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1,279 Nanotechnology Resources

Misc. - Numbers

$1.3 million DARPA grant to fund graphene infrared detector research
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has awarded a $1.3 million grant to a team led by University of Central Florida researcher Debashis Chanda to fund the development of a next-generation infrared detector that could be used in fields as varied as night vision, meteorology and space exploration.
June 7, 2016
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2D materials enhance a 3D world
In the past decade, two-dimensional, 2D, materials have captured the fascination of a steadily increasing number of scientists. These materials, whose defining feature is having a thickness of only one to very few atoms, can be made of a variety of different elements or combinations thereof.
January 10, 2017
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2D Materials Prove to be a Promising Alternative for the Production of Microprocessors
Two-dimensional (2D) materials are considered to be very versatile, although - or often more precisely as they are made up of only one or a few layers of atoms. the best-known 2D material is graphene. Molybdenum disulfide, referring to a layer comprising of molybdenum and sulfur atoms that is three-atoms thick, is also included in this category, although, unlike graphene, it is available with semiconductor properties.
April 12, 2017
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3D computer models of damage in multi-layered materials
Computer modelling of nano-indentation studies performed on ion-irradiated steels has generated 3D stress-field maps on an engineering scale that agree well with experimental results.
April 20, 2017
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3D nanoprinting improves performance of atomic force microscopes
Tiny sensors made through nanoscale 3D printing may be the basis for the next generation of atomic force microscopes. These nanosensors can enhance the microscopes' sensitivity and detection speed by miniaturizing their detection component up to 100 times. the sensors were used in a real-world application for the first time at EPFL, and the results are published in Nature Communications.
September 23, 2016
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3D printing and nanotechnology, a mighty alliance to detect toxic liquids
Carbon nanotubes have made headlines in scientific journals for a long time, as has 3-D printing. But when both combine with the right polymer, in this case a thermoplastic, something special occurs: electrical conductivity increases and makes it possible to monitor liquids in real time.
January 10, 2017
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3D Printing of patterned membranes opens door to rapid advances in membrane technology
A new type of 3D printing developed by researchers at Penn State will make it possible for the first time to rapidly prototype and test polymer membranes that are patterned for improved performance.
June 2, 2016
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3D Printing Transforms Microscopic Nanorings into Smart Materials that Work at Human-Scale
Dartmouth College researchers have used advanced 3D printing to unlock the key to converting microscopic nanorings into smart materials capable of performing work at human-scale.
March 23, 2017
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3D printing with high-performance aerospace-grade carbon fiber
Lawrence Livermore National Lab researchers have become the first to 3D print aerospace-grade carbon fiber composites, opening the door to greater control and optimization of the lightweight, yet stronger than steel material.
February 28, 2017
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66 Lb. Pushing Force in PI's new High Resolution Linear Actuator
A linear actuator is a positioning device that provides motion in 1 degree of freedom. Designed for highly accurate and fast repetitive industrial applications, the L-239 compact linear actuator is the newest addition to the suite of motion control solutions available from precision positioning systems industry leader PI (Physik Instrumente).
April 12, 2017
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1550nm Photon Counting
Offering a unique combination of high quantum efficiency, wide dynamic range and ease of use for photon counting applications, the COUNT® Q from LASER COMPONENTS provides everything needed for free-running photon detection from 950 - 1600nm.
August 16, 2016
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2016 Neuroscience Conference Debuts PI's Ultra-Stable Microscope XY Stage Packages
Physik Instrumente will introduce two new compact XY microscope stages based on ultrasonic piezo direct-drive motors. Model U-761 provides 25x25mm travel and is equipped with 10nm resolution linear encoders, model U-780 provides 135x85mm.
November 3, 2016
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2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry 'for the design and synthesis of molecular machines'
A tiny lift, artificial muscles and miniscule motors. the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016 is awarded to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for their design and production of molecular machines. they have developed molecules with controllable movements, which can perform a task when energy is added.
October 5, 2016
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Misc. - A

A better understanding of nanomaterials
In the past six years, the National Research Programme "Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials" (NRP 64) intensively studied the development, use, behaviour and degradation of engineered nanomaterials, including their impact on humans and on the environment.
April 6, 2017
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A bio-inspired gel material could help engineers control movements of soft robots
The resulting pH- and ion-sensitive material is able to respond and react to its environment. Understanding this naturally-occurring process can be particularly helpful for active control of the motion or deformation of actuators for soft robotics and sensors without using external power supply or complex electronic controlling devices. It could also be used to build autonomous structures.
March 19, 2017
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A breakthrough in the study of how things break, bend and deform
Every material can bend and break. Through nearly a century's worth of research, scientists have had a pretty good understanding of how and why. But, according to new findings from Drexel University materials science and engineering researchers, our understanding of how layered materials succumb to stresses and strains was lacking. the report suggests that, when compressed, layered materials -- everything from sedimentary rocks, to beyond-whisker-thin graphite -- will form a series of internal buckles, or ripples, as they deform.
October 4, 2016
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A breakthrough technique for non-invasive electron microscopy for soft materials
Using the Molecular Foundry's imaging capabilities, scientists developed a technique, called "CLAIRE," that allows the incredible resolution of electron microscopy to be used for non-invasive imaging of biomolecules and other soft matter. the new technique offers both clarity and speed ("Cathodoluminescence-activated nanoimaging: Noninvasive near-field optical microscopy in an electron microscope").
July 25, 2016
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A camera that can see unlike any imager before it
Picture a sensor pixel about the size of a red blood cell. now envision a million of these pixels–a megapixel's worth–in an array that covers a thumbnail. Take one more mental trip: dive down onto the surface of the semiconductor hosting all of these pixels and marvel at each pixel's associated tech-mesh of more than 1,000 integrated transistors, which provide each and every pixel with a tiny reprogrammable brain of its own. T
September 20, 2016
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A close up look at ultra-thin nanomaterials for industrial use
Advances in nanomaterials hold the promise of new, better, more competitive products. the EU-funded 2DInterFOX project is seeking new insights into their behaviour - the results could help manufacturers develop new electronic and energy-related products, potentially boosting their competitiveness.
July 5, 2016
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A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction
How can a gecko move across a ceiling upside down? Two mechanisms are responsible: Adhesion via billions of extremely fine hairs on its feet, which enable it to stick to ceilings and walls. and as soon as the gecko moves, it relies on stiction. However, any change of adhesion and stiction at macroscopic level is expressed on the nanometer scale through the change in the forces exerted between atoms and molecules.
June 29, 2016
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A Fast, Non-Destructive Testing Method for 2D Materials
When a material is thinned down to a single-atom thickness, it can greatly alter that material's physical properties. for instance, graphene, the popular 2D material, has unmatched electrical conductivity and strength, unlike its bulk form, graphite.
May 3, 2017
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A faster, precise silica coating process for quantum dot nanorods
Materials researchers at North Carolina State University have fine-tuned a technique that enables them to apply precisely controlled silica coatings to quantum dot nanorods in a day -- up to 21 times faster than previous methods. In addition to saving time, the advance means the quantum dots are less likely to degrade, preserving their advantageous optical properties.
July 11, 2016
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A glimpse inside the atom
An electron microscope can't just snap a photo like a mobile phone camera can. the ability of an electron microscope to image a structure -- and how successful this imaging will be -- depends on how well you understand the structure. Complex physics calculations are often needed to make full use of the potential of electron microscopy.
July 18, 2016
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A golden discovery for wearable technology
Some day, your smartphone might completely conform to your wrist, and when it does, it might be covered in pure gold, thanks to researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology.
March 16, 2017
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A graphene window to better microfluidics
Working with protein microcrystals can be an enormously challenging endeavor. Aside from their extremely small size, microcrystals can be delicate, difficult to handle, and susceptible to radiation damage from x-ray diffraction studies. Microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" technologies offer some highly promising ways to circumvent these difficulties, but can bring with them new problems to overcome.
July 26, 2016
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A guide to the nanotechnology used in the average home
As a researcher of nanomaterials, I am often asked: "When are we finally going to start seeing nanotechnology products on the market?"
July 5, 2016
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A joint study to design nanoporous materials to carry small molecules
Prof. Ryotaro Matsuda, the Graduate School of Engineering at Nagoya University, and Prof. Susumu Kitagawa, the Department of Synthetic Chemistry & Biological Chemistry and the Director of the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences at Kyoto University, won the contest "Air Liquide Essential Molecules Challenge."
November 28, 2016
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A little impurity makes nanolasers shine
Scientists have improved the performance of tiny lasers by adding impurities, in a discovery which will be central to the development of low-cost biomedical sensors, quantum computing, and a faster internet. a researcher added atoms of zinc to lasers one hundredth the diameter of a human hair and made of gallium arsenide -- a material used extensively in smartphones and other electronic devices,.
July 5, 2016
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A 'magnetic slippery surface' improves de-icing
Icy conditions can be deadly, whether you're flying into bad weather or too close to power transmission lines during a storm. Researchers at the University of Houston have reported the discovery of a material that can be applied to any surface to repel ice.
November 10, 2016
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A matter of orientation
Many artificial materials can be built on the particle level. the properties of this material - whether it is hard or soft, electrically conductive or insulating, water-repellent or magnetic -- are determined by the properties of the particles themselves, and especially by the arrangement of the materials' building blocks.
June 5, 2016
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A miniaturized sensor that can measure chemistry on a chip
The researchers use a phenomenon called "Raman scattering:" when a laser strikes a molecule it kicks back the laser energy as photons of light at a variety of wavelengths that depend on the structure and composition of the molecule.
August 16, 2016
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A 'nano-golf course' to precisely assemble nanoparticles
Whether it has to do with making pens or building space shuttles, the manufacturing process consists of creating components and then carefully assembling them. But when it comes to infinitely small structures, manipulating and assembling high-performance nanoparticles on a substrate is no mean feat.
October 3, 2016
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A "Nano-golf Course" to Precisely Assemble Nanoparticles
EPFL researchers have developed a method to place and position hundreds of thousands of nanoparticles very precisely on a one centimeter square surface.
October 4, 2016
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A nanotechnology approach to purifying liquid crystals
Liquid crystals used in modern devices such as laptops, tablets and smartphones typically contain a small fraction of ionic contaminants. These ion contaminants can originate from multiple sources during the chemical synthesis of materials, in the process of assembling the device, and in its daily use.
January 23, 2017
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A nanobiotechnology tool for site-specific delivery in the gastrointestinal tract
Last year, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose tumors.
September 27, 2016
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A new contact to the two-dimensional world
Your laptop or cellphone becomes very hot after intensive use like playing video games. this is because much of the electric energy is wasted in the form of heat, particularly at the contact between metal and semiconductor.
February 22, 2017
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A new form of light
Glow-in-the-dark stickers, weird deep-sea fish, LED lightbulbs -- all have forms of luminescence. In other words, instead of just reflecting light, they make their own.
October 5, 2016
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A new Formulation Explains Self-Assembly of Atoms into Nanoclusters
A team of researchers from Iowa State University have created a new formulation that helps to clarify the self-assembly of atoms into nanoclusters and to promote the scientific understanding of associated nanotechnologies.
September 12, 2016
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A new invisibility cloak to conceal objects in diffusive atmospheres
Researchers at the Public University of Navarre and the Universitat Politècnica de València have come up with a new invisibility cloak capable of concealing objects in diffusive atmospheres, not just in permanent light, made possible by the cloaks developed so far, but also in any kind of light.
January 20, 2017
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A new low-defect method to nitrogen dope graphene resulting in tunable bandstructure
An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Electronics Science and Technology and Materials Science and Technology Divisions, has demonstrated hyperthermal ion implantation (HyTII) as an effective means of substitutionally doping graphene -- a hexagonally-arranged single-atomic thickness carbon sheet -- with nitrogen atoms.
June 5, 2016
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A new material can clear up nuclear waste gases
An international team of scientists at EPFL and the US have discovered a material that can clear out radioactive waste from nuclear plants more efficiently, cheaply, and safely than current methods.
June 13, 2016
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A new method for quick and precise measurement of quantum states
Nuclear spin tomography is an application in (human) medicine known from medical institutions. the patient absorbs and re-emits electromagnetic radiation in all directions in space. they are detected and 3D images or 2D slice images are reconstructed from that data.
January 11, 2017
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A new method of engineering polymer brushes
Antimicrobial cutting boards. Flame-retardant carpets. Friction-resistant bearings. Engineered surfaces add value to the things we use, providing extra layers of safety, easing their operation, preserving their quality or adding utility.
September 13, 2016
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A new method to program nanoparticle organization in polymer thin films
Controlling the organization of nanoparticles into patterns in ultrathin polymer films can be accomplished with entropy instead of chemistry, according to a discovery by Dr. Alamgir Karim, UA's Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company Professor of Polymer Engineering, and his student Dr. Ren Zhang (PNAS, "Entropy-driven segregation of polymer-grafted nanoparticles under confinement").
March 13, 2017
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A new nanoparticle contrast agent for MRI
A new, specially coated iron oxide nanoparticle developed by a team at MIT and elsewhere could provide an alternative to conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. In rare cases, the currently used gadolinium agents have been found to produce adverse effects in patients with impaired kidney function.
February 14, 2017
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A new sensitive and stable self-powered photodetector
Researchers in Singapore and China have collaborated to develop a self-powered photodetector that can be used in a wide range of applications such as chemical analysis, communications, astronomical investigations and much more.
February 9, 2017
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A new system of building structures based on nanostrutured concrete
Professor of the Institute of Civil Engineering of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) Andrey Ponomarev and a graduate student Alexander Rassokhin developed a new construction technology (Magazine of Civil Engineering, "Hybrid wood-polymer composites in civil engineering").
April 24, 2017
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A new tool to study plant cell biomechanics
Microbead capture of plant protoplasts allows researchers to study cellular response
July 5, 2016
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A new type of quantum bits
In computers of the future, information might be stored in the form of quantum bits. But how can a quantum bit be realised?
July 26, 2016
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A new understanding of metastability clears path for next-generation material
They say diamonds are forever, but diamonds in fact are a metastable form of carbon that will slowly but eventually transform into graphite, another form of carbon. Being able to design and synthesize other long-lived, thermodynamically metastable materials could be a potential gold mine for materials designers, but until now, scientists lacked a rational understanding of them.
November 21, 2016
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A new way to display the 3-D structure of molecules
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have created a sort of nanoscale display case that enables new atomic-scale views of hard-to-study chemical and biological samples.
August 18, 2016
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A new way to make nanostructured phosphides for efficient water splitting
A major challenges in transitioning to a clean energy society is how to store the excess electricity generated by wind and solar power plants. Renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, hydroelectric and geothermal fluctuate over time, and storing this energy is a crucial task for creating a sustainable society.
November 17, 2016
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A new way to trap dangerous gases with metal organic frameworks
A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas has developed a novel method for trapping potentially harmful gases within microscopic organo-metallic structures.
December 14, 2016
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A Novel and Intuitive Operating Concept Revolutionizes Raman Imaging
Advanced functionality, accelerated workflow and enhanced hardware control
February 17, 2017
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A novel non-precious metal catalyst for water splitting
A new research, affiliated with Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has presented a novel strategy for non-precious metal catalyst that can replace rare and expensive platinum(Pt)-based catalyst, currently used in hydrogen fuel cell.
November 18, 2016
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A pioneering patent for free-floating graphene production technology
A novel process for producing single layer graphene sheets has been invented by CRR's chief scientist, Larry Fullerton. Cedar Ridge Research (CRR) has received U.S. patent 9,334,168 from the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for the process.
August 08, 2016
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A polyphenyline fuel cell membrane outperforms the market
Fuel cells provide power without pollutants. But, as in the Goldilocks story, membranes in automobile fuel cells work at temperatures either too hot or too cold to be maximally effective. a polyphenyline membrane patented by Sandia National Laboratories, though, seems to work just about right, says Sandia chemist Cy Fujimoto.
September 12, 2016
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A promising route to the scalable production of highly crystalline graphene films
Researchers discovered a procedure to restore defective graphene oxide structures that cause the material to display low carrier mobility. by applying a high-temperature reduction treatment in an ethanol environment, defective structures were restored, leading to the formation of a highly crystalline graphene film with excellent band-like transport.
August 25, 2016
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A quantum low pass for photons
The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called Poisson-distribution. There are, however, light sources with non-classical photon number distributions that can only be described by the laws of quantum mechanics.
April 13, 2017
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A roadmap for polymer-based additive manufacturing
Additive manufacturing (AM) is a high-priority technology growth area for U.S. manufacturers. Innovative AM processes that fabricate parts layer-by-layer directly from a 3-D digital model have great potential for producing high-value, complex, individually customized parts.
December 13, 2016
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A Study on Unpredictable Behavior of Nanoparticles
Nanoparticles behave in an extremely complex manner in the environment. In a large overview study, ETH environmental scientists have proved that currently there is a lack of systematic experimental data that could help in understanding the nanoparticles in a comprehensive way.
April 20, 2017
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A Successful Kick off Meeting of Newly Launched LIFE Project NanoMONITOR
The newly started European Commission LIFE project NanoMONITOR addresses the challenges of supporting the risk assessment of nanomaterials under REACH by development of a real-time information and monitoring system. at the project's kickoff meeting held on the 19th January 2016 in Valencia (Spain) participants discussed how this goal could be achieved.
June 16, 2016
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A Xeuss 2.0 HR SAXS/WAXS Instrument was Installed Last Summer at the University of Texas El Paso in the Department of Physics.
The instrument is used primarily to advance the main research program of the Nanomaterials, Interfaces, and Confinement for Energy & the Environment (NICE2 ) Laboratory headed by Dr. Jose Leobardo Banuelos. this includes work through collaborations at UTEP in physics, geology, chemistry, and engineering, and several U.S. and international collaborators.
November 4, 2016
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Acetone experiences Leidenfrost effect, no hotplate needed
In doing his due diligence, cleaning his lab equipment, fluid physicist Stoffel Janssens from the Mathematical Soft Matter Unit in the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST), Okinawa, Japan, took notice of the unusual interaction between the water and acetone droplets floating over the water surface as the droplets made their way to the drain.
March 14, 2017
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Achieving ultra-low friction without oil additives
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new process for treating metal surfaces that has the potential to improve efficiency in piston engines and a range of other equipment.
October 11, 2016
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Achromatic Flat Lenses Add More Color to the World of Optics
A new, flat lens with the ability to focus light with a higher efficiency within the visible spectrum was reported by a team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) last summer. In order to bend and focus light as it passed, an ultrathin array of nanopillars was used in the lens.
February 9, 2017
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ACS Motion Control Joins Forces with PI
Motion control and nanopositioning systems global leader PI (Physik Instrumente) is proud to announce the acquisition of 80% of the Israeli-based company, ACS Motion Control, a well-known developer and manufacturer of controllers and drives for multi-axis systems.
January 25, 2017
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Actuators inspired by muscle
To make robots more cooperative and have them perform tasks in close proximity to humans, they must be softer and safer. a new actuator developed by a team led by George Whitesides, Ph.D. – who is a Core Faculty member at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology in Harvard University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) - generates movements similar to those of skeletal muscles using vacuum power to automate soft, rubber beams.
June 1, 2016
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Adding clay to saline nanofluids creates useful materials
You've seen sauce or mayonnaise that separates, or a slippery layer of oil that forms on top of skin cream. Oil and water generally stay separate. It is actually hard work to keep water droplets or oil droplets stable in a substance called an emulsion.
November 24, 2016
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Adding color to the gray world of electron microscopy
As his Christmas gift to himself each year, the late biochemist Roger Tsien treated himself to two weeks of uninterrupted research in his lab. this image is a product of those annual sojourns. While it may look like a pine wreath dotted with crimson berries, it is in fact one of the world's first color electron micrographs–and the method used to create it may dramatically advance cell imaging.
December 19, 2016
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Adhesive behavior of self-constructive materials measured for first time
When building with molecules, it is important to understand how they stick to each other. the problem is that the methods used to measure this are themselves an influencing factor on the process. In today's Nature Communications, researchers at TU Eindhoven, led by Professor Bert Meijer, present a method that excludes this influence and which can measure how fast small molecules detach from a larger molecular entity dissolved in water.
May 15, 2017
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Advanced Electron Tomography Techniques Help Reveal Structure and Composition of Polymer Nano-Patches
Patches of chain-like molecules placed across nanoscale particles can radically transform the optical, electronic, and magnetic properties of particle-based materials. Understanding why depends critically on the three-dimensional features of these "polymer nano-patches"–which are tantalizingly difficult to reveal at a scale spanning just billionths of a meter.
October 30, 2016
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Africa's Most Vulnerable Face an Even Hotter Future
Already home to some of the most environmentally vulnerable populations on the planet, Africa looks to increasingly feel the sting of climate change through more frequent, widespread and intense heat waves.
May 26, 2016
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AFSEM offers a Solution for Conductive AFM in SEM with Self-sensing Cantilevers
GETec and Nanosurf now offer self-sensing conductive cantilevers for AFSEM™ that enable conductivity probing in the vacuum environment of the SEM
September 22, 2016
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An accelerated pipeline to open materials research
Workflow system unites imaging, algorithms, and HPC to advance materials discovery and design
July 21, 2016
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An Archimedes' screw for groups of quantum particles
Anyone who has tried to lead a group of tourists through a busy city knows the problem. how do you keep the group together when they are constantly jostled, held up and distracted by the hubbub around them?
November 18, 2016
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An innovative magnetically activated thermal switch based on nanofluids
With the exponential rise of power dissipation in electric devices such as integrated circuits or micro/nano electro mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), new thermal management solutions are in high demand.
December 9, 2016
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An old rock teaches us new tricks to fabricate van der Waals heterostructures
In 2004 Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov proved that it is possible to separate atomically-thick layers of graphite and other two-dimensional materials by just using an adhesive tape. Since then, the scientific community has pursued the possibility of building man-made materials by artificial stacking of different ultrathin materials one on top of the other. These materials are called van der Waals heterostructures.
February 15, 2017
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Analytik Appointed Exclusive Distributors for Particle Metrix GmbH Particle Analysers
Analytik, leading suppliers of innovative analytical instrumentation, are pleased to announce their appointment as exclusive distributors for German company, Particle Metrix GmbH, manufacturers of particle analysers for dispersions and macromolecular solutions. the main applications are in the fields of the life sciences and colloid chemistry.
February 1, 2017
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Anasys Instruments Introduces the nanoIR2-FS High Speed Nanoscale IR Spectroscopy System
Anasys Instruments, the world leader in nanoscale IR spectroscopy, announces its next generation nanoscale IR spectroscopy and chemical imaging system, the nanoIR2-FS™. the nanoIR2-FS, with new FASTSpectra™ technology, sets new standards in measurement speed, resolution, sensitivity, and multi-modal characterization capabilities, while extending its Resonance Enhanced AFM-IR technology to a broader spectroscopic range to provide unrivalled correlation to FTIR at the nanoscale across a wider range of samples.
September 30, 2016
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Andor Launches Ultrafast Spectroscopy-Enabled sCMOS Detectors
Andor Technology Ltd., an Oxford Instruments company and world leader in scientific imaging and spectroscopy solutions, today announced the launch of an ultrafast Spectroscopy Mode on its market leading high speed and low noise Zyla and iStar scientific CMOS (sCMOS) platforms. Physical and Life Science spectroscopists now have seamless access to a unique combination of superb spectral rates up to 27,000 sps, high sensitivity and high dynamic range.
January 30, 2017
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Announcing the 2017 Lee Osheroff Richardson Science Prize Winner
The Lee Osheroff Richardson (LOR) Science Prize promotes and recognises the novel work of young scientists working in the fields of low temperatures and/or high magnetic fields in the Americas. Oxford Instruments is delighted to announce Dr Brad Ramshaw, Assistant Professor at Cornell University as the winner of the 2017 LOR Science Prize.
February 17, 2017
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Application Study Demonstrates Speciation Analysis of Plasma Proteins
Exciting advances in the analysis of plasma proteins using a hyphenated system that couples asymmetric flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have been reported by Postnova Analytics.
June 14, 2016
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Applied NanoFluorescence launches the NS MiniTracer:
Affordable and rapid trace detection of single-walled carbon nanotubes
September 27, 2016
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'Artificial atom' created in graphene
In a tiny quantum prison, electrons behave quite differently as compared to their counterparts in free space. they can only occupy discrete energy levels, much like the electrons in an atom - for this reason, such electron prisons are often called "artificial atoms"
August 22, 2016
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Artificial Intelligence Powers Major Content Expansion of Nature Research's Nano
Nano, a Nature Research solution, has just been given a boost by artificial intelligence (AI), increasing the information available to users by sourcing data from over 400,000 relevant research papers.
March 7, 2017
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Artificial topological matter opens new research directions
An international team of researchers have created a new structure that allows the tuning of topological properties in such a way as to turn on or off these unique behaviors. the structure could open up possibilities for new explorations into the properties of topological states of matter.
April 5, 2017
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Asphalt-based carbon-capture material advances
A Rice University laboratory has improved its method to turn plain asphalt into a porous material that can capture greenhouse gases from natural gas.
September 13, 2016
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Asignal boost for molecular microscopy
A team of researchers of the Laser Spectroscopy Division of Prof. Theodor W. Hansch (Director at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and Chair of Experimental Physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Munich) has now developed a technique, where an optical microcavity is used to enhance Raman scattering signals, and utilized it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging (Nature Communications, "Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes").
July 12, 2016
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Asymmetrical magnetic microbeads turned into micro-robots
Janus was a Roman god with two distinct faces. Thousands of years later, he inspired material scientists working on asymmetrical microscopic spheres–with both a magnetic and a non-magnetic half–called Janus particles. Instead of behaving like normal magnetic beads, with opposite poles attracting, Janus particle assemblies look as if poles of the same type attract each other.
July 19, 2016
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Atom art: Beauty at the atomic scale
"Nature makes some beautiful patterns with atoms."
September 29, 2016
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Atom-scale 'Lego' could keep scientists busy 'for next 50 years'
Atom-scale building blocks that have been compared to microscopic Lego are allowing researchers to play with the properties of common materials, and the possibilities are so great that it could keep scientists busy for the next 50 years.
May 12, 2017
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Atomic blimp stretches a crystal
With just a bit of helium, the lighter-than-air element that makes balloons float, scientists have done what was once thought impossible–they stretched a crystal lattice in just one dimension, allowing them to tune the structure's electronic and magnetic properties. to achieve this elongation, scientists devised a new method called "strain doping." Scientists implant helium ions into a crystal.
July 27, 2016
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Atomic Force Microscope Leader Park Systems Presents Superhydrophobic Coatings Webinar on June 15
Park Systems, worldleader in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is offering a nanotechnology webinar titledSuperhydrophobic Coatings on June 15, 2016.
June 8, 2016
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Atomic gyroscope design
Shrink rays may exist only in science fiction, but similar effects are at work in the real world at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
August 24, 2016
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Atomic 're-packing' behind metallic glass mystery
An international collaboration involving Hokkaido University's high-voltage electron microscope has solved a puzzle about the atomic structure of metallic glasses that has baffled scientists for four decades (Nature Communications, "Hidden amorphous phase and reentrant supercooled liquid in Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses").
March 29, 2017
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Atomic sculpting with a microscope
A new tool now rests in the 3D printing toolbox. the electron beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope has been exquisitely controlled with specially programmed electronics to tunnel into non-crystalline material and construct 3D features that are in perfect alignment with the underlying substrate (i.e., epitaxial).
June 17, 2016
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Atomic-scale simulations predict how to use nanoparticles to increase hydrogen production
What if industrial waste water could become fuel? with affordable, long-lasting catalysts, water could be split to produce hydrogen that could be used to power fuel cells or combustion engines.
June 29, 2016
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Attosecond camera for nanostructures
Physicists have observed a light-matter phenomenon in nano-optics, which lasts only attoseconds.
May 31, 2016
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Attosecond camera for nanostructures
Physicists of the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munich in collaboration with scientists from the Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg have observed a light-matter phenomenon in nano-optics, which lasts only attoseconds.
May 31, 2016
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Misc. - B

Background suppression for super-resolution light microscopy
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have developed a new fluorescence microscopy method: STEDD nanoscopy produces images of highest resolution with suppressed background.
February 1, 2017
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Bacterial Wind Turbines Could Power the Nanobots of the Future
Computer Model Suggests a Way to Generate Tiny Amounts of Power for Tiny Machines
July 13, 2016
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Beating the heat a challenge at the nanoscale
Rice University scientists who analyze the properties of materials as small as a single molecule have encountered a challenge that appears at very low temperatures.
July 28, 2016
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Better biosensors on edge
Using a laser to burn patterns into a polymer sheet, KAUST researchers have created graphene electrodes that act as effective biosensors.
February 14, 2017
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Better contrast agents based on nanoparticles
Scientists have developed nanoparticles which can serve as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. this new type of nanoparticles produce around ten times more contrast than the actual contrast agents and are responsive to specific environments.
August 03, 2016
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Better contrast agents based on nanoparticles
Scientists at the University of Basel have developed nanoparticles which can serve as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. this new type of nanoparticles produce around ten times more contrast than the actual contrast agents and are responsive to specific environments. T
August 03, 2016
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Better material insights with gentle e-beams
There are several ways to change a molecule, chemically or physically. One way is to heat it; another is to bombard it with light particles, or photons. a lesser known method relies on electron collision, or e-beam technology, which is becoming increasingly popular in industry.
June 15, 2016
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Better, stronger: polymer breakthrough to improve things we use everyday
Medicine, mobile phones, computers and clothes could all be enhanced using the process for making paint, according to research by the University of Warwick (Nature Chemistry, "Sequence-controlled methacrylic multiblock copolymers via sulphur-free RAFT emulsion polymerization").
October 17, 2016
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Bibby Scientific Launches new Jenway® Spectrophotometer with Advanced Diode Array Technology
Bibby Scientific Ltd announced today that Jenway®, a leading UK manufacturer of analytical laboratory instruments, has launched the new 7200 visible scanning spectrophotometer.
August 02, 2016
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Bio-inspired catalysts that work in water open door to greener chemical processes
UniversitPokemon Go Laval researchers have developed catalysts that, like enzymes present in living cells, are able to function efficiently in water. this discovery, the details of which were published today in Chemical Communications, shows that it may be possible to substantially reduce the use of toxic and non-recyclable organic solvents in a host of chemical reactions, particularly when synthesizing pharmaceutical ingredients.
May 4, 2017
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Bio-Inspired Nanostructures Generate Bright Colors Independent of the Viewing Angle
Colors are created in various ways, and pigments are the best known colors. the feathers of peacock or the blue tarantula have very bright colors, but these are not caused by pigments, rather by nanostructures that cause the reflected light waves to overlap. this results in remarkably dynamic color effects.
November 18, 2016
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Bio-inspired tire design: Where the rubber meets the road
The fascination with the ability of geckos to scamper up smooth walls and hang upside down from improbable surfaces has entranced scientists at least as far back as Aristotle, who noted the reptile's remarkable feats in his History of Animals.
August 24, 2016
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Biodegradable polymers made by chemical vapor deposition
Polymerization by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a simple method for modifying surfaces by which topologically challenging substrates can be evenly coated with polymers. In the journal Angewandte Chemie ("Backbone-Degradable Polymers Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition"), researchers have now introduced the first CVD method for producing degradable polymers. Biomolecules or drugs can be attached by means of special side groups. this introduces new possibilities for applications like the coating of biodegradable implants.
December 6, 2016
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Biofouling - Sticking to the story at the molecular level
A deeper understanding of protein adhesion to solid surfaces may shed new light on biological phenomena such as marine biofouling. In their quest for non-toxic, microorganism-repelling surfaces, A*STAR researchers evaluated the relationship between charge and pH for an adhesive protein that exists in minute quantities in the footprint of barnacle larvae and showed it influences their ability to attach to surfaces.
January 11, 2017
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Biolin Scientific Partners with L.A.B. Analytical to Expand Analytical Instrument Business in Scandinavia
Biolin Scientific has signed an agreement with L.A.B. Analytical, a specialist laboratory appliances provider, to distribute Biolin Scientific's state-of the-art surface analysis instruments in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Iceland.
August 23, 2016
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Bioinspired process makes materials light, robust, programmable at nano- to macro-scale
Researchers at Tufts University's School of Engineering have developed a new bioinspired technique that transforms silk protein into complex materials that are easily programmable at the nano-, micro- and macro-scales as well as ultralight and robust. Among the varied structures generated was a web of silk nano fibers able to withstand a load 4,000 times its own weight.
February 27, 2017
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Biophysics: Stopping the random walk
The cell's internal skeleton undergoes constant restructuring. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists now show that its associated proteins can be efficiently transported to their sites of action by diffusion -- provided they can be arrested when they get there.
August 17, 2016
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Bird feathers inspire researchers to produce vibrant new colors
A Nagoya University-led research team mimics the rich color of bird plumage and demonstrates new ways to control how light interacts with materials.
May 8, 2017
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Bistatic laser monitor sees through fire
The creation of new materials is often accompanied with powerful illumination. Scientists are designing an advanced bistatic laser monitor that enables observing high-speed processes hidden by background lighting, e.g. at welding. the newly developed two-laser monitor makes it possible to obtain better images and even to observe X-ray processes from a safe distance.
April 13, 2017
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Blacktrace Launches Particle Works, a Nano- and Microstructure Specialist Brand
Blacktrace Holdings Limited, a leading group of companies focused on Productizing Science®, will be launching its latest brand, Particle Works, at the NANOTEXNOLOGY 2016 conference in Thessaloniki, Greece, from the 4th to the 8th of July.
July 6, 2016
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'Bolt of lightning' captures development of block copolymer
The ability to precisely control every aspect of a material, even at the nanoscale, is of critical importance in a host of applications.
October 18, 2016
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Boron atoms stretch out, gain new powers
Hold on, there, graphene. you might think you're the most interesting new nanomaterial of the century, but boron might already have you beat, according to scientists at Rice University.
January 27, 2017
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Boron boosts graphene's sensitivity to noxious gases
Detecting noxious gases, such as those released from power plants and other sources that can harm the environment, is something graphene does well, but it could be even better.
July 29, 2016
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Borophene: a prospective extraordinary sodium anode material
Sodium-based batteries have drawn considerable attention as a prospective alternative to lithium-based batteries due to the abundance and low price of sodium element. However, finding a suitable anode material has been a long-standing critical task before the commercialization of sodium-based batteries.
June 23, 2016
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Bouncing droplets remove contaminants like pogo jumpers
Scalpels that never need washing. Airplane wings that de-ice themselves. Windshields that readily repel raindrops. While the appeal of a self-cleaning, hydrophobic surface may be apparent, the extremely fragile nature of the nanostructures that give rise to the water-shedding surfaces greatly limit the durability and use of such objects.
July 5, 2016
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Breaking me softly- ability to control breakage in a material
A finding by a University of Central Florida researcher that unlocks a means of controlling materials at the nanoscale and opens the door to a new generation of manufacturing is featured online today in the journal Nature ("Controlled fragmentation of multimaterial fibres and films via polymer cold-drawing").
June 5, 2016
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Breakthrough in materials science: Research team can bond metals with nearly all surfaces
Through this "nanoscale-sculpturing" process, metals such as aluminium, titanium, or zinc can permanently be joined with nearly all other materials, become water-repellent, or improve their biocompatibility. the potential spectrum of applications of these "super connections" is extremely broad, ranging from metalwork in industry right through to safer implants in medical technology.
September 7, 2016
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Breakthrough in the formation of beam size controllable X-ray nanobeams
A research team in Japan has now succeeded in developing high precision X-ray deformable mirrors that can be configured as necessary. they are the first to have achieved the formation of three types of X-ray focused beams, which differ in focused spot size, without changing the experimental setup.
July 11, 2016
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Breakthrough in the quantum transfer of information between matter and light
From stationary to flying qubits at speeds never reached before.... this feat, achieved by a team from Polytechnique Montreal and France's Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), brings us a little closer to the era when information is transmitted via quantum principles.
November 11, 2016
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Breakthrough in the synthetic replication of composite-material structures found in Mother of pearl
Biomaterials play a crucial role in the development of future high-performance materials. a naturally occurring example of such biomaterial, the mollusk shell, guides chemical replication processes in laboratories. Due to its complex chemical construction, however, these processes are not easy to replicate synthetically. Chemists at the University of Konstanz, in cooperation with the University of Science and Technology of China (Hefei, China), are now the first to synthetically reproduce the structural configuration of natural mother of pearl or "nacre".
August 19, 2016
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Breakthrough in the synthetic replication of composite-material structures found in Mother of pearl
Biomaterials play a crucial role in the development of future high-performance materials. a naturally occurring example of such biomaterial, the mollusk shell, guides chemical replication processes in laboratories. Due to its complex chemical construction, however, these processes are not easy to replicate synthetically.
September 7, 2016
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Breakthrough work advances path for nanoscale spin-wave majority gates
At the Annual Conference on Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, imec, an research and innovation center in nano-electronics and digital technologies, presented breakthrough results supporting the building of technology-relevant majority gates based on spin waves.
October 30, 2016
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Breathable and stretchable protein wafers
Scientists constructed defect-free sheets of material with pores that "breathe"–open and close simultaneously without falling apart. the material also displays counterintuitive mechanical behavior. Unlike materials such as pizza dough that get thinner when stretched, these sheets expand or contract equally in both directions when stretched or compressed.
September 2, 2016
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Bridging the gap between the quantum and classical worlds
In the quantum world, physicists study the tiny particles that make up our classical world -- neutrons, electrons, photons -- either one at a time or in small numbers because the behaviour of the particles is completely different on such a small scale.
August 02, 2016
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Bright colors by nanotechnology
Colors are produced in a variety of ways. the best known colors are pigments. However, the very bright colors of the blue tarantula or peacock feathers do not result from pigments, but from nanostructures that cause the reflected light waves to overlap.
November 17, 2016
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Bruker announces Acquisition of Nanoindenting Leader Hysitron
Bruker today announced that it has acquired Hysitron, Inc., a technology leader in the development, manufacture, and sale of nanomechanical test instrumentation. the acquisition adds Hysitron's innovative nanomechanical testing instruments to Bruker's existing portfolio of atomic force microscopes (AFMs), surface profilometers, and tribology and mechanical testing systems, significantly enhancing Bruker's leadership position in nanomaterials research markets. Hysitron's 2016 revenues were approximately $20 million. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed.
January 25, 2017
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Bruker Introduces Complete Commercial AFM-Based SECM Solution
PeakForce SECM mode enables previously unobtainable electrochemical information.
September 21, 2016
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Bruker Introduces Complete Commercial AFM-Based SECM Solution
Bruker's Nano Surfaces Division today announced the release of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) capability for its Dimension Icon® atomic force microscope (AFM) platform. Utilizing a proprietary probe design, Bruker's new PeakForce SECM™ mode controls nanoelectrode tip position and tip-sample interaction with unprecedented precision to provide simultaneous capture of topographical, electrochemical, electrical, and mechanical maps.
September 21, 2016
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Bubble-printed patterning of quantum dots on plasmonic substrates
The use of quantum dots (QDs) in practical applications relies on the ability to precisely pattern QDs on substrates with desired optical properties. Typical direct-write printing techniques such as inkjet and gravure printing are limited in resolution (micron-scale), structural complexity, and require significant post-processing time.
May 11, 2017
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BuFA and OCSiAl Join Forces to Manufacture and Market Cutting-edge Nanotubes-based Modifiers
OCSiAl, the world leader in single-wall carbon nanotubes manufacturing and BuFA Composite Systems, the leading European manufacturer of composite materials have agreed a partnership that will see BuFA expand the production and marketing of OCSiAl's TUBALL™ nanotubes-based concentrates and resin formulations.
November 23, 2016
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Building a better (nano) bowtie
Bowtie-shaped nanoparticles made of silver may help bring the dream of quantum computing and quantum information processing closer to reality. These nanostructures, created at the Weizmann Institute of Science and described recently in Nature Communications, greatly simplify the experimental conditions for studying quantum phenomena and may one day be developed into crucial components of quantum devices.
July 5, 2016
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Building a better microscope with metasurfaces
A team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has developed the first flat lens for immersion microscopy. this lens, which can be designed for any liquid, may provide a cost-effective and easy-to-manufacture alternative to the expensive, centuries-old technique of hand polishing lenses for immersion objectives.
May 10, 2017
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Building a smart cardiac patch with nanoelectronic scaffolds and living cells
Scientists and doctors in recent decades have made vast leaps in the treatment of cardiac problems - particularly with the development in recent years of so-called "cardiac patches," swaths of engineered heart tissue that can replace heart muscle damaged during a heart attack.
June 27, 2016
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Building the invisible masterpieces of a molecular machine
There is no doubt about the impact of the nanotechnology to modify our understanding of matter, that has extended its scope to applications hardly imaginable just a few decades ago. with the ability to manipulate small molecules or even atoms at will, chemists are nowadays able to design and develop novel materials whose dimension are one millionth of a millimeter, building these materials using components of just one nanometer.
March 9, 2017
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Bursting pods
Plants are capable of producing powerful movement that is initiated at the molecular level. this fast motion is often supported by helix-based architectures, for example in vetches or orchids that spread seeds by explosive opening of their pods.
February 15, 2017
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Misc. - C

