiency as high as a stunning 44.5 percent. This could be one of the most efficient solar cell in the world, if all goes as planned.
July 12, 2017
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Solar energy: googling your roof
Internet users can assess the solar potential of their roofs through a platform developed by Google. The online "calculator', which was only accessible in the US, has now reached Europe, starting in Germany
July 12, 2017
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China Wants to Build Panda-Shaped Solar Grids All Over the World
China is known as the home of the endangered and adorable panda, and now there's a new panda that could be spreading to the whole world. Only this one doesn't eat bamboo -- it eats sunlight. A company called Panda Green Energy has built a solar panel array that looks like a giant panda. It's the cutest power plant you've ever seen, and the company wants to start building them in other parts of the world.
July 7, 2017
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Solar cell design using diverse plant pigments
A member of the Faculty of Biology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University in cooperation with his colleagues has optimized and characterized TiO2-based solar cell design using diverse plant pigments. Two types of solar cells with two photosensitizers: thylakoid membrane preparations and anthocyanin-enriched raspberry extracts have been studied.
July 3, 2017
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Meniscus-assisted technique produces high efficiency perovskite PV films
A new low-temperature solution printing technique allows fabrication of high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with large crystals intended to minimize current-robbing grain boundaries. The meniscus-assisted solution printing (MASP) technique boosts power conversion efficiencies to nearly 20 percent by controlling crystal size and orientation.
July 7, 2017
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Self-powered system makes smart windows smarter
Researchers developed a new type of smart window: a self-powered version that promises to be inexpensive and easy to apply to existing windows, with potential to save heating and cooling costs. The window powers itself with a transparent solar cell that harvests near-ultraviolet light.
June 30, 2017
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New nanocatalyst paves way for carbon-neutral fuel
Australian scientists have paved the way for carbon neutral fuel with the development of a new efficient catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air into synthetic natural gas in a 'clean' process using solar energy.
June 21, 2017
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Solar heating could cover over 80 percent of domestic heating requirements in Nordic countries
According to researchers at Aalto University, by using suitable systems, more than 80% of heating energy for Finnish households could be produced using solar energy.
June 19, 2017
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'Magic' alloy could spur next generation of solar cells
In what could be a major step forward for a new generation of solar cells called "concentrator photovoltaics," University of Michigan researchers have developed a new semiconductor alloy that can capture the near-infrared light located on the leading edge of the visible light spectrum
June 15, 2017
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'Magic' alloy could spur next generation of solar cells
In what could be a major step forward for a new generation of solar cells called 'concentrator photovoltaics,' researchers have developed a new semiconductor alloy that can capture the near-infrared light located on the leading edge of the visible light spectrum.
June 15, 2017
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New technology will enable properties to share solar energy
In the UK alone, some 1.5 million homes are equipped with solar panels, and it has been estimated that by 2020 the figure could soar to 10 million, with the prospect of lower energy bills for consumers and massive reductions in CO2 emissions.
June 14, 2017
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Solar material for producing clean hydrogen fuel
A new material has been created based on gold and black phosphorus to produce clean hydrogen fuel using the full spectrum of sunlight.
June 14, 2017
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Google's Project Sunroof gives you solar panel peer pressure
You can look up whether your neighbors are adding solar installations to their roofs.
June 12, 2017
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Novel techniques examine solar cells with nanoscale precision
Using two novel techniques, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have for the first time examined, with nanometer-scale precision, the variations in chemical composition and defects of widely used solar cells.
June 9, 2017
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Simulations pinpoint atomic-level defects in solar cell nanostructures
Calculations help researchers predict defect-free materials
June 9, 2017
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Solar cell design - a seating plan for molecules
Individual pieces of a jigsaw puzzle joined together as if moved by magic -- that is what FAU materials researchers imagine when they apply molecules to surfaces to produce materials for new technologies such as organic solar cells.
June 8, 2017
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A common sunscreen could help make better solar panels
Zinc oxide does it all.
June 5, 2017
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Saving Lives and Money: The Potential of Solar to Replace Coal
By swapping solar photovoltaics for coal, the US could prevent 51,999 premature deaths a year, potentially making as much as $2.5 million for each life saved. A team has calculated US deaths per kilowatt hour per year for coal related to air pollution-related diseases associated with burning coal.