Cal State LA Awarded Grant to Educate Future Leaders in Field of Paper-Based Microfluidics
Cal State LA has been awarded a grant to educate tomorrow's leaders in the interdisciplinary field of paper microfluidics.
July 29, 2016
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Can crab shells provide a 'green' solution to malaria?
A non-toxic mixture of chitin-rich crab shell powder and nanosized silver particles could be an environmentally friendly way of curbing the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes, and malaria in particular. this is according to a series of experiments led by Jiang-Shiou Hwang of the National Taiwan Ocean University.
May 11, 2017
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Can we beat Mother Nature at materials design?
In nature, wood, shells, and other structural materials are lightweight, strong, and tough. Significantly, these materials are made at the ambient temperature in the local environment -- not at the high temperatures at which human-made structural materials are generally processed. Similar materials are difficult to make synthetically.
June 29, 2016
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Can we find more benign nanomaterials?
Chemists at the University of Iowa will research the effects of nanomaterials on the environment and human health using a network of supercomputers funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation.
October 19, 2016
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Can we see a singularity?
A team of scientists at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai, India, have found new ways to detect a bare or naked singularity, the most extreme object in the universe.
April 20, 2017
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Carbon Nanospheres Overcome Electron Spin Decoherence
Monitoring electron spins for a prolonged time period poses to be a major barrier in quantum computing. Scientists from EPFL have discovered the possibility of carbon nanospheres to overcome such barriers, even at room temperature.
July 21, 2016
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Carbon nanotube dry adhesive holds in extreme cold, strengthens in extreme heat
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University, Dayton Air Force Research Laboratory and China have developed a new dry adhesive that bonds in extreme temperatures--a quality that could make the product ideal for space exploration and beyond.
November 16, 2016
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Carbon nanotube 'stitches' strengthen composites
The newest Airbus and Boeing passenger jets flying today are made primarily from advanced composite materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastic – extremely light, durable materials that reduce the overall weight of the plane by as much as 20 percent compared to aluminum-bodied planes. Such lightweight airframes translate directly to fuel savings, which is a major point in advanced composites' favor.
August 03, 2016
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Carbon-Rich Nanorods Could Provide Water Purification Solution for Developing World
A team of researchers unintentionally have created nanorods when an experiment they were involved in did not go as planned. they then decided to have a closer look at the microscopic, unplanned nanorods.
June 15, 2016
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Carry your own PhD project - Fully funded PhD positions in nanotechnology
Carry your own PhD project - Fully funded PhD positions in natural sciences & engineering -- in Electrical and Optical Fields / Nanotechnology supervised by Prof. Jurg Leuthold or in Nanotechnology / Optics & Photonics supervised by Prof. Martin Wegener.
September 6, 2016
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Catalyst efficiency improved for clean industries
Method reduces use of expensive platinum
July 7, 2016
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Catching molecular dance moves in slow motion by adding white noise
In extreme slow-motion, a molecule of medicine entering a cell receptor would look a little like a Soyuz space capsule docking at the International Space Station. It would brake here, boost there; rotate, translate and then, with a light jolt, lock into place.
November 21, 2016
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Cellulosic nanomaterials could help strengthen auto parts
Trees that are removed during forest restoration projects could find their way into car bumpers and fenders as part of a study led by Srikanth Pilla of Clemson University.
July 27, 2016
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Cement inspired by nature
Researchers at MIT are seeking to redesign concrete – the most widely used human-made material in the world – by following nature's blueprints.
May 26, 2016
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Cemtrex announces Plans to set Up Research Pilot Plant for Graphene Production
Cemtrex Inc., a world leading industrial and manufacturing solutions company, announced today that it will set up a research pilot plant for the production of Graphene while simultaneously sequestering carbon dioxide from flue gases at its Farmingdale facility. the Company expects the research pilot plant to commence within six months.
July 18, 2016
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Cetim Facility Receives Bruker Contour CMM Dimensional Analysis System
New Optical Coordinate Measurement Technology Enables High-Precision 3D Scanning
November 18, 2016
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Chains of nanogold forged with atomic precision
Researchers at Nanoscience Center of University of Jyvaskyla in Finland have succeeded in producing short chains and rings of gold nanoparticles with unprecedented precision. they used a special kind of nanoparticles with a well-defined structure and linked them together with molecular bridges. These structures -- being practically huge molecules -- allow extremely accurate studies of light--matter interaction in metallic nanostructures and plasmonics ("Covalently linked multimers of gold nanoclusters Au102(p-MBA)44 and Au~250(p-MBA)n").
September 22, 2016
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Chaos makes carbon materials lighter and stronger
In the quest for more efficient vehicles, engineers are using harder and lower-density carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, which can be manufactured sustainably by "baking" naturally occurring soft hydrocarbons in the absence of oxygen.
March 19, 2017
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Characterisation of Nanomaterials in Commercial Products
Postnova Analytics reports on how the inorganic analysis team within LGC (Teddington, UK) has been using the AF2000 Field Flow Fractionation system coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to characterise nanomaterials in complex sample matrices for clinical, cosmetic and food use.
January 6, 2017
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Chemical engineer receives NSF grant to study self-assembly of large-scale particles
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Joseph McCarthy, William Kepler Whiteford Professor and Vice Chair for Education in the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, a $404,187 grant for research into the self-assembly of materials into complex structures at sizes much larger than the nanoscale.
September 2, 2016
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Chemical sensor on the basis of materials possessing molecular memory created
Scientists from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have developed an electrochemical sensor on the basis of polymers with molecular imprinting, aimed at detection of saccharides and hydroxy acids. the researchers have presented the results in the Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical journal.
April 5, 2017
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Chemical Switch Engineered into a Light-Driven Proton Pump
Synthetic biology is an emerging and rapidly evolving engineering discipline. Within the NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering, Scientists from Bernese have developed a version of the light-driven proton pump proteorhodopsin, which is chemically switchable and it is also an essential tool to efficiently power synthetic cells and molecular factories.
August 10, 2016
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Chemically custom tailored graphene
Two-dimensional graphene consists of single layers of carbon atoms and exhibits intriguing properties. the transparent material conducts electricity and heat extremely well. It is at the same time flexible and solid.
May 8, 2017
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Chemist develops new theory for explaining the function of proteins
A University of Arkansas chemist and his collaborator at North Carolina State University have developed a new theory for explaining how proteins and other biomolecules function based on movement and change of shape and structure rather than content (The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, "Effective Riemannian Diffusion Model for Conformational Dynamics of Biomolecular Systems").
January 13, 2017
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Chemists cook up new nanomaterial and imaging method
A team of chemists led by Northwestern University's William Dichtel has cooked up something big: the scientists created an entirely new type of nanomaterial and watched it form in real time – a chemistry first.
January 19, 2017
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Chemists uncover a new way heat travels between molecules
A new model, developed by University of Pennsylvania chemists, could be the first step towards better harnessing heat energy to power nanoscale devices.
November 18, 2016
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Chinese Researchers develop new Visualization Technique Based on In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy
Life in the nano lane is fast and just got faster in terms of knowledge of fundamental mechanisms working at the nanoscale -- where processes are driven by a dance of particles such as atoms and ions one-billionth of a meter in size.
June 8, 2016
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Chip-based nanoscopy: Microscopy in HD quality
In nanoscopy, the position of single fluorescent molecules can be determined with a precision of just a few nanometres. this information can be used to produce images with a resolution of about 20 to 30 nanometres, and thereby ten times that of conventional light microscopy.
April 24, 2017
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Chromatography Gas Purifiers
Asynt has introduced GasTrap gas purifiers for analytical laboratories using Gas Chromatography (GC), High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) instrumentation.
June 1, 2016
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Cicada wings inspire antireflective surfaces
A team of Shanghai Jiao Tong University researchers has used the shape of cicada wings as a template to create antireflective structures fabricated with one of the most intriguing semiconductor materials, titanium dioxide (TiO2). the antireflective structures they produced are capable of suppressing visible light -- 450 to 750 nanometers -- at different angles of incidence.
October 11, 2016
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Cleaning concrete contaminated with chemicals
In March 1995, members of a Japanese cult released the deadly nerve agent sarin into the Tokyo subway system, killing a dozen people and injuring a thousand more.
September 19, 2016
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Closer ties for silver clusters
Tiny clusters of silver atoms arranged with atomic level precision could become more versatile and useful due to a simpler way to hold them together.
December 20, 2016
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Closing the gate to mitochondria
Eukaryotic cells contain thousands of proteins, which are distributed to different cellular compartments with specific functions. a German-Swiss team of scientists led by Prof. Dr. Bettina Warscheid from the University of Freiburg and Prof. Dr. AndrPokemon Go Schneider from the University of Bern has developed the method "ImportOmics".
May 9, 2017
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Coffee-ring phenomenon explained in new theory
The formation of a simple coffee stain has been the subject of complex study for decades, though it turns out that there remain some stones still to be turned.
December 20, 2016
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Collaboration strikes gold pioneering a new method for catalyst production
An ultra-high-vacuum chamber with temperatures approaching absolute zero–the coldest anything can get–may be the last place you would expect to find gold. But a group of researchers from Stony Brook University (SBU) in collaboration with scientists at the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have just demonstrated that such a desolate place is ideal for producing catalytically active gold nanoparticles.
September 12, 2016
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Collapsing energy bands to explore their geometric structure
The geometry and topology of electronic states in solids plays a central role in a wide range of modern condensed-matter systems including graphene or topological insulators. However, experimentally accessing this information has proven to be challenging, especially when the bands are not well-isolated from one another.
June 1, 2016
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Color-changing nanocoatings ready for the big time
The dazzling colors of peacock feathers arise from the physical interaction of light with biological nanostructures. Researchers have discovered how to exploit this natural trickery known as structural coloration into a large-scale printing technology that produces lightweight and ultra-resistant coatings in any color desirable (Light: Science & Applications, "Scalable, ultra-resistant structural colors based on network metamaterials").
November 21, 2016
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Compact Lasers Used to Recreate Conditions Prevalent Inside Stars
The energy density contained in the center of a star is said to be greater than what is imaginable. Compared with the one atmosphere of pressure humans live with on Earth's surface, the star's energy density is several billions of atmospheres.
January 12, 2017
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Compact Linear Piezo Stages offer Nanometer Resolution and Extended Travel Ranges, from PI
Engineers and scientists working in the fields of nano-biotechnology, metrology, and photonics run applications that require nanometer precision and ultra-fine adjustment, often in confined spaces. to meet those requirements, PI, a lead manufacturer of nanopositioning and motion control solutions, provides its compact linear piezo positioners -- P-620.1 to P-629.1 -- of the PIHera family consisting of 60 stages available in a large variety of travel ranges.
November 30, 2016
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Compact Micro-Translation Stage for Single and Multi-Axis Precision Positioning is Fast and Precise
PI's palm-sized motorized positioning stage combines precision with long lifetime components, making it more attractive to research and industry.
August 23, 2016
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Companies now can bring Fast and Accurate Nanoparticle Analysis In-House
Nanotechnology manufacturers seeking ways to measure and analyze nanoparticles now have a simple, fast, accurate and cost-effective tool thanks to the recent release of NanoMet by developer FullScaleNANO.
November 11, 2016
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Companies now can bring Fast and Accurate Nanoparticle Analysis In-House
Nanotechnology manufacturers seeking ways to measure and analyze nanoparticles now have a simple, fast, accurate and cost-effective tool thanks to the recent release of NanoMet by developer FullScaleNANO.
November 15, 2016
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Computational and patterning approaches to realize metasurfaces in novel plasmonic materials
Compact optical components are crucial to realize miniaturized optical systems and integrated optoelectronic devices. Plasmonic metasurfaces -- structured materials in 2D with rationally designed, subwavelength-scale building blocks -- have drawn great interest because they can control light based on subwavelength structures. These planar devices are attractive for applications ranging from high resolution imaging to 3D holography.
January 27, 2017
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Computer model fills fundamental knowledge gaps of perovskites
Laboratory-scale solar cells based on inexpensive, crystalline materials called perovskites have emerged as serious contenders to silicon in terms of their efficiency at capturing energy from sunlight. Unfortunately, the neglect of fundamental research into perovskites in favor of close focus on its solar applications has left holes in basic knowledge about the material itself. A*STAR researchers are helping to fill some of these gaps – and by doing so could propel perovskite solar cell performance to the next level.
June 29, 2016
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Conference-Review: 13th Confocal Raman Imaging Symposium
"One of the most informative and interactive symposia of recent years", said WITec CEO Dr. Joachim Koenen about the 13th Confocal Raman Imaging Symposium held from September 26th to the 28th in Ulm, Germany.
October 19, 2016
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Confined water at Fahrenheit -451
The interactions of water with the surrounding rock mineral deposits create geothermal energy and mineral deposits. the properties of water and other fluids change when they are confined in very small pores. In analyzing the properties of water molecules confined inside an emerald at extremely low temperature, scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory found that individual molecules undergo a transition, essentially existing simultaneously as six copies of itself, each of which is, in a sense, 1/6 'present'. the formula might be written "H12/6O" instead of "H2O."
November 23, 2016
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Controlled, Accurate Plasma Cleaner for TEM Sample Preparation
Henniker Plasma would like announce the launch of their new, cost effective bench-top plasma cleaner for TEM sample preparation tasks.
November 9, 2016
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Controlling electron spin for efficient water splitting
Water is made of oxygen and hydrogen, and splitting water molecules to produce hydrogen for fuel is a promising path for alternative energy. One of the main obstacles to making hydrogen production a reality is that current methods of water splitting result in hydrogen peroxide also being formed, which affects both the efficiency of the reaction and the stability of the production process.
February 13, 2017
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Controlling electron spin for efficient water splitting
The method could lead to solar-based production of hydrogen for fuel
April 10, 2017
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Controlling electron spin makes water splitting more efficient
One of the main obstacles in the production of hydrogen through water splitting is that hydrogen peroxide is also formed, which affects the efficiency stability of the reaction and the stability of the production.
February 1, 2017
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Controlling electrons in time and space
In an electron microscope, electrons are emitted by pointy metal tips, that way the can be steered and controlled with high precision. Recently, such metal tips have also been used as high precision electron sources for generating x-rays.
November 15, 2016
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Controlling forces between atoms, molecules, promising for '2-D hyperbolic' materials
A new approach to control forces and interactions between atoms and molecules, such as those employed by geckos to climb vertical surfaces, could bring advances in new materials for developing quantum light sources.
April 4, 2017
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Controlling friction levels through on/off application of laser light
A NIMS research group led by Masahiro Goto, Distinguished Chief Researcher, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, and Michiko Sasaki, postdoctoral researcher, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration discovered that the amount of friction force between organic molecules and a sapphire substrate in a vacuum can be changed repeatedly by starting and stopping laser light irradiation.
February 13, 2017
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Controlling light and heat on the nanoscale with hybrid optical-thermal antennas
Localization of photons to nanoscale volumes with the aid of plasmonic nanoantennas opened new horizons in bio(chemical) sensing and nanoscale imaging. However, plasmon resonances are short-lived, and the photon energy quickly dissipates as heat, creating temperature gradients on plasmonic chips.
August 24, 2016
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Controlling microparticles from afar
A University of Tokyo research team developed a new method that allows them to remotely control and move a micron-sized particle to a desired position. this particle, which can be produced in mass quantity at one time, acts as a self-propelled particle capable of maneuvering itself through water by drawing energy from an electric field and possesses two swimming modes--propulsion and rotation.
March 23, 2017
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Controlling the formation of ice on surfaces
In recent years, researchers working on de-icing and anti-icing strategies have been inspired by biology and nanotechnology to develop nanocoatings and other nanostructured surfaces.
March 17, 2017
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Controlling the organizational behavior of nanoparticles with polymers
In order to create new nanomaterial technologies such as next-generation lighting, fundamental challenges underpinning the science and engineering of nanoparticles must be resolved. for example, many proposed technologies hinge on the organization of particles into layers, called films, that have a precise microstructure. However, fabrication of these films is a challenging feat to accomplish because it is difficult to control the structure of nanoparticle assemblies on micrometer scales.
January 3, 2017
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Controlling the properties of matter in two-dimensional crystals
By creating atomic chains in a two-dimensional crystal, researchers at Penn State believe they have found a way to control the direction of materials properties in two and three dimensional crystals with implications in sensing, optoelectronics and next-generation electronics applications ("Spontaneous formation of atomically thin stripes in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers").
October 27, 2016
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Controlling the stiffness of a material at the nanoscale
Using a needle far thinner than a human hair, scientists revealed how to control mechanical stiffness in a promising material. the team applied an electric field with a nano-sized needle to cause a reversible change in the arrangement of the atoms in the material.
February 24, 2017
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Controlling the structure and phase composition of lanthanide-doped alumina for emerging applications
Lanthanide dopants play an important role in desirable phase transformations of aluminum oxide (alumina) in order to achieve optimized physical and chemical properties. for example, the presence of dopants -- such as ytterbium, gadolinium or lanthanum -- strengthens the grain boundaries of alumina, largely affecting its mechanical properties.
January 9, 2017
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Correlated magnets made out of single atoms
Solid state physics offers a rich variety of intriguing phenomena, several of which are not yet fully understood. Experiments with fermionic atoms in optical lattices get very close to imitating the behaviour of electrons in solid state crystals, thus forming a well-controlled quantum simulator for these systems.
September 29, 2016
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Court Decision on Climate Plan Jolts Carbon Prices
A temporary halt to the federal government's plan to cut electric power plant emissions has caused carbon prices in the Northeast's only cap-and-trade program to plummet, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.
July 5, 2016
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Cracking the code for fissure control
Cracks in a material typically compromise its strength and integrity, so research focus has traditionally been on preventing their occurrence and spread. An A*STAR team has now taken a different approach, prompting and directing the propagation of cracks on thin films to make highly-ordered patterned coatings for electrochromic materials (Nature Communications, "Ordered fragmentation of oxide thin films at submicron scale").
February 8, 2017
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Creating a plasmonic nanolaser using nanoparticles
Researchers at Aalto University, Finland are the first to develop a plasmonic nanolaser that operates at visible light frequencies and uses so-called dark lattice modes.
January 3, 2017
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Creating Internet of Nano-Things by Exploiting Terahertz Waves Using Tiny Graphene Radios
Generally, individuals take the same congested path for wireless communication, a section of the electromagnetic spectrum called radio waves.
November 2, 2016
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Creating the tiniest structures on surfaces with nanotechnology manufacturing processes
Nanotechnology is regarded as the key technology of the 21st century, delivering the fundamental methods, which allow objects just a few hundred nanometers in size to be produced in any required shape. These objects find applications practically everywhere -- be it for microprocessors and electrical circuits in computers, in the telecommunications industry, or in medicine and biotechnology -- to name just a few.
January 13, 2017
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Creeping gel
Directed motion seems simple to us, but the coordinated interplay of complex processes is needed, even for seemingly simple crawling motions of worms or snails. by using a gel that periodically swells and shrinks, researchers developed a model for the waves of muscular contraction and relaxation involved in crawling.
October 22, 2016
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Crystal analysis in 3D
Whether building bone, shells, or corals, living creatures are true masters of crystallization. In the laboratory, this amazing precision cannot be duplicated yet. the processes and many of the precise structures of bio minerals remain largely unexplored.
August 09, 2016
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Crystallinity and Size of Nanoparticles can be Studied with Combined SAXS/WAXS Technique
SAXS/WAXS is becoming an increasingly popular technique for the characterization of nanoparticles. Equipment such as Xenocs' Nano-inXider SAXS/WAXS system allows researchers to study the size and crystallinity of nanoparticles.
July 25, 2016
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Crystallization frustration predicts metallic glass formation
Researchers have discovered a way to predict which alloys will form metallic glasses. the research could pave the way for new strong, conductive materials.
August 02, 2016
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Crystallization method offers new option for carbon capture from ambient air
Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found a simple, reliable process to capture carbon dioxide directly from ambient air, offering a new option for carbon capture and storage strategies to combat global warming.
January 9, 2017
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Crystallography: Electron diffraction locates hydrogen atoms
Diffraction-based analytical methods are widely used in laboratories, but they struggle to study samples that are smaller than a micrometer in size. Researchers from the Laboratoire de cristallographie et sciences des materiaux (CNRS/Ensicaen/Unicaen), the Laboratoire catalyse et spectrochimie (CNRS/Ensicaen/Unicaen), and the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic have nevertheless been successful in using electron diffraction to reveal the structure of nanocrystals.
January 13, 2017
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Cuing environmental responses in fungi
Genome sequences provide clues to the evolution of sensory perception
May 26, 2016
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Custom-Built Microscope Resolves Nanoscale Images Via Multiphoton Fluorescence and Second-Harmonic Generation
Extremely small biological structures such as viruses, proteins, and single molecules can now be visualized with the most sophisticated light microscopes in the world. However despite this advancement, even the very best microscopes are known to have certain limitations.
May 27, 2016
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Misc. - D

Deben Announce that Their Tensile Stage has Been Selected by GETec & Nanosurf for Their AFSEM Correlative AFM and SEM Product
Deben, a leading provider of in-situ testing stages together with innovative accessories and components for electron microscopy, reports on the use of the AFSEM™ correlative AFM & SEM system with their tensile stage for in situ mechanical test and measurement. Manufactured by GETec, it will be sold by Nanosurf and other selected sales channels worldwide.
May 16, 2017
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Deciphering material properties at the single-atom level
It was a big challenge and a small particle. Scientists determined the three-dimensional position of more than 23,000 atoms in a tiny iron-platinum particle with 22 picometer precision. they correlated the observed chemical order/disorder and defects in the atomic structure with magnetic properties at the single-atom level.
April 20, 2017
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Deciphering the beetle exoskeleton with nanomechanics
What can a beetle tell us about good design principles? Quite a lot, actually.
January 11, 2017
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Decorating single layer and bilayer graphene with useful chemical groups
Researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology disclosed a new method to add chemical groups on (that is, to "functionalize") single layer (SLG) and bilayer (BLG) graphene lying on silica/silicon. this study, recently published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society ("Sodide and Organic Halides Effect Covalent Functionalization of Single-Layer and Bilayer Graphene") also suggests how decorated graphene serves as a platform to produce 2D materials with new characteristic
March 29, 2017
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DECTRIS Ltd. Introduces the PILATUS3 R CdTe Detector Series at the ACA Meeting 2016
At the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Crystallographic Association, DECTRIS introduced the PILATUS3 R CdTe detector series for high-energy X-ray applications in the laboratory.
August 03, 2016
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Deep insight into interfaces
Interfaces between different materials and their properties are of key importance for modern technology. Together with an international team, physicists of Wurzburg University have developed a new method, which allows them to have an extremely precise glance at these interfaces and to model their properties.
September 16, 2016
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Dentin nanostructures - a super-natural phenomenon
Dentin is one of the most durable biological materials in the human body. Researchers from Charite -- Universitatsmedizin Berlin were able to show that the reason for this can be traced to its nanostructures and specifically to the interactions between the organic and inorganic components. Measurements performed at BESSYII, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin's synchrotron radiation source, showed that it is the mechanical coupling between the collagen protein fibers and mineral nanoparticles which renders dentin capable of withstanding extreme forces.
June 2, 2016
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Designing new materials from 'small' data
Finding new functional materials is always tricky. But searching for very specific properties among a relatively small family of known materials is even more difficult.
February 17, 2017
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Development of a Novel Mass analysis technique that can be performed even with an ordinary business card
An ICYS-MANA researcher, Kota Shiba, International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Science, and Genki Yoshikawa, a Group Leader of the Nanomechanical Sensors Group, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, NIMS, developed a new mass analysis technique that operates under a completely different principle from that of conventional techniques.
August 31, 2016
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Diamond micro-anvils will produce immense pressures to make new materials
University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers will use pressures greater than those found at the center of the Earth to potentially create as yet unknown new materials. In the natural world, such immense forces deep underground can turn carbon into diamonds, or volcanic ash into slate.
October 18, 2016
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Diamond nanothread: Versatile new material could prove priceless for manufacturing
Would you dress in diamond nanothreads? it's not as far-fetched as you might think. and you'll have a Brisbane-based carbon chemist and engineer to thank for it.
November 2, 2016
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Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene
Graphene is the stuff of the future. for years, researchers and technologists have been predicting the utility of the one-atom-thick sheets of pure carbon in everything from advanced touch screens and semiconductors to long-lasting batteries and next-generation solar cells.
September 19, 2016
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Diamond-Based Hybrid Nanoparticles Could Improve Next-Generation Technologies
Nanamaterials are capable of enhancing an increasing number of next-generation technologies. they guarantee to increase the speed of computer chips and also increase the resolution of medical imaging devices. Nanomaterials also improve the energy efficiency of electronics. However, pervading nanomaterials with the correct properties can be both expensive and time consuming.
June 9, 2016
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Diamonds and quantum information processing on the nanoscale
A City College of New York led-team headed by physicist Dr. Carlos Meriles has successfully demonstrated charge transport between Nitrogen-Vacancy color centers in diamond. the team developed a novel multi-color scanning microscopy technique to visualize the charge transport. the breakthrough experiment could potentially lead to room-temperature quantum information processing in diamond and optical data storage in three dimensions.
August 30, 2016
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Diamonds are technologists' best friends
Physicists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University have obtained diamond crystals in the form of a regular pyramid of micrometer size. Moreover, in cooperation with co-workers from other Russian and foreign research centers they have also studied the luminescence and electron emission properties of obtained diamond crystals.
December 29, 2016
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Diamonds coupled using quantum physics
Atomic defects in diamonds can be used as quantum memories. Researchers at TU Wien for the first time have succeeded in coupling the defects in various diamonds using quantum physics.
April 10, 2017
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Direct determination of bandgap energy of single cesium lead bromide nanocrystals
An international research group led by Tom Gregorkiewicz, professor at the University of Amsterdam and Yasufumi Fujiwara, professor at Osaka University's Graduate School of Engineering together with his Japanese group at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology determined directly the relation between the bandgap energy of single cesium lead bromide nanocrystals (CsPbBr3 NCs) and their size and shape.
November 7, 2016
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Direct observation of graphene decoupling on Cu(111)
A recent quantum mechanical study of graphene by a research team at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), South Korea, has elucidated the intercalation mechanism and pathways for graphene decoupling from the copper substrate.
September 20, 2016
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Direct radiolabeling of nanomaterials
Positron emission tomography plays a pivotal role for monitoring the distribution and accumulation of radiolabeled nanomaterials in living subjects. the radioactive metals are usually connected to the nanomaterial through an anchor, a so-called chelator, but this chemical binding can be omitted if nanographene is used, as scientists now report.
February 9, 2017
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Direct radiolabeling of nanomaterials
Positron emission tomography plays a pivotal role for monitoring the distribution and accumulation of radiolabeled nanomaterials in living subjects. the radioactive metals are usually connected to the nanomaterial through an anchor, a so-called chelator, but this chemical binding can be omitted if nanographene is used, as American scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
February 9, 2017
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Directa Plus and Colmar launch Second Collection of Graphene-enhanced Sportswear
New Technologic G+ ski jacket selected as Gold Winner at ISPO Munich
February 7, 2017
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Directa Plus and Eurojersey Jointly develop First Graphene-Enhanced Textiles for Sensitive Fabrics Brand
New range of highly performant technical fabrics targeting sportswear, athleisure and underwear sectors
February 14, 2017
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Directed matter - Toward atomic-scale 3D nanofabrication
Additive manufacturing techniques featuring atomic precision could one day create materials with Legos flexibility and Terminator toughness, according to researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
July 12, 2016
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Discovering the unique properties of 2D materials grown on carbon-coated surfaces
Two-dimensional materials are a bit of a mind-bending concept. Humans live in a three-dimensional world, after all, where everything observed in our natural world has height, width, and depth. and yet when graphene--a carbon material unique in its truly flat, one-atom-deep dimension--was first produced in 2004, the mind-bending concept became reality and an unexplored frontier in materials science.
February 10, 2017
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Discovery could lead to jet engines that run hotter - and cleaner
Researchers here have made a discovery in materials science that sounds like something from the old Saturday morning cartoon Super Friends: They've found a way to deactivate "nano twins" to improve the high-temperature properties of superalloys that are used in jet engines.
January 17, 2017
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Discovery of critical phenomena in a quantum spin liquid
For the first time, a NIMS research group led by Takayuki Isono and Shinya Uji, and the University of Tokyo research group led by Professor Kazushi Kanoda, jointly observed quantum critical behavior of the magnetic susceptibility for an organic material with a triangular lattice, when the material was in a quantum spin-liquid state at very low temperatures.
December 2, 2016
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Discovery yields self-healing diamond-like carbon coating
Fans of Superman surely recall how the Man of Steel used immense heat and pressure generated by his bare hands to form a diamond out of a lump of coal.
August 05, 2016
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Disorder grants a memory to quantum spins
Nature doesn't have the best memory. If you fill a box with air and divide it in half with a barrier, it's easy to tell molecules on the left from molecules on the right. But after removing the barrier and waiting a short while, the molecules get mixed together, and it becomes impossible to tell where a given molecule started. the air-in-a-box system loses any memory of its initial conditions.
June 7, 2016
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Disrupting the research process: changing materials science with robotics, AI and autonomy
ARES may not look like Johnny Five, the famous robot from the 1986 movie scene, but this robot's ability to integrate robotics, artificial intelligence (AI) and data science is altering materials research in a big way at Air Force Research Laboratory.
October 22, 2016
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Distinguishing truth under the surface: electrostatic or mechanic
Through a novel approach, we provide a method to decouple one of the major problems into KPFM/EFM advanced modes, the mechanical crosstalk.
December 29, 2016
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Doping Enhances Nanolaser Performance
Researchers from ANU have found a way to enhance the performance of nanolasers by adding impurities. this discovery will be key to the development of quantum computing, low-cost biomedical sensors and rapid internet.
July 7, 2016
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Draft 2016 NNI Strategic Plan Available for Public Comment
The draft 2016 National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) Strategic Plan is now available online for public comment prior to publication.
September 13, 2016
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Dressing a metal in various colors with nanocoatings
Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology announced that Professor Kyung-in Jang's research team succeeded in developing a technology that can control various color changes by coating several nanometers of semiconducting materials on a metal substrate through joint research with a research team led by professor Young-min Song.
January 16, 2017
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Droplets finally all the same size - in a nanodroplet library
A single drop with the volume of a millionth of a litre is really not very large and certainly does not look like something you can do a lot with. However, a simple device, constructed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, can split the microdroplet into a collection of equally-sized nanodroplets ("Nano-liter droplet libraries from a pipette: step emulsificator that stabilizes droplet volume against variation in flow rate").
June 15, 2016
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Drum beats from a one atom thick graphite membrane
Researchers from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, have demonstrated the ability to manipulate the vibrations of a drum of nanometre scale thickness - realizing the world's smallest and most versatile drum. this work has implications in improving the sensitivity of small detectors of mass - very important in detecting the mass of small molecules like viruses.
June 14, 2016
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Misc. - E