June 1, 2017
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Seeing light-to-energy transfer in new solar cell materials
Scientists are now able to capture the moment less than one trillionth of a second a particle of light hits a solar cell and becomes energy, and describe the physics of the charge carrier and atom movement for the first time.
June 1, 2017
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Ultra-stable perovskite solar cell remains stable for more than a year
Perovskite solar cells promise cheaper and efficient solar energy, with enormous potential for commercialization. But even though they have been shown to achieve over 22% power-conversion efficiency, their operational stability still fails market requirements. Despite a number of proposed solutions in fabrication technology, this issue has continued to undercut whatever incremental increases in efficiency have been achieved.
June 1, 2017
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Seeing below the surface of solar cells
It's difficult to improve processes you can't see. That's the problem for solar cells made of super-thin films. These highly flexible cells aren't as efficient as they could be at converting sunlight to electricity.
May 30, 2017
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How to obtain highly crystalline organic-inorganic perovskite films for solar cells
Members of the Laboratory of New Materials for Solar Energetics, working at the Faculty of Material Sciences, in cooperation with their colleagues from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have elaborated a new method. It allows to obtain highly crystalline organic-inorganic perovskite films for solar cells.
May 23, 2017
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Solar cells more efficient thanks to new material standing on edge
Researchers from Lund University in Sweden and from Fudan University in China have successfully designed a new structural organization using the promising solar cell material perovskite. The study shows that solar cells increase in efficiency thanks to the material's ability to self-organise by standing on edge.
May 23, 2017
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Solar cells more efficient thanks to new material standing on edge
Researchers have designed a new structural organization using the promising solar cell material perovskite. The study shows that solar cells increase in efficiency thanks to the material's ability to self-organize by standing on edge.
May 23, 2017
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Mercedes-Benz Energy pairs with solar company to sell batteries, rooftop panels
German luxury car maker follows Tesla's path into residential market.
May 18, 2017
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Photocatalyst makes hydrogen production 10 times more efficient
Hydrogen is an alternative source of energy that can be produced from renewable sources of sunlight and water. A group of Japanese researchers has developed a photocatalyst that increases hydrogen production tenfold.
May 18, 2017
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Climate change refuge for corals discovered (and how we can protect it right now)
Refuge could preserve climate-sensitive corals due to environmental gradients that allow for coral acclimatization
May 17, 2017
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New designer quantum dot systems with greater control over beneficial properties
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed new designer quantum dot systems with greater control over beneficial properties for photoelectrochemical and photovoltaic solar applications.
May 17, 2017
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Photovoltaics and batteries: an expensive combination
Solar power can cover up to 40% of the electricity needs of a typical Belgian household. Going beyond that level becomes really expensive: using batteries coupled with solar panels would be twice as expensive as using the power grid.
May 15, 2017
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Next-gen solar cells could be improved by atomic-scale redesign
Researchers have uncovered the exact mechanism that causes new solar cells to break down in air, paving the way for a solution.
May 12, 2017
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Power plants could cut a third of their emissions by using solar energy
Led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, the COMBO-CFB project has developed a new innovative concept to increase solar energy production in the energy system. According to this research, the concept can reduce fuel consumption and emissions stressing the climate by more than 33 per cent.
May 9, 2017
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Power plants could cut a third of their emissions by using solar energy
The COMBO-CFB project has developed a new innovative concept to increase solar energy production in the energy system. According to this research, the concept can reduce fuel consumption and emissions stressing the climate by more than 33 per cent. the concept is based on the combination of concentrated solar power (CSP) technology and a traditional power plant process into a hybrid plant which produces electricity on the basis of consumption.
May 9, 2017
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Installing solar to combat national security risks in the power grid
Power grid vulnerabilities are one of the most prevalent national security threats. the technical community calls for building up grid resiliency using distributed energy and microgrids for stabilization as multiple sources increases the difficulty of triggering cascading blackouts, and following an attack or natural disaster, microgrids can provide localized energy security. An interdisciplinary team calculated what it takes to make military bases more secure.
May 8, 2017
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Using sulfur to store solar energy
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and their European partners plan to develop an innovative sulfur-based storage system for solar power. Large-scale chemical storage of solar power and its overnight use as a fuel are to be achieved by means of a closed sulfur-sulfuric acid cycle. In the long term, this might be the basis of an economically efficient renewable energy source capable of providing base-load power.