ECHA Biocidal Products Committee backs first nanomaterial approval
The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA)'s Biocidal Products Committee (BPC) backed three approvals, and one non-approval, of active substance/product-type combinations, at its October meeting.
November 3, 2016
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Echo technique could make X-ray lasers more stable
Researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China have developed a method that could open up new scientific avenues by making the light from powerful X-ray lasers much more stable and its color more pure.
June 5, 2016
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Edible nanocoating increases life of foods
In order to extend the life of fruits and vegetables and preserve them for longer refrigeration, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) researchers developed an edible coating with added functional ingredients applied to freshly cut foods.
September 27, 2016
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Efficiency plus versatility in engineering polymer brush patterns
Antimicrobial cutting boards. Flame-retardant carpets. Friction-resistant bearings. Engineered surfaces add value to the things we use, providing extra layers of safety, easing their operation, preserving their quality or adding utility.
October 12, 2016
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Efficient Earth-abundant heterogeneous electrocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting
Developing earth-abundant heterogeneous electrocatalysts with high catalytic activity and stability to replace noble metal catalysts for both hydrogen evolution reactions (HERs) and oxygen evolution reactions (OERs) through photoelectrochemical (PEC) system is of great importance for achieving highly efficient water splitting.
April 25, 2017
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Efficient hydrogen production made easy
In the 2015 movie "The Martian," stranded astronaut Matt Damon turns to the chemistry of rocket fuel, hydrazine and hydrogen, to create lifesaving water and nearly blows himself up. But if you turn the process around and get the hydrazine to help, you create hydrogen from water by changing conductivity in a semiconductor, a transformation with wide potential applications in energy and electronics.
June 13, 2016
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Electron beam microscope directly writes nanoscale features in liquid with metal ink
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to harness a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to directly write tiny patterns in metallic "ink," forming features in liquid that are finer than half the width of a human hair.
October 4, 2016
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Electrons in graphene behave like light, only better
A team led by Cory Dean, assistant professor of physics at Columbia University, Avik Ghosh, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Virginia, and James Hone, Wang Fong-Jen Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, has directly observed–for the first time–negative refraction for electrons passing across a boundary between two regions in a conducting material.
October 5, 2016
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Electrostatic design of materials - a fundamentally new approach
Computational materials design is traditionally used to improve and further develop already existing materials. Simulations grant a deep insight into the quantum mechanical effects which determine material properties.
May 12, 2017
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Elusive atomic motion captured by electron microscopy
The movement of atoms through a material can cause problems under certain circumstances. Atomic-resolution electron microscopy has enabled researchers at Linköping University in Sweden to observe for the first time a phenomenon that has eluded materials scientists for many decades.
May 9, 2017
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EM Resolutions Announce the Availability of Kleindiek Nanotechnik's new Cryo Microgripper for Cryo-FIB Lift-out
EM Resolutions, manufacturers and suppliers of tools and accessories for users of electron microscopes, announce the availability of new cryo microgripper for cryo-FIB lift-out, a product of Kleindiek Nanotechnik.
October 18, 2016
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Energy cascades in quasicrystals trigger an avalanche of discovery
Most materials, when viewed at the atomic level, come in one of two types. some materials, like table salt, are highly crystalline, which means that the atoms in the material are arranged in orderly and repeating geometric patterns. other materials, such as glass, display no such organization; in those cases, the atoms are arranged in what scientists call an amorphous structure.
December 13, 2016
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Engineer patents waterlike polymer to create high-temperature ceramics
Ceramic textiles, improved jet engine blades, 3-D printed ceramics and better batteries may soon become a reality, thanks to a recently patented polymer from a Kansas State University engineer.
March 30, 2017
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Engineering a chemical switch into a light-driven proton pump
Synthetic biology is an emerging and rapidly evolving engineering discipline. Within the NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering, Bernese scientists have engineered a chemically switchable version of the light-driven proton pump proteorhodopsin -- an essential tool for efficiently powering molecular factories and synthetic cells.
August 09, 2016
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Engineering technique is damaging materials research reveals
A technique that revolutionised scientists' ability to manipulate and study materials at the nano-scale may have dramatic unintended consequences, new Oxford University research reveals.
April 20, 2017
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Engineers create new technique for testing nanomaterials
A University of California, Irvine engineer has invented a method for analyzing nanowires at temperatures approaching 800 degrees Fahrenheit in first-ever experiments, showing the valuable role the materials could play in converting excess heat from machines and electronics into useable electricity.
July 13, 2016
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Engineers develop a nanoporous plastic clothing material that cools the skin
Stanford engineers have developed a low-cost, plastic-based textile that, if woven into clothing, could cool your body far more efficiently than is possible with the natural or synthetic fabrics in clothes we wear today. Describing their work in Science ("Radiative human body cooling by nanoporous polyethylene textile"), the researchers suggest that this new family of fabrics could become the basis for garments that keep people cool in hot climates without air conditioning.
September 2, 2016
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Engineers develop low-cost, flexible terahertz radiation source for fast, non-invasive screening
Portable handheld sensors for detecting explosives, wearable sensors that can detect chemical agents, compact devices for fast and accurate identification of defects in computing chips as well as advanced, non-invasive imaging techniques that could detect tiny tumours could become a reality sooner than expected as researchers around the world are actively studying novel ways to exploit terahertz (THz) technology.
January 31, 2017
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Engineers develop octopus-inspired smart adhesive pads
With increased study of bio-adhesives, a significant effort has been made in search for novel adhesives that will combine reversibility, repeated usage, stronger bonds and faster bonding time, non-toxic, and more importantly be effective in wet and other extreme conditions.
July 12, 2016
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Engineers investigate a simple, no-bake recipe to make bricks from Martian soil
Explorers planning to settle on Mars might be able to turn the planet's red soil into bricks without needing to use an oven or additional ingredients. Instead, they would just need to apply pressure to compact the soil--the equivalent of a blow from a hammer.
April 27, 2017
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Engineers overcome a hurdle in growing a revolutionary optical metamaterial
Engineers have now produced an elusive diamond crystal structure that could revolutionize photonics. this has put them on the path to achieving a material that is the 'holy grail of directed particle self-assembly.' Such materials could be used to make lenses, cameras and microscopes with better performance, or possibly even 'invisibility cloaks,' solid objects that would redirect all light rays around a central compartment, rendering objects there invisible.
February 21, 2017
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Engineers use light to print 3-D shape-memory materials
Engineers from MIT and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) are using light to print three-dimensional structures that "remember" their original shapes. Even after being stretched, twisted, and bent at extreme angles, the structures -- from small coils and multimaterial flowers, to an inch-tall replica of the Eiffel tower -- sprang back to their original forms within seconds of being heated to a certain temperature "sweet spot."
August 26, 2016
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Enhancing the Luminescence of Core-Shell Lanthanide-Doped Nanocrystals through Surface Modifications
Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have demonstrated a mechanism that exploits surface quenching processes to magnify the luminescence of core-shell lanthanide-doped nanocrystals, featured in Nano Letters, an ACS Publication.
January 24, 2017
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Epigem Granted US Patent on Composite Electrode
Epigem, a high-tech British micro-engineering company, has been granted a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for its composite electrode.
October 14, 2016
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Epigem Increases Blood Research Activity
High-tech British micro engineering company Epigem today announced the appointment of new staff member Niamh Kilcawley.
September 23, 2016
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ESF, Graphene Flagship Fund Young Researchers to Attend EuroScience Open Forum in Manchester
Funding support from the European Science Foundation (ESF) and the Graphene Flagship consortium enabled nine young researchers working on graphene and related research topics to attend the EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF) which is taking place in Manchester this week.
July 28, 2016
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Eureka moment leads to new method of studying environmental toxins
In 1986, Gordon Brown used SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) to visualize something no one had ever seen before: the exact way that atoms bond to a solid surface. the work stemmed from a eureka moment that Brown had during the doctoral defense of graduate student Kim Hayes but has since grown into one of the seminal works in inorganic geochemistry, and even spawned a new field of study – molecular environmental science.
December 5, 2016
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'Exceptional' nanosensor architecture based on exceptional points
Researchers from the University of California San Diego have developed a novel design for a compact, ultra-sensitive nanosensor that can be used to make portable health-monitoring devices and to detect minute quantities of toxins and explosives for security applications.
November 10, 2016
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Experimental semiconductor eyed for next-generation 'power electronics'
Researchers have demonstrated the high-performance potential of an experimental transistor made of a semiconductor called beta gallium oxide, which could bring new ultra-efficient switches for applications such as the power grid, military ships and aircraft.
January 10, 2017
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Exploring applications of quasicrystals at small scales
The discovery of quasicrystals three decades ago unveiled a class of matter that exhibits long-range order but lacks translational periodicity (Dan Shechtman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of quasicrystals in 2011). Owing to their unique structures, quasicrystals possess many unusual and useful properties.
August 12, 2016
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External Washers Reduce Risk of Vial Contamination
SP Scientific has published a white paper that discusses how the pharmaceutical industry and safety regulators are putting more emphasis on the importance of using external washers to remove particles from the outside of vials.
December 12, 2016
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Extreme science: the biggest, fastest and hottest breakthroughs of 2016
This year we pushed the boundaries of science to new extremes. we saw new levels of supercomputer performance, peeled the plastic off the biggest telescope and solar plant on earth, did the first-ever spectroscopy on antimatter, and even made liquid light.
January 3, 2017
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Misc. - F

Fabricating palladium-ruthenium nanoparticles could lead to improved industrial processes
The chemical elements palladium (Pd) and ruthenium (Ru) are both used separately in the chemical industry. for a long time, researchers have thought that combining the two could lead to improved and novel properties for industrial applications. However, the two elements do not readily mix together to become a single material.
September 22, 2016
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Facebook and Microsoft team up to lay a massive internet cable across the Atlantic
A 4,100-mile cable capable of 160 terabits per second
May 26, 2016
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Fantastic Voyage to the nanoverse one step closer
Robots so small they can enter the bloodstream and perform surgeries are one step closer, a research team from Monash University has discovered.
June 30, 2016
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Fast and furious bucket brigade - ultrafast proton transport in carbon nanotubes
The movement of protons–hydrogen atoms with the electrons striped away–through a membrane is critical to efficiently producing electricity in a fuel cell. a decade ago, theory predicted that confinement of water into a single one-dimensional chain would achieve rapid proton transport, with the protons hopping down the chain of hydrogen-bonded water molecules.
September 2, 2016
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Fast and simple way to make highly ordered porous films
Osaka-based researchers developed a new method to create films of porous metal--organic frameworks fully aligned on inorganic substrates. the method is simple, requiring only that the substrate and an organic linker are mixed under mild conditions, and fast, producing perfectly aligned films within minutes. the films oriented fluorescent dye molecules within their pores, and the fluorescence response of these dyes was switched on or off simply by rotating the material in polarized light.
April 3, 2017
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Fast track control accelerates switching of quantum bits
From laptops to cellphones, today's technology advances through the ever-increasing speed at which electric charges are directed through circuits. Similarly, speeding up control over quantum states in atomic and nanoscale systems could lead to leaps for the emerging field of quantum technology.
December 14, 2016
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FAU Chemists Successfully Produce Defect-Free Graphene for the First Time
Graphene is a revolutionary material, and researchers across the world have been actively involved in finding cost-effective techniques to produce defect-free graphene.
September 6, 2016
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Federal Government releases 2016 National Nanotechnology Initiative Strategic Plan
The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) is pleased to announce the release of the new 2016 National Nanotechnology Initiative Strategic Plan. Under the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act of 2003, NNI agencies are required to develop an updated NNI Strategic Plan every three years.
November 3, 2016
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Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul use SAXS/WAXS Experiments to Study Catalysts
Focusing their research on catalysis and photocatalysis, the L3FNano laboratory at the Institute of Physics of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, are using the Xenocs' Nano-inXider SAXS/WAXS system to explore catalysts at the nanoscale.
July 18, 2016
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FEI and Cornell University Collaborate to Commercialize new EMPAD Detector
Speed, sensitivity and dynamic range will enable multichannel atomic-scale imaging and analysis of material properties such as electric and magnetic fields.
July 26, 2016
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Filming light and electrons coupled together as they travel under cover
In a breakthrough for future optical-electronic hybrid computers, scientists at EPFL have developed an ultrafast technique that can track light and electrons as they travel through a nanostructured surface.
October 11, 2016
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Finding a needle in a crystalline haystack
Revealing new insights into how materials become "fatigued" and fail, a new X-ray analysis technique clearly shows the culprit -- rare, abnormally large crystalline regions. with repeated use, materials undergo a deformation process called fatigue. Fatigue can disrupt the arrangements of the atoms in the material. the atoms are often arranged in small crystalline regions, called grains.
June 17, 2016
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Finding order and structure in the atomic chaos where materials meet
Materials science researchers have developed a model that can account for irregularities in how atoms arrange themselves at the so-called "grain boundaries'' -- the interface where two materials meet. by describing the packing of atoms at these interfaces, the tool can be used to help researchers determine how grain boundaries affect the properties of metal alloys and other materials.
April 20, 2017
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Finding the balance between keeping molecules whole or splitting them on oxides
Water is behind creating certain biofuels, sequestering carbon, and forming corrosive rust. If and how water (H2O) breaks when it hits a metal oxide surface, such as a catalyst or a pipe, matters.
February 20, 2017
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First Commercial Graphene Manufacturing Plant in Australia Opens
Imagine Intelligent Materials Pty Ltd (Imagine IM), opened Australia's first commercial graphene plant in Geelong today. the pilot plant will produce up to 10 tonnes of graphene per year. It was built for Imagine IM by Geelong---based engineering company, Austeng.
June 15, 2016
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First ever direct observation of chiral currents in quantum Hall atomic simulation
Using an atomic quantum simulator, scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have achieved the first-ever direct observation of chiral currents in the model topological insulator, the 2-D integer quantum Hall system.
April 24, 2017
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First look inside nanoscale catalysts shows defects are useful
Using one of the world's brightest light sources to peer inside some of the world's smallest particles, scientists have confirmed a longstanding hypothesis: that atomic disorder or "defects" at the edges of nanoparticles is what makes them effective as chemical change agents.
January 11, 2017
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First luminescent molecular system with a lower critical solution temperature
Depending on their solubility, solids can completely dissolve in liquids to form clear solutions, or form suspensions that still contain undissolved solid. Solutions of polymers often have a lower critical solution temperature; only below this temperature is the polymer completely soluble at all concentrations.
May 1, 2017
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First natural van der Waals heterostructure exfoliated
Scientists at the University of Manchester have re-discovered' a material, which could make the construction of 2D van der Waals heterostructures easier to build.
February 13, 2017
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First observation of magnetic phase transition in 2-D materials
Park Je-Geun, Associate Director at the Center for Correlated Electron Systems, within the Institute for Basic Science, working in collaboration with CHEONG Hyeonsik at Sogang University and PARK Cheol-Hwan at Seoul National University demonstrated the magnetic behavior of a special class of 2D materials. this is the first experimental proof to a theory proposed more than 70 years ago. the paper, describing the experiment, is published in the journal Nano Letters.
January 3, 2017
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First random laser made of paper-based ceramics
Working with physicists from the University of Rome, a team led by Professor Cordt Zollfrank from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) built the first controllable random laser based on cellulose paper in Straubing. the team thereby showed how naturally occurring structures can be adapted for technical applications.
November 10, 2016
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First steps towards the touch robot
A squeeze in the arm, a pat on the shoulder, or a slap in the face -- touch is an important part of the social interaction between people. Social touch, however, is a relatively unknown field when it comes to robots, even though robots operate with increasing frequency in society at large, rather than just in the controlled environment of a factory.
October 22, 2016
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First time physicists observed and quantified tiny nanoparticle crossing lipid membrane
Nanomaterials have invaded most of products used in our daily life. they are found everywhere: from cosmetics (creams, toothpastes, and shampoo), food components (sugar, or salt), clothes, buildings cement, paints, car tires, oil, electronic products (smartphones, screen), energy, pharmaceutics (drugs, medical imaging).
November 2, 2016
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First underwater carpet cloak realized, with metamaterial
Researchers at the Institute of Acoustics (IOA) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have designed and fabricated an underwater acoustic carpet cloak using transformation acoustics, a scientific first.
May 5, 2017
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First wave-propelled robot swims, crawls and climbs using a single, small motor
The first single actuator wave-like robot has been developed by engineers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU). the 3D-printed robot can move forward or backward in a wave-like motion, moving much like a worm would in a perpendicular wave. SAW VIDEO
August 1, 2016
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Five ways nanoscience is making science fiction into fact
Russian author Boris Zhitkov wrote the 1931 short story Microhands, in which the narrator creates miniature hands to carry out intricate surgeries. and while that was nearly 100 years ago, the tale illustrates the real fundamentals of the nanoscience researchers are working on today.
February 15, 2017
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Five nanotechnology research projects that could deliver big results
Berkeley Lab researchers are using the science of the very small to help solve big challenges. That's because, at the nanoscale–the scale of molecules and proteins–new and exciting properties emerge that can possibly be put to use.
August 05, 2016
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Flat lens opens a broad world of color
Last summer, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) announced a new, flat lens that could focus light with high efficiency within the visible spectrum. the lens used an ultrathin array of nanopillars to bend and focus light as it passed.
February 8, 2017
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Flexible optical design method for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors
NICT paves a way for realizing a high detection efficiency with an ultralow noise
October 22, 2016
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Flexible optical design method for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology has succeeded in the development of flexible optical design method for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors.
October 22, 2016
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Flexible optical sensors to control the quality of beverages and environmental parameters
Researchers from Universidad Politecnica de Madrid have developed an innovative optical sensor using a conventional tape since it is a low-cost and flexible material that can be easily acquired at stationery shops and it can detect variations of the optical properties of a liquid when is immersed in such liquid. the developed sensor can be used to control both the quality of beverages and environmental monitoring.
December 12, 2016
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Fluctuating liquid structure induces ultrabroad infrared absorption: the hydrated proton on ultrafast time scales
The elusive infrared absorption continuum of protons in aqueous environment has been topic of intense controversial debate since half a century. Scientists now show for the case of the Zundel cation the surrounding liquid induces fluctuating electrical forces onto the proton, modulating its vibrational motions between the two water molecules. this mechanism, together with low-frequency thermal motions, results in the extreme broadening of the infrared spectrum.
July 5, 2016
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Fluorescence microscopy: It cannot get any sharper
It is the holy grail of light microscopy: improving the resolving power of this method such that one can individually discern molecules that are very close to each other.
December 23, 2016
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Flying start for world's first graphene-enhanced aircraft
Prospero, the first model aircraft to incorporate a graphene skinned wing, was successfully flown at the Farnborough International Air Show in the UK earlier this year. the flight sets an example of how graphene might be used within the aerospace sector.
November 28, 2016
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For first time, researchers measure forces that align crystals and help them snap together
Like two magnets being pulled toward each other, tiny crystals twist, align and slam into each other, but due to an altogether different force. for the first time, researchers have measured the force that draws them together and visualized how they swivel and align
April 27, 2017
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For the first time, scientists catch water molecules passing the proton baton
Water conducts electricity, but the process by which this familiar fluid passes along positive charges has puzzled scientists for decades.
December 1, 2016
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Forces of nature: Interview with microscopy innovators Gerd Binnig and Christoph Gerber
The inventors of one of the most versatile tools in modern science - the atomic force microscope, or AFM - tell their story in an interview published online this week. the AFM was invented in the mid 1980s by Gerd Binnig, Christoph Gerber and C
August 25, 2016
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Free Webinar Introducing PANalytical's new Empyrean Nano Edition: a Versatile X-ray Scattering Platform
PANalytical, one of the world's leading suppliers of analytical instrumentation and software for X-ray and related techniques, announces their free webinar 'SAXS / WAXS and more...Introducing the Empyrean Nano edition' on September 1, 2016 presented by Dr. Jörg Bolze, product manager nanomaterials, PANalytical B.V., the Netherlands.
August 24, 2016
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From abundant hydrocarbons to rare spin liquids
Fuel such as petrol is made up of hydrocarbons -- a family of molecules consisting entirely of carbon and hydrogen. Pigment and dye, coal and tar are made up of hydrocarbons too.
April 24, 2017
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From super to ultra-resolution microscopy
A new method pushes the frontier in imaging resolution, with the potential to distinguish individual features in single molecules
July 5, 2016
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From super to ultra-resolution microscopy
Proteins mostly do not work in isolation but rather make up larger complexes like the molecular machines that enable cells to communicate with each other, move cargo around in their interiors or replicate their DNA. Our ability to observe and track each individual protein within these machines is crucial to our ultimate understanding of these processes
July 5, 2016
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From Technical Sales Solutions to TSS Microscopy: More Than a Name Change
From 2003 to 2016, Technical Sales Solutions was known as the premier provider of used electron microscopes.
February 8, 2017
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Funding for a novel computational framework that can custom design nanoparticles
Building upon their previous research, engineering faculty at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering were awarded grants from the National Science Foundation to develop a novel computational framework that can custom design nanoparticles.
July 28, 2016
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Fundamental researchers offer new ways to sort molecules for clean energy and more
It's called the office candy dish problem. you grab a jellybean, but it's not the flavor you want. Pawing through for your favorites is irritating in terms of time, energy, and efficacy. It also annoys your office mates. In an odd way, it's the same problem for those in manufacturing, power generation, and elsewhere. they want a specific subset of molecules or other bits; however, getting that subset can consume vast amounts of energy.
September 27, 2016
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'Fuzzy' fibers can take rockets' heat
To stand up to the heat and pressure of next-generation rocket engines, the composite fibers used to make them should be fuzzy.
March 30, 2017
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Misc. - G

Gas gives laser-induced graphene super properties
Rice University scientists who invented laser-induced graphene (LIG) for applications like supercapacitors have now figured out a way to make the spongy graphene either superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic.
May 15, 2017
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Germany's Nanotechnology 2020 Action Plan
Applications based on nanotechnology have become ever more significant economically in the past few years. they have become commonplace in the everyday lives of workers and consumers. Nanotechnology-based product innovations play an increasingly important role in many areas of life, such as health and nutrition, the workplace, mobility and energy production.
November 22, 2016
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Germs add ripples to make 'groovy' graphene
Graphene, a two-dimensional wonder-material composed of a single layer of carbon atoms linked in a hexagonal chicken-wire pattern, has attracted intense interest for its phenomenal ability to conduct electricity. now University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have used rod-shaped bacteria - precisely aligned in an electric field, then vacuum-shrunk under a graphene sheet - to introduce nanoscale ripples in the material, causing it to conduct electrons differently in perpendicular directions.
July 11, 2016
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GETec and Nanosurf now Offer Self-Sensing Conductive Cantilevers for AFSEM™
GETec and Nanosurf now offer self-sensing conductive cantilevers for AFSEM™ that enable conductivity probing in the vacuum environment of the SEM
September 22, 2016
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Getting light in shape with metamaterials
Converting light from one wavelength (or "color") to a shorter wavelength, a process needed for efficient communication and advanced manufacturing, is typically inefficient. to tackle that inefficiency, a team built a specialized, layered structure with tiny metallic cavities that improves the light conversion efficiency by orders of magnitude.
July 28, 2016
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Getting light in shape with metamaterials
Converting light from one wavelength (or "color") to a shorter wavelength, a process needed for efficient communication and advanced manufacturing, is typically inefficient. to tackle that inefficiency, a team built a specialized, layered structure with tiny metallic cavities that improves the light conversion efficiency by orders of magnitude.
August 03, 2016
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Getting nanoparticle catalysts into shape
Prof Dr Beatriz Roldán Cuenya from the Ruhr-Universitat Bochum (RUB) will receive one of the renowned Consolidator Grants from the European Research Council (ERC). the funding totals two million euros for five years. the scientist aims to use the money to gain new insights into the catalytic abilities of nanoparticles, particularly how the size, shape and chemical state of the particles change during a catalytic reaction.
December 14, 2016
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GF Machining Solutions and Sensofar Metrology Agree Strategic Partnership
GF Machining Solutions (a division of Georg Fischer) and Sensofar Metrology (a division of Sensofar-Tech, SL, based near Barcelona, Spain) have agreed to a new strategic partnership.
December 1, 2016
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'Ghost imaging' with atoms demonstrated
A team of physicists in Australia has used a technique known as 'ghost imaging' to create an image of an object from atoms that never interact with it. this is the first time that ghost imaging has been achieved using atoms, although it has previously been demonstrated with light, leading to applications being developed for imaging and remote sensing through turbulent environments.
December 1, 2016
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Giving citizens a voice in the era of nanotechnology
From user communities to school competitions, an EU-funded project has given civil society a stronger voice in the ongoing debate over nanotechnology. the goal is to help ensure societal concerns are incorporated at all levels of decision-making, and that research with the potential to directly benefit citizens is prioritised.
January 13, 2017
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Giving friction the slip with diamond-like carbon films
In engines, motor oil additives improve lubricity, although they can damage the environment. Argonne National Laboratory scientists discovered new coatings for engine parts with exceptional anti-wear properties.
December 5, 2016
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Giving friction the slip with new carbon nanofilms
In engines, motor oil additives improve lubricity, although they can damage the environment. Argonne National Laboratory scientists discovered new coatings for engine parts with exceptional anti-wear properties.
January 9, 2017
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Global warming: Spring snow a no-go?
Study suggests less snow and earlier snowmelt at higher elevations in warming climate
May 26, 2016
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Glowing crystals can detect, cleanse contaminated drinking water
Tiny, glowing crystals designed to detect and capture heavy-metal toxins such as lead and mercury could prove to be a powerful new tool in locating and cleaning up contaminated water sources.
November 29, 2016
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Going green with nanotechnology
Reducing the environmental impact of organic solar cell production, building more efficient energy storage: Wurzburg-based research institutes have provided for progress in the Bavarian project association UMWELTnanoTECH. Below, we will present their outstanding results.
December 20, 2016
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Gold standards for nanoparticles
Understanding how small organic ions stabilize gold nanoparticles may allow for better control.
March 28, 2017
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Graphene able to transport huge currents on the nanoscale
Once again, graphene has proven itself to be a rather special material: an international research team led by Professor Fritz Aumayr from the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Wien was able to demonstrate that the electrons in graphene are extremely mobile and react very quickly.
December 21, 2016
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Graphene coated microbubbles as superior photoacoustic imaging contrast agent
Researchers have demonstrated that the coupling of pristine graphene sheets on practically any polymer surface can be accomplished in mild reaction conditions and in aqueous medium. the method leaves intact the 2D planar structure of graphene preserving its original features.
June 30, 2016
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Graphene Composite watch Launched in Geneva, Switzerland
An ultralight high-performance mechanical watch made with graphene was recently launched in Geneva at the Salon International De La Haute Horlogerie.
January 17, 2017
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Graphene Could Enter the Body on Top of a Stable Lipid Monolayer
Researchers have, for the first time, succeeded in placing a graphene layer on top of a firm fatty lipid monolayer. Graphene, surrounded by a protective shell of lipids, could enter the body and work as a versatile sensor. the findings, recently published in Nanoscale, are the initial steps towards such a shell.
September 29, 2016
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Graphene Could Help Make Desalination More Productive When Used in Filtration Membranes
A single sheet of graphene, comprising an atom-thin lattice of carbon, may appear to be rather delicate. MIT engineers, however, have discovered that the ultrathin material is remarkably sturdy and remains intact under applied pressures of at least 100 bars. this is equivalent to almost 20 times the pressure generated by a typical kitchen faucet.
April 25, 2017
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Graphene holds up under high pressure
A single sheet of graphene, comprising an atom-thin lattice of carbon, may seem rather fragile. But engineers at MIT have found that the ultrathin material is exceptionally sturdy, remaining intact under applied pressures of at least 100 bars. That's equivalent to about 20 times the pressure produced by a typical kitchen faucet.
April 24, 2017
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Graphene could revolutionize the internet of things
EPFL researchers have produced a tunable, graphene-based device that could significantly increase the speed and efficiency of wireless communication systems. Their system works at very high frequencies, delivering unprecedented results.
July 8, 2016
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Graphene cracks the glass corrosion problem
Researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, within the Institute for Basic Science have demonstrated graphene coating protects glass from corrosion. Their research, published in ACS Nano, can contribute to solving problems related to glass corrosion in several industries.
October 18, 2016
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Graphene device could substantially increase the energy efficiency of fossil fuel-powered cars
A graphene-based electrical nano-device has been created which could substantially increase the energy efficiency of fossil fuel-powered cars.
June 2, 2016
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Graphene Flagship Partner IIT and Momodesign Launch Graphene-Coated Motorcycle Helmet
Recently, a team of researchers from Graphene Flagship partner Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Italy and Italian luxury design company, Momodesign participated in a collaborative project where they built a motorcycle helmet that includes graphene technology. a graphene coating helps distribute the force of an impact thereby making the helmet less susceptible to damage compared to helmets that do not have graphene. this can also be experienced even in high temperature conditions. the result is a helmet that enhances safety and thermal comfort.
November 24, 2016
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Graphene foam gets big and tough
A chunk of conductive graphene foam reinforced by carbon nanotubes can support more than 3,000 times its own weight and easily bounce back to its original height, according to Rice University scientists.
February 13, 2017
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Graphene from soybeans
A breakthrough by CSIRO-led scientists has made the world's strongest material more commercially viable, thanks to the humble soybean.
February 15, 2017
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Graphene hydraulic press delivers new 2D materials
A graphene hydraulic 'nano-press' has proved to be capable of creating new two-dimensional materials by exerting huge pressure on compounds sealed between layers of graphene.
July 7, 2016
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Graphene partnership could deliver lighter planes
A major Chinese investment in graphene research plans to deliver lighter, better performing aircraft and high-speed trains.
July 25, 2016
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Graphene shows promise for composite applications
At Composites Europe 2016, the Graphene Flagship presents the Graphene Pavilion, showcasing development and innovation in using graphene in composites. Highlights include aircraft with graphene-enhanced skin and propellor blades and an impact-resistant motorcycle helmet. the Graphene Connect workshop held alongside offers opportunities for networking and collaboration between research and academia.
November 22, 2016
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Graphene under pressure
Small balloons made from one-atom-thick material graphene can withstand enormous pressures, much higher than those at the bottom of the deepest ocean, scientists at the University of Manchester report.
August 25, 2016
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Graphene used as a frequency mixer
A professor, a postdoctoral researcher and a graduate student hop onto a trampoline.
June 28, 2016
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Graphene Used in Packaging to Block Moisture and Protect Products
Plastic packaging may seem impenetrable, and often nearly impossible to remove, but water molecules can still pass through. this permeability to moisture can reduce the lifespan of a product.
July 28, 2016
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Graphene-Based Conductive Ink Wins Overall Prize in National Science Photography Competition
An image of spectacular swirling graphene ink in alcohol, which can be used to print electrical circuits onto paper, has won the overall prize in a national science photography competition, organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).
April 4, 2017
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Graphene-infused packaging is a million times better at blocking moisture
Plastic packaging might seem impenetrable – and sometimes nearly impossible to remove – but water molecules can still pass through. and this permeability to moisture can limit the lifespan of a product. to better protect goods such as electronics and medicines, scientists have developed a new kind of packaging that incorporates a single layer of graphene.
July 13, 2016
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Graphene's Tunable Wetting and Adhesion Holds Promise for Advanced Coating Materials
A team of researchers from the University of Illinois based at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated graphene's doping-induced tunable wetting and adhesion feature, opening doors to unique and new possibilities for advanced coating materials and transducers.
July 11, 2016
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Graphene/CNT sensor could aid in detecting nuclear threats
Just one example: In its 2017 Budget-in-Brief, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security lists among its priorities allocating $103.9 million for radiological and nuclear detection equipment "to keep U.S. ports of entry safe and secure by detecting and interdicting illicit radioactive or nuclear materials."
April 21, 2017
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Growing perfect crystals by filling the gaps
Be it in phyics, metallurgy, gemology or engineering, the applications of crystals are very broad. a research team including Christos Likos and Lorenzo Rovigatti from the Faculty of Physics of the University of Vienna, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and Princeton University (USA) has developed a new method to assemble large, periodic crystals.
May 31, 2016
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GS Group strengthens its Positions in the Chinese market
Nanocarbon Materials, LLC (part of the Technopolis GS innovative cluster, an investment project from the GS Group holding company) has successfully performed tests of in-house NCM Chrome nano-additives at the Northern Chinese factory, the Industrial Precision Steel Tube Company. the innovative material will be applied for preparing electrolytic tanks for nickel-plating of oil well pipes.
June 14, 2016
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Guiding light: 3-D metasurfaces with optical possibilities
Metamaterials don't exist in nature, but their ability to make ultra-thin lenses and ultra-efficient cell phone antennas, bend light to keep satellites cooler and let photovoltaics absorb more energy mean they offer a world of possibilities.
March 9, 2017
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Misc. - H

Hafnia dons a new face
It's a material world, and an extremely versatile one at that, considering its most basic building blocks -- atoms -- can be connected together to form different structures that retain the same composition.
May 12, 2017
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Harvard Researchers Build Small, Hand-Held Spectrometer Using Meta-Lenses
New hand-held spectrometers matching the same performance capacity of large, benchtop instruments have been designed by physicists from Harvard University. the details of the innovation are published in APL Photonics, from AIP Publishing. the team derived inspiration from their cutting-edge work in meta-lenses. the hand-held spectrometers have the potential for several applications from health care diagnostics to food and environmental monitoring.
February 10, 2017
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Haydale Plc and Flowtite Technology as to Create Next Generation GRP Pipe Products
Haydale Graphene Industries plc, the Group focused on enabling technology for the commercialisation of graphene and other nano materials, is pleased to announce a new joint development agreement.
May 26, 2016
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Haydale, Filamentprint Launch new Graphene Enhanced PLA Filaments for 3D Printing
Haydale Graphene Industry PLC's owned subsidiary, Haydale Composite Solutions has announced its commercial partnership with Fullerex Ltd and Filamentprint Ltd for the purpose of promoting and selling graphene-enhanced Poly Lactic Acid (PLA) filaments that are used in 3D printing devices.
August 15, 2016
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Hiden Gas Analysers at the SIMB Annual Meeting
Research and development facilities around the world have chosen Hiden's QGA and HPR-20 atmospheric pressure gas analysis systems to facilitate high sensitivity, fast response studies of process gases, reaction products and breakthrough gases in catalyst characterization, materials screening, fuel cell development and biogas studies -- to name just a few of the many applications our systems have addressed over the last 3 decades.
July 26, 2016
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Hiden Introduce All-new Ultra-high Performance Quadrupole MS
Hiden announce the introduction of the all-new DLS-20 mass spectrometer, setting a new performance standard for high resolution quadrupole systems.
July 19, 2016
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High accuracy measurements to meet manufacturing needs
The advanced technologies designed by researchers working on the SURFUND project go beyond the current state-of-the-art techniques in metrology, the science of measurements applied to manufacturing and other industrial processes.
August 04, 2016
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High-energy electrons probe ultrafast atomic motion
A new ultrafast technique, using high-energy electrons coupled to a laser pump, revealed insights into atomic vibrational dynamics in a laser-heated gold thin film. this technique directly measured the phonon spectrum and explored the energy transfer from the laser excited electrons to atomic vibrations of the atomic lattice.
March 15, 2017
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High-Load and Compact: Precision 6-Axis Motion from Two new PI Hexapods
6-axis parallel positioning systems provide precision and versatility for loads from 2 kg to 1,000+ kg.
December 21, 2016
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High-Load and Compact: Precision 6-Axis Motion from Two new PI Hexapods
The usefulness of hexapods, or Stewart Platforms, is expanding as research and industry increase the scope of application to include motion simulation, industrial production, precision machining, automotive assembly, image stabilization, and alignment of opto-mechanical components.
December 21, 2016
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High-Precision in Any Aspect with PI's new Rotary Air Bearing Series
PI (Physik Instrumente), a leader in precision motion control solutions, announces the new A-62x PIglide series of rotary air bearing stages. Air-bearings have no rolling or sliding elements and deliver frictionless, non-contact motion, resulting in negligible reversal error, better straightness, wobble, eccentricity and velocity stability -- ideal prerequisites for high-end industrial applications such as inspection, metrology, calibration, and scanning.
April 25, 2017
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High-precision magnetic field sensing
Researchers from the Institute for Biomedical Engineering, which is operated jointly by ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, have succeeded in measuring tiny changes in strong magnetic fields with unprecedented precision. In their experiments, the scientists magnetised a water droplet inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, a device that is used for medical imaging.
December 2, 2016
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High-Resolution Nanopatterns Fabricated in Hard Substrates
Yuliya Lisunova and co-authors have presented their publication entitled "High-aspect ratio nanopatterning via combined thermal scanning probe lithography and dry etching" in Microelectronic Engineering.
May 5, 2017
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High-sensitivity cameras reveal the atomic structure of metal-organic frameworks
Researchers at KAUST have developed a method for fine-scale imaging of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), three-dimensional structures made up of metal ions connected by organic ligands. MOFs are useful for gas storage and separation because they can be designed to have precise pore sizes of molecular dimensions and large void spaces (porosity) within their frameworks.
February 21, 2017
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Highly sensitive gas sensors for volatile organic compound detection
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a group of carbon-based chemicals with low evaporation or vaporization points. some VOCs are harmful to animal or environmental health so sensing these gasses is important for maintaining health and safety. VOCs also occur in nature and can be useful in medical diagnostics, which require highly sensitive sensors to be effective.
February 1, 2017
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Hokkaido University Scientists Analyze Solar Cells with Gold Nanoparticles
Scientists from Hokkaido University are currently analyzing the development of solar cells made of solid materials in order to enhance their ability to survive in harsh environmental conditions.
May 26, 2016
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HORIBA X-RAY LAB is a Powerful Tool for RoHS, ELV and Halogen-Free Applications
HORIBA Scientific, global leader in X-ray Fluorescence analysis, announces enhancements to the software in its MESA-50 Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Analyzer.
August 03, 2016
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How does water melt? Layer by layer!
We all know that water melts at 0°C. However, already 150 years ago the famous physicist Michael Faraday discovered that at the surface of frozen ice, well below 0°C, a thin film of liquid-like water is present. this thin film makes ice slippery and is crucial for the motion of glaciers.
December 12, 2016
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How nanoparticles affect flow through porous stuff in surprising ways
Those who have mixed oil and vinegar may have unknowingly observed a strange fluid phenomenon called fingering instability. a type of this phenomenon, called viscous fingering (VF), occurs in porous media where fluids of differing viscosity converge in finger-shaped patterns as a result of growing disturbances at the interface.
April 4, 2017
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How photosynthetic pigments harvest light
Plants and other photosynthetic organisms use a wide variety of pigments to absorb different wavelengths of light. MIT researchers have now developed a theoretical model to predict the spectrum of light absorbed by aggregates of these pigments, based on their structure.
January 12, 2017
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How shaping light can change particle behavior
Light can take many different forms. Even in our day-to-day life, sunlight is vastly different from fluorescent light. In physics, when studying interactions between light and tiny particles, the shape of the light can make a big difference. Scientists from Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and collaborators at the University of Innsbruck in Austria found that the interactions between particles trapped in light distributed along an optical microfiber, as well as the speed of particle movement were different based on the light's characteristics.
August 15, 2016
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How small is nanotechnology?
In this video illustrating the small scale of nanotechnology, the letters that spell Molecular Foundry were written with a beam of electrons fired at the surface. the smallest feature is 20 nanometers, or roughly 100 atoms.
August 10, 2016
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How researchers capture nanoparticles in water bodies
For a number of years now, an increasing number of synthetic nanoparticles have been manufactured and incorporated into various products, such as cosmetics. for the first time, a research project at the Technical University of Munich and the Bavarian Ministry of the Environment provides reliable findings on their presence in water bodies.
August 29, 2016
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How to convince molecules to self-assemble into precise hollow nanotubes
Uniform tiny tubes could change devices as diverse as cell phone batteries and water purifiers. the challenge is making the tubes the same. Scientists discovered a family of nature-inspired synthetic materials; when placed in water, the material spontaneously assembles into millions of long, hollow tubes (PNAS, "Self-assembly of crystalline nanotubes from monodisperse amphiphilic diblock copolypeptoid tiles").
December 14, 2016
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How to tell when a nanoparticle is out of shape
Nanoparticles -- those with diameters less than one-thousandth the width of a human hair -- are increasingly prevalent in high technology, medicine, and consumer goods.* Their characteristics, both desirable and undesirable, depend critically on their size.
December 21, 2016
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How to turn green light blue
The upconversion of photons allows for a more efficient use of light: Two photons are converted into a single photon having higher energy. Researchers at KIT now showed for the first time that the inner interfaces between surface-mounted metal-organic frameworks (SURMOFs) are suited perfectly for this purpose - they turned green light blue.
August 10, 2016
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How water can split into two liquids below zero
Did you know that water can still remain liquid below zero degrees Celsius? It is called supercooled water and is present in refrigerators. at even smaller temperatures, supercooled water could exist as a cocktail of two distinct liquids.
January 25, 2017
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How water gets its exceptional properties
Water is liquid at room temperature -- astounding for such a small molecule. Insights into the causes are provided by a new simulation method, which has its origins in brain research.
July 5, 2016
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Hybrid approach predicts and confirms structure of complex metal nanoparticles
In a paper published Friday, November 25, 2016, in the journal Science Advances, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Toledo report on an X-ray-determined structure that authenticates the a priori prediction, and in conjunction with first-principles theoretical analysis, supports the underlying forecasting methodology.
November 29, 2016
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Hybrid Method Predicts and Verifies Complex Metal Nanoparticle Structure
Researchers have been able to predict and verify the full structure of a monolayer-coated molecular metal nanoparticle using a combined theoretical and experimental approach.
November 29, 2016
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Hybrid nanostructures hold hydrogen well
Layers of graphene separated by nanotube pillars of boron nitride may be a suitable material to store hydrogen fuel in cars, according to Rice University scientists.
October 22, 2016
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Hydrogen bonds directly detected for the first time
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel's Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances.
May 12, 2017
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Hyperprecise measurement with Bose-Einstein condensates
Atom interferometry is the most sensitive known technique for measuring gravitational forces and inertial forces such as acceleration and rotation. it's a mainstay of scientific research and is being commercialized as a means of location-tracking in environments where GPS is unavailable. it's also extremely sensitive to electric fields and has been used to make minute measurements of elements' fundamental electrical properties.
January 3, 2017
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Misc. - I