May 3, 2017
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Solar cells with nanostripes
Solar cells based on perovskites reach high efficiencies: they convert more than 20 percent of the incident light directly into usable power. on their search for underlying physical mechanisms, researchers have now detected strips of nanostructures with alternating directions of polarization in the perovskite layers. These structures might serve as transport paths for charge carriers.
May 2, 2017
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Solar cells with nanostripes
Solar cells based on perovskites reach high efficiencies: they convert more than 20 percent of the incident light directly into usable power. on their search for underlying physical mechanisms, researchers of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now detected strips of nanostructures with alternating directions of polarization in the perovskite layers.
May 2, 2017
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Light can improve perovskite solar cell performance
Presence or absence of light plays a major role in perovskite film deposition
April 26, 2017
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Modeling reveals how policy affects adoption of solar energy photovoltaics in California
Researchers have created quantitative models to measure the impact of government incentives and installation costs on commercial solar photovoltaic adoption, providing new insight and predictive capabilities relevant to energy policy
April 25, 2017
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Pathway for generating up to 10 terawatts of power from sunlight by 2030
The annual potential of solar energy far exceeds the world's energy consumption, but the goal of using the sun to provide a significant fraction of global electricity demand is far from being realized.
April 25, 2017
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Solar cell design with over 50 percent energy-conversion efficiency
Solar cells convert the sun's energy into electricity by converting photons into electrons. a new solar cell design could raise the energy conversion efficiency to over 50% by absorbing the spectral components of longer wavelengths that are usually lost during transmission through the cell.
April 24, 2017
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One small change makes solar cells more efficient
The quest for more efficient solar cells has led to the search of new materials. for years, scientists have explored using tiny drops of designer materials, called quantum dots.
April 21, 2017
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Blockchain used to power Brooklyn microgrid for solar energy re-sale
LO3 Energy's 'TransActive Grid,' is the blockchain platform set up for the project; it timestamps each energy transaction as a chain of secure blocks
April 20, 2017
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New perovskite ink opens window for quality cells
Scientists have developed a new perovskite ink with a long processing window that allows the scalable production of perovskite thin films for high-efficiency solar cells.
April 18, 2017
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New world record for solar hydrogen production
Scientists have recaptured the record for highest efficiency in solar hydrogen production via a photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting process.
April 18, 2017
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Researchers capture excess photon energy to produce solar fuels
Scientists have developed a proof-of-principle photoelectrochemical cell capable of capturing excess photon energy normally lost to generating heat.
April 18, 2017
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Researchers capture excess photon energy to produce solar fuels
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a proof-of-principle photoelectrochemical cell capable of capturing excess photon energy normally lost to generating heat.
April 18, 2017
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Researchers capture excess photon energy to produce solar fuels
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a proof-of-principle photoelectrochemical cell capable of capturing excess photon energy normally lost to generating heat.
April 13, 2017
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Sunny days for solar charging
Improved performance and affordability make portable solar chargers an attractive power option when there's no wall outlet in sight.
April 11, 2017
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Hybrid perovskite material could replace silicon to double efficiency of solar cells
A new material has been shown to have the capability to double the efficiency of solar cells by researchers at Purdue University and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
April 6, 2017
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Tesla shows off a new Panasonic-made low-profile residential solar panel
Tesla is still hoping to begin installations of its solar roof tile product later this year, but that's not really a great option unless you're building new or replacing your existing roof, so it makes sense that it would continue to also offer retrofit solar options, like the new Panasonic panels it began advertising on its site quietly over the weekend.
April 10, 2017
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Solar cell produces hydrogen to light the night
Ultrathin solar cells use less material, split water, don't destroy themselves.
March 30, 2017
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Tesla to begin taking orders for its solar roof shingles
A solar-shingle roof is expected to cost no more than a standard roof
March 30, 2017
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Solar power-related jobs in U.S. grew 25% in 2016
Solar industry generated $154 billion in U.S. economic activity last year
March 28, 2017
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Photovoltaic ink could lead to easy solar panel manufacture
Easily scalable processing could make for rapid panel production.
March 23, 2017
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Japanese company develops a solar cell with record-breaking 26%+ efficiency
A group of researchers funded by a Japanese government program develops "industrially compatible" cells.
March 22, 2017
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Solar cells can become twice as efficient by employing a few smart nano-tricks
In the future, solar cells can become twice as efficient by employing a few smart little nano-tricks.
March 21, 2017
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Liquid storage of solar energy - more effective than ever before
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have demonstrated efficient solar energy storage in a chemical liquid. the stored energy can be transported and then released as heat whenever needed. the research is now presented on the cover of the scientific journal Energy & Environmental Science.
March 19, 2017
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Liquid storage of solar energy: More effective than ever before
Researchers have demonstrated efficient solar energy storage in a chemical liquid. the stored energy can be transported and then released as heat whenever needed, they say.
March 19, 2017
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Random Network Nanotube Films Enhance Long-Term Stability of Perovskite Solar Cells
Five years ago, there was a widespread discussion worldwide regarding third-generation solar cells that challenge conventional silicon cells due to a simple and inexpensive manufacturing process that required lesser energy.
March 19, 2017
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Nanotube film may resolve longevity problem of perovskite solar cells
Researchers lengthened the lifetime of perovskite solar cells by using nanotube film to replace the gold used as the back contact and the organic material in the hole conductor.
March 17, 2017
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Nanotube film may resolve longevity problem of challenger solar cells
Researchers have lengthened the lifetime of perovskite solar cells by using nanotube film to replace the gold used as the back contact and the organic material in the hole conductor.
March 17, 2017
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San Diego installs massive flow battery that can power 1,000 homes
Flow battery systems have an expected lifespan of more than 20 years
March 17, 2017
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Tesla co-founder and CTO JB Straubel explains its new solar storage facility
Tesla's new solar energy storage facility on the Hawaiian island of Kauai does what most solar power plants cannot: it stores energy from the sun during peak times for use when the grid (and its customers) needs it most. the facility is unique, with 52 MWh of storage capacity and 13 MWh of generation via its field of panels.
March 17, 2017
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Using gold coating to control luminescence of nanowires
In electronics, the race for smaller is huge.
March 16, 2017
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World's most efficient, environment-friendly solar cells
In the future, solar cells can become twice as efficient by employing a few smart little nano-tricks, suggest investigators in a new report.
March 21, 2017
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How to increase efficiencies of ultrathin CIGSe solar cells
Ultrathin CIGSe solar cells need much less rare earth elements and energy for production. Unfortunately, they are much less efficient too. now a team at Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin together with a group in the Netherlands has shown how to prevent the absorption loss of ultrathin CIGSe cells. they designed nanostructured back contacts for light trapping and could achieve a new record value of the the short circuit current density reaching nearly the best values for thicker CIGSe-cells.
March 14, 2017
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Chemists create molecular 'leaf' that collects and stores solar power without solar panels
An international research team has engineered a molecule that uses light or electricity to convert the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide -- a carbon-neutral fuel source -- more efficiently than any other method of "carbon reduction." the discovery is a new milestone in the quest to recycle carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere into carbon-neutral fuels and others materials.
March 8, 2017
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Chemists create molecular 'leaf' that collects and stores solar power without solar panels
An international team of scientists led by Liang-shi Li at Indiana University has achieved a new milestone in the quest to recycle carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere into carbon-neutral fuels and others materials.
March 8, 2017
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Kauai is moving from diesel generators to renewable energy with help from Tesla
Shipping fuel is expensive, so why not generate it from energy sources found locally?
March 8, 2017
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In shift, more homeowners are buying solar panels than leasing them
The solar energy market is growing 24.2% annually
March 8, 2017
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Tesla built a huge solar energy plant on the island of Kauai
Tesla is selling clean power to the island's electric company
March 8, 2017
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Tesla's Kauai solar facility will offset 1.6M gallons of fuel use per year
Tesla's Kauai solar power facility is officially open for business as of Friday, with a 13 MW SolarCity solar farm installation providing power to a Powerpack storage facility with 52 MWh of total capacity. the beauty of the new facility, in terms of the specific needs of the sun-soaked island in the Pacific, is that it can capture energy from the sun during peak daytime production hours, and then keep that power ready for peak consumption hours at night.