IBS Researchers Study Hydrogenation of Graphene
The addition of hydrogen to graphene could improve its future applicability in the semiconductor industry, when silicon leaves off. Recently, researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM) within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) gained additional insights into this chemical reaction.
November 4, 2016
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IBS Researchers Use Zeolites as Template to Synthesize Graphene-Like Carbon Structures
Graphene, an allotrope of carbon, discovered more than a decade ago has led to myriad research that seeks to unlock its vast potential. Zeolites, commonly used microporous solid catalysts in the petrochemical industry, have recently attracted attention in the field of material science as a template for carbon synthesis. Each individual crystal is distinguished by its unique 1 nanometer (nm) sized pore structure, this structure facilitates the accommodation of carbon nanotubes inside the zeolite. on paper, these nanoporous systems are an ideal template for the synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) graphene architecture but the zeolite pores are too small to accommodate bulky molecular compounds like polyaromatic and furfuryl alcohol that are often used in carbon synthesis. Small molecules like ethylene and acetylene can be used as a carbon source to achieve successful carbonization within the zeolite pores, but it comes at a great cost. the high temperatures required for the synthesis cause the reactions to occur non-selectively on the external surfaces of the zeolite as well as the internal pore walls, resulting in coke deposition and consequently causing serious diffusion limitations in the zeolite pores.
June 30, 2016
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'Ideal' energy storage material for electric vehicles developed
The energy-storage goal of a polymer dielectric material with high energy density, high power density and excellent charge-discharge efficiency for electric and hybrid vehicle use has been achieved by a team of Penn State materials scientists.
August 23, 2016
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Illuminating transfer of nanoscale motion through microscale machine
From the printing press to the jet engine, mechanical machines with moving parts have been a mainstay of technology for centuries. as U.S. industry develops smaller mechanical systems, they face bigger challenges -- microscopic parts are more likely to stick together and wear out when they make contact with each other.
September 12, 2016
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Imaging at the speed of light
Tiny micro- and nanoscale structures within a material's surface are invisible to the naked eye, but play a big role in determining a material's physical, chemical, and biomedical properties
March 14, 2017
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Imprinting nano patterns on the inside and outside of polymer fibers
Researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonic Materials and Fibre Devices, which is run by Fabien Sorin, have come up with a simple and innovative technique for drawing or imprinting complex, nanometric patterns on hollow polymer fibers.
January 24, 2017
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Imprinting nanopatterns in metals with diamonds
A baker specialising in the spiced Spekulatius biscuits eaten in Germany around Christmas time and Paul Braun, a doctoral student at the Physical Metallurgy group in the Department of Materials and Earth Sciences at the TU Darmstadt have one thing in common: they both spend some of their time imprinting designs into materials -- the one into biscuit dough; the other into metal.
March 22, 2017
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Improving OER performance with novel electrodeposited perovskite electrocatalysts
Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is the core process -- but also the bottleneck -- in many energy devices such as metal-air batteries and water-splitting techniques, calling for new insights in rational design of OER electrocatalysts.
October 22, 2016
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Improving the mechanical properties of polymer gels through molecular design
A polymer gel consists of a three-dimensional cross-linked polymer network swollen with liquid molecules. However, most conventional polymer gels are brittle because stress concentration readily occurs in their cross-linked polymer network structure. the mechanical properties of polymer gels need to be improved to facilitate their application as, for example, molecular sieves and superabsorbent materials.
December 1, 2016
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In a first, metamaterial achieves the performance predicted by theoretical bounds
In 2015 UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer and materials scientist Jonathan Berger developed an idea that could change the way people think about high-performance structural materials. Two years later, his concept is paying research dividends.
February 21, 2017
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Infiniti Research Reports on the Future Trends of Nano Coatings in Textiles Sector
Since its discovery about a decade ago, nanopolymer research has increased tremendously and is revolutionizing the future of the textile coatings sector. this technology cannot be seen by the naked eye, yet it is all around us, as it is used in several applications like home furniture, cars, and now clothing and textiles.
January 24, 2017
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Innovative Method to Build Advanced Carbon Monoxide Nanosensors
Detecting carbon monoxide (CO) in the air is a significant issue because CO is an environmental pollutant and a poisonous gas. Typically, CO is obtained from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels like gasoline and cooking gas.
May 26, 2016
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Innovative technique mimics natural structural color
Following in depth research to explain the physics behind photonic band gap in structured photonic materials, a new method has been devised to characterise the internal structures of natural materials and replicate their interaction with light using 3D printing of ceramics. the internal structure of materials and their local-self uniformity dictates their ability to diffuse absorb, reflect and transmit light.
February 17, 2017
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Inside nanotubes, water turns solid when it should be boiling
It's a well-known fact that water, at sea level, starts to boil at a temperature of 212 degrees Fahrenheit, or 100 degrees Celsius. and scientists have long observed that when water is confined in very small spaces, its boiling and freezing points can change a bit, usually dropping by around 10 C or so.
November 28, 2016
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Inspiring images invite you into the world of engineering
Graphene is a sheet form of carbon that is a single atom thick, which can be produced by successively peeling thin layers off graphite using tape until an individual atomic layer is left. In the ink produced here, powdered graphite is mixed with alcohol then forced at high pressure through micrometre-scale capillaries made of diamond.
November 29, 2016
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Integration of Nanoparticles into Glass Could Open Exciting Possibilities for new Hybrid Materials
Australian researchers at the University of Adelaide have developed a method for embedding light-emitting nanoparticles into glass without losing any of their unique properties -- a major step towards 'smart glass' applications such as 3D display screens or remote radiation sensors.
June 8, 2016
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International Conference & Exhibition on Advanced & Nano Materials to be held in Toronto, Canada
The International Academy of Energy, Minerals & Materials, has announced that it will be hosting the ICANM2017: International Conference on Advanced and Nano Materials, from 07-09 August.
September 29, 2016
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International team solves mystery of colloidal chains
When Northwestern Engineering's Erik Luijten met Zbigniew Rozynek, they immediately became united by a mystery.
May 12, 2017
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International Team Uses N-doped Graphene to develop Ultrasensitive Sensor
A team of international researchers working at Penn State have developed a highly sensitive chemical sensor based on Raman spectroscopy. this was developed using nitrogen-doped graphene as a substrate. In this scenario, doping introduces nitrogen atoms into the carbon structure of graphene.
July 25, 2016
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Introducing the little black graphene dress
Science and fashion have been brought together to create the world's most technically advanced dress, the intu Little Black Graphene Dress.
January 30, 2017
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Introducing the world's biggest nanomaterial production plant
The European SHYMAN project aims to establish continuous hydrothermal synthesis as the most flexible and sustainable process to create nanomaterials at industrial scale. After demonstrating this potential in the lab, the project has now announced the opening of its first facility in Nottingham.
August 1, 2016
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'Inverse designing' spontaneously self-assembling materials
Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin are exploring how molecular simulations with the latest optimization strategies can create a more systematic way of discovering new materials that exhibit specific, desired properties.
May 9, 2017
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Invisibility cloak with photonic crystals
Metamaterials made from metal elements initially proposed for constructing invisibility cloaks, did not solve some important cloaking problems.
August 31, 2016
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Iowa University Researchers Obtain Grant to develop Extreme Quantum Terahertz Nanoscope
A team of researchers from Iowa State University's department of physics and astronomy are focusing on constructing a strong instrument that has the potential to explore and tune materials in various ways, to help to solve the global energy, information processing, and data storage requirements.
August 15, 2016
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Iron nanocubes may be key in the future of NO2 sensing
While nanoparticles sound like a recent discovery, these tiny structures have been used for centuries. the famous Lycurgus cup, made by 4th century Roman artisans, features dichroic glass, with gold and silver nanoparticles sprinkled throughout, producing a green appearance when light is shining on it from the front, and a red appearance when illuminated from behind.
March 14, 2017
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Iron Nanocubes may Have Favorable Impact on Future of NO2 Sensing
Although they sound like a recent discovery, nanoparticles have been in use for centuries. for instance, the famous Lycurgus cup, crafted by 4th century Roman artisans, features dichroic glass, with silver and gold nanoparticles scattered throughout, giving the cup a red appearance when illuminated from behind and a green appearance when light is shining on it from the front.
March 15, 2017
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It's delightful, it's dynamic, it's dewetting
How would you like a kitchen surface that cleans itself? Technological advances such as this could be one step closer after a breakthrough by Northumbria University and Nottingham Trent University.
September 28, 2016
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It's official: Phonon and magnon are a couple
Professor Park Je-Geun, Associate Director of the Center for Correlated Electron Systems, within the Institute for Basic Science, and colleagues have observed, quantified and created a new theoretical model of the coupling of two forms of collective atomic excitation, known as magnons and phonons in crystals of the antiferromagnet manganite (Y,Lu)MnO3, a mineral made of manganese oxide and rare-earth elements called yttrium and lutetium.
October 19, 2016
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Misc. - J

Journey to the centre of the cell: Nano-rods and worms wriggle best
When it comes to delivering drugs, nanoparticles shaped like rods and worms are the best bet for making the daunting journey to the centre of a cell, new Australian research suggests.
September 12, 2016
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JPK Selects Compact Tensile Stage from Deben for their NanoWizard® AFM Platform to Broaden Capabilities for Materials Characterisation
Deben, a leading provider of in-situ testing stages together with innovative accessories and components for electron microscopy, have supplied leading German instrument manufacturers, JPK Instruments, with a tensile stage to use in conjunction with the world-renowned NanoWizard® AFM platform.
February 22, 2017
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Misc. - K

Keysight Technologies Expands Capabilities of Ultrafast-Scanning 9500 Atomic Force Microscope
Provides Researchers the Speed, Ease of Use, Advanced Imaging Modes Required for the Most Demanding Applications
July 25, 2016
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KIT Researchers develop Tailored Probes for Atomic Force Microscopes
The nanostructure of surfaces is made visible with atomic force microscopes. the probes of these microscopes use supreme quality measurement needles to scan the investigation material. These needles have now successfully been used by KIT for their applications.
August 11, 2016
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Misc. - L

Lake Shore Spotlighting new VSM, other Characterization Solutions at MRS Fall
Booth 501 to feature 8600 Series VSM and platforms for variable temperature material measurement.
November 22, 2016
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Lake Shore Exhibiting new Nanoscale Characterization Solutions at Nanotech 2017
VSM for fast, convenient analysis of magnetic nanomaterial properties among products featured
May 10, 2017
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LANXESS and OCSiAl set new Standards for Conductive Additives
LANXESS and OCSiAl have officially entered into a collaboration that will result in production and marketing of an expanded line of TUBALL™ single wall carbon nanotube-based conductive additives for applications in various industries.
October 12, 2016
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Laser particles could provide sharper images of tissues
A new imaging technique developed by scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) aims to illuminate cellular structures in deep tissue and other dense and opaque materials. Their method uses tiny particles embedded in the material, that give off laser light.
November 4, 2016
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Latest Advancements in Nanoscale IR Spectroscopy -- Webinar by Anasys Instruments
Anasys Instruments, the world leader in nanoscale FTIR spectroscopy, is hosting a webinar on August 24th titled "Latest advancements in nanoscale IR spectroscopy: Resolution, Performance, & Speed".
August 11, 2016
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Lattice of nanotraps and line narrowing in Raman gas
Decreasing the emission linewidth from a molecule is one of the key aims in precision spectroscopy. One approach is based on cooling molecules to near absolute zero.
February 8, 2017
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Lead dressed like gold
Since the Middle Ages, alchemists have sought to transmute elements, the most famous example being the long quest to turn lead into gold. Transmutation has been realized in modern times, but on a minute scale using a massive particle accelerator.
February 28, 2017
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Leading High Tech Manufacturer Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology Appoints new MD
Leading provider of plasma etch and deposition equipment solutions, Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology is pleased to announce the recent appointment of Richard Pollard to the role of Managing Director.
July 27, 2016
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Leading U.S. Science and Technology Laboratory Selects Veeco Ion Beam Sputtering Technology
Veeco Instruments Inc. announced today that Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, based in California, has ordered Veeco's SPECTOR® Ion Beam Sputtering system. the system will be used to deposit optical thin films and to conduct research regarding laser performance in support of the Laboratory's national security mission.
August 05, 2016
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Legos and origami inspire next-generation materials
Inspired by the fun of playing with Legos, an international team of researchers from Tianjin University of Technology and Harvard University have used the idea of assembling building-blocks to make the promise of next-generation materials a practical reality.
March 29, 2017
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Light and matter merge in quantum coupling
Where light and matter intersect, the world illuminates. Where light and matter interact so strongly that they become one, they illuminate a world of new physics, according to Rice University scientists.
August 22, 2016
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Light drives single-molecule nanoroadsters
Scientists at Rice University and at the University of Graz, Austria, are driving three-wheeled, single-molecule "nanoroadsters" with light and, for the first time, seeing how they move.
November 4, 2016
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Light opens and closes windows in membranes
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Universitat Hannover developed novel membranes, whose selectivity can be switched dynamically with the help of light. for this purpose, azobenzene molecules were integrated into membranes made of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs).
December 23, 2016
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Light provides pull for future nanocatalyst measurement
Rice University nanophotonics researcher Isabell Thomann uses lasers, light-activated materials and light-measuring nanoscale tips to push the boundaries of experimental nanoscience, but light is providing the pull in her latest study.
December 14, 2016
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Light speckles having a conversation
The amount of light passing through an opaque layer, can be enhanced using smart techniques.
October 20, 2016
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Light strikes gold
Using light to sculpt tiny crystals able to do big jobs has garnered attention in the scientific community since scientists used such a process to create silver prisms in 2001. However, scientists have been unable to apply the process to gold–until now.
January 9, 2017
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Light to design precision polymers
Chemists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have succeeded in specifically controlling the setup of precision polymers by light-induced chemical reactions. the new method allows for the precise, planned arrangement of the chain links, i.e. monomers, along polymer chains of standard length
December 14, 2016
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Light-controlled gearbox for nanomachines
Rewarded with a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2016, nanomachines provide mechanical work on the smallest of scales. Yet at such small dimensions, molecular motors can complete this work in only one direction.
March 19, 2017
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LightPath Teams Up with NIL to Use Carbide-Bonded Graphene Coating Technology for Molding Optics
LightPath Technologies, Inc., a leading vertically integrated global manufacturer, distributor and integrator of proprietary optical and infrared components and high-level assemblies, today announced it has won a $200,000 sub-award from the National Science Foundation for a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research titled "Carbide bonded graphene coating for enhanced glass molding." LightPath is part of the research team led by the primary grantee of Nanomaterial Innovation Limited (NIL), a spin-off from the Ohio State University.
June 30, 2016
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Lights, action, electrons!
Ever since J.J. Thompson's 1897 discovery of the electron, scientists have attempted to describe the subatomic particle's motion using a variety of different means. Electrons are far too small and fast to be seen, even with the help of a light microscope
October 10, 2016
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Lightning-fast switch for electron waves
The characteristic shine of metals is created by electrons which can freely move in the interior of the material and reflect incoming radiation. Similar to water waves on a pond, waves can form on the surface of this electron sea -- so called "surface plasmons". Instead of a stone that is thrown into water, light is used to generate surface plasmons in the laboratory. When light is focused onto a nanometer-sharp metallic tip, miniature waves propagate on the material's surface in a circular fashion starting from the tip apex.
December 13, 2016
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Linkam's cryo-stage is chosen by JPK Instruments for their NanoWizard® AFM systems.
Market leaders in temperature controlled microscopy and established manufacturers of advanced freeze drying microscopes, Linkam Scientific Instruments, have been chosen by JPK Instruments to supply a customized version of one of their cryo-stage systems to enable surface properties to be studied over an extended temperature range.
March 15, 2017
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Liquid crystal design method could speed development of cheap chemical sensors
University of Wisconsin-Madison chemical engineers have developed a new way to create inexpensive chemical sensors for detecting explosives, industrial pollutants or even the chemical markers of disease in a patient's breath.
November 3, 2016
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Liquid fingerprinting technique instantly identifies unknown liquids
A new company will commercialize sensing technology invented at Harvard University that can perform instant, in-field characterization of the chemical make-up and material properties of unknown liquids.
August 04, 2016
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Liquid crystals open new route to planar optical elements
Researchers at Osaka University developed a technology to control the light wavefront reflected from a cholesteric liquid crystal -- a liquid crystal phase with a helical structure.
June 16, 2016
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LiveLink™ for SOLIDWORKS® from COMSOL Allows Users to Build Simulation Apps that Integrate with CAD
COMSOL, Inc. the leading provider of software solutions for multiphysics modeling, simulation, app design and deployment, has announced an update to its LiveLink™ for SOLIDWORKS® product. as an add-on to the COMSOL Multiphysics® software, LiveLink™ for SOLIDWORKS® allows a CAD model to be synchronized between the two software packages.
February 2, 2017
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Living structural materials could open new horizons for engineers and architects
The structural materials that are currently used to construct homes, buildings, and infrastructure are expensive to produce and transport, wear out due to age and damage, and have limited ability to respond to changes in their immediate surroundings. Living biological materials–bone, skin, bark, and coral, for example–have attributes that provide advantages over the non-living materials people build with, in that they can be grown where needed, self-repair when damaged, and respond to changes in their surroundings.
August 09, 2016
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Location matters in the self-assembly of nanoclusters
Scientists at Iowa State University have developed a new formulation that helps to explain the self-assembly of atoms into nanoclusters and to advance the scientific understanding of related nanotechnologies. Their research offers a theoretical framework to explain the relationship between the distribution of "capture zones," the regions that surround the nanoscale "islands" formed by deposition on surfaces, and the underlying nucleation or formation process.
September 6, 2016
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Lockheed Martin's Micro-Size Cryocooler Ideal for Sensor and Missile Applications
Lockheed Martin has developed a new micro-size cryocooler that enables quick-startup infrared (IR) sensors for sensor and missile applications.
August 11, 2016
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Lonely atoms, happily reunited
The remarkable behaviour of platinum atoms on magnetite surfaces could lead to better catalysts. Scientists at TU Wien can now explain how platinum atoms can form pairs with the help of carbon monoxide.
July 26, 2016
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Lotus leaf inspires scientists to create world's first self-cleaning metals
Taking their ideas from defence mechanisms found in plants such as the Lotus leaf, the 'High Throughput Laser Texturing of Self-Cleaning and Antibacterial Surfaces', or 'TresClean' project, has made a breakthrough that will enable the production of self-cleaning sheet metal on an industrial scale for the first time.
June 28, 2016
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Low-cost and defect-free graphene
Graphene is one of the most promising new materials. However, researchers across the globe are still looking for a way to produce defect-free graphene at low costs. Chemists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universiat Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU) have now succeeded in producing defect-free graphene directly from graphite for the first time.
September 2, 2016
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Low-cost coating for a more sustainable glass
The panoramic glass façades of modern day high-rises and office buildings may be aesthetically pleasing, but they can come at a cost. the visible light they let in, accompanied by infrared light that can cause buildings' temperatures to rise, can lead to increased air-conditioning use and higher levels of energy consumption, especially in hot, desert climates like the UAE.
June 15, 2016
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Low-cost printed patterns for diagnostics
Laser printouts on paper might be used as a platform for low-cost organic electronics, microfluidic, or sensor applications. German scientists at Humboldt University Berlin have now developed a procedure for the selective coating of laser-printed micropatterns on paper. These coatings can be used for further functionalization and enable envisioning various applications in the field of diagnostics and sensors.
July 5, 2016
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Misc. - M

Machine learning enables predictive modeling of 2-D materials
Machine learning, a field focused on training computers to recognize patterns in data and make new predictions, is helping doctors more accurately diagnose diseases and stock analysts forecast the rise and fall of financial markets. and now materials scientists have pioneered another important application for machine learning -- helping to accelerate the discovery and development of new materials.
December 6, 2016
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Magic ink from the nano world
Plasmonic printing produces resolutions several times greater than conventional printing methods. In plasmonic printing, colours are formed on the surfaces of tiny metallic particles when light excites their electrons to oscillate. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart have now shown how the colours of such metallic particles can be altered with hydrogen.
March 1, 2017
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Magnetic and Magnetooptical Response of STF Films Improved by Oxygen Defects Like Nanopillars
It is essential to develop the constituent materials of the next generation of devices in order to develop these devices for information processing based on new phenomena such as magnonics, magnetooptics, multiferroics, and spintronics.
March 19, 2017
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Magnetic atoms arranged in neat rows
Nanotechnology is revolutionising the way we live by making microelectronic systems even smaller, enabling new developments in diagnosis and treatment in medicine, and giving the surfaces of materials new self-cleaning properties -- to name just a few examples.
August 03, 2016
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Magnetic bubbles pop up
A team at RIKEN has been squashing, moving and popping an unusual breed of magnetic bubbles in the hope that these structures could eventually be used as information carriers in a new form of low-power computing (Advanced Materials, "Variation of topology in magnetic bubbles in a colossal magnetoresistive manganite").
February 3, 2017
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Magnetic carbon with minute patterns
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) for the first time have now produced micro- and nanostructured magnetic carbon. Together with scientists of Freiburg University, they provided polymers with minute structures by means of lithography and converted them by pyrolysis. In this way, they obtained pyrolytic magnetic carbon (PMC). It is inexpensive, can be used at room temperature, and is suited for micro- and nano electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS).
February 8, 2017
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Magnetism under the magnifying glass
Being able to determine magnetic properties of materials with sub-nanometer precision would greatly simplify development of magnetic nano-structures for future spintronic devices.
August 31, 2016
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Magnets built atom-by-atom in first effort of its kind
Material scientists have predicted and built two new magnetic materials, atom-by-atom, using high-throughput computational models. the success marks a new era for the large-scale design of new magnetic materials at unprecedented speed.
April 14, 2017
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Major UK Graphene Manufacturer Joins the NGI
The National Graphene Institute (NGI) has signed a collaborative partnership with a leading UK graphene company to accelerate the commercialisation of applications.
June 23, 2016
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Making flawless graphene coatings
Graphene, the ultra-thin material just a single carbon atom in thickness, holds the promise of such impressive applications as wear-resistant, friction-free coatings. But first manufacturers have to be able to produce large sheets of graphene under precisely controlled conditions. Dirk van Baarle studied how graphene grows at atomic scale and what determines the friction with other materials. PhD defence 29 November.
November 29, 2016
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Making graphene using laser-induced phase separation
All our smart phones have shiny flat AMOLED displays. Behind each single pixel of these displays hide at least two silicon transistors which were mass-manufactured using laser annealing technologies.
December 1, 2016
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Making magnets flip like cats at room temperature
In today's world of ever-increasing digital information storage and computation, the next information storage revolution seeks to exploit a novel effect arising from the relativistic physics of Einstein which allows to make a new type of magnet behave like cats.
July 21, 2016
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MANTA Instruments Launches the ViewSizer 3000, a Scientific Instrument Offering Breakthrough Nanoparticle Characterization
ViewSizer 3000 enables more effective R&D for biotech and pharma organizations
July 27, 2016
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Mantis shrimp inspires next generation of ultra-strong materials
Mantis shrimp are available in the lab and can be photographed or videoed.
May 31, 2016
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Manufacturing nanostructures with polymer 'pens'
Miniaturization of electronic devices has been ongoing since well before the first room-sized computer was built more than half a century ago. a hand-held smart phone now holds far more data than that behemoth of the late 1940s, but continuing this trend toward tiny has become more challenging.
June 14, 2016
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Mapping the effects of crystal defects
New research offers insights into how crystal dislocations -- a common type of defect in materials -- can affect electrical and heat transport through crystals, at a microscopic, quantum mechanical level.
March 15, 2017
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Marcy NanoCenter
With more than $14 billion in private and public investment in New York State in high-tech R&D and manufacturing, this cluster includes semiconductor industry giants AMD, ASML, Applied Materials, IBM, NXP Semiconductor, and Tokyo Electron among others.
Provides Information
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Material scientists' fascination with negative Poisson's ratio
Poisson's ratio describes the fundamental elasticity of any solid. Conventional materials contract laterally when stretched and Poisson's ratio expresses the ratio of transverse contraction strain to longitudinal extension strain in the direction of stretching force.
August 03, 2016
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Materials bend as they 'breathe' under high temperatures
Carrying out maintenance tasks inside a nuclear plant puts severe strains on equipment, due to extreme temperatures that are hard for components to endure without degrading. Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have come up with a radically new way to make actuators that could be used in such extremely hot environments
May 10, 2017
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Materials study probes 'field-assisted' processing for high-tech ceramic components
A new project will study the fundamental mechanisms behind a method that uses electrical fields to enhance ceramics-sintering processing to manufacture components for a range of military and commercial applications.
January 24, 2017
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'Materials that compute' advances as engineers demonstrate pattern recognition
The potential to develop "materials that compute" has taken another leap at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering, where researchers for the first time have demonstrated that the material can be designed to recognize simple patterns. this responsive, hybrid material, powered by its own chemical reactions, could one day be integrated into clothing and used to monitor the human body, or developed as a skin for "squishy" robots.
September 2, 2016
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Materials: when defects turn into qualities
Hybrid organic-inorganic materials, which were developed approximately twenty years ago -- notably by Gerard Ferey, laureate of the CNRS 2010 Gold Medal, and his team -- are known firstly for their extreme porosity. this remarkable property offers a diverse range of applications in the fields of energy, health, and sustainable development.
December 21, 2016
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Math techniques improve computational efficiency in quantum chemistry
Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed new mathematical techniques to advance the study of molecules at the quantum level.
May 4, 2017
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Measuring entropy on a single molecule
Chemical reactions, especially in biological systems, oftentimes involve macromolecules changing their shape their "configuration" for instance, by rotation or translational movements.
February 14, 2017
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Mechanical behavior of tiny structures is affected by atomic defects
An international team of scientists with participation from the University of Göttingen, the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Pennsylvania State University, and Wright State University has measured the mechanics of tiny crystalline ceramics. Materials are made of atoms, and if they are arranged periodically, they are called crystalline structures.
September 28, 2016
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Meta-lenses bring benchtop performance to small, hand-held spectrometer
Game-changing nanostructure-based lenses allow smaller devices, increased functionality
February 9, 2017
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Meta-lens works in the visible spectrum, sees smaller than a wavelength of light
Curved lenses, like those in cameras or telescopes, are stacked in order to reduce distortions and resolve a clear image. That's why high-power microscopes are so big and telephoto lenses so long.
June 2, 2016
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Metal nanoparticles induced visible-light photocatalysis
In the quest to solve solar energy conversion as well as environmental remediation issues, photocatalysis using sunlight have been attracting tremendous attention.
April 27, 2017
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Metal-organic frameworks found to exist in nature
One of the hottest new materials is a class of porous solids known as metal-organic frameworks, or MOFs. These man-made materials were introduced in the 1990s, and researchers around the world are working on ways to use them as molecular sponges for applications such as hydrogen storage, carbon sequestration, or photovoltaics.
August 05, 2016
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Metal-organic frameworks used as looms
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have made major progress in the production of two-dimensional polymer-based materials. to produce cloths from monomolecular threads, the scientists used SURMOFs, i.e. surface-mounted metal-organic frameworks, developed by KIT. they inserted four-armed monomers, i.e. smaller molecular building blocks, into some SURMOF layers. Cross-linking of the monomers then resulted in textiles consisting of interwoven polymer threads.
February 15, 2017
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Metamaterial device allows chameleon-like behavior in the infrared
An electric current will not only heat a hybrid metamaterial, but will also trigger it to change state and fade into the background like a chameleon in what may be the proof-of-concept of the first controllable metamaterial device, or metadevice, according to a team of engineers.
October 27, 2016
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Metamaterial uses light to control its motion
Researchers have designed a device that uses light to manipulate its mechanical properties. the device, which was fabricated using a plasmomechanical metamaterial, operates through a unique mechanism that couples its optical and mechanical resonances, enabling it to oscillate indefinitely using energy absorbed from light.
October 10, 2016
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Metamaterial: Medival mail armor inspires physicists
The Middle Ages certainly were far from being science-friendly: Whoever looked for new findings off the beaten track faced the threat of being burned at the stake. Hence, the contribution of this era to technical progress is deemed to be rather small. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), however, were inspired by medieval mail armor when producing a new metamaterial with novel properties. they succeeded in reversing the Hall coefficient of a material.
February 9, 2017
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Metamaterials open up entirely new possibilities in optics
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have developed a method that enables them to manipulate light to follow any predetermined path along a surface. the innovation has now been described as one of the world's 30 most exciting discoveries within optics and photonics during 2016.
November 29, 2016
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Metasurface technique makes more efficient, independent holograms
Not far from where Edwin Land -- the inventor of the Polaroid camera -- made his pioneering discoveries about polarized light, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are continuing to unlock the power of polarization.
April 4, 2017
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Micro and Nanosystems Researchers at KTH develop new Plastic Manufacturing Process
Researchers at the Department of Micro- and Nanosystems at KTH have developed a new way to simultaneously shape and surface treat plastic components. the new method can reduce the manufacturing cost of medical devices, such as diagnostic tools for various diseases.
September 16, 2016
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Micro Materials Limited Under new Ownership
Micro Materials Ltd, leaders in nanoindentation and nanomechanical measurements, announced that Spantech Products Ltd of Surrey, UK has acquired a majority holding in MML as part of a management supported buyout arrangement.
March 16, 2017
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Micro-bubbles and frequency combs
When measuring the duration of high-speed physical phenomena, a good stopwatch can only get you so far, and while oscilloscopes can pick up electrical signals with frequencies of a few GHz, measuring incredibly fast optical phenomena requires something more -- a system called an optical frequency comb.
January 30, 2017
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Microscope becomes gauge to measure forces between crystals
All materials found in nature -- even the most "perfect" diamond -- contain defects, since the atoms inside them are never arranged in perfect order.
August 1, 2016
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Microscope Stage for Electronics Material Testing
The Prior Scientific H112 microscope stage offers a travel range of over 300 x 300 mm making it ideal for accurate and precise scanning of semiconductor wafers, photo masks, flat panel displays and printed circuit boards.
September 23, 2016
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Microscope Stage for Productive Microplate Imaging
Prior Scientific announces the H139, a new motorised microscope stage designed to enable life scientists to precisely position, move and image up to two microplates or nine microscope slides.
November 2, 2016
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Microscopic Particles Have Been Counted Without a Microscope
Scientists from Australia and Russia have discovered a new method for counting microscopic particles in optical materials with the help of a laser.
August 10, 2016
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Microswimmer robot chains can decouple and reconnect in a magnetic field
Researchers have successfully pulled off a feat that both sci-fi fans and Michael Phelps could appreciate. Using a rotating magnetic field they show how multiple chains of microscopic magnetic bead-based robots can link up to reach impressive speeds swimming through in a microfluidic environment.
July 28, 2016
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Mimicking bug eyes could brighten reflective signs and clothes
That bright, reflective coating used on road signs, bicycles and clothing are important safety measures at night. they help drivers get to their destinations while avoiding bicyclists and pedestrians in low-light conditions. Now, inspired by the structure of insect eyes, scientists have developed new materials that could improve the color and effectiveness of these safeguards.
December 1, 2016
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Miniature Linear Positioning Stage for Single and Multi-Axis Applications
The L-402 compact linear stage is the newest addition to the suite of motion control solutions available from precision positioning systems industry leader PI (Physik Instrumente). Delivering performance and reliability at minimized cost, this affordable miniature linear positioner is well-suited for micromanipulation, test systems, and opto-mechanical alignment automation applications.
February 9, 2017
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MIT Researchers develop Method to Produce Highly Conductive, Wrinkle-Free, Single-Domain Graphene at Wafer Scale
Just like in a hair-raising thrill ride, electrons can move through graphene. Scientists have been aware for years that electrons can blitz through graphene close to the speed of light, much faster than they can move through silicon and other semiconducting materials.
April 4, 2017
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MIT Researchers develop Porous, 3D Forms of Graphene
MIT researchers have developed one of the strongest lightweight materials known to man. they created the new material by compressing and fusing flakes of graphene, a 2D form of carbon. the new material has a sponge-like configuration with a density of only 5%, and is likely to have strength 10 times that of steel.
January 9, 2017
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Mix and match lasers
Combining silicon with a light-producing semiconductor may help develop micrometer-scale lasers, shows Doris Keh-Ting Ng and her colleagues from the A*STAR Data Storage Institute.
November 30, 2016
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Model could shatter a mystery of glass
A glass is a curious material in between liquid and solid states of matter, but eventually glass always yields to its solid proclivity by settling into the ordered patterns of a crystal. Or so it was thought.
November 28, 2016
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Model for multivalley polaritons
Everything we experience is made of light and matter. and the interaction between the two can bring about fascinating effects. for example, it can result in the formation of special quasiparticles, called polaritons, which are a combination of light and matter. a team at the Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), modeled the behavior of polaritons in microcavities, nanostructures made of a semiconductor material sandwiched between special mirrors (Bragg mirrors).
April 25, 2017
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Modelling photocatalytic interfaces
Water is a crucial molecule to have a good understanding of with respect to adsorption on solid surfaces. this is mainly due to its ubiquity and therefore its pivotal role in many scientific processes including catalysis and corrosion protection.
November 14, 2016
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Modified metals for space engineering produced in microsecond
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University and the Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS, have developed a method to apply wear-resistant coatings on metals by followed fusing them in substrates. Such modified materials, through a combination of lightness, strength and corrosion resistance, could be used in mechanical engineering, aviation and space engineering.
December 6, 2016
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Modular construction on a molecular scale
Modular constructions from cages (proteins), hubs (metal ions), and struts (organic linkers) allows the rational design of porous scaffolds. the inherent chemical and structural diversity of these building blocks leads to a new class of versatile, self-assembled materials.
June 30, 2016
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Modulated doping improves GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers
"GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are expected to be adopted in various applications, such as retinal scanning displays, adaptive headlights, and high-speed visible-light communication systems," explain Tetsuya Takeuchi and colleagues at Meijo University and Nagoya University in Japan in their latest report.
November 11, 2016
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MOF sensor for the detection of hydrogen sulfide at room temperature
Metalorganic frameworks (MOFs) are regarded as a new class of porous materials with significant prospects for addressing current challenges pertinent to energy and environmental sustainability.
February 10, 2017
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Molecular imaging hack makes cameras 'faster'
A new Rice University technique grabs images of chemical processes that happen faster than most laboratory cameras are able to capture them.
November 18, 2016
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Molecular libraries for organic light-emitting diodes
Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are promising candidates for flexible flat displays. by means of a screening process developed by chemists at Goethe University Frankfurt, it is now possible to identify more quickly lead structures with superior luminescence and charge-transport properties.
April 21, 2017
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Molecular scale transporter with a twist, powered by liquid crystal defects
Defects that break the symmetry of otherwise orderly material are called topological defects. In solid crystals, they are called dislocations because they interrupt the regularly structured atom lattice.
March 19, 2017
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Molecular wave of nanosized metal oxide catalyst
Metal oxides represent primary source of catalytic materials for a variety of industrial and research applications, either as an active phase or as a supporting phase. Mechanistic studies conducted by Ananikov group revealed formation of catalytically active species due to partial dissolution of metal oxide in the reaction mixture and generation of soluble metal complexes. Therefore, metal oxides are not directly involved in heterogeneous catalysis; rather, they can be considered as a source of reactive species for solution-state homogeneous catalysis.
June 1, 2016
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Molecule-sized motors get the chemistry Nobel
Three researchers share award for work on the border of chemistry and mechanics.
October 5, 2016
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Mood ring materials - a new way to detect damage in failing infrastructure (w/video)
"Mood ring materials" could play an important role in minimizing and mitigating damage to failing infrastructure.
November 22, 2016
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More energy from the sun - Researchers road-test powerful method for studying singlet fission
Physicists from Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB), Freie Universitat Berlin and University of Cambrigde have successfully employed a powerful technique for studying electrons generated through singlet fission, a process which it is believed will be key to more efficient solar energy production in years to come.
November 28, 2016
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More surprises in graphene land
When Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov were preparing their first report on graphene back in 2004 [1], few would have imagined the impact that their paper would have today.
September 2, 2016
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Most complex nanoparticle crystal ever made by design
The most complex crystal designed and built from nanoparticles has been reported by researchers at Northwestern University and the University of Michigan. the work demonstrates that some of nature's most complicated structures can be deliberately assembled if researchers can control the shapes of the particles and the way they connect using DNA.
March 2, 2017
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Motion Controller for Linear and Rotary Air Bearing Stages
Air bearings provide advantages over mechanical bearings when frictionless vibration-free motion is required, highly constant velocity control is crucial, and when angular repeatability and geometric performance must be optimal. Nanopositioning industry leader PI (Physik Instrumente) L.P. has released a new high-performance motion control controller designed to handle 1, 2 or 4-axis of PIglide air bearing positioning stages.
April 5, 2017
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Motion-directed robots on a micro scale
Phototactic behaviour directs some bacteria towards light and others into darkness: this enables them to utilize solar energy as efficiently as possible for their metabolism, or, otherwise, protects them from excessive light intensity.
September 30, 2016
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mROBerTO: the modular millirobot for swarm behavior studies
Developed by a team at the University of Toronto, mROBerTO (milli-ROBot TORonto) is designed for swarm-robotics researchers who might wish to test their collective-behavior algorithms with real physical robots. with just a 16 mm x 16 mm footprint, mROBerTO can be used in a multitude of other miniature robot projects too–its modular design allowing for easy addition or removal of components.
October 26, 2016
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Multi-university effort to advance materials, define the future of mobility
Three MIT-affiliated research teams will receive about $10M in funding as part of a $35M materials science discovery program launched by the Toyota Research Institute (TRI). Provided over four years, the support to MIT researchers will be primarily directed at scientific discoveries and advancing a technology that underpins the future of mobility and autonomous systems: energy storage.
April 3, 2017
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Mystery of biological plastic synthesis machinery unveiled
Plastics and other polymers are used every day. These polymers are mostly made from fossil resources through petrochemical refinery process. on the other hand, many microorganisms naturally synthesize polyesters known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) as distinct granules inside the cell. PHAs are a family of microbial polyesters that have attracted much attention as biodegradable and biocompatible plastics and elastomers that can substitute petrochemical counterparts.
December 1, 2016
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Mysteries of enzyme mechanism revealed
An international research team led by the University of Leicester has made a breakthrough advance by trapping an intermediate in the mechanism of enzymes called heme peroxidases and determining its structure using a beam of neutrons from the heart of a nuclear reactor.
November 29, 2016
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Misc. - N

Nano hall of mirrors causes molecules to mix with light
When a molecule emits a blink of light, it doesn't expect it to ever come back. However researchers have now managed to place single molecules in such a tiny optical cavity that emitted photons, or particles of light, return to the molecule before they have properly left. the energy oscillates back and forth between light and molecule, resulting in a complete mixing of the two.
June 13, 2016
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Nano Memory Research Showcased at Leading UK Science Facility
Innovative research investigating X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methods for memory applications has been deemed as a showcase study at one of the UK's top science facilities.
March 27, 2017
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Nano 'sandwich' offers unique properties
Rice University researchers have modeled a nanoscale sandwich, the first in what they hope will become a molecular deli for materials scientists.
February 27, 2017
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'Nano-kebab' fabric breaks down chemical warfare agents
Researchers have created a fabric material containing nanoscale fibers that are capable of degrading chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Uniform coatings of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized on top of the nanofibers, forming unique kebab-like structures. These MOFs are what break down the CWAs, rendering them harmless.
October 3, 2016
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Nano-notch sends self-assembling polymers into a spiral
A simple circular or hexagonal pit written into silicon can be used to generate self-assembling polymer spirals thanks to the addition of a tiny notch in the template, report scientists in the launch issue of Nano Futures.
April 25, 2017
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Nano-Optical Researchers Provide Insights into Performance of Newly Developed Plasmonic Grating Structures
University of Arkansas researchers have discovered that a newly developed plasmonic fabrication capability and design can improve the performance of biosensors, solar cells and photodetectors.
September 22, 2016
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Nano-spike catalysts convert carbon dioxide directly into ethanol
In a new twist to waste-to-fuel technology, scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed an electrochemical process that uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper to turn carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, into ethanol. Their finding, which involves nanofabrication and catalysis science, was serendipitous.
October 13, 2016
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Nano-stiltskin: Turning gold into ...see-through rubber
Flexible solar panels that could be rolled up for easy transport and other devices would benefit from transparent metal electrodes that can conduct electricity, are stretchable, and resist damage following repeated stretching. Researchers found that topology and the adhesion between a metal nanomesh and the underlying substrate played key roles in creating such materials
June 13, 2016
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Nano: Making a Big Deal out of the Very Small
Springer Nature today announces the launch of Nano -- a research solution offering highly-indexed and structured information on nanotechnology, drawn from high-impact journals and patents. Nano will be part of the new Nature Research portfolio of high-quality products and services for researchers.
June 15, 2016
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Nanoantenna Lighting-Rod Effect Allows speedy Optical Switches
A team of researchers, led by the University of Southampton, have built a fast nanoscale optical transistor using gold nanoantenna assisted phase transition.
October 22, 2016
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Nanobionic spinach plants can detect explosives
Spinach is no longer just a superfood: by embedding leaves with carbon nanotubes, MIT engineers have transformed spinach plants into sensors that can detect explosives and wirelessly relay that information to a handheld device similar to a smartphone.
October 30, 2016
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Nanocatalysts generate power from polluted air
Researchers from the University of Antwerp and KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have succeeded in developing a process that purifies air and, at the same time, generates power. the device must only be exposed to light in order to function .
May 8, 2017
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Nanocavity and atomically thin materials advance the technology for chip-scale light sources
When an individual uses Facebook or searches Google, the information processing happens in a large data center. Short distance optical interconnects can improve the performance of these data centers. Current systems utilize electrons, which could cause overheating and wastes power. However, utilizing light to transfer information between computer chips and boards can improve efficiency.
January 24, 2017
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Nanocoating technology improves Teflon
The National Science Foundation has awarded $225,000 to start-up company SurfTec LLC to commercialize its patent-pending technology invented at the University of Arkansas.
July 5, 2016
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Nanocomposite material used for practical cloaking device
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have made an object disappear by using a composite material with nano-size particles that can enhance specific properties on the object's surface.
July 15, 2016
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Nanocubes simplify printing and imaging in color and infrared
Duke University researchers believe they have overcome a longstanding hurdle to producing cheaper, more robust ways to print and image across a range of colors extending into the infrared.
December 14, 2016
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Nanodiamonds help generate new record for static pressures for study
Extraordinary things happen to ordinary materials when they are subjected to very high pressure and temperature. Sodium, a conductive metal in normal conditions, becomes a transparent insulator; gaseous hydrogen becomes a solid.
August 1, 2016
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Nanodiamonds in an instant
Superman can famously make a diamond by crushing a chunk of coal in his hand, but Rice University scientists are employing a different tactic.
September 6, 2016
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Nanoelectronics scores laboratory victory
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have pioneered a method for growing an atomic scale electronic material at the highest quality ever reported. In a paper published in Applied Physics Letters, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Davood Shahrjerdi and doctoral student Abdullah Alharbi detail a technique for synthesizing large sheets of high-performing monolayer tungsten disulfide, a synthetic material with a wide range of electronic and optoelectronic applications.
November 9, 2016
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Nanoengineering transforms particles into LEGO like building blocks
Researchers have developed a nanoscale engineering method that transforms tiny particles into "LEGO- like" modular building blocks.
October 11, 2016
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Nanoengineers build world's largest database of crystal surfaces and shapes
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with the Materials Project at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), have created the world's largest database of elemental crystal surfaces and shapes to date.
September 13, 2016
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Nanoengineers Create new Open-Source Database of Elemental Crystal Surfaces and Shapes
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with the Materials Project at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), have created the world's largest database of elemental crystal surfaces and shapes to date. Dubbed Crystalium, this new open-source database can help researchers design new materials for technologies in which surfaces and interfaces play an important role, such as fuel cells, catalytic converters in cars, computer microchips, nanomaterials and solid-state batteries.
September 14, 2016
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Nanofabricated devices detect ultrasound with light
A tiny, transparent device that can fit into a contact lens has a bright future, potentially helping a range of scientific endeavors from biomedicine to geology.
February 13, 2017
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Nanofur for oil spill cleanup
Some water ferns can absorb large volumes of oil within a short time, because their leaves are strongly water-repellent and, at the same time, highly oil-absorbing. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, together with colleagues of Bonn University, have found that the oil-binding capacity of the water plant results from the hairy microstructure of its leaves.
August 23, 2016
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Nanoga Develops Nanoscopic Watermark to Combat Counterfeits
Nanoga, an EPFL-based startup, recently developed a new method to place a nanoscopic watermark onto ceramic or glass. It is not possible to fake products with this watermark, which is unseen by the naked eye and appears only when exposed to ultraviolet light.
June 28, 2016
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Nanogaps in plasmonic gold wires enhance voltage when excited
If they're quick about it, "hot'' electrons excited in a plasmonic metal can tunnel their way across a nanoscale gap to a neighboring metal. Rice University scientists said the cool part is what happens in the gap.
May 8, 2017
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Nanogen - Making the revolutionary routine™
Nanogen's mission is to become a leading supplier of molecular diagnostic tests to the medical community and to clinical researchers.
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Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging
Research has demonstrated a scalable and reliable fabrication process of a large scale hyperlens device based on direct pattern transfer techniques. the research team's new cost-effective fabrication method can be used to proliferate practical far-field and real-time super-resolution imaging devices that can be widely used in optics, biology, medical science, nanotechnology, and other related interdisciplinary fields.
April 21, 2017
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Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging
The concept of a perfect lens that can produce immaculate and flawless images has been the Holy Grail of lens makers for centuries. In 1873, a German physicist and optical scientist by the name of Ernst Abbe discovered the diffraction limit of the microscope.
April 21, 2017
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NanoMarkets Market Research Reports on Nanotechnology, Nanostorage and Nanoelectronics
NanoMarkets' mission is to measure the impact of nanotechnology on the communications, information technology and computing industries and provide both qualitative and quantitative assessments of the opportunities available to companies operating within these markets as well as the component, semiconductor, materials and manufacturing companies that supply them.
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Nanomaterial makes laser light more applicable
Light is absorbed differently, depending on the material it shines on. An international research team including material scientists from Kiel University has created a complex hybrid material with the ability to absorb light with a unique broad range of wavelengths. In addition to that it scatters light which makes it really interesting for industrial applications.That could mean an important step in optoelectronic technologies towards laser light as a successor to LEDs.
March 28, 2017
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Nanomaterial safety screening could become faster, cheaper with new laboratory test
UCLA researchers have designed a laboratory test that uses microchip technology to predict how potentially hazardous nanomaterials could be.
August 15, 2016
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Nanomaterials for neurology: State-of-the-art
Despite the numerous challenges associated with the application of nanotechnology in neuroscience, it promises to have a significant impact on our understanding of how the nervous system works, how it fails in disease, and the development of earlier and less-invasive diagnostic procedures so we can intervene in the pre-clinical stage of neurological disease before extensive neurological damage has taken place.
November 1, 2016
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Nanomechanics Inc. Introduces Service Lab Testing
Leading nanoindentation experts offer comprehensive evaluation, consulting and results consistent with the highest industry standards
August 10, 2016
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Nanomechanics Inc. Receives 2016 Governor's Award for Trade Excellence
Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development presents Nanomechanics with the GATE award
October 28, 2016
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Nanomechanics Inc. Reports Record Growth in 2016
Leading nanoindentation experts report continued growth both nationally and internationally.
September 20, 2016
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Nanomechanics launches the World's First Isometric Multi-Dimensional Instrument
Nanoindentation experts will launch the new Gemini that measures the interaction of two objects that are sliding across each other â€"" not merely making contact
April 24, 2017
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Nanometer Precise Compact Linear Positioner is based on Novel Stick-Slip Piezo Motor
PI (Physik Instrumente), a top provider of precision motion control and positioning solutions for more than 4 decades, announces the release of a new compact linear stage, just 45mm wide, which combines high positioning accuracy with higher force and velocity than conventional inertia drives.
June 2, 2016
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Nanometer Precision 3-Channel Controller for Miniature Piezo Inertia Drives and Actuators
PI (Physik Instrumente) L.P., known industry-wide for nanometer precision motion components, systems, and solutions, announces the newest digital servo controller with 3-channels, offering greater flexibility for miniaturized precision positioning and handling tasks. Applications include precision alignment and automation, semiconductor technology, photonics, bio-nano-technology, metrology, microscopy, micro-manipulation.
July 29, 2016
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Nanometer-thin layers of water can become ice-like at room temperature
New research by scientists at the University of Akron shows that a nanometer-thin layer of water between two charged surfaces exhibits ice-like tendencies that allow it to withstand pressures of hundreds of atmospheres. the discovery could lead to better ways to minimize friction in a variety of settings.
August 29, 2016
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Nanometrics Launches new System for Optical Critical Dimension and Thin Film Metrology
Nanometrics Incorporated, a leading provider of advanced process control systems, today announced the launch of IMPULSE®+, its latest system for integrated process control enabling both optical critical dimension (OCD) and thin film metrology. the IMPULSE+ has already been deployed for high-volume manufacturing of second-generation 3D-NAND as well as development of third-generation devices.
June 9, 2016
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Nanomix sensors
operate at the intersection between the molecular and macroscopic worlds. the central element, carbon nanotubes, are individual molecules to which electrical leads can be attached.
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Nanoparticle catalysts outperform single metal atoms
Scientists at Northwestern University, University of California at Santa Barbara, and Argonne National Laboratory determined that the active sites for two reactions involving carbon dioxide (carbon monoxide oxidation and water-gas shift) are associated with small platinum particles and not single platinum atoms as previously proposed.
January 9, 2017
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'Nanoparticle taxicab' materials can identify, collect and transport debris on surfaces
Inspired by proteins that can recognize dangerous microbes and debris, then engulf such material to get rid of it, polymer scientists led by Todd Emrick at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed new polymer-stabilized droplet carriers that can identify and encapsulate nanoparticles for transport in a cell, a kind of "pick up and drop off" service that represents the first successful translation of this biological process in a materials context.
November 2, 2016
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Nanoparticles hitchhiking their way along strands of hair
In shampoo ads, hair always looks like a shiny, smooth surface. But for physicists peering into microscopes, the hair surface looks much more rugged, as it is made of saw-tooth, ratchet-like scales.
January 27, 2017
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Nanoparticles improve melting and solidification for manufacturing processes
In an advance that could lead to improved manufacturing, a new study by UCLA researchers shows that adding nanoparticles to metals during the melting process allows for better control during melting.
January 19, 2017
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Nanoparticles remain unpredictable
The way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. a more standardized approach would help to advance the research field.
April 19, 2017
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Nanoparticles to replace rare-earth elements in permanent magnets
Technologies from wind turbines to electric vehicles rely on critical materials called rare-earth elements. These elements, though often abundant, can be difficult and increasingly costly to come by.
June 1, 2016
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Nanophase Technologies
is an industry-leading nanocrystalline materials innovator and manufacturer with an integrated family of nanomaterial technologies.
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Nanoplatelets instead of quantum dots
A team of researchers led by ETH Zurich professor David Norris has developed a model to clarify the general mechanism of nanoplatelet formation. Using pyrite, they also managed to confirm their theory.
April 4, 2017
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NanoSafety Group publishes 2nd Edition of guidance to support safe working with nanomaterials
The UK Nanosafety Group has updated and published a 2nd edition of guidance (pdf) to support safe and responsible working practices with nanomaterials in research and development laboratories.
May 30, 2016
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Nanoscale 3D Printing Improves Working of Atomic Force Microscopes
Nanometric-scale sensors that have the potential to enhance the functioning of atomic force microscopes have been printed by EPFL researchers.
September 27, 2016
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Nanoscale 'conversations' create complex, multi-layered structures
Building nanomaterials with features spanning just billionths of a meter requires extraordinary precision. Scaling up that construction while increasing complexity presents a significant hurdle to the widespread use of such nano-engineered materials.
December 22, 2016
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Nanoscale Engineering Technique can Transform Particles into "LEGO-Like" Blocks
A nanoscale engineering technique that can transform small particles into "LEGO-like" modular building blocks has been developed by scientists. the research work, which was headed by the University of Melbourne promises to be useful in nano- and micro-scale applications such as chemical sensing, energy storage and drug delivery.
October 12, 2016
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Nanoscale factories built to order
An A*STAR-led discovery could lead to improvements in the way drugs are delivered to the right parts of the body by uncovering the mechanisms that help oil, water, and free radicals mix in tiny droplets.
November 2, 2016
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Nanoscale Interactions Help Create Self-Assembled Materials with Unprecedented Complexity
Building nanomaterials with features spanning just billionths of a meter requires extraordinary precision. Scaling up that construction while increasing complexity presents a significant hurdle to the widespread use of such nano-engineered materials.
December 23, 2016
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Nanoscale tetrapods could provide early warning of a material's failure
Light-emitting, four-armed nanocrystals could someday form the basis of an early warning system in structural materials by revealing microscopic cracks that portend failure, thanks to recent research by scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley.
September 20, 2016
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Nanoscience Research Projects Could Resolve Big Challenges
The science of the extremely small is being used by researchers from the Berkeley Lab to resolve big challenges.
August 05, 2016
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Nanoscience researchers report new insights about properties of matter at the nanoscale
UCLA nanoscience researchers have determined that a fluid that behaves similarly to water in our day-to-day lives becomes as heavy as honey when trapped in a nanocage of a porous solid, offering new insights into how matter behaves in the nanoscale world.
September 14, 2016
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Nanoscopic Gold Spring-Shaped Coils Help Analyze Chiral Molecules
Scientists from the University of Bath have used gold spring-shaped coils and powerful lasers to help in the detection of twisted molecules, and the applications could bring about improvements in nanorobotics, telecommunications and pharmaceutical design. These coils are 5,000 times thinner than human hairs.
April 4, 2017
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Nanoscopic golden springs change color of twisted light
University of Bath scientists have used gold spring-shaped coils 5,000 times thinner than human hairs with powerful lasers to enable the detection of twisted molecules, and the applications could improve pharmaceutical design, telecommunications and nanorobotics.
April 3, 2017
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Nanoscopic watermark sorts fakes from genuines
Nanoga, an EPFL-based startup, has developed a technique to put a nanoscopic watermark onto glass or ceramic. Products with this watermark, which is invisible to the naked eye and only shows up under ultraviolet light, are impossible to counterfeit.
June 27, 2016
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Nanosensors on the alert for terrorist threats
Scientists from the Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ICP RAS) and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have demonstrated that sensors based on binary metal oxide nanocomposites are sensitive enough to identify terrorist threats and detect environmental pollutants.
November 1, 2016
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Nanosensors on the Alert for Terrorist Threats
Scientists interested in the prospects of gas sensors based on binary metal oxide nanocomposites.
November 2, 2016
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Nanoshells: Potential catalysts and cradles of life
A way to coax simple, inorganic nanoparticles to spontaneously assemble into shells has been discovered, potentially paving the way for more efficient industrial chemical processing, gene delivery and clean-up of chemical contaminants in the environment, researchers say (Nature Chemistry, "Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles into Biomimetic Capsid-Like Nanoshells").
November 7, 2016
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Nanosize crystals grow by twisting, aligning and snapping together
Crystalline nanoparticles suspended in a liquid medium often combine to form large crystals. However, the fundamentals governing this behavior remain unclear. a new study to measure and model the interaction force, called the van der Waals force, between two nanosize crystals provides clues for understanding this behavior.
May 15, 2017
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Nanostructure of Rudolph's antlers inspire next generation of unbreakable materials
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered the secret behind the toughness of deer antlers and how they can resist breaking during fights.
December 19, 2016
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Nanostructured coatings take a bite out of pollutants
As one of the primary components of rust, iron hydroxides normally pose corrosive risks to health. An A*STAR team has found a way to turn these compounds into an environmentally friendly coating that repeatedly absorbs large amounts of pollutants, such as dyes, from drinking water at room temperature.
January 25, 2017
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Nanostructures made of pure gold
The idea is reminiscent of the ancient alchemists' attempts to create gold from worthless substances: Researchers from TU Wien (Vienna) have discovered a novel way to fabricate pure gold nanostructures using an additive direct-write lithography technique.
November 4, 2016
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Nanosubs gain better fluorescent properties for tracking
The next generation of nanosubmarines being developed at Rice University has been upgraded with tags that fluoresce longer, which enables the submersibles to be tracked for greater periods while being driven through a solution.
June 13, 2016
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Nanosystem and Digital Surf launch NanoMap Alpha
New surface imaging & metrology software based on Mountains® Technology
July 13, 2016
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Nanotech, KolourOptik Technology Recently Featured by Simon Fraser University
Nanotech Security Corp. today announced that the company and its KolourOptik® technology were recently featured by Simon Fraser University. KolourOptik technology is a branding and anti-counterfeiting nanotechnology developed at Simon Fraser University by Nanotech's current Chief Technology Officer Mr. Clint Landrock and current Director Dr. Bozena Kaminska.
August 22, 2016
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Nanotechnology and 3-D Printing Combined
ORNL research using in situ microscopy with incredible potential.
September 14, 2016
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Nanotechnology and luxury watches: an innovative partnership
Founded by Swiss-born Sydneysider Christophe Hoppe, Bausele Australia bills itself as the first "Swiss-made, Australian-designed" watch company.
November 29, 2016
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Nanotechnology commercialisation calls for closer attention to safety and environmental considerations
Commercial uses of nanotechnology are continuing to grow and expand. There already exists a huge number of different types of nanomaterials and nanotechniques, but not enough effort has gone into the management of safety-related risks, the costs of which are significant. this is causing much uncertainty in the field of nanotechnology application and also having a major impact on European competitiveness..
June 30, 2016
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Nanotechnology could give us safer, greener diapers and sanitary products
A new material made of tiny nanofibers could replace potentially harmful materials found in diapers and sanitary products, according to new research published in Applied Materials Today ("High absorbency cellulose acetate electrospun nanofibers for feminine hygiene application,").
September 27, 2016
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Nanotechnology designed to speed up the hardening of concrete
Researchers at Tecnalia and the ICMCB-CNRS have recently published the article "Ultra-Fast Supercritical Hydrothermal Synthesis of Tobermorite under Thermodynamically Metastable Conditions' in Angewandte Chemie ("Ultra-Fast Supercritical Hydrothermal Synthesis of Tobermorite under Thermodynamically Metastable Conditions").
April 26, 2017
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Nanotechnology enables new insights into chemical reactions
Eighty percent of all products of the chemical industry are manufactured with catalytic processes. Catalysis is also indispensable in energy conversion and treatment of exhaust gases. It is important for these processes to run as quickly and efficiently as possible; that protects the environment while also saving time and conserving resources.
January 4, 2017
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Nanotechnology providing the tools to clean up oil spills
Oceanic oil spills are tough to clean up. they dye feathers a syrupy sepia and tan fish eggs a toxic tint. the more turbulent the waters, the farther the slick spreads, with inky droplets descending into the briny deep.
October 11, 2016
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Nanotechnology researchers turn sugar waste into carbon quantum dots
From Britain to Mexico, countries are considering sugar taxes to reduce consumption and curb the global obesity epidemic. In 2014, about 600 million people, roughly double the population of the United States, were obese. Addressing the problem earlier this year, the World Health Organization pointed the finger at high sugar consumption, in particular through sugar-sweetened beverages.
November 24, 2016
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Nanotechnology-modified aerospace composites
New technology that could enhance both the electrical and thermal conductivity of conventional composite materials has been developed thanks to a collaboration between the University of Surrey, University of Bristol and the aerospace company Bombardier.
December 19, 2016
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Nanotechnology: the future is tiny
"Nanotechnology: the Future is Tiny" puts a spotlight on some of the scientists who are pushing the boundaries of technology and it gives examples of their work and how they are advancing knowledge one little step at a time.
August 31, 2016
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Nanotechnology's hot pick-up artist
First there was graphene, an atomically thin film of carbon atoms with record-crushing properties. Then thousands of other atomically thin materials entered the scene which can be layered to create new hybrid supermaterials -- so called van der Waals heterostructures.
June 16, 2016
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Nanotechnology's tiny steps toward atomic-scale 3D fabrication
Over the past few decades, the development of electron microscopy has gone hand in hand with techniques for atomically precise fabrication of 3D structures based on electron and ion beams.
May 31, 2016
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Nanotube growth moving in the right direction
For the first time, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists and collaborators have captured a movie of how large populations of carbon nanotubes grow and align themselves.
February 10, 2017
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Nanotubes' 'stuffing' as is
Marianna Kharlamova (the Lomonosov Moscow State University Department of Materials Science) examined different types of carbon nanotubes' "stuffing" and classified them according to the influence on the properties of the nanotubes
June 2, 2016
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Nanowires as sensors in new type of atomic force microscope
A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) uses nanowires as tiny sensors. Unlike standard AFM, the device with a nanowire sensor enables measurements of both the size and direction of forces.
October 17, 2016
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Nanowires as sensors in new type of atomic force microscope
A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) uses nanowires as tiny sensors. Unlike standard AFM, the device with a nanowire sensor enables measurements of both the size and direction of forces. Physicists at the University of Basel and at the EPF Lausanne have described these results in the recent issue of Nature Nanotechnology.
October 17, 2016
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NanoXplore to Use Graphene-Enhanced Engineering Plastics to Support Commercialization of Electric Motor Systems
Group NanoXplore Inc., a Montreal-based company specialising in the production and application of graphene and its derivative materials, is very pleased to announce that Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) will partner with the company to support the commercialisation of lighter, more reliable and higher-efficiency components for electric motor systems using graphene-enhanced engineering plastics in place of metals. the total value of the project is $10.4M.
September 21, 2016
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NASA eyes first-ever carbon-nanotube mirrors for CubeSat telescope
A lightweight telescope that a team of NASA scientists and engineers is developing specifically for CubeSat scientific investigations could become the first to carry a mirror made of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin.
July 12, 2016
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National Science Foundation awards $763K for community college nanotechnology project
Northwest Vista College's Advanced Materials Technology (nanotechnology) program is one of only three nanotechnology associate degree programs at a Texas community college. and now thanks to a recent National Science Foundation grant totaling $763,000 for three years, it will establish the NVC program and San Antonio as a hub for companies needing employees skilled in micro-nano-bio technologies.
August 31, 2016
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Natural photosynthesis with artificial molecules
Chemists from the Universities of Basel and Zurich in Switzerland have come one step closer to generating energy from sunlight: for the first time, they were able to reproduce one of the crucial phases of natural photosynthesis with artificial molecules.
June 24, 2016
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Nature-inspired nanotubes that assemble themselves, with precision
When it comes to the various nano-widgets scientists are developing, tubes with inner diameters just a few billionths of a meter wide could tackle jobs better than conventional materials. Creating millions of nanotubes with identical diameters is difficult. Precise manufacturing is needed.
August 05, 2016
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Neuro chip records brain cell activity
Brain functions are controlled by millions of brain cells. However, in order to understand how the brain controls functions, such as simple reflexes or learning and memory, we must be able to record the activity of large networks and groups of neurons.
October 26, 2016
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New 2D Materials Created by Graphene Hydraulic Nano-press
A graphene hydraulic 'nano-press' has proven its potential to develop 2D materials by applying pressure on the compounds that are trapped between graphene layers.
July 8, 2016
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New application of the selective laser melting method
Scientists of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University and Delft University of Technology developed a technology for obtaining new metal structures by selective laser melting method.
March 13, 2017
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New approach to determining how atoms are arranged in materials
Researchers from North Carolina State University, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed a novel approach to materials characterization, using Bayesian statistical methods to glean new insights into the structure of materials. the work should inform the development of new materials for use in a variety of applications.
August 23, 2016
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New approach to microlasers
Terahertz radiation – the band of electromagnetic radiation between microwaves and visible light – has promising applications in security and medical diagnostics, but such devices will require the development of compact, low-power, high-quality terahertz lasers.
June 13, 2016
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New aspect of atom mimicry for nanotechnology applications
In nanotechnology control is key. Control over the arrangements and distances between nanoparticles can allow tailored interaction strengths so that properties can be harnessed in devices such as plasmonic sensors. now researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology use dendrimers that mimic the electron valency of atoms and link them into arrays using molecules that coordinate with the dendrimer as they would form a covalent electron pair in their valence shell -- "electron pair mimicry".
December 2, 2016
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New aspect of atom mimicry for nanotechnology applications
In nanotechnology control is key. Control over the arrangements and distances between nanoparticles can allow tailored interaction strengths so that properties can be harnessed in devices such as plasmonic sensors.
December 6, 2016
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New Atomic Force Microscope Uses Nanowires as Tiny Sensors
Nanowires are being used as tiny sensors by a new type of atomic force microscope (AFM). Unlike conventional AFM, this new device with a nanowire sensor allows measurements to be taken of both the direction and size of forces.
October 18, 2016
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New Brochure - Process Interfaces for Hiden Gas Analysers
Hiden Analytical launch their latest catalogue detailing the extensive selection of continuous-sampling interfaces for adaptation of the Hiden gas analyser systems to a diverse range of gas- and liquid-related process types and operating at pressures from 1 millibar through to 30 bar.
September 13, 2016
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New catalyst that can split water into hydrogen almost as good as platinum, but less costly
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) scientists have developed an exiting new catalyst that can split water into hydrogen almost as good as platinum, but less costly and found frequently on Earth.
February 15, 2017
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New cheap and simple mass production technique for graphene
A team of engineers from Exeter's Centre for Graphene Science have developed a new method for creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial manufacture of graphene. Complete and fully-functional devices can then be transferred to a substrate of choice, such as silicon, plastics or even textiles (2D Materials, "A simple process for the fabrication of large-area CVD graphene based devices vie selective in situ functionalization and patterning").
December 14, 2016
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New Chemical Reaction for Synthesis of Nanostructures for Technological Applications
A new chemical reaction to aid the synthesis of low-dimensional polymers that can be rationalized as phthalocyanine derivatives was recently developed by a collaborative team of researchers.
July 21, 2016
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New classes of electron orbits discovered
Phenomena like solar flares and auroras are consequences of magnetic reconnection in the near-Earth space. These "magnetic reconnection" events are akin to magnetic explosions that accelerate particles as they rapidly change the topology of the magnetic field lines.
October 4, 2016
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New cluster technology for surface polishing of materials
Currently the main method of getting smooth surfaces is chemical-mechanical, or "wet" polishing. However, it has two disadvantages: residual pattern about 1 nm and defective near-surface layer. Moreover, in case of semiconductor production for "wet" planarization (removing of imperfections from the surface of manufactured semiconductor plate) it is necessary to break vacuum conditions.
July 28, 2016
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New Computational Method Improves Nanomaterial Fabrication Control
The control of nanomaterial fabrication could be improved with a new computational method.
February 15, 2017
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New consortium to develop advanced water splitting materials for hydrogen production
The U.S. Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has formed a new consortium with five other national labs intended to accelerate the development of commercially viable pathways for hydrogen production from renewable energy sources.
October 22, 2016
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New Cost-Effective Compact Stepper Motor Controller Delivers 2,048 Microstep Resolution
Precision positioning systems industry leader PI (Physik Instrumente) has released a higher performance model of its successful Mercury Stepper Motion controller. Stepper motors take up discrete positions in a revolution of a constant distance. Typical commercial models provide 200 to 1000 full steps per revolution.
May 4, 2017
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New Design Rule Brings One Step Closer to Nature-Inspired Nanostructures
Researchers should have knowledge about how to refine and use synthetic materials that can tolerate industrial conditions to imitate the natural ability of proteins as catalysts, sensors, etc. a collaboration between researchers and Molecular Foundry staff, led to the discovery of a new design rule that regulates the way by which polymer building blocks combine to form the backbones that run along the length of small biomimetic sheets.
June 8, 2016
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New diamond harder than ring bling
The Australian National University (ANU) has led an international project to make a diamond that's predicted to be harder than a jeweller's diamond and useful for cutting through ultra-solid materials on mining sites.
December 12, 2016
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New display sheets that can be cut into any shape with scissors
A research group led by Masayoshi Higuchi, the leader of the Electronic Functional Macromolecules Group, Research Center for Functional Materials, NIMS, developed new display sheets that can be cut into any shape with scissors. as you can cut this display into any shape you like, and attach it on the surfaces of things that has complex shapes such as clothing and buildings, the display is expected to meet diverse display needs, which cannot be achieved by conventional display technologies.
August 24, 2016
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New DualPerm, Oxygen & Water Vapour Permeation Station
At this year's K show, we are pleased to announce the introduction of our new combined oxygen and water vapour station, the DualPerm, this combination package offers substantial savings to the initial purchase cost of 2 separate permeation analysers; shared computer interface; shared nitrogen supply and reduced installation costs.
July 20, 2016
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New electron microscope sees more than an image
The electron microscope, a powerful tool for science, just became even more powerful, with an improvement developed by Cornell physicists. Their electron microscope pixel array detector (EMPAD) yields not just an image, but a wealth of information about the electrons that create the image and, from that, more about the structure of the sample.
March 30, 2017
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New Environmentally Friendly Process to Produce Larger Two-Dimensional Nanosheets
A novel production method for two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets has been developed by a research team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
July 26, 2016
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New fiber-based sensor could quickly detect structural problems in bridges and dams
Today, there is great interest in using distributed sensors to continually monitor the structural health of large structures such as dams or bridges. with 1 million sensing points, a newly developed fiber optic distributed sensor could offer significantly faster detection of structural problems than is currently available.
May 4, 2017
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New findings boost promise of molybdenum sulfide for hydrogen catalysis
Researchers from North Carolina State University, Duke University and Brookhaven National Laboratory have found that molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) holds more promise than previously thought as a catalyst for producing hydrogen to use as a clean energy source.
December 1, 2016
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New focused ion beam strengthens nanotechnology and high-pressure science
A new "nano scalpel" enables scientists at DESY to prepare samples or materials with nanometre precision while following the process with a scanning electron microscope. the Focused Ion Beam, or FIB, microscope which has now gone into service also allows a detailed view of the inner structure of materials. the device was purchased by the University of Bayreuth, as part of a joint research project on the DESY campus funded by the Federal Ministry of Research. the FIB will be operated at the DESY NanoLab jointly with the University of Bayreuth.
July 11, 2016
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New high-capability solid-state electron microscope detector enables novel studies of materials
At Cornell University, the Sol M. Gruner detector group has developed and demonstrated a new type of imaging electron detector that records an image frame in 1/1000 of a second, and can detect from 1 to 1,000,000 electrons per pixel. this is 1000 times the intensity range, and 100 times the speed of conventional electron microscope image sensors.
June 7, 2016
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New insights into the forms of metal-organic frameworks
The accurate interpretation of particle sizes and shapes in nanoporus materials is essential to understanding and optimizing the performance of porous materials used in many important existing and potentially new applications. However, only a few experimental techniques have been developed for this purpose.
January 24, 2017
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New Magnetic Direct Drive Linear Positioning Stages and new Motion Controller, from PI
Motion and nanopositioning industry leader PI is expanding its PIMag® series of high dynamics linear motor stages with 2 new models and a new motion controller. Stages are equipped with incremental and absolute-type linear encoders for direct position measurement and ironless 3-phase motors and single-phase voice-coil drives.
January 17, 2017
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New material to revolutionize water proofing
Scientists at the Australian National University have developed a new spray-on material with a remarkable ability to repel water.
September 12, 2016
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New materials for the construction of metal organic two-dimensional quasicrystals
Unlike classical crystals, quasicrystals do not comprise periodic units, even though they do have a superordinate structure. the formation of the fascinating mosaics that they produce is barely understood. In the context of an international collaborative effort, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now presented a methodology that allows the production of two-dimensional quasicrystals from metal organic networks, opening the door to the development of promising new materials.
July 13, 2016
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New materials with photonic crystals that filter radiation
Research by the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre has proposed various designs of materials of a photonic crystal type that can be used to filter radiation. Specifically, the focus has been to develop a coating comprising dielectric spheres which if applied to a window, for example, would prevent the outside heat entering in the summer and the indoor heat from escaping in winter.
October 22, 2016
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New math tools for new materials
University of Utah mathematician Graeme Milton presents a new tool for understanding how energy waves move through complex materials, opening up possibilities to design materials that absorb or bend energy as desired. His solution for so-called "analytic materials" was published in Proceedings of the Royal Society a ("Analytic materials").
November 21, 2016
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New mechanical metamaterials can block symmetry of motion, findings suggest
Engineers and scientists at the University of Texas at Austin and the AMOLF institute in the Netherlands have invented the first mechanical metamaterials that easily transfer motion effortlessly in one direction while blocking it in the other, as described in a paper published on Feb. 13 in Nature.
February 13, 2017
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New metamaterial can switch from hard to soft - and back again
When a material is made, you typically cannot change whether that material is hard or soft. But a group of University of Michigan researchers have developed a new way to design a "metamaterial" that allows the material to switch between being hard and soft without damaging or altering the material itself.
January 23, 2017
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New metamaterials can change properties with a flick of a light-switch
Invisibility cloaks have less to do with magic than with metamaterials. These human-engineered materials have properties that don't occur in nature, allowing them to bend and manipulate light in weird ways. for example, some of these materials can channel light around an object so that it appears invisible at a certain wavelength. These materials are also useful in applications such as smaller, faster, and more energy efficient optics, sensors, light sources, light detectors and telecommunications devices.
August 02, 2016
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New Method Could Help Detect Molecules with Sensors Based on Ultra-Thin Nanomaterials
More efficient sensors are needed to be able to detect environmental pollution. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have proposed a new, sophisticated method of detecting molecules with sensors based on ultra-thin nanomaterials. the novel method could improve environmental sensing in the future.
March 16, 2017
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New method developed for producing some metals
The MIT researchers were trying to develop a new battery, but it didn't work out that way. Instead, thanks to an unexpected finding in their lab tests, what they discovered was a whole new way of producing the metal antimony – and potentially a new way of smelting other metals, as well.
August 25, 2016
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New method helps stabilize materials with elusive magnetism
Magnetic materials displaying what is referred to as itinerant ferromagnetism are in an elusive physical state that is not yet fully understood. they behave like a magnets under very specific conditions, such as at ultracold temperatures near absolute zero. Physicists normally have no other choice than to study this very unique state of matter in a controlled fashion, using ultracold atomic gases.
August 10, 2016
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New Method Provides Scope for Improved Dye Removal
A versatile, new method of using laser-induced design to synthesize silver-based hybrid nano-particles has been developed by scientists in China. the research illustrates that the nano-composite has the potential to be an efficient adsorbent for affordable water purification and dye removal.
July 20, 2016
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New method snips complex fibers into uniform particles
An interdisciplinary team of researchers enabled by the National Science Foundation-funded Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSEC) program has developed a way to break fibers or sheets of material into many tiny, almost perfectly uniform segments or strips. the method can work on plastics, metals, glasses, and even natural materials such as silk or hair, producing sectioned particles ranging in size from nanoparticles to ones that can be handled and easily seen with the naked eye.
June 5, 2016
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New method to identify microscopic failure in polymers and composite materials
If you've never had the plumber to your house, you've been lucky. Pipes can burst due to a catastrophic event, like subzero temperatures, or time and use can take a toll, wearing away at the materials with small dings and dents that aren't evident until it's too late.
August 17, 2016
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New method to measure nano-mechanical bending
New advances in nanometrology have been developed by researchers at the London Centre for Nanotechnology and published in the journal Scientific Reports, opening new opportunities to convert nanomechanical biosensors to reliable consumer products.
June 16, 2016
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New Method Traps Potentially Harmful Gases within Microscopic Organo-Metallic Structures
A team of researchers at UT Dallas has developed a novel method for trapping potentially harmful gases within microscopic organo-metallic structures.
December 14, 2016
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New method uses nanoparticles to quickly identify chemical warfare agents
A new method for extracting, enriching and identifying chemical warfare agents from oils and other organic liquids could help government officials and homeland security protect civilians more effectively from their deadly effects. the method, published in Journal of Chromatography A, uses nanoparticles to capture the chemicals.
July 15, 2016
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New microscope chemically identifies micron-sized particles
Researchers have developed a microscope that can chemically identify individual micron-sized particles. the new approach could one day be used in airports or other high-security venues as a highly sensitive and low-cost way to rapidly screen people for microscopic amounts of potentially dangerous materials.
January 5, 2017
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New Model Describing Deformation and Breakup of Droplets Improves Nanoscale Printing and Spraying
The growing interest and demand for nanotechnology will result in an increasing need for nanoscale printing and spraying, which relies on depositing small drops of liquid onto a surface. a new theory explaining how such a nanosized droplet deforms and breaks up when it strikes a surface has been recently developed by researchers from Tsinghua University in Beijing.
January 31, 2017
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New models allow for extraction of oil trapped in nano-capillaries of reservoirs
IBM scientists recently discovered that a drop of oil doesn't look like a drop at all if it is small, to the scale of one billionth of a billionth of a liter, or attoliter. Rather, a nanoscale oil droplet looks more like a flat film against a solid surface.
May 4, 2017
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New molecular design to get hydrogen-powered cars motoring
A radical new process that allows hydrogen to be efficiently sourced from liquid formic acid could be one step forward in making the dream of hydrogen-powered cars an economic reality.
June 5, 2016
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New Multi-Axis SiP Alignment Systems for Test and Production from PI
Nanopositioning equipment manufacturer PI now offers a new family of automated alignment engines for silicon photonics applications including 3 to 6 axis mechanisms, controllers with firmware based alignment algorithms, and the software tools to meet the high accuracy demands of different markets, such as packing, planar testing, or inspection.
January 6, 2017
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New Multi-View Microscope Captures Higher-Resolution 3D Images
Taking inspiration from medical imaging, scientists have been motivated to develop a multi-view microscope capable of capturing higher-resolution, 3D images of live cells and tissues without the need for upping the dosage of potentially hazardous radiation received by the specimens.
August 15, 2016
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New Nano-Coatings Reduce the Effort for Cleaning Heat Exchangers
Heat exchangers are used in a number of steps while processing juice and milk in the food industry. It is essential that these heat exchangers are free from microbes in order to avoid the occurrence of risks when used by customers. Persistent biofilms can remain stuck especially in the numerous recesses and grooves of the heat exchanger.
April 12, 2017
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New Nanomaterial Degrades Laser Light's Brightness Without Degrading its Power
The absorption of light differs based on the material on which it shines. a global team of researchers including material scientists from Kiel University has developed a complex hybrid material that can absorb light with a distinctive wide array of wavelengths.
March 29, 2017
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New nanosensor system can detect cocaine at low concentrations
Researchers from Valencia and the Basque Country have developed a new method to detect cocaine and mycoplasma at very low concentrations. It has been designed as an alternative for use in laboratories and is potentially more competitive than existing analysis methods.
October 3, 2016
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New nanosensors for the detection of TNT
A new type of sensor has the potential to replace sniffer dogs when it comes to detecting explosives such as TNT. this week, researchers from a number of institutions including TU Delft are publishing an article about this subject in the American Chemical Society's journal Nano Letters.
November 9, 2016
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New Nanotool Helps Characterizing Mechanical Properties of Biomolecules
LMU physicists have developed a unique nanotool capable of providing an easy way to characterize the mechanical properties of biomolecules.
October 22, 2016
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New 'needle-pulse' beam pattern packs a punch
A new beam pattern devised by University of Rochester researchers could bring unprecedented sharpness to ultrasound and radar images, burn precise holes in manufactured materials at a nanoscale -- even etch new properties onto their surfaces.
January 27, 2017
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New nontoxic process promises larger ultrathin sheets of 2-D nanomaterials
Scientists has developed a novel way to produce two-dimensional nanosheets by separating bulk materials with nontoxic liquid nitrogen. the environmentally friendly process generates a 20-fold increase in surface area per sheet, which could expand the nanomaterials' commercial applications.
July 25, 2016
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New nontoxic process promises larger ultrathin sheets of 2-D nanomaterials
A team of scientists led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a novel way to produce two-dimensional nanosheets by separating bulk materials with nontoxic liquid nitrogen. the environmentally friendly process generates a 20-fold increase in surface area per sheet, which could expand the nanomaterials' commercial applications.
July 25, 2016
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New photonic sensor opens the door to high-speed biodetection
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique for extremely high speed photonic sensing of the mechanical properties of freely flowing particles using an opto-mechano-fluidic resonator (OMFR). this research potentially opens up completely new mechanical "axes of measurement" on micro/nanoparticles and bioparticles.
June 5, 2016
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New plastic material begins to oscillate spontaneously in sunlight
Materials that move all by themselves under the influence of light - this phenomenon has been known for a number of years. However, since the source tends to be ultraviolet light, the required intensity can damage the material. the challenge was to find a material that behaves in this way in visible light, preferably unprocessed sunlight.
July 5, 2016
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New 'printone' tool allows users to create 3-D printed wind instruments in any shape or form
A research team from Autodesk and Dartmouth College has developed a new interactive design tool called "Printone," which provides users with the ability to create functional 3-D printed wind instruments in any shape or form using interactive sound simulation feedback.
December 6, 2016
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New process produces hydrogen at much lower temperature
Simpler process and higher efficiency creates great expectations for consumer market
December 1, 2016
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New process produces hydrogen at much lower temperature
Waseda University researchers have developed a new method for producing hydrogen, which is fast, irreversible, and takes place at much lower temperature using less energy. this innovation is expected to contribute to the spread of fuel cell systems for automobiles and homes.
December 1, 2016
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New properties discovered in atom-wide troughs
Could adding defects make a good material even better? Scientists have found that linear defects in a promising thin film create one-atom-thick metallic wires. These wires cross the otherwise intact material, offering a way to channel electrons and photons, tiny packets of light. a multidisciplinary team made this discovery using resources at the Molecular Foundry and the Advanced Light Source (Nature Physics, "Charge density wave order in 1D mirror twin boundaries of single-layer MoSe2").
January 10, 2017
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New reaction for the synthesis of nanostructures
The collaboration between the research groups of professors Pau Ballester and Jose R. Galan-Mascaros at the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), Dr. Jonas Björk at Linköping University and the group of Dr. David Ecija at Institute IMDEA Nanoscience has allowed the development of a new chemical reaction for the synthesis of low-dimensional polymers that can be rationalised as phthalocyanine derivatives.
July 20, 2016
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New record in microwave detection
Aalto University scientists have broken the world record by fourteen fold in the energy resolution of thermal photodetection.
July 8, 2016
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New records set up with 'screws of light'
The research team around Anton Zeilinger has succeeded in breaking two novel records while experimenting with so-called twisted particles of light.
November 17, 2016
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New research could transform how we filter water
A new process for water filtration using carbon dioxide consumes one thousand times less energy than conventional methods, scientific research published recently has shown.
May 8, 2017
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New Research Milestone Facilitates Creation of Scalable Crystalline Graphene Films
A team of researchers have discovered a process to repair graphene oxide (GO) structures that have a fault which make the material to exhibit low carrier mobility.
August 26, 2016
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New research shows Fukushima radioactive fallout on Tokyo enclosed in glassy microparticles
New research shows that most of the radioactive fallout which landed on downtown Tokyo a few days after the Fukushima accident was concentrated and deposited in non-soluble glass microparticles, as a type of 'glassy soot'. this meant that most of the radioactive material was not dissolved in rain and running water, and probably stayed in the environment until removed by direct washing or physical removal.
June 28, 2016
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New Rotary Air Bearing Series Achieve High Precision in Any Orientation
With a max payload of 13 to 425 kg and virtually unlimited life, PI's RM series is a complete positioning solution based on in-house technology development and manufacturing.
April 26, 2017
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New sensor made from carbon nanoparticles synthesized from cellulose
Materials offering huge potential using newspapers and sugar as the raw material and by means of simple chemical reactions are being synthesised at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country
February 14, 2017
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New solution for making 2D nanomaterials
2D nanomaterials, such as graphene, have the potential to revolutionise technology through their remarkable physical properties, but their translation into real world applications has been limited due to the challenges of making and manipulating 2D nanomaterials on an industrial scale.
November 21, 2016
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New solution for making 2D nanomaterials
Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials have been made by dissolving layered materials in liquids, according to a recent publication involving London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) resaerch. the liquids can be used to apply the 2D nanomaterials over large areas and at low costs, enabling a variety of important future applications.
January 24, 2017
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New Strategy to Decontaminate Polluted Soils Using Nanoparticles and Bioremediation
Researchers at the Basque Institute of Agricultural Research and Development Neiker-Tecnalia are working on a strategy to cure soils polluted by organic compounds containing chlorine (organochlorine compounds). the novel process involves integrating zero-iron nanoparticles in bioremediation methods. the companies Ekotek and Dinam, Gaiker-IK4 and the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country are also taking part in this project called as NANOBIOR.
June 13, 2016
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New Study Discovers Self-Assembling 2D and 3D Materials from Tiny Gold Nanoclusters
Self-assembly of matter is one of the basic principles of nature, monitoring the growth of larger ordered and functional systems from smaller building blocks. It is possible to observe self-assembly in all length scales from molecules to galaxies.
January 16, 2017
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New surfaces repel water in oil as well as oil in water
Researchers of Aalto University have developed new surface materials that are extremely difficult to wet both by water and oil. Because they don't need isolating air to stay trapped between the droplet and rough surface to prevent wetting, these surface materials work even when wet by another liquid.
October 28, 2016
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New tabletop technique probes outermost electrons of atoms deep inside solids
Researchers have invented a new way to probe the valence electrons of atoms deep inside a crystalline solid, outlines a new report.
November 21, 2016
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New technique allows to visualize defects on the surface of graphene
The technique, developed by researchers at the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry in a collaborative project, employs the metal palladium, which interacts with "carbon reactivity centres" found on graphene. Graphene is an incredibly strong one-atom-thick layer of carbon touted to be an excellent conductor of heat and electricity.
May 31, 2016
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New Technique Could Improve Holograms for Anti-Fraud Protection and Entertainment
Not far from where Edwin Land -- the inventor of the Polaroid camera -- made his pioneering discoveries about polarized light, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are continuing to unlock the power of polarization.
April 5, 2017
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New technique reveals powerful, 'patchy' approach to nanoparticle synthesis
Patches of chain-like molecules placed across nanoscale particles can radically transform the optical, electronic, and magnetic properties of particle-based materials. Understanding why depends critically on the three-dimensional features of these "polymer nano-patches"–which are tantalizingly difficult to reveal at a scale spanning just billionths of a meter.
October 28, 2016
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New Technology Allows Multispectral Printing and Imaging
Researchers at Duke University believe that they have conquered a longstanding obstacle in producing cheaper, more robust processes to print and image spanning a range of colors extending into the infrared. There are a broad range of "colors" across the electromagnetic spectrum that humans cannot see, but will provide a wealth of information.
December 14, 2016
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New thin membranes can self-repair following damage
Separating one chemical from another is vital to manufacturing, water quality, and more. Unfortunately, the relatively thick nature and inefficiency of these separation techniques increases energy use.
March 2, 2017
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New thin-films can self-repair following damage
Separating one chemical from another may sound incredibly dull, but it's vital to making everything from plastic dishes to cleaning drinking water. Chemical separation accounts for 10 to 15 percent of the nation's energy use. the relatively thick nature and inefficiency of these separation techniques adds to the amount of energy used.
January 13, 2017
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New tougher-than-metal fiber-reinforced hydrogels
Efforts are currently underway around the world to create materials that are friendly to both society and the environment. Among them are those that comprise different materials, which exhibit the merits of each component.
February 24, 2017
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New transgenic grasses neutralize toxic pollution from bombs, explosives, and munitions
On military live fire training ranges, troops practice firing artillery shells, drop bombs on old tanks or derelict buildings and test the capacity of new weapons.
November 22, 2016
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New X-ray method allows scientists to probe molecular explosions
Summer blockbuster season is upon us, which means plenty of fast-paced films with lots of action. However, these aren't new releases from Hollywood studios; they're one type of new "movies" of atomic-level explosions that can give scientists new information about how X-rays interact with molecules. a team led by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays provided by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays ("Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics").
June 15, 2016
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Newly Developed Nanomaterial can be Stepping Stone for Rewritable Nanophotonic Circuits
When a military drone on a reconnaissance mission is seized behind enemy lines, a group of engineers work immediately to remotely delete sensitive information from the drone's chips. the fact that the chips are optical, not electronic, enables the engineers to simply flash a UV light beam onto the chip to immediately delete the entire content, thus preventing a disaster.
December 6, 2016
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Newly Developed Nanostructures Help Boost Oil Production
Norwegian and Brazilian researchers have developed nanostructures that could help to increase the production of oil, extend the lifespan of certain foods or could be used in drugs or cosmetics by controlling a mix of water, salt and clay.
November 28, 2016
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Next-generation software supports explorations beyond the nanoworld into the intramolecular picoworld
For physicist Percy Zahl, traversing surfaces is not only a long-time hobby of his but also the focus of his research. An avid cyclist who is part of the Green Arm Bandits of the East End Cycling Team, he has pedaled more than 10,000 miles in 2016 alone, competing in races as close to home as the New York tri-state area and touring in places as far away as Chile.
March 30, 2017
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NGI Forms Collaborative Partnership with Leading UK Graphene Manufacturer
The National Graphene Institute (NGI) has signed a collaborative partnership with a leading UK graphene company to accelerate the commercialisation of applications.
June 24, 2016
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NIST Develops new Approach for Enhancing Quality of Carbon Nanotubes
Researchers who are trying to use the unique properties of carbon nanotubes often give up hope when the small cylinders fill with water during processing.
July 19, 2016
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Non-Flammable and Paper-Like Graphene Membrane Suitable for Large-Scale Production
A simple and scalable method for converting graphene oxide into a non-flammable and paper-like graphene membrane capable of being used in large-scale production has been discovered by the University of Arkansas.
April 13, 2017
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Non-flammable graphene membrane developed for safe mass production
University of Arkansas researchers have discovered a simple and scalable method for turning graphene oxide into a non-flammable and paper-like graphene membrane that can be used in large-scale production.
April 12, 2017
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Nonlinear effects in graphene membranes can be used for next-generation ICT
Like drums in regular drumsets, graphene membranes at the nanoscale possess a distinct set of oscillating modes that correspond to specific oscillation frequencies. the modes can be excited by applying an external voltage.
June 16, 2016
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Not your typical 'cut glass crystal'
To better move energy in solar cells and other devices, scientists need single, ordered crystals. the single crystals can handle tough environments while transmitting energy and light well. However, conventional manufacturing methods don't work for all materials.
December 14, 2016
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Nothing - and something - give concrete strength, toughness
What does one need to strengthen or toughen concrete? a lot of nothing. Or something.
August 08, 2016
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Novel 3-in-1 'Rheo-Raman' microscope enables interconnected studies of soft materials
An innovative three-in-one instrument that allows scientists to correlate the flowability of soft "gooey" materials such as gels, molten polymers and biological fluids with their underlying microstructure and composition has been developed by scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Thermo Fisher Scientific.
October 4, 2016
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Novel light sources made of two-dimensional materials
So-called monolayers are at the heart of the research activities. These "super materials" (as the prestigious science magazine "Nature" puts it) have been surrounded by a virtual hype in the past ten years. this is because they show great promise to revolutionise many areas of physics.
October 28, 2016
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Novel Method of Using Laser-Induced Phase Separation to Produce Graphene
All smartphones are designed with shiny flat AMOLED displays. a minimum of two silicon transistors, which were manufactured in large scale using laser annealing technologies, hide behind each pixel of these displays.
December 2, 2016
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Novel microsupercapacitor that exploits three-dimensional porous electrodes
Energy storage units that can be integrated into wearable and flexible electronic systems are becoming increasingly important in today's world. a research team from King Abdullah University of Science & Technology has now developed a microsupercapacitor that exploits three-dimensional porous electrodes.
December 5, 2016
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Novel Nanofiber Solution to Create Air Filters for Clean, Fresh Air with UV Protection
Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have successfully developed a unique nanofiber solution that forms thin, see-through air filters that can eliminate nearly 90 % of PM2.5 particles and realize high air flow of 2.5 times better than traditional air filters. Additionally, this eco-friendly air filter enhances natural lighting and visibility while blocking destructive UV rays.
March 21, 2017
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Novel nanotechnology processing capable of producing nanomaterials on an industrial scale
Researchers at Illinois Tech recently unveiled a major breakthrough in nanotechnology processing that reduces the time, and increases the amount of product that can be manufactured on an industrial scale. the new technique makes nanotechnology economically viable for numerous applications, including pollution control for vehicles, reduction in waste heat from vehicles and electronics, and removal of toxic waste from water.
August 16, 2016
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Novel porous materials made from flexible 'spaghetti-like' molecules
Known for their extraordinary surface area, a sugar packet equivalent of metal-organic framework provides a city block (2.5 acres) of area to absorb gas or catalyze reactions. the challenge comes in consistently manufacturing these frameworks, known as MOFs.
August 03, 2016
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Novel production system for high-quality protein crystals
Researchers at the University of Tokyo have developed a superconducting magnet system to create a quasi-microgravity environment where protein crystals of high quality are formed. Furthermore, the system is equipped with an optical device to observe the crystal growth in place and in real time, enabling the high-throughput production of protein crystals without interrupting the crystallization process.
June 14, 2016
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Novel Wafer Analyzer for up to 300 mm Wafer Using High Speed Raman Imaging Technology
Nanophoton introduces RAMANdrive - a new Wafer Analyzer - for a wide range of applications at semiconductor market at ICCGE-18 (the 18th International Conference on Crystal Growth and Epitaxy) in Nagoya, Japan, August 7th - 12th, 2016.
August 09, 2016
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NSF Awards Grants to develop Novel Computational Framework that can Custom Design Nanoparticles
Building upon their previous research, engineering faculty at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering were awarded grants from the National Science Foundation to develop a novel computational framework that can custom design nanoparticles.
July 29, 2016
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NSF grant to advance research on molecular transformation, carbon recycling
Two Indiana University chemists have received $525,000 from the National Science Foundation to advance research with applications to the emerging field of carbon recycling.
June 29, 2016
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NSLS-II's Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline Team Receives 2016 Microscopy Today Innovation Award
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory are proud recipients of one of the 2016 Microscopy Today Innovation Awards, which highlight the 10 best microscopy innovations each year.
July 27, 2016
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NTU's new Nanofiltration Membrane Helps Treat, Produce Extremely Clean Water at Low Cost
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) have invented a new type of nanofilter that could reduce the energy needed to treat wastewater by up to five times.
July 8, 2016
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Nucleon interactions key to quantum phase transition
Research led by North Carolina State University sheds new light on the ways in which protons and neutrons can bind and even undergo a quantum phase transition. the work has implications for understanding the connections between nuclear interactions and nuclear structure found in nature (Physical Review Letters, "Nuclear binding near a quantum phase transition").
September 19, 2016
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NUS Researchers Create Revolutionary 2D Graphene-Like Polymer Sheets
The novel ultra-thin two-dimensional polymer sheet, which is the organic analogue of graphene, heralds new opportunities for long lasting sodium rechargeable batteries
March 14, 2017
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Misc. - O

Observation of a quantum spin liquid
A novel and rare state of matter known as a quantum spin liquid has been empirically demonstrated in a single crystal of the compound calcium-chromium oxide by a team of Helmholtz scientists in Berlin and Dresden.
July 26, 2016
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Ocean Optics Introduces new SERS Nanosponge Substrate for Raman Spectroscopy Applications
Ocean Optics has introduced a new substrate for Raman spectroscopy applications. the new RAM-SERS-SP Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy substrates use a proprietary gold-silver nanosponge alloy to produce highly sensitive, trace-level Raman spectroscopy measurements. the applications for SERS range from detection of explosives and narcotics, to food safety, anti-counterfeit tagging, and biological research.
August 03, 2016
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On the path toward molecular robots
Researchers are working on mimicking cellular systems to develop molecular motors that can move or even deliver drugs to target tissues. Engineering such motors may ultimately lead to molecular robots that can execute more complex tasks. to this end, researchers must find ways to convert motion at the molecular level to motion at the macroscopic level. they also must find ways to cause chemical reactions to repeat autonomously and continuously.
July 6, 2016
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On-chip observation of THz graphene plasmons
Researchers developed a technique for imaging THz photocurrents with nanoscale resolution, and applied it to visualize strongly compressed THz waves (plasmons) in a graphene photodetector.
November 4, 2016
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On-surface chemistry leads to novel products
On-surface chemical reactions can lead to novel chemical compounds not yet synthesized by solution chemistry. the first-step, second-step, and third-step products can be analyzed in detail using a high-resolution atomic force microscope, as demonstrated in Nature Communications ("Thermal control of sequential on-surface transformation of a hydrocarbon molecule on a copper surface") by scientists from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the Department of Physics at Basel University and their colleagues from Japan and Finland.
September 13, 2016
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One synthetic molecule, two doorways into cell
Shuhei Furukawa from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and colleagues in Japan synthesised polyhedral-shaped porous molecules that rotate in a double layer of lipids, exposing different-shaped openings.
March 13, 2017
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Open-source software unlocks 3-D view of nanomaterials
Now it's possible for anyone to see and share 3-D nanoscale imagery with a new open-source software platform developed by researchers at the University of Michigan, Cornell University and open-source software company Kitware Inc.
March 31, 2017
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Open-source software unlocks 3-D view of nanomaterials
Now it's possible for anyone to see and share 3-D nanoscale imagery with a new open-source software platform developed by researchers at the University of Michigan, Cornell University and open-source software company Kitware Inc.
April 3, 2017
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Opening the way to mobile smell sensors with nanomechanical systems
Six organizations including NIMS, Kyocera, Osaka University, NEC, Sumitomo Seika and NanoWorld jointly launched the MSS Alliance on September 25, 2015 in order to establish a de facto standard for odor analysis and sensor systems employing a sensor element called the Membrane-type Surface stress Sensor (MSS).
December 6, 2016
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Optical fibre with Einstein effect
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light in Erlangen have discovered a new mechanism for guiding light in photonic crystal fibre (PCF). PCF is a hair-thin glass fibre with a regular array of hollow channels running along its length. When helically twisted, this spiralling array of hollow channels acts on light rays in an analogous manner to the bending of light rays when they travel through the gravitationally curved space around a star, as described by the general theory of relativity.
February 14, 2017
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Oxford Instruments and Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory Collaborate to develop HTS Magnet Technology Components for High Field Superconducting Sagnet Systems
Oxford Instruments, a leading provider of high technology tools and systems for industry and research, has entered into a collaboration agreement with the High Field Laboratory (HLD) at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (HZDR), Germany, to develop high temperature superconducting (HTS) insert coils for high field magnet systems greater than 25 Tesla.
August 1, 2016
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Oxford Instruments announces Dr Andrea Caviglia, Delft University of Technology as Winner of the 2016 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize
Oxford Instruments is delighted to announce the winner of the 2016 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize as Dr Andrea Caviglia, Assistant Professor at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, in the Netherlands. the Nicholas Kurti Science Prize promotes and recognises the novel work of young scientists working in the fields of low temperatures and/or high magnetic fields in Europe.
August 1, 2016
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Oxford Instruments Asylum Research announces new SurfRider Econo Board Probes for Routine AFM Measurements
Get ready to surf your sample with new economical atomic force microscope (AFM) probes. "Econo Board™ Probes" are the first group of probes released from Asylum Research's new line of SurfRider™ Probes.
September 20, 2016
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Oxford Instruments Asylum Research announces the new Cypher VRS Video-Rate Atomic Force Microscope
Oxford Instruments Asylum Research announces the new Cypher VRS Video-Rate AFM, the first and only full-featured video-rate atomic force microscope (AFM). the Cypher VRS sets a new benchmark for speed, enabling high resolution imaging of dynamic events at up to 625 lines/second, corresponding to about 10 frames per second. for comparison, this is about 300x faster than typical AFMs and 10x faster than current "fast scanning" AFMs.
February 6, 2017
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Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Launches a new Online Probe Store to Purchase Atomic Force Microscopy Probes
Oxford Instruments Asylum Research announces its new AFM Probe Store, which features a complete range of probes, a convenient interface to select and purchase probes, and interactive customer support: AFMprobes.AsylumResearch.com. the Probe Store is now open to all customers in North and South America, and Australia.
August 05, 2016
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Oxford Instruments Increases EBSD Speed by an Order of Magnitude
Oxford Instruments, a global leader in microanalysis systems, has launched Symmetry® the world's first CMOS-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) detector.
May 15, 2017
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Oxford Instruments NanoScience achieves the latest ISO9001:2015 certification
Oxford instruments NanoScience, the provider of market-leading research tools, recently announced that it has achieved ISO 9001:2015 certification. NanoScience has been registered and certified with the ISO 9001 Quality Management System standard since 1994.
March 3, 2017
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Oxford Nanoimaging Super-Resolution Nanoimager Used for Advanced Cellular Imaging Techniques
Oxford Nanoimaging Limited manufacture and sell custom microscopes offering super-resolution and single-molecule capabilities to research users. the multidisciplinary bioimaging unit, Micron Oxford, are using the Nanoimager instrument to advance their cellular imaging techniques for both their facilities and research programs.
February 1, 2017
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Misc. - P

P2i Ranked Third in the Intellectual Property League Table 2017
P2i, the world leader in liquid repellent nano-coating technology, has been ranked third in Clydesdale and Yorkshire Bank's IP100 League Table compiled by Metis Partners. the IP League Table profiles and ranks innovative companies, highlighting those which have significantly invested in their IP in the form of IP creation, IP management policies, R&D activities and IP commercialisation.
May 9, 2017
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Pairing nanodiamonds with other nanomaterials could enable huge advances in nanotechnology
Nanomaterials have the potential to improve many next-generation technologies. they promise to speed up computer chips, increase the resolution of medical imaging devices and make electronics more energy efficient. But imbuing nanomaterials with the right properties can be time consuming and costly. a new, quick and inexpensive method for constructing diamond-based hybrid nanomaterials could soon launch the field forward.
June 8, 2016
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Park Systems announces Revolutionary Single Click Software SmartScan Available on Park XE Series Atomic Force Microscopes
Park Systems, a leader in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) since 1997, just announced that Park SmartScan a powerful AFM operating software that drastically boosts productivity single click reliable nanoscale images is now available on Park XE series AFMs.
February 21, 2017
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Park Systems announces Revolutionary Single Click Software SmartScan Available on Park XE Series Atomic Force Microscopes
Park Systems, a leader in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) since 1997 just announced that Park SmartScan a powerful AFM operating software that drastically boosts productivity single click reliable nanoscale images is now available on Park XE series AFMs.
February 22, 2017
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Park Systems Introduces the Only AFM Capable of 300mm Wafer Scans for Defect Review and Failure Analysis in Semiconductor Manufacturing and Research
Park Systems, world leading manufacturer of Atomic Force Microscope today announced NX20 300mm, the only AFM on the market capable of scanning the entire sample area of 300mm wafers using a 300mm vacuum chuck while keeping the system noise level below 0.5angstrom (Å) RMS. Park NX20 300mm enables AFM inspection and scans over the entire sample area of 300mm wafers by using a full 300mm x 300mm motorized XY stage so the system can access any location on a 300mm wafer.
August 04, 2016
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Park Systems Invites all Researchers to Become Park AFM Scholars and Receive a Nanotechnology Research Scholarship
Park Systems announces the 2017 Park AFM Scholarship Award eligible to undergraduate or postdoctoral students working in nanotechnology research either already using Park AFM or who have research they would like to do with Atomic Force Microscope and need help getting access to the equipment.
November 10, 2016
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Park Systems, World Leading Manufacturer of Atomic Force Microscopes Receives Frost & Sullivan 2016 Global Enabling Technology Leadership Award
Frost & Sullivan announced today that Park Systems, the leading manufacturer of Atomic Force Microscopes is the recipient of its2016 Global Enabling Technology Leadership Award.
July 27, 2016
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Park Systems, World Leading Supplier of Atomic Force Microscopes, Invites all Researchers to Become Park AFM Scholars and Receive a Nanotechnology Research Scholarship
Park Systems announces the 2017 Park AFM Scholarship Award eligible to undergraduate or postdoctoral students working in nanotechnology research either already using Park AFM or who have research they would like to do with Atomic Force Microscope and need help getting access to the equipment. Park will assist researchers who qualify as Park AFM scholars to gain access to the right microscopy tools for their research and are offering a scholarship for those who qualify. Park Systems is now accepting applications which include abstracts from all students and researchers who present research ideas.
November 15, 2016
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Peering into complex, tiny structures with 3D analysis tool tomviz
The future of technology is being built at the tiniest scales and now demands tools for 3D design and analysis.
March 30, 2017
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Perpetual 'ice water': Stable solid-liquid state revealed in nanoparticles
Imagine pouring a glass of ice water and having the ice cubes remain unchanged hours later, even under a broiler's heat or in the very back corner of the freezer.
August 03, 2016
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Phonon nanoengineering: Vibrations of nanoislands dissipate heat more effectively
Europium silicide has for some time attracted the attention of scientists. Recognized as being promising for electronics and spintronics, this material has recently been submitted by a team of physicists from Poland, Germany and France to comprehensive studies of the vibrations of its crystal lattice.
March 8, 2017
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Phantom Majorana particles found in insulating magnets
University of Tokyo and Tokyo Institute of Technology researchers and their international collaborators have demonstrated by large-scale numerical simulations that phantom 'Majorana particles' emerge in an insulating magnet at a wide range of temperatures from extremely low up to room temperature.
July 7, 2016
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Photonic Chip for Achieving Superresolution Light Microscopy
A photonic chip that enables superresolution light microscopy - or 'nanoscopy' - to be achieved by using traditional microscopes has been developed by physicists at Bielefeld University and the Arctic University of Norway in Tromsø. In the case of nanoscopy, single fluorescent molecules' position can be ascertained at an accuracy of a few nanometres - or one-millionth of a millimeter.
April 25, 2017
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'Photonic doping' makes class of metamaterials easier to fabricate
The field of metamaterials, an intersection of materials science, physics, nanotechnology and electrical engineering, aims to produce structures with unusual electromagnetic properties. Through the careful combination of multiple materials in a precise periodic arrangement, the resulting metamaterials exhibit properties that otherwise couldn't exist, such as a negative index of refraction. some metamaterials can even channel electromagnetic waves around their surfaces, rendering them invisible for certain wavelengths of light.
March 9, 2017
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Photosynthesis: Gathering sunshine with the world's smallest antennas
Walk through any woods, branches swaying overhead, and you're surrounded by billions of the world's most efficient systems for collecting energy. Inside every leaf, blade of grass, and algal cell, clusters of proteins and tiny pigments, called photosynthetic antenna complexes, capture sunshine.
November 4, 2016
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Physicist discovers strange forces acting on nanoparticles
A new scientific paper published, in part, by a University of new Mexico physicist is shedding light on a strange force impacting particles at the smallest level of the material world.
April 10, 2017
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Physicists create a high-precision 'quantum ruler'
Physicists from the Russian Quantum Center (RQC), MIPT, the Lebedev Physical Institute, and L'Institut d'Optique (Palaiseau, France) have devised a method for creating a special quantum entangled state. this state enables producing a high-precision ruler capable of measuring large distances to an accuracy of billionths of a metre.
June 23, 2016
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Physicists collide ultracold atoms to observe key quantum principle
Physicists from new Zealand's University of Otago have used steerable 'optical tweezers' to split minute clouds of ultracold atoms and slowly smash them together to directly observe a key theoretical principle of quantum mechanics.
July 11, 2016
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Physicists couple distant nuclear spins using a single electron
For the first time, researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland have coupled the nuclear spins of distant atoms using just a single electron. Three research groups took part in this complex experiment, the results of which have now been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology ("Role of the electron spin in the nuclear spin coherence in a quantum dot").
July 11, 2016
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Physicists demonstrate photonic hypercrystals for control of light-matter interaction
Control of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells.
May 5, 2017
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Physicists design a device inspired by Dr. Who's sonic screwdriver
Physicists have designed a handheld device inspired by the sonic screwdriver in Doctor Who and the tricorder in Star Trek that will use the power of MRI and mass spectrometry to perform a chemical analysis of objects.
March 8, 2017
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Physicists develop new touchscreen technology
Physicists at the University of Sussex are at an advanced stage of developing alternative touchscreen technology to overcome the shortfall in the traditional display, phone and tablet material that relies on electrodes made from indium tin oxide (ITO).
September 14, 2016
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Physicists develop world's first artificial cell-like spheres from natural proteins
The team of researchers at Saarland University, led by Professor of Condensed Matter Physics Karin Jacobs, initially had something quite different in mind. Originally, the team set out to research and describe the characteristics of hydrophobins -- a group of naturally occurring proteins.
October 17, 2016
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Physicists discovered new peculiarities of a material with a giant magnetocaloric effect
The magnetocaloric effect is manifested in cooling or heating of the magnetic material (a material having magnetic properties) in an external magnetic field. this phenomenon was first discovered in the 19th century, but the first theoretical justification was obtained some 40 years later.
August 25, 2016
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Physicists 'dissolve' water in an emerald
Scientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and several research teams working in Russia and other European countries have been the first to reliably realize and document the phenomenon of water molecular dipoles ordering by confining water molecules within nanocages in a beryl crystal.
October 5, 2016
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Physicists find a way to control charged molecules - with quantum logic (w/video)
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) physicists have solved the seemingly intractable puzzle of how to control the quantum properties of individual charged molecules, or molecular ions. the solution is to use the same kind of "quantum logic" that drives an experimental NIST atomic clock.
May 10, 2017
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Physicists gain insights into why materials break
New research suggests scientists could eventually help create materials that resist breaking or crack in a predictable fashion.
November 7, 2016
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Physicists harness neglected properties of light
University of Toronto (U of T) researchers have demonstrated a way to increase the resolution of microscopes and telescopes beyond long-accepted limitations by tapping into previously neglected properties of light. the method allows observers to distinguish very small or distant objects that are so close together they normally meld into a single blur.
February 16, 2017
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Physicists observe behavior of quantum materials in curved space
Light and matter are typically viewed as distinct entities that follow their own, unique rules. Matter has mass and typically exhibits interactions with other matter, while light is massless and does not interact with itself. Yet, wave-particle duality tells us that matter and light both act sometimes like particles, and sometimes like waves.
June 13, 2016
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Physicists observe diffusion of individual atoms in light bath
In a combination of experiments and theory the diffusion of individual atoms in periodic systems was understood for the first time. the interaction of individual atoms with light at ultralow temperatures close to the absolute zero temperature point provides new insights into ergodicity, the basic assumption of thermodynamics.
October 10, 2016
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Physicists patent detonation technique to mass-produce graphene
Forget chemicals, catalysts and expensive machinery – a Kansas State University team of physicists has discovered a way to mass-produce graphene with three ingredients: hydrocarbon gas, oxygen and a spark plug.
January 25, 2017
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Physicists Patent Detonation Technique to Mass-Produce Graphene
A research team from Kansas State University have discovered a new technique for mass-producing graphene, but without the use of catalysts, chemicals, and expensive machinery. the new technique involved the use of oxygen, hydrocarbon gas, and a spark plug.
January 27, 2017
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Physicists predict novel phenomena in exotic materials
Discovered just five years ago, topological semimetals are materials with unusual physical properties that could make them useful for future electronics.
June 5, 2016
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Physicists predict the existence of unusual optical composites
Physicists from MIPT have predicted the existence of transparent composite media with unusual optical properties. Using graphics card based simulations, scientists studied regular volume structures composed of two dielectrics with close parameters, and found that the optical properties of these structures differ from both those of natural crystals and artificial periodic composites, which are currently attracting a lot of interest.
March 9, 2017
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Physicists to study atomic-layer black phosphorus for its potential use in fiber-optic communication
The National Science Foundation has awarded $466,954 to University of Arkansas physicists to study the ultra-thin material black phosphorous for its potential use in fiber-optic communication.
June 16, 2016
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Physicists use laser tweezers to make an AV-pattern out of Abrikosov vortices
A nanophotonics group lead by Prof. Brahim Lounis of the University of Bordeaux and including scientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology has performed a unique experiment involving the optical manipulation of individual Abrikosov vortices in a superconductor. In their article published in Nature Communications, the scientists mention the possibility of designing new logic units based on quantum principles for use in supercomputers.
November 23, 2016
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PI's Award-Winning Fast Multichannel Photonics Alignment Engine
The FMPA Fast Multichannel Photonics Alignment Engine is an advanced alignment system based on a highly specialized digital motion controller with embedded advanced alignment and tracking functionality and a hybrid precision scanning and tracking mechanism combining the advantages of piezoelectric on servo-motorized drives.
December 14, 2016
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PI's Award-Winning Fast Multichannel Photonics Alignment Engine
When alignment speed is critical and accuracy needs to be at the nanoscale, for projects from planar testing to packaging, PI's system is the solution.
December 16, 2016
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PI's new 4-Channel Dynamic Cost-Effective Digital Piezo Controller
Physik Instrumente L.P., an industry leader in precision motion control systems, and nanopositioning solutions, announces a new, 4-channel version of its high-performance E-727 digital piezo controller.
October 20, 2016
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PI's new High-Speed, NanoCube 3-Axis Piezo Motion Stage
The new P-616 NanoCube® XYZ piezo scanner is a redesign of PI's successful P-611, 3D positioning stage. now based on a parallel-kinematic design, with only one lightweight moving platform for all 3 axes, higher precision and dynamics are available in a more compact package.
October 4, 2016
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PI's new High-Speed, NanoCube 3-Axis Piezo Motion Stage
Higher scanning speed, ceramic-insulated acutators for long life, flexures for friction-free motion, and capactive sensors for sub-nm precise positioning make this new piezo nanopositioner ideal for fast fiber alignment and microscopy applications.
October 5, 2016
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Pioneering a better way to make renewable hydrogen
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a method which boosts the longevity of high-efficiency photocathodes in photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices.
January 9, 2017
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Plasmon-enhanced thermophoresis for the reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles
The optical manipulation of plasmonic nanoparticles -- metal nanoparticles that are highly efficient at absorbing and scattering light -- has advantages for applications such as nanofabrication, drug delivery and biosensing. to that end, researchers have been developing techniques for the reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles that can be used to modulate their structural, electrical and optical properties.
September 21, 2016
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Plasmonic Goldfinger - integrating nanoparticles into transparent nailpolish
Since ancient times, people have used lustrous silver, platinum and gold to make jewelry and other adornments. Researchers have now developed a new way to add the metals to nail polish with minimal additives, resulting in durable, tinted -- and potentially antibacterial -- nail coloring.
March 29, 2017
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Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets - an alternative to graphene
Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. now researchers at the Technical University of Munich have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process.
March 8, 2017
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Pop science: Engineers stop soap bubbles from swirling
The spinning rainbow surface of a soap bubble is more than mesmerizing - it's a lesson in fluid mechanics. Better understanding of these hypnotic flows could bring improvements in many areas, from longer lasting beer foam to life-saving lung treatments.
September 13, 2016
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Porous, 3-D forms of graphene 10 times as strong as steel but much lighter
A team of researchers at MIT has designed one of the strongest lightweight materials known, by compressing and fusing flakes of graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon. the new material, a sponge-like configuration with a density of just 5 percent, can have a strength 10 times that of steel.
January 6, 2017
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Portable nanofiber device offers precise, point-and-shoot capability
Harvard researchers have developed a lightweight, portable nanofiber fabrication device that could one day be used to dress wounds on a battlefield or dress shoppers in customizable fabrics.
March 1, 2017
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Portugal calls for startups using nanotechnologies
StartupNano opens its doors to entrepreneurs around the world working with nanotechnology based solutions. from the North of Portugal, startups have access to support to go from idea to global markets, to unique laboratories and expertise in nanotechnology, and to incubation in a unique international infrastructure for nanotechnology built by Portugal and Spain governments
November 9, 2016
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'Pressure-welding' nanotubes creates ultrastrong material
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials (TISNCM), Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU), and the National University of Science and Technology MISiS have shown that an ultrastrong material can be produced by "fusing" multiwall carbon nanotubes together.
November 4, 2016
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Preventing frost formation with nanoengineered surfaces
Frost and ice accumulation result in significant decreases in the performance of ships, wind turbines, and heat exchangers. the use of active chemical, thermal, and mechanical methods of ice removal is time consuming and costly in operation. the development of passive methods to inhibit condensation, frost and ice formation is an attractive alternative.
January 13, 2017
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Prestigious Nanjing University Orders Multiple Oxford Instruments Plasma Systems
Leading manufacturer of plasma etch and deposition processing systems Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, recently won an order from Nanjing University of Post and Telecommunications, based in Nanjiang, Jiangsu, China for multiple plasma etch systems to be used for silicon and III-V etching.
July 18, 2016
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Probe for nanofibers has atom-scale sensitivity
Optical fibers are the backbone of modern communications, shuttling information from a to B through thin glass filaments as pulses of light. they are used extensively in telecommunications, allowing information to travel at near the speed of light virtually without loss.
January 30, 2017
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Probing how water flows on superhydrophobic surfaces by atomic force microscopy
Water (and other liquids) has an unusual property when it flows closely to some specially designed surfaces: its speed isn't equal to zero even in the layer that directly touches the wall. this means that liquid doesn't adhere to the surface, but instead slides along it. Such an effect is called hydrodynamic slip and it was first described more than 200 years ago. However, at that time it hasn't received much attention as it didn't significantly influence the cumulative liquid flow.
October 13, 2016
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Process turns wheat flour into CO2-capturing micropores
Researchers have shown how a process for the "carbonization" of wheat flour creates numerous tiny pores that capture carbon dioxide, representing a potential renewable technology to reduce the industrial emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
October 5, 2016
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Producing Light-Based Lab-on-a-Chip Devices Through a new Cost-Effective Fabrication Process
Optical sensing can be incorporated onto lab-on-a-chip devices in a cost-effective and easier manner using a new fabrication process.
March 23, 2017
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Producing Perfect Graphene Coatings
Graphene is an ultra-thin material that is just a single carbon atom in thickness, and has the potential to be used impressive applications such as friction-free, wear-resistant coatings. But first, large sheets of graphene have to be manufactured under precisely controlled conditions.
November 30, 2016
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Programmable materials find strength in molecular repetition
Synthetic proteins based on those found in a variety of squid species' ring teeth may lead the way to self-healing polymers carefully constructed for specific toughness and stretchability that might have applications in textiles, cosmetics and medicine, according to Penn State researchers.
June 2, 2016
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Programmable silk-based materials with embedded, pre-designed functions
Tufts University engineers have created a new format of solids made from silk protein that can be preprogrammed with biological, chemical, or optical functions, such as mechanical components that change color with strain, deliver drugs, or respond to light, according to a paper published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
December 27, 2016
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Progress made toward more accurate nanoresonators
Leti, a CEA Tech institute, has come up with a method for troubleshooting background-noise-related disturbances in NEMS electromechanical nanoresonators. the new method will pave the way for further performance enhancements. the research was published in Nature Nanotechnology ("Frequency fluctuations in silicon nanoresonators").
September 6, 2016
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Project to help bring widespread use of micro-robotics
Micro-robotic manipulators with the ability to move in increments far smaller than the width of a human hair might be enlisted for a range of applications in research, manufacturing, medicine and homeland security.
August 03, 2016
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Promising route to the scalable production of highly crystalline graphene films
Researchers discovered a procedure to restore defective graphene oxide structures that cause the material to display low carrier mobility. by applying a high-temperature reduction treatment in an ethanol environment, defective structures were restored, leading to the formation of a highly crystalline graphene film with excellent band-like transport. These findings are expected to come into use in scalable production techniques of highly crystalline graphene films.
August 25, 2016
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Proof that materials behave differently at the nanoscale
Scientists have long suspected that the way materials behave on the nanoscale -- that is when particles have dimensions of about 1--100 nanometres -- is different from how they behave on any other scale. a new paper in the journal Chemical Science provides concrete proof that this is the case.
September 30, 2016
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Proper breeding ground for germanene
Germanene is a one atom thick sheet of germanium, in a honeycomb structure. It has clear similarities with graphene, the material that induced massive research activity worldwide, especially after 2010's Nobel Prize.
June 22, 2016
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Protein dosage compensation mechanism unravelled
Researchers at Okayama University report in PLOS Genetics which genes from the yeast genome exhibit dosage compensation -- the ability to temper protein production when the corresponding encoding gene's copy number increases. In addition, they identify the underlying process to be protein degradation, and link the mechanism to stoichiometric buffering of protein complex subunits.
March 15, 2017
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Proton pinball on the catalyst
Thanks to a reaction that resembles a sort of proton pinball game, a thin layer of moisture on the surface of a catalysts can improve the efficiency of fuel cells, devices used to transform chemical energy (a fuel like hydrogen, for example) directly into electricity without releasing greenhouse gases in emissions
August 02, 2016
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Pushing a single-molecule switch
An international team of researchers from Donostia International Physics Center, Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, University of Liverpool, and the Polish Academy of Sciences has shown a new way to operate a single-molecule switch by applying an external force.
July 15, 2016
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Putting highly charged ions on the right path
Highly charged ions formed by stripping multiple electrons from neutral atoms can be powerful probes for analysis and modification of material surfaces. But difficulties in producing steady submicron beams of such ions have limited their usefulness. Now, RIKEN researchers have overcome this problem by modifying humble glass tubes.
February 17, 2017
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Misc. - Q

Quantum dots with impermeable shell: a powerful tool for nanoengineering
Unique optical features of quantum dots make them an attractive tool for many applications, from cutting-edge displays to medical imaging. Physical, chemical or biological properties of quantum dots must, however, be adapted to the desired needs.
August 11, 2016
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Quantum drag
Friction and drag are commonplace in nature. you experience these phenomena when riding in an airplane, pairing electrical wiring, or rubbing pieces of sandpaper together.
July 20, 2016
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Quantum Friction: Beyond the local equilibrium approximation
Systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium are very common in nature. In recent years they have attracted constantly growing attention because of their relevance for fundamental physics as well as for modern nanotechnology.
December 1, 2016
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Quantum Materials, E&P Technology Business to develop Nanomaterials for Optimizing Oil and Gas Well Production
Leading North American quantum dot manufacturer Quantum Materials Corporation today announced that the Company has partnered with a Texas-based E&P technology business and is currently developing specialized nanomaterials for use in oil and gas well production optimization.
August 05, 2016
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Quantum matter - shaken, but not stirred
A team of researchers led by physics professor Immanuel Bloch has experimentally realized an exotic quantum system which is robust to mixing by periodic forces (Nature Physics, "Periodically driving a many-body localized quantum system").
February 20, 2017
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Quantum mechanics is complex enough, for now...
Quantum mechanics is based on a set of mathematical rules, describing how the quantum world works. These rules predict, for example, how electrons orbit a nucleus in an atom, and how an atom can absorb photons, particles of light.
April 21, 2017
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Quantum phase transition observed for the first time
A group of scientists led by Johannes Fink from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) reported the first experimental observation of a first-order phase transition in a dissipative quantum system.
February 2, 2017
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Quantum-confined bandgap narrowing mechanism for light harvesting
Researchers for the first time have found a quantum-confined bandgap narrowing mechanism where UV absorption of the grapheme quantum dots and TiO2 nanoparticles can easily be extended into the visible light range.
July 14, 2016
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QuantumSphere
manufactures leading metallic nanopowders for breakthrough propellants, munitions and other energetic applications in the aerospace, defense, automotive, energy and other markets demanding advanced material applications.
Provides a Service
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Quick Delivery of Piezo Nanopositioning Systems for Photonics, Microscopy, Semiconductor, Automation Markets
PI launches new accelerated delivery of high quality nanopositioning core components.
July 20, 2016
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Misc. - R

Rabbits' detached retina 'glued' with new hydrogel
A newly developed elastic gel administered in liquid form and shown to turn jellylike within minutes after injection into rabbits' eyes to replace the clear gelatinous fluid inside their eyeballs, may help pave the way for new eye surgery techniques, says an international team of researchers led by Japanese scientists.
March 19, 2017
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'Radical' new approach to connecting carbon atoms
A team of researchers at Princeton University has devised an innovative approach to form valuable carbon-carbon bonds from ubiquitous but traditionally unreactive carbon-hydrogen bonds.
October 18, 2016
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Rare-earths become water-repellent only as they age
Surfaces that have been coated with rare earth oxides develop water-repelling properties only after contact with air. Even at room temperature, chemical reactions begin with hydrocarbons in the air.
March 22, 2017
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Real-time direct observation of atom movements in electron microscopy
Even if two crystalline systems have an identical crystal structure with the same overall composition, their physical properties can remarkably vary relative to each other, strongly depending upon whether the composed atoms are arranged in an orderly manner or not.
March 18, 2016
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Reconfiguring active particles into dynamic patterns
From swarming bees to clustering bacteria colonies, nature stuns with its ability to self organize and perform collective, dynamic behaviors. now researchers have found a way to mimic these behaviors in active materials on the microscale -- by varying just a single parameter.
July 11, 2016
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Record speed and accuracy achieved with single-electron pumps
The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), in collaboration with NTT (Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation) in Japan, has measured silicon single-electron pumps with the highest speed and accuracy ever achieved, paving the way towards practical primary standards for electric current.
July 5, 2016
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Reduced Graphene Oxide, Graphene Oxide and Graphene Integrated onto Silicon Substrates
A method that helps to integrate reduced graphene oxide (rGO), graphene oxide (GO) and graphene onto silicon substrates at room temperature using nanosecond pulsed laser annealing has been developed by materials researchers at North Carolina State University.
September 14, 2016
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Regulating neuronal behavior with gold nanocone array surfaces
In a new paper in Small, researchers from Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany, present flexible gold nanocone arrays as a supporting substrate for culture of neuronal cells with excellent cell viability and possibility for regulating cell activity.
May 9, 2017
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Research accelerates next-generation ultra-precise sensing technology
The mining, navigation, minerals exploration and environmental hydrology sectors are set to benefit from new research into quantum technology, say experts.
June 9, 2016
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Research on Hyperspectral Infrared Nanoimaging
The development of hyperspectral infrared nanoimaging has been reported by a team of researchers from the Basque institutions CIC nanoGUNE, Ikerbasque and Cidetec, and the German Robert Koch-Institut. Hyperspectral infrared nanoimaging is based on Fourier transform infrared nanospectroscopy (nano-FTIR).
February 24, 2017
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Research on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides as an Alternative to Graphene
Physicists from the University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) have reported a new discovery related to the electrical properties of materials that could be utilized for the fabrication of next-generation transistors and electronics.
December 1, 2016
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Research Presents new Possibilities for Making Artificial Topological Materials
A group of international researchers have developed a new, unique structure that helps tune topological properties in such a manner that these unique behaviors can be turned on or off. the structure presents new possibilities for studying the characteristics of topological states of matter.
April 6, 2017
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Research Reveals Graphene Balloons can Withstand Extreme Pressure
Researchers at the University of Manchester state that small balloons manufactured using one-atom-thick material graphene can endure huge pressures, much more than those at the bottom of the deepest ocean. this is possible because of the extraordinary strength of graphene, which is 200 times stronger than steel.
August 26, 2016
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Research reveals inner workings of liquid crystals
Liquid crystals are used in everything from tiny digital watches to huge television screens, from optical devices to biomedical detectors. Yet little is known of their precise molecular structure when portions of such crystals interact with air.
March 23, 2017
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Research Reveals new Insights and Properties of Matter at the Nanoscale
Nanoscience researchers at UCLA have established that a fluid that behaves similar to water in daily life turns as heavy as honey when trapped in a nanocage of a porous solid, providing new insights into the way matter acts in the nanoscale world.
September 15, 2016
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Research reveals novel quantum state in strange insulating materials
Researchers from Brown University have shown experimentally how a unique form of magnetism arises in an odd class of materials called Mott insulators. the findings are a step toward a better understanding the quantum states of these materials, which have generated much interest among scientists in recent years.
February 9, 2017
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Research Shows Gas can Bestow Laser-Induced Graphene with Super Properties
Researchers from Rice University who are credited for inventing laser-induced graphene (LIG) for applications such as supercapacitors have recently discovered a way to create the spongy graphene either superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic.
May 16, 2017
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Research Throws Light on Altered Behavior of Water Inside Carbon Nanotubes
It is a known fact that water at sea level starts boiling at a temperature of 100 °C or 212 °F. Scientists have long observed that the freezing and boiling points of water change slightly when it is confined to very small spaces - usually dropping by about 10 °C.
November 29, 2016
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Researchers Adapt 'Off-the-Shelf' Hazard Assessment Tool for Emerging Nanomaterials
Researchers have adapted an 'off-the-shelf' hazard assessment tool for use with emerging nanomaterials in an effort to better understand threats they may pose to workers, the public and the environment. as described in the peer-reviewed, scientific journal Environmental Health, researchers focused on characterizing nanosilver products already approved for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and currently found in hundreds of products -- and discovered health and environmental hazards not previously considered by EPA during its approval process.
November 22, 2016
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Researchers Apply Nanotechnology to Explain Unresolved Processes Behind Catalysis
The fact that catalytic processes are employed for producing nearly 80% of products in the chemical industry makes catalysis highly obligatory for energy conversion and treatment of exhaust gases. Moreover, to save time, to conserve resources, and to protect the environment, it is extremely important that these processes are carried out in a fast and efficient manner.
January 5, 2017
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Researchers Build Diamond Micro-Anvils to Produce Immense Pressures to Create Novel Materials
Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are set to apply pressures greater than those known to exist at the center of the Earth to potentially develop yet unidentified new materials.
October 19, 2016
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Researchers can now build an inexpensive and flexible micro-Raman system
Raman spectroscopy provides detailed chemical information, and when combined with a microscope, it can non-destructively analyze biological samples. While commercial research-grade Raman microscopes have been available for some time, they have tended to be both inflexible and very expensive. In a paper in the current issue of Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging, researchers from Germany and Serbia describe an inexpensive, versatile micro-Raman system that can be assembled from readily available components at a fraction of the cost of a commercial tool.
June 5, 2016
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Researchers coax colloidal spheres to self-assemble into photonic crystals
Colloidal particles, used in a range of technical applications including foods, inks, paints, and cosmetics, can self-assemble into a remarkable variety of densely-packed crystalline structures. for decades, though, researchers have been trying to coax colloidal spheres to arranging themselves into much more sparsely populated lattices in order to unleash potentially valuable optical properties.
February 28, 2017
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Researchers control adhesive material remotely with light
Adhesive mechanisms in the natural world, as used by geckos and other animals when they walk upside down on the ceiling, have many advantages: they are always strongly adhesive - and without any glues or residues.
January 25, 2017
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Researchers Control Electron Spin of Levitated Nanodiamonds to Advance Sensors and Quantum Data Processing
A team of researchers have demonstrated a way to manipulate the "electron spin" of a nanodiamond when it is levitated using lasers in a vacuum. this innovative method has potential in applications spanning across sensors, quantum data processing, and studies covering the fundamental physics of quantum mechanics.
July 21, 2016
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Researchers control 'shear-band' defects in manufacturing processes
An international team of researchers has invented a method to control the formation of defects called "shear bands" in metals manufacturing processes and discovered microscopic details of how the defects are created.
September 21, 2016
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Researchers Could Navigate with Nanosatellites in Space Using Electrospray Thrusters
Moving a nanosatellite around in space takes only a tiny amount of thrust. Engineers from Michigan Technological University and the University of Maryland teamed up, put a nanoscale rocket under a microscope, and watched what happened.
August 09, 2016
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Researchers Create 2D Nanomaterials by Dissolving Layered Materials in Liquids
According to a recent UCL-led research, two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials have been created by dissolving layered materials in liquids. the liquids can be used to apply the 2D nanomaterials across large areas and at minimal costs, paving the way for a number of important future applications.
November 22, 2016
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Researchers create 3D full-color plasmonic holographic images with nanomaterials
Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology are creating a new approach to reconstruct 3-D full-color holographic images by using just one layer of nanoscale metallic film. this work has a huge potential to change our daily lives by equipping our cell phones with 3-D floating displays and printing 3-D security marking onto credit cards.
October 13, 2016
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Researchers Create Nanodiamonds for Potential Use in Spacecraft, Satellites
Researchers at Rice University are creating nanodiamonds and other forms of carbon by crushing nanotubes against a target at great speeds. Nanodiamonds won't make anyone rich, however the method of producing them will enhance the knowledge of scientists who design structures that resist damage caused by high-speed impacts.
September 12, 2016
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Researchers Create Nanopowders for Production of Novel Aluminum Alloys
Researchers from Siberian Federal University with the researchers of the Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center of the SB RAS have developed a technique for the synthesis of aluminum alloys, the use of which will allow the development of new types of products with enhanced characteristics based on aluminum.
March 21, 2017
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Researchers Demonstrate Ability to Manipulate Vibrations of Nanometer-Scale-Thickness Drum
Scientists at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, have successfully manipulated the vibrations of a graphene drum of a nanometer scale thickness, achieving the most versatile and world's smallest drum.
June 15, 2016
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Researchers demonstrate tunable wetting and adhesion of graphene
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated doping-induced tunable wetting and adhesion of graphene, revealing new and unique opportunities for advanced coating materials and transducers. "Our study suggests for the first time that the doping-induced modulation of the charge carrier density in graphene influences its wettability and adhesion," explained SungWoo Nam, an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering at Illinois. "This work investigates this new doping-induced tunable wetting phenomena which is unique to graphene and potentially other 2D materials in complementary theoretical and experimental investigations."
July 7, 2016
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Researchers demonstrate world's first qubit device fabricated in standard CMOS process
Leti, an institute of CEA Tech, along with Inac, a fundamental research division of CEA, and the University of Grenoble Alpes have achieved the first demonstration of a quantum-dot-based spin qubit using an industry-standard fabrication process.
November 28, 2016
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Researchers Derive new Insights into Chemical Reactions Using Nanotechnology
Catalytic processes are used to manufacture 80% of all products of the chemical industry. Catalysis is also crucial in treatment of exhaust gases and energy conversion. It is vital for these processes to function as rapidly and efficiently as possible; that saves time and conserves resources while also protecting the environment. Industry is constantly analyzing new substances and arrangements that could result in new and improved catalytic processes.
January 6, 2017
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Researchers Describe new Process for Creating Super Elastic 3-D Printed Metallic Nanostructured Materials
For years, scientists and engineers have synthesized materials at the nanoscale level to take advantage of their mechanical, optical, and energy properties, but efforts to scale these materials to larger sizes have resulted in diminished performance and structural integrity.
July 19, 2016
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Researchers Describe Two Unique Structures for Gold Nanocluster
Diamonds and graphite are chemically the same yet physically different, just like how two minerals can differ from each other, one hard and translucent and the other soft and opaque. the changing arrangement of carbon atoms provides a unique feature to both diamonds and minerals.
June 16, 2016
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Researchers determine fundamental limits of invisibility cloaks
Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin have been able to quantify fundamental physical limitations on the performance of cloaking devices, a technology that allows objects to become invisible or undetectable to electromagnetic waves including radio waves, microwaves, infrared and visible light.
July 6, 2016
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Researchers determine relation bandgap energy of single cesium lead bromide nanocrystals and their size and shape
Researchers from the University of Amsterdam (UvA), in collaboration with Japanese partners, have determined directly the relation between the bandgap energy of single cesium lead bromide nanocrystals (CsPbBr3 NCs) and their size and shape. by studying individual NCs being either isolated or surrounded by 'neighbors', they explicitly visualized for the first time band structure modification introduced by effective coupling between semiconductor NCs upon close contact.
October 18, 2016
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Researchers develop a Nanoparticle Testing Tool to Determine the best Nanoparticle
The discovery power of the gene chip is coming to nanotechnology. a tool to test millions (possibly billions) of different nanoparticles in a rapid manner and at a specific time in order to determine the best particle for a particular use has been developed by researchers from the Northwestern University.
June 27, 2016
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Researchers develop Bioinspired Technique to Transform Natural Proteins into Robust Complex Materials
A research team from the School of Engineering at Tufts University has invented an innovative bioinspired method to transform silk protein into robust and ultralight complex materials that can be easily programmed at the macro-, micro-, and nano-scales.
February 28, 2017
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Researchers develop environmentally-friendly soy bionano fiber air filter
Washington State University researchers have developed a soy-based air filter that can capture toxic chemicals, such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde, which current air filters can't.
January 13, 2017
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Researchers develop hazard assessment for nanosilver products
Researchers have adapted an 'off-the-shelf' hazard assessment tool for use with emerging nanomaterials in an effort to better understand threats they may pose to workers, the public and the environment. as described in the peer-reviewed, scientific journal Environmental Health, researchers focused on characterizing nanosilver products already approved for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and currently found in hundreds of products -- and discovered health and environmental hazards not previously considered by EPA during its approval process..
November 22, 2016
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Researchers develop label-free technique to image microtubules
Imaging very small materials takes not only great skill on the part of the microscopist, but also great instruments and techniques. for a refined microscopic look at biological materials, the challenges include getting an image that is free from "noise," the interference that can be caused by a number of items, including the area surrounding an item.
January 27, 2017
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Researchers develop methods to control defects in graphene
Researchers at Penn State, the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company have developed methods to control defects in two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, that may lead to improved membranes for water desalination, energy storage, sensing or advanced protective coatings.
October 10, 2016
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Researchers develop Nano-Radio Out of Atomic-Scale Defects in Pink Diamonds
Scientists from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed the world's smallest radio receiver, which was made out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds.
December 19, 2016
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Researchers develop new Hybrid Nanoparticle by Combining Gold and Rust Nanoparticles
Researchers from the University of Georgia are giving new meaning to the phrase "turning rust into gold"–and making the use of gold in research settings and industrial applications far more affordable.
September 16, 2016
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Researchers develop new Nanomaterial that Holds Potential for Energy-Efficient Windows
Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory are using nanomaterials to enhance the energy efficiency of the currently available single-pane windows in both residential and commercial buildings.
June 2, 2016
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Researchers develop new Process for Growing Zeolite Nanosheets
Researchers have developed an innovative one-step, crystal growth process for making ultra-selective membranes for chemical separations. Headed by the University of Minnesota, the team showed that a material called zeolite nanosheets can be used for making ultra-thin membranes with molecular-sized pores.
March 16, 2017
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Researchers develop novel membranes whose selectivity can be tuned dynamically with light
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and Uni-versitat Hannover developed novel membranes, whose selectivity can be switched dynamically with the help of light. for this pur-pose, azobenzene molecules were integrated into membranes made of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Depending on the irradiation wavelength, these azobenzene units in the MOFs adopt a stretched or angular form. In this way, it is possible to dynamically adjust the permeability of the membrane and the separation factor of gases or liquids. the results are reported in Nature Communications. (DOI:10.1038/ncomms13872)
December 23, 2016
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Researchers develop recycling for carbon fiber composites
A WSU research team for the first time has developed a promising way to recycle the popular carbon fiber plastics that are used in everything from modern airplanes and sporting goods to the wind energy industry.
May 2, 2017
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Researchers develop scalable, electrically driven photon sources to drive quantum technologies
Quantum computing is heralded as the next revolution in terms of global computing. Google, Intel and IBM are just some of the big names investing millions currently in the field of quantum computing which will enable faster, more efficient computing required to power the requirements of our future computing needs.
November 15, 2016
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Researchers develop shape-changing 'smart' material
Washington State University researchers have developed a unique, multifunctional smart material that can change shape from heat or light and assemble and disassemble itself. they have filed a provisional patent on the work.
June 30, 2016
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Researchers develop Silicon Nanoantenna that Scatters Light in Particular Direction
A group of physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), ITMO University, and the University of Texas at Austin have created a unique nanoantenna with the ability to scatter light in a specific direction based on the intensity of incident radiation. the outcomes of this research will help develop flexible processing of optical information in telecommunication systems.
November 17, 2016
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Researchers develop Tiny Quantum Dots in Graphene
When confined to small spaces, electrons exhibit their quantum properties. Extremely small quantum dots in graphene have been developed by Scientists from TU Wien (Vienna), Manchester and Aachen.
August 24, 2016
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Researchers devise new tool to measure polarization of light
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new tool for detecting and measuring the polarization of light based on a single spatial sampling of the light, rather than the multiple samples required by previous technologies. the new device makes use of the unique properties of organic polymers, rather than traditional silicon, for polarization detection and measurement (Optics Express, "Intrinsic coincident linear polarimetry using stacked organic photovoltaics").
June 24, 2016
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Researchers Discover Elegant Way to Decouple Organic Nanosheets Grown on Metal Surfaces
An international team has discovered an elegant way to decouple organic nanosheets grown on metal surfaces. After iodine intercalation, measurements at the synchrotron source BESSY II of Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) showed that a network of organic molecules behaved almost as it was free-standing. the strong influence of the metal on the network was reduced. this opens up new ways to transfer organic nanostructures from metal surfaces onto more suitable substrates for molecular electronics. the results have been published in "Angewandte Chemie".
June 23, 2016
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Researchers discover new chemical sensing technique
Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new technique to determine the chemical composition of materials using near-infrared light.
June 23, 2016
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Researchers discover new type of memory effect in Transition Metal Oxides
Transition metal oxides (TMO) are extensively studied, technologically important materials, due to their complex electronic interactions, resulting in a large variety of collective phenomena. Memory effects in TMO's have garnered a huge amount of interest, being both of fundamental scientific interest and technological significance.
March 23, 2017
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Researchers Discover Peculiar State of Fluid Mixtures Contained In Nanochannels
Shrinking the investigation of objects down to the nanometer scale often reveals new properties of matter that have no equivalent for their bulk analysis. this phenomenon is motivating many current studies of nanomaterials which can reveal fascinating new phenomena.
January 11, 2017
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Researchers discover self-assembling 2D and 3D materials formed by gold nanoclusters
Self-assembly of matter is one of the fundamental principles of nature, directing the growth of larger ordered and functional systems from smaller building blocks. Self-assembly can be observed in all length scales from molecules to galaxies. Now, researchers at the Nanoscience Centre of the University of Jyväskylä and the HYBER Centre of Excellence of Aalto University in Finland report a novel discovery of self-assembling two- and three-dimensional materials that are formed by tiny gold nanoclusters of just a couple of nanometres in size, each having 102 gold atoms and a surface layer of 44 thiol molecules.
January 13, 2017
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Researchers Discover the Preparation of High-Quality Crystals Formed of Gold Nanoparticles
A research study demonstrating the possibility to attain extremely high quality crystals developed from gold nanoparticles has been published in the renowned journal called the Journal of the American Chemical Society by a research team headed by Professor Flavio Maran of the University of Padova (Italy) and Academy Professor Kari Rissanen of the University of Jyväskylä (Finland).
March 23, 2017
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Researchers discovered elusive half-quantum vortices in a superfluid
Researchers in Aalto University, Finland, and P.L. Kapitza Institute in Moscow have discovered half-quantum vortices in superfluid helium (Physical Review Letters, "Observation of Half-Quantum Vortices in Topological Superfluid 3He").
December 14, 2016
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Researchers Document Self-Healing Property of Graphene for First Time
Researchers from Hyderabad, India, present the first ever documented observation of the self-healing phenomena of graphene. this discovery may have potential for use in artificial skin.
March 23, 2017
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Researchers Employ 2D Materials to Produce New-Age Light Sources
Over the past 10 years, there has been much research and a virtual hype surrounding monolayers, or "super materials" (as denoted by "Nature," a prestigious science magazine). this is due to the fact that these monolayers exhibit excellent potential to transform many areas of physics.
October 30, 2016
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Researchers Explore Role of Entropy in Directed Organization of Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles
Controlling the organization of nanoparticles into patterns in ultrathin polymer films can be accomplished with entropy instead of chemistry, according to a discovery by Dr. Alamgir Karim, UA's Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company Professor of Polymer Engineering, and his student Dr. Ren Zhang. Polymer thin films are used in a variety of technological applications, for example paints, lubricants, and adhesives.
March 14, 2017
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Researchers Fabricate HyTII Graphene Film with Tunable Bandstructure
A team of researchers from various disciplines at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Electronics Science and Technology and Materials Science and Technology Divisions, has showed hyperthermal ion implantation (HyTII) as a viable means of substitutionally doping graphene with nitrogen atoms. the outcome is a low-defect film with a tunable bandstructure agreeable to a number of device applications and platforms.
June 7, 2016
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Researchers Find new Way to Produce Nanomagnets with Low Zero-Point Energy
So-called "zero-point energy" is a term familiar to some cinema lovers or series fans; in the fictional world of animated films such as "The Incredibles" or the TV series "Stargate Atlantis", it denotes a powerful and virtually inexhaustible energy source.
July 11, 2016
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Researchers find way of developing composites that self-heal at very low temperatures
Scientists have developed a method of allowing materials, commonly used in aircraft and satellites, to self-heal cracks at temperatures well below freezing.
September 13, 2016
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Researchers Gain Insights into how Melting Occurs in 2D Systems
A fact known worldwide is that in Winter snow falls, and in Spring, it melts. However, the question remains how is this phase change driven?
February 2, 2017
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Researchers Get Closer to Creating UV/Visible Light-Regulated Gearbox for Nanomachines
Nanomachines enable mechanical work to be carried out on the smallest of scales, were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in the year 2016. However, at such minute dimensions, molecular motors can finish the work only in a single direction.
March 21, 2017
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Researchers grow a versatile 2-dimensional material
University of Pennsylvania researchers are now among the first to produce a single, three-atom-thick layer of a unique two-dimensional material called tungsten ditelluride. Their findings have been published in 2-D Materials ("Large-area synthesis of high-quality monolayer 1T'-WTe2 flakes").
February 8, 2017
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Researchers Harness STEM's Electron Beams to Create Nanoscale Templates
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to harness a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to directly write tiny patterns in metallic "ink," forming features in liquid that are finer than half the width of a human hair.
September 12, 2016
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Researchers invent process to make sustainable rubber, plastics
Synthetic rubber and plastics - used for manufacturing tires, toys and myriad other products - are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas. But those manmade materials could get a lot greener soon, thanks to the ingenuity of a team of scientists from three U.S. research universities.
April 25, 2017
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Researchers make leap in measuring quantum states
A breakthrough into the full characterisation of quantum states has been published today as a prestigious Editors' Suggestion in the journal Physical Review Letters ("Experimental demonstration of self-guided quantum tomography").
July 21, 2016
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Researchers nearly reached quantum limit with nanodrums
Extremely accurate measurements of microwave signals can potentially be used for data encryption based on quantum cryptography and other purposes.
October 30, 2016
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Researchers obtain Bose-Einstein condensate with nickel chloride
Bose-Einstein condensates - often called the "fifth state of matter", the other four states being solids, liquids, gases and plasmas - are obtained when atoms are cooled almost to absolute zero.
April 3, 2017
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Researchers peel back another layer of chemistry with 'tender' X-rays
Scientists can now directly probe a previously hard-to-see layer of chemistry thanks to a unique X-ray toolkit developed at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). the X-ray tools and techniques could be extended, researchers say, to provide new insight about battery performance and corrosion, a wide range of chemical reactions, and even biological and environmental processes that rely on similar chemistry.
August 31, 2016
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Researchers Perform Experimental Validation of Heat Transport at the Nanoscale
The phenomenon of heat transport is highly significant as its regulation, for example, is inevitable for efficient cooling of smaller chips.
February 20, 2017
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Researchers propose technique for measuring weak or nonexistent magnetic fields
Physicists at the University of Iowa have proposed a new technique to detect and measure materials that give off weak magnetic signals or have no magnetic field at all. Their solution would use a noninvasive probe to induce a magnetic response in the material being studied and then detect how that response changes the probe's own magnetic field.
March 8, 2017
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Researchers Prove 3D Aromaticity in Stacked Antiaromatic Molecules
Aromatic molecules are made up of planar carbon-based rings with alternating single and double (p) bonds. These molecules possess 4n+2 (n = 0, 1, 2 ...) p electrons. p electrons are those involved in p bonds, which causes high stability because the p electrons delocalize over the ring structure.
December 16, 2016
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Researchers Prove that Glass can Bend and Flex on a Nanoscale
A new glass technology capable of adding a new level of flexibility to the microscopic world of medical devices has been developed by Brigham Young University researchers.
March 24, 2017
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Researchers provide new insight into dark matter halos
Research from the University of Pennsylvania could shed light on the distribution of one of the most mysterious substances in the universe.
April 17, 2017
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Researchers Realize Wafer-Scale, High-Yield Synthesis of Suspended Graphene Nanoribbons
Wafer-scale and high yield synthesis has been realized by a team of researchers from Tohoku University. as per the research conducted at Hokkaido University and the University of Tokyo, the comparison of molecular dynamics simulations, experiments and theoretical calculations has illuminated the distinctive growth dynamic.
June 14, 2016
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Researchers report new thermoelectric material with high power factors
With energy conservation expected to play a growing role in managing global demand, materials and methods that make better use of existing sources of energy have become increasingly important.
November 15, 2016
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Researchers Reveal Stable Solid-Liquid State in Gallium Nanoparticles
Envision ice cubes that continue to remain unchanged after many hours once they were poured from a glass, even in the very interior part of a freezer or under the heat of a boiler. this is essentially the discovery recently made by an international group of researchers headed by an electrical engineering professor from Duke University.
August 04, 2016
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Researchers road-test powerful method for studying singlet fission
Physicists have successfully employed a powerful technique for studying electrons generated through singlet fission, a process which it is believed will be key to more efficient solar energy production in years to come.
October 19, 2016
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Researchers Make Significant Strides in Understanding Friction on Graphene
The unique combination of strength, chemical stability, and electrical conductivity has made graphene, a 2D form of carbon in sheets just one atom thick, the subject of widespread research. However, some of the fundamental properties of graphene, including the way it works when something slides along its surface, are still not clearly understood despite many years of study.
November 30, 2016
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Researchers Study Defects in Nanoscale Instruments
Scientists from the Tokyo Institute of Technology collaborated with the University of Cambridge to explore the interaction between electronic defect states and microwave fields within the field-effect transistors' oxide layer at cryogenic temperatures. It has been discovered that the physics of such defect states are in sync with driven two-level systems that possess long coherence times.
October 20, 2016
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Researchers Study Electron Pair Mimicry for Nanotechnology Applications
Control plays a significant role in nanotechnology. Control over the distances between nanoparticles and also the arrangements can allow customized interaction strengths in order to harness properties in devices such as plasmonic sensors.
December 5, 2016
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Researchers Study new Opportunities Provided by Silver Nanoclusters
Small clusters of silver atoms arranged with atomic level precision are capable of becoming more versatile and useful due to a simpler way to hold them together.
December 21, 2016
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Researchers Successfully Squeeze More onto Limited Wafer Space of Computer Chip
Manufacturers of computer chips constantly aim to pack more transistors into less space, however with the size of those transistors nearing the atomic scale, there are physical limitations on how small they are able to make the circuitry's patterns.
September 12, 2016
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Researchers surprised at the unexpected hardness of gallium nitride
Gallium nitride (GaN) has emerged as one of the most important and widely used semiconducting materials. Its optoelectronic and mechanical properties make it ideal for a variety of applications, including light-emitting diodes (LEDs), high-temperature transistors, sensors and biocompatible electronic implants in humans.
October 28, 2016
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Researchers Synthesize and Characterize new Silver Nanoclusters
A group of international scientists have successfully synthesized and characterized two previously unknown, record-large silver nanoclusters of 136 and 374 atoms.
September 12, 2016
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Researchers turn nanorods into multistate switches with an electron beam
Rice University scientists have discovered how to subtly change the interior structure of semi-hollow nanorods in a way that alters how they interact with light, and because the changes are reversible, the method could form the basis of a nanoscale switch with enormous potential.
October 10, 2016
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Researchers uncover how molecular machines assemble
Ribosomes--macromolecular machines consisting of RNA and proteins that twist, fold and turn--are responsible for making all of the protein within a cell and could hold the key to deciphering a range of diseases. Despite the intricacies of ribosomes, cells are able to churn out 100,000 of them every hour. But because they assemble so speedily, researchers haven't been able to figure out how they come together.
December 1, 2016
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Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easier
Using sunlight to drive chemical reactions, such as artificial photosynthesis, could soon become much more efficient thanks to nanomaterials.
March 28, 2017
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Researchers update 'sweet' 1950s separation method to clean nanoparticles from organisms
Sometimes old-school methods provide the best ways of studying cutting-edge tech and its effects on the modern world.
January 26, 2017
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Researchers use acoustic waves to move fluids at the nanoscale
A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. the breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications.
November 14, 2016
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Researchers Use Advanced Tools to Exploit Atomic, Molecular Properties of Matter at Pritzker Nanofabrication Facility
Academic and industrial researchers have begun working side-by-side at the University of Chicago's Pritzker Nanofabrication Facility, using some of the world's most advanced tools to exploit the atomic and molecular properties of matter for emerging applications in science and technology.
July 12, 2016
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Researchers Use Carbon-Nanotube-Based Sensor to Monitor Structural Health
Aging, deterioration and extreme events like earthquakes and hurricanes can take a toll on roads, bridges and other structures. with damage and defects often invisible, the search is on for systems that can monitor the health of structures and alert their owners to potential problems and even impending catastrophic failure.
July 8, 2016
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Researchers use graphene templates to make new metal-oxide nanostructures
Researchers from Brown University have found a new method for making ultrathin metal-oxide sheets containing intricate wrinkle and crumple patterns. In a study published in the journal ACS Nano, the researchers show that the textured metal-oxide films have better performance when used as photocatalysts and as battery electrodes.
November 7, 2016
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Researchers Use Nano Optical Cavity to Mix Molecules with Light
Generally, a blink of light emitted by a molecule does not ever return back. this theory has been altered now by a team of researchers who have found a way to place single molecules in an extremely tiny optical cavity that emitted light particles, or photons, return to the molecule before they have left properly. the energy swings back and forth between molecule and light, resulting in a full mix of the two.
June 15, 2016
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Researchers Use Nanoscale Metallic Film to develop 3D Full-Color Holographic Images
A new approach to reconstruct 3D full-color holographic images with the help of only a single layer of nanoscale metallic film is being developed by researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology. this new invention has the potential to change daily lives by equipping cell phones with 3D floating displays and providing credit cards with 3D printed security marking.
October 14, 2016
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Researchers 'watch' crystal structure change in real time
Washington State University researchers have met the long-standing scientific challenge of watching a material change its crystal structure in real time.
July 25, 2016
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Researchers watch catalysts at work
Physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in watching a silver catalyst at work for the first time with the aid of an atomic force microscope. the observations made during an Ullmann reaction have allowed the researchers to calculate the energy turnover and, potentially, to optimize the catalysis.
August 17, 2016
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Researchers weld graphene sheets to form tough, porous material
Flakes of graphene welded together into solid materials may be suitable for bone implants, according to a study led by Rice University scientists.
September 2, 2016
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Researchers Work Out new Eco-Friendly Method for Making Silicon Nanowires
Researchers from the Faculty of Physics at the Lomonosov Moscow State University have developed a new eco-friendly method to make silicon nanowires. this process may allow researchers to replace hydrofluoric acid (HF) with ammonium fluoride (NH4F).
October 19, 2016
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Researchers Work to expand access to health care using nanotechnology
Treatment for HIV has come a long way since the illness emerged as a serious global health problem in the 1980s. with constant monitoring and the right cocktail of medication, patients with HIV can now live long, healthy lives.
February 21, 2017
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Resonator with nanoscale features detects dangerous chemicals in the environment
Inspired by the anatomy of insects, an interdisciplinary research team at the University of Alberta has come up with a novel way to quickly and accurately detect dangerous airborne chemicals.
September 16, 2016
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Responsive filtration membranes by polymer self-assembly
A team of researchers from Tufts University in Medford, MA have put together a review article, which discusses recent developments in stimuli-responsive membranes with an emphasis on membranes manufactured by polymer self-assembly.
December 29, 2016
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Reusable sponge that soaks up oil, could revolutionize oil spill and diesel cleanup
When the Deepwater Horizon drilling pipe blew out seven years ago, beginning the worst oil spill in U.S. history, those in charge of the recovery discovered a new wrinkle: the millions of gallons of oil bubbling from the sea floor weren't all collecting on the surface where it could be skimmed or burned. some of it was forming a plume and drifting through the ocean under the surface.
March 8, 2017
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Revisiting trajectories at the quantum scale
There is a gap in the theory explaining what is happening at the macroscopic scale, in the realm of our everyday lives, and at the quantum level, at microscopic scale. In this paper published in EPJ D ("On the fundamental role of dynamics in quantum physics"), Holger Hofmann from the Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter at Hiroshima University, Japan, reveals that the assumption that quantum particles move because they follow a precise trajectory over time has to be called into question. Instead, he claims that the notion of trajectory is a dogmatic bias inherited from our interpretation of everyday experience at the macroscopic scale.
June 7, 2016
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Revolutionary Composite Gas Transition Seal
Haydale Composite Solutions (HCS) have been awarded a contract extension by UK utility company - National Grid to develop 14 different lightweight composite Gas Transition Piece (GTP) solutions for 7 different pipeline diameters from 300-1050mm.
September 30, 2016
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Revolutionizing smart textile nanofinishing in a green fashion
A major challenge in nanotechnology is that of determining how to introduce green and sustainable principles when assembling individual nanoscale elements to create working devices.
July 25, 2016
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Rice Researchers Tweak Graphene to develop Phonon-Friendly Cones
Rice University researchers claim that just a few nanoscale tweaks could enable graphene-nanotube junctions do extremely well at transferring heat. the Rice lab of theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson discovered that placing a cone-like "chimney" between the graphene and nanotube all but eliminates a barrier that hinders heat from escaping.
January 5, 2017
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Rice Scientists Drive Three-Wheeled, Single-Molecule Nanoroadsters with Light
Scientists at Rice University and at the University of Graz, Austria, have for the very first time observed the movement of three-wheeled, single-molecule "nanoroadsters" by driving these nanoroadsters with light.
November 7, 2016
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Rice University Lab Uses Electron Beam to Convert Nanorods into Multistate Switches
Rice University scientists have discovered how to subtly change the interior structure of semi-hollow nanorods in a way that alters how they interact with light, and because the changes are reversible, the method could form the basis of a nanoscale switch with enormous potential.
October 12, 2016
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Rice University Receives Citation for Chemical Breakthroughs Award for Discovery of Carbon 60
The American Chemical Society has presented Rice University the Citation for Chemical Breakthroughs Award in recognition of the discovery of carbon 60, or the buckyball, at Rice in 1985. Buckyball co-discoverer Robert Curl accepted the award Aug. 21 at the ACS annual meeting in Philadelphia along with Matteo Pasquali, chair of the chemistry department.
August 29, 2016
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Rice University Researcher Uses Light to Push Boundaries of Experimental Nanoscience
Rice University nanophotonics researcher Isabell Thomann uses lasers, light-activated materials and light-measuring nanoscale tips to push the boundaries of experimental nanoscience, but light is providing the pull in her latest study.
December 14, 2016
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Rice University Researchers Find Ways to Improve Graphene Nanoribbons
For decades, carbon fiber has been considered as a pillar of strength in the field of materials manufacturing. Rice University scientists are now finding ways to improve these carbon fibers to enhance its properties.
October 20, 2016
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Rice University Researchers Reveal Brittle Nature of Two-Dimensional Molybdenum Diselenide
Researchers from Rice University have found that an atom-thick material suggested for use in next-generation optical devices and flexible electronics is more brittle than anticipated.
November 15, 2016
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Rigaku Innovative Technologies announces Synchrotron Optics Refurbishment Program and new Optics and Coatings for Synchrotron Applications
Proprietary, cost-effective process restores performance, while new optics deliver high reflectivity and precision
October 28, 2016
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Rivet graphene proves its mettle
Nanoscale "rivets" give graphene qualities that may speed the wonder material's adoption in products like flexible, transparent electronics, according to researchers at Rice University.
July 14, 2016
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Rotating ring of complex organic molecules discovered around newborn star: Chemical diversity in planet forming regions unveiled
Researchers have discovered a rotating ring containing large organic molecules around a protostar. this observation definitively shows that organic materials formed in interstellar space are brought into the planet-forming region. Researchers also found that the molecular species brought into the planet-forming region vary from one protostar to another. Chemical composition is a new way to answer the long-standing question of whether or not the Solar System is a typical example of a planetary system.
June 28, 2016
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Rutgers University Researchers Discover Simple Technique to Produce High-Quality Graphene
A simple technique to produce high-quality graphene has been devised by Rutgers University engineers, which can be later used in next-generation energy and electronic devices.
September 2, 2016
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Misc. - S

Sandia Nanophotonics Researcher Awarded 2016 Outstanding Young Professional Award by IEEE-HKN
Sandia National Laboratories researcher Salvatore Campione has been awarded the 2016 Outstanding Young Professional Award by IEEE honor society Eta Kappa Nu (IEEE-HKN).
September 23, 2016
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Save Up to 80% Energy Costs with the Micron Pulvis Sub-Micron Mill
Capable of producing finer particle sizes than a jet mill and with energy consumption typically eighty percent less than other mills, the Pulvis offers an efficient alternative to impact type mills, when it comes to ultra-fine milling.
December 9, 2016
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Saving energy through light control
Tired of inconvenient blinds and shades? Switch to smart glass, windows that get dark on bright days and turn clear on cloudy ones. Researchers at the Center for Excitonics took advantage of the fundamental properties of molecules to design a material that changes from transparent to opaque (and vice versa) within only a few seconds
May 2, 2017
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Saving precious water with nanoscale ingenuity
Managing scarce water resources is problematic for many Middle East countries, and forecasts predict a more straitened situation ahead. Desalination plants are one way to manage water shortages, as more than two-thirds of the world's desalination capacity is in this region, but processing seawater has enormous energy and environmental costs.
June 23, 2016
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Science at cusp of 'transformational' grasp of life via cell modeling, researchers say
A paper recently published in the Journal of Molecular Biology shows how advances in molecular biology and computer science around the world soon may lead to a three-dimensional computer model of a cell, the fundamental unit of life.
October 5, 2016
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Scientist uncovers physics behind plasma-etching process
Physicist Igor Kaganovich at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and collaborators have uncovered some of the physics that make possible the etching of silicon computer chips, which power cell phones, computers, and a huge range of electronic devices. Specifically, the team found how electrically charged gas known as plasma makes the etching process more effective than it would otherwise be.
January 27, 2017
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Scientists can listen to proteins by turning data into music
Transforming data about the structure of proteins into melodies gives scientists a completely new way of analyzing the molecules that could reveal new insights into how they work - by listening to them. a new study published in the journal Heliyon shows how musical sounds can help scientists analyze data using their ears instead of their eyes.
October 20, 2016
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Scientists Control Nanoballoons using Static Electricity
Molecular-sized machines could be used to manipulate significant bodily mechanisms in the future. In a recent study, scientists from Umeå University and the University of California, Berkeley have electrostatically controlled a nanoballoon consisting of a carbon molecule 10,000 times thinner than a strand of human hair, to switch between collapsed and inflated state.
October 14, 2016
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Scientists count microscopic particles without microscope
Scientists from Russia and Australia have put forward a simple new way of counting microscopic particles in optical materials by means of a laser.
August 09, 2016
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Scientists create a nano-trampoline to probe quantum behavior
A research group from Bar-Ilan University, in collaboration with French colleagues at CNRS Grenoble, has developed a unique experiment to detect quantum events in ultra-thin films.
February 22, 2017
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Scientists create most efficient quantum cascade laser ever
A team of University of Central Florida (UCF) researchers has produced the most efficient quantum cascade laser ever designed -- and done it in a way that makes the lasers easier to manufacture.
October 17, 2016
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Scientists decipher the nanoscale architecture of a beetle's shell
Beetles wear a body armor that should weigh them down -- think medieval knights and turtles. In fact, those hard shells protecting delicate wings are surprisingly light, allowing even flight.
February 22, 2017
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Scientists Define Smart Way to Induce Large-Amplitude Vibrations in Graphene
Graphene, the one-atom-thick material made of carbon atoms, still holds some unexplained qualities, which are important in connection with electronic applications where high-conductivity matters, ranging from smart materials that collectively respond to external stimuli in a coherent, tunable fashion, to light-induced, all-optical networks.
March 9, 2017
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Scientists Demonstrate Novel Approach to Magnetomechanical Nanoactuation
Researchers of the Nanomagnetism Group and Electron Microscopy Group at CIC nanoGUNE devised and demonstrated a novel approach to nanoactuation that relies on magnetomechanics instead of the conventional electromechanics utilized in micro and nanoactuated mechanical systems. the work was reported in Small.
June 24, 2016
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Scientists determine precise 3-D location, identity of all 23,000 atoms in a nanoparticle
Scientists used one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes to map the precise location and chemical type of 23,000 atoms in an extremely small particle made of iron and platinum.
February 1, 2017
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Scientists develop more efficient catalytic nanomaterial
Scientists at Ames Laboratory have discovered a method for making smaller, more efficient intermetallic nanoparticles for fuel cell applications, and which also use less of the expensive precious metal platinum
May 9, 2017
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Scientists develop nanomachines to diagnose illness
Imagine you want to build an intricate work of architecture, like a castle.
June 27, 2016
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Scientists develop new Method of Identifying Damages in Polymers
Pipes can burst for many reasons, such as subzero temperatures or catastrophic events, or continuous use and time can wear the material, leaving dents and dings that become evident only when it is too late.
August 22, 2016
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Scientists develop novel nanomaterial with controllable optical properties
Scientists at the Technical University Hamburg and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht have produced a new optical nanomaterial based on nanoporous gold, which facilitates changes of up to thirty percent in the optical transmission by applying an electrical voltage. the change is incredibly large if one considers that the thickness of the nanomaterial layer is only two hundred nanometres -- which is only about five-hundredth the diameter of a human strand of hair.
March 10, 2017
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Scientists discover light could exist in a previously unknown form
New research suggests that it is possible to create a new form of light by binding light to a single electron, combining the properties of both.
August 05, 2016
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Scientists discover new atomically layered, thin magnet
It may not seem like a material as thin as an atom could hide any surprises, but a research team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) discovered an unexpected magnetic property in a two-dimensional material.
April 26, 2017
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Scientists Discover new Means of Controlling Defects in Graphene
New methods to control defects in 2D materials, including graphene that can result in enhance membranes for energy storage, advanced protective coating, sensing or water desalination have been developed by scientists at the Penn State's Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company.
October 12, 2016
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Scientists Display Effect of All-Optical Switching Between Photons Using Non-Linear Metamaterials
Scientists demonstrated the effect of the all-optical switching between streams of photons using non-linear metamaterials.
June 24, 2016
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Scientists Explain Creation of Intricate Nanostructures by Hitting with High Energy Ions
Intricate nanostructures can be created on crystal surfaces by hitting them with high energy ions. Scientists from TU Wien (Vienna) can now explain these remarkable phenomena.
August 30, 2016
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Scientists explain the way Weyl particles 'dance' on crystal surface
Researchers at MIPT have examined the behavior of Weyl particles trapped on the surface of Weyl semimetals. Their study was published in Physical Review B.
April 27, 2017
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Scientists Explore Catalytic Abilities of Nanoparticles
The European Research Council is supporting the catalyst research of Bochum-based scientist Beatriz Roldán Cuenya. Ultimately, this could help to use climate-damaging CO2 in a sensible way.
December 14, 2016
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Scientists Investigate Beneficial Use of Nanostructures in Laser Ion Acceleration
Nanostructured surfaces have manifold applications. Among others they are used to selectively increase aborption of light. you can find them everywhere, where light harvesting is the key point, e.g. in photovoltaics. But also in laser proton acceleration this approach attracts a lot of attention as nanostructured targets hold the promise to significantly increase maximum proton energies and proton numbers at a given laser energy.
March 16, 2017
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Scientists Leverage Properties of Graphene to develop Next-Gen Sensors, Membranes for Energy and Water
The unique and valuable properties of graphene -- a wonder material noted for its strength and electrical conductivity -- are being leveraged by Masdar Institute researchers to help advance technologies of relevance to strategic local industries like oil and gas and desalination.
July 26, 2016
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Scientists make new high-tech liquid metamaterials
Scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) have controlled wave-generated currents to make previously unimaginable liquid materials for new technological innovations, including techniques to manipulate micro-organisms.
February 9, 2017
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Scientists make plastic from pine trees
Most current plastics are made from oil, which is unsustainable. However, scientists from the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) at the University of Bath have developed a renewable plastic from a chemical called pinene found in pine needles.
January 17, 2017
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Scientists Manipulate Surfaces to Make Them Hardly Reflect Any Light and Become Nearly Invisible
Anti-reflective coating is applied to most lenses, eyeglass lenses, lasers, and objectives, however this coating only functions optimally within a narrow wavelength range.
October 22, 2016
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Scientists observe a surprising quantum effect when short light pulses interact with matter
A group of theoretical physicists headed by Oriol Romero-Isart from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information and the University of Innsbruck observes a surprising quantum effect when short light pulses interact with matter. In the future, this effect may be used for developing a completely new type of far-field light nanoscopes.
September 23, 2016
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Scientists Observe Self -Sorting Phenomena of Artificial Nanofibers in Real Time
Similar to the way in which ants helped the Greek goddess Psyche in sorting a room filled with various grains, cells organize molecules into strong, functional fibers - but without any assistance. Researchers have now noticed that these self-sorting phenomena occur with artificial molecules in real time.
June 2, 2016
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Scientists print nanoscale imaging probe onto tip of optical fiber
Combining speed with incredible precision, a team of researchers has developed a way to print a nanoscale imaging probe onto the tip of a glass fiber as thin as a human hair, accelerating the production of the promising new device from several per month to several per day.
May 10, 2017
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Scientists Produce Rings and Chains of Gold Nanoparticles
A team of researchers at the Nanoscience Center of the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland have successfully produced rings and short chains of gold nanoparticles with unparalleled precision.
September 23, 2016
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Scientists program cells to remember and respond to series of stimuli
Synthetic biology allows researchers to program cells to perform novel functions such as fluorescing in response to a particular chemical or producing drugs in response to disease markers. In a step toward devising much more complex cellular circuits, MIT engineers have now programmed cells to remember and respond to a series of events.
July 21, 2016
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Scientists Propose Using Nanoscale Tetrapods to Provide Early Warning of Material's Failure
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have proposed that four-armed, light-emitting nanocrystals could soon serve as the foundation of an early warning system in structural materials by revealing microscopic cracks that indicate failure.
September 20, 2016
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Scientists see snowman's face in platinum encrusted nanoparticle
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have captured the formation of a platinum encrusted nanoparticle that bears a striking resemblance to a festive snowman. as well as providing some Christmas cheer, the fully functional 'nano-snowman' has applications for providing greener energy and for advancements in medical care.
December 20, 2016
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Scientists set traps for atoms with single-particle precision
Atoms, photons, and other quantum particles are often capricious and finicky by nature; very rarely at a standstill, they often collide with others of their kind. But if such particles can be individually corralled and controlled in large numbers, they may be harnessed as quantum bits, or qubits – tiny units of information whose state or orientation can be used to carry out calculations at rates significantly faster than today's semiconductor-based computer chips.
November 3, 2016
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Scientists shrink electron gun to matchbox size
Ultrashort bursts of electrons have several important applications in scientific imaging, but producing them has typically required a costly, power-hungry apparatus about the size of a car.
November 22, 2016
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Scientists simplify the simulation of high-precision optical instruments
Physicists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and University Jean Monnet (France) have developed a new simulation method for optical elements that form the basis of numerous modern instruments and devices.
February 1, 2017
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Scientists tie the tightest knot ever achieved
Scientists at the University of Manchester have produced the most tightly knotted physical structure ever known - a scientific achievement which has the potential to create a new generation of advanced materials (Science, "Braiding a molecular knot with eight crossings").
January 12, 2017
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Scientists to develop space-based quantum-dot spectrometer
A NASA technologist has teamed with the inventor of a new nanotechnology that could transform the way space scientists build spectrometers, the all-important device used by virtually all scientific disciplines to measure the properties of light emanating from astronomical objects, including Earth itself.
February 14, 2017
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Scientists trace 'poisoning' in chemical reactions to the atomic scale
Researchers have revealed new atomic-scale details about pesky deposits that can stop or slow chemical reactions vital to fuel production and other processes. this disruption to reactions is known as deactivation or poisoning.
November 23, 2016
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Scientists Unearth the Mystery Behind Melting of Two-Dimensional Substances
At the end of a detailed study, researchers at the University of Oxford's Department of Chemistry have established experimental proof related to melting of two-dimensional materials. the outcomes of the research can be used to assist in technological advancement of thin-film materials such as graphene.
April 24, 2017
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Scientists unveil new form of matter: Time crystals
To most people, crystals mean diamond bling, semiprecious gems or perhaps the jagged amethyst or quartz crystals beloved by collectors.
January 26, 2017
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Scientists use a frozen gas to boost laser light to new extremes
To observe something as small and fast as an electron rushing to form a chemical bond, you need a bright light with an incredibly small wavelength that comes in very fast pulses -- just a few attoseconds, or billionths of a billionth of a second, long.
June 5, 2016
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Scientists use silver to make lights shine brightly
The toxic and expensive phosphors used widely in fluorescent lighting could be eliminated thanks to a new study conducted by a materials scientist at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
June 5, 2016
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Scientists win Nobel Prize in Chemistry for making tiny machines out of molecules
These are applications for medicine and energy storage
October 5, 2016
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Scientists Work Out Reliable Programming of Perforated Cobalt Grid
There are many possibilities for computing created by nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids. Researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have worked with international collaborators to demonstrate reliable programming of a cobalt grid at room temperature.
February 3, 2017
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Scientists work to improve the lifecycle of materials
When most living creatures get hurt, they can self-heal and recover from the injury. But, when damage occurs to inanimate objects, they don't have that same ability and typically either lose functionality or have their useful lifecycle reduced. Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology are working to change that.
December 14, 2016
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Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistry
In 2013, materials scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering, grew a garden of self-assembled crystal microstructures. Now, applied mathematicians at SEAS and Wyss have developed a framework to better understand and control the fabrication of these microstructures.
March 30, 2017
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Sea of Thieves new Trailer Shows Us a World Beyond the Ships
And the game continues to look great.
November 29, 2016
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Sea sponges offer clues to how human-made structures can resist buckling
Judging by their name alone, orange puffball sea sponges might seem unlikely paragons of structural strength. But maintaining their shape at the bottom of the churning ocean is critical to the creatures' survival, and new research shows that tiny structural rods in their bodies have evolved the optimal shape to avoid buckling under pressure.
January 4, 2017
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Secret Behind Formation of Hollowed Nanoparticles During Metal Oxidation Revealed
Rust is a sign of neglect. Rust undermines the tools and structures that are used on a daily basis, from cars to buildings and bridges. However, if carefully controlled, the same process that causes rust â€"" metal oxidation â€"" could provide researchers ways to progress advanced drug delivery technologies or battery technologies.
April 24, 2017
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See the light, get the data
A nanocrystalline material that rapidly makes white light out of blue light has been developed by KAUST researchers (ACS Photonics, "Perovskite nanocrystals as a color converter for visible light communication").
August 12, 2016
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Seeing atoms
Life in the nano lane is fast and just got faster in terms of knowledge of fundamental mechanisms working at the nanoscale -- where processes are driven by a dance of particles such as atoms and ions one-billionth of a meter in size.
June 7, 2016
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Seeing energized light-active molecules proves quick work for scientists
For people who enjoy amusement parks, one of the most thrilling sensations comes at the top of a roller coaster, in the split second between the end of the climb and the rush of the descent. Trying to take a picture at exactly the moment that the roller coaster reaches its zenith can be difficult because the drop happens so suddenly.
September 12, 2016
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Seeing living nanofibers in real time
The Greek goddess Psyche borrowed help from ants to sort a room full of different grains. Cells, on the other hand, do something similar without Olympian assistance, as they organize molecules into robust, functional fibers. now scientists are able to see self-sorting phenomena happen in real time with artificial molecules.
May 31, 2016
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Self-assembling Nanostructures Creates new Potential for Nanotechnology
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new method to produce nanoscale architectures that combine together in intricate patterns with unparalleled efficiency.
August 10, 2016
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Self-assembly - the power of attraction
Engineered nanometer- and micrometer-scale structures have a vast array of uses in electronics, sensors and biomedical applications. Because these are difficult to fabricate, KAUST researchers are trying a bottom-up philosophy, which harnesses the natural forces between atoms and molecules such that microstructures form themselves.
January 17, 2017
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Self-Assembly Mechanisms Behind the Formation of the Largest Gold Nanoparticles Revealed
A team of scientists from Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated the capability of synthetic nanoparticles to obtain the same level of structural complexity, accuracy, and hierarchy as their natural counterparts, biomolecules. Featured in Science, this study also highlights the atomic-level mechanisms behind nanoparticle self-assembly.
January 24, 2017
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Self-cleaning, anti-reflective, microorganism-resistant coatings
Coatings or paints are materials applied to different surfaces basically for decorative and protective purposes. Yet today the market for these materials is being subjected to increasingly tougher specifications. In addition to being decorative and protective, today's coatings must have additional properties such as, for example, low microorganism-adherence, ease of cleaning or self-repair properties.
August 08, 2016
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Self-healing textiles not only repair themselves, but can neutralize chemicals
Someday, chemically protective suits made of fabric coated in self-healing, thin films may prevent farmers from exposure to organophosphate pesticides, soldiers from chemical or biological attacks in the field and factory workers from accidental releases of toxic materials, according to a team of researchers.
July 25, 2016
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Self-healing textiles not only repair themselves, but can neutralize chemicals
Someday, chemically protective suits made of fabric coated in self-healing, thin films may prevent farmers from exposure to organophosphate pesticides, soldiers from chemical or biological attacks in the field and factory workers from accidental releases of toxic materials, according to a team of researchers.
July 25, 2016
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Self-organizing smart materials that mimic swarm behavior
A new study by an international team of researchers, affiliated with Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has announced that they have succeeded in demonstarting control over the interactions occurring among microscopic spheres, which cause them to self-propel into swarms, chains, and clusters.
July 21, 2016
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Self-shading windows
A team of researchers at MIT has developed a new way of making windows that can switch from transparent to opaque, potentially saving energy by blocking sunlight on hot days and thus reducing air-conditioning costs. While other systems for causing glass to darken do exist, the new method offers significant advantages by combining rapid response times and low power needs.
August 11, 2016
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Sensor detects odor from human sweat using mosquito membrane protein
A University of Tokyo research group and their collaborators developed an odor-detecting sensor made from a membrane protein found in mosquitoes called an olfactory receptor, which responds to the smell of human sweat, that they embedded in an artificial cell membrane.
December 1, 2016
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Serendipity uncovers borophene's potential
Almost one year ago, borophene didn't even exist.
February 22, 2017
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Shape-changing metamaterial developed using Kirigami technique
Engineers from the University of Bristol have developed a new shape-changing metamaterial using Kirigami, which is the ancient Japanese art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes.
August 05, 2016
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Shaping atomically thin materials in suspended structures
Researchers at Tohoku University have realized wafer-scale and high yield synthesis of suspended graphene nanoribbons. the unique growth dynamic has been elucidated through comparing experiments, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations made with researchers from the University of Tokyo and Hokkaido University.
June 13, 2016
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Shaping atomically thin materials in suspended structures
Researchers at Tohoku University have realized wafer-scale and high yield synthesis of suspended graphene nanoribbons (Nature Communications, "Wafer-scale fabrication and growth dynamics of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays"). the unique growth dynamic has been elucidated through comparing experiments, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations made with researchers from the University of Tokyo and Hokkaido University.
June 17, 2016
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Sheets like graphene: Tailored chemistry links nanoparticles in stable monolayers
Just like carbon atoms in sheets of graphene, nanoparticles can form stable layers with minimal thicknesses of the diameter of a single nanoparticle. a novel method of linking nanoparticles into such extremally thin films has been developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw.
October 3, 2016
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Sheffield Researchers Use JPK's Nanowizard AFM Systems to Study Soft Matter, Biological Systems at Molecular Scale
JPK Instruments, a world-leading manufacturer of nanoanalytic instrumentation for research in life sciences and soft matter, works closely with users at the University of Sheffield where their NanoWizard® AFM systems are being used to further understand soft matter and biological systems at the molecular scale in the Hobbs SPM Group in the Department of Physics.
March 9, 2017
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Shellfish chemistry combined with polymer to create new biodegradable adhesive
A new type of adhesive that combines the bonding chemistry of shellfish with a bio-based polymer has been shown to perform as well as commercially available products and can be easily degraded, representing a potential non-toxic alternative.
January 17, 2017
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Significant Studies on Surface Reactions to develop Bio-Nano Technologies and Functional Materials
Things that occur on the surface are frequently given short shrift when compared to what occurs on inside. However, with chemical reactions, what happens on the surface can mean the difference between a working material and one that refuses to carry out its duty.
December 1, 2016
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Silicon brings more color to holograms
We can't yet send holographic videos to Obi-Wan Kenobi on our droid, but A*STAR researchers have got us a little bit closer by creating holograms from an array of silicon structures that work throughout the visible spectrum (Laser & Photonics Reviews, "Silicon multi-meta-holograms for the broadband visible light").
August 10, 2016
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Silicon fluorescent material developed enabling observations under a bright 'biological optical window'
A research group at the NIMS International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), led by MANA Principal Investigator Françoise Winnik, a MANA postdoc researcher Sourov Chandra, a research group led by MANA Independent Scientist Naoto Shirahata, and a research group consisting of Professor Yoshinobu Baba and Assistant Professor Takao Yasui, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, jointly developed a silicon fluorescent material that is very low in toxicity and high in luminescence efficiency, compared to conventional materials.
September 16, 2016
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Silicon nanoparticles trained to juggle light
A team of physicists from ITMO University (Saint Petersburg) and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) has demonstrated the potential of silicon nanoparticles for effective non-linear light manipulation. Their work lays the foundation for the development of novel optical devices with a wide range of functionalities.
August 23, 2016
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Silkworms eating graphene spin silk twice as strong
Researchers at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, have demonstrated that mechanically enhanced silk fibers could be naturally produced by feeding silkworms with diets containing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) or graphene.
October 11, 2016
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Silver nanoparticle concentration too low to be harmful in water supply, paper finds
Silver nanoparticles have a wide array of uses, one of which is to treat