March 8, 2017
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New materials could turn water into the fuel of the future
A new materials discovery approach puts solar fuels on the fast track to commercial viability
March 6, 2017
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Amazon pledges to cover 15 massive warehouse rooftops with solar panels
By the end of 2017, company should have solar arrays covering millions of square footage.
March 2, 2017
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​Amazon turns warehouse roofs into solar power stations
Fifteen warehouses with solar panels will crank out 41 megawatts of power -- and mean you won't have to pay as much for Amazon services.
March 2, 2017
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Chinese solar exports fall in 2016 with global anti-dumping measures
Besides trade issues, manufacturers have also been opening Southeast Asian factories.
February 20, 2017
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Dream of energy-collecting windows is one step closer to reality
Researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Milano-Bicocca are bringing the dream of windows that can efficiently collect solar energy one step closer to reality thanks to high tech silicon nanoparticles.
February 20, 2017
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Printable solar cells just got a little closer
Research removes a key barrier to large-scale manufacture of low-cost, printable perovskite solar cells
February 16, 2017
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Graphene interface engineering for large area, high efficiency solar cells
Graphene and other layered materials are opening up new opportunities for improving efficiency in many technologies, such as solar cells. Perovskite-based solar cells have highly efficient solar power conversion, but suffer drawbacks such as reduced lifetime and poor performance at large scales.
February 15, 2017
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U.S. solar growth blows away previous records
The solar industry now employs more than twice as many Americans as does the coal industry
February 15, 2017
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Powur's Jonathan Budd talks about the future of solar power
Jonathan Budd sees solar power as a money-making opportunity. His new company, Powur, essentially lets people add solar to their homes with no upfront costs. While there isn't much technology in his solution he does have some interesting ideas about the future of solar.
February 8, 2017
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Powerful change: a profile of today's solar consumer
People with higher incomes and better education no longer dominate demand for the domestic solar market in Queensland with a new study revealing the highest uptake in solar PV systems comes from families on medium to lower incomes.
February 7, 2017
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Report: 1 in 50 new U.S. jobs came from solar last year
Employment in the industry rose in 44 states and is expected to continue growing
February 7, 2017
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Up to half of the Arctic's melt might be totally natural
But climate change is still responsible for the rest
March 13, 2017
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UPS to spend $18M to install 26,000 new solar panels
The new project will produce 10 megawatts of power, or enough electricity to power about 1,200 U.S. homes annually
February 10, 2017
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Solar Foundation expects 10% job growth in 2017 despite coal-focused government
A new report form the Solar Foundation complements Energy Department numbers.
February 7, 2017
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Thin, flexible, light-absorbent material for energy and stealth applications
Transparent window coatings that keep buildings and cars cool on sunny days. Devices that could more than triple solar cell efficiencies. Thin, lightweight shields that block thermal detection. These are potential applications for a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego.
February 2, 2017
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Floating solar panel market to be worth $2.7B in 2025
Revenue expected to increase 50% annually over the next three years
February 1, 2017
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Storing solar power increases energy consumption and emissions, study finds
Homes with solar panels do not require on-site storage to reap the biggest economic and environmental benefits of solar energy, according to research. In fact, storing solar energy for nighttime use actually increases both energy consumption and emissions compared with sending excess solar energy directly to the utility grid.
January 30, 2017
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The world's largest solar farm contains 2.5 million solar modules
It took only eight months to build and cost $679 million
January 27, 2017
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Apple to build 200MW solar farm to power data center
Apple is working toward 100% renewable energy use
January 25, 2017
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Designing architecture with solar building envelopes
As part of the ArKol -- development of architecturally highly integrated fa栤e collectors with heat pipes project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners is developing two new-style fa栤e collectors from the concept through to readiness for application. Both developments are intended to be much more flexibly integratable into the building envelope than standard collectors currently on the market, and in this way make the architectural integration of solar collectors in fa栤es more attractive.
January 16, 2017
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Jetstream aims to double residential solar efficiency
Large-scale solar projects work because they use concentrators to achieve much greater efficiencies than what's possible with traditional silicon photovoltaic panels. Up until now, residential projects have not had access to concentrator technology, and the limited spectral response and effectiveness of silicon has made it hard to get efficiencies much past about 20%. Startup Jetstream is planning to change that, with the first concentrator-based system suitable for residential use.
January 9, 2017
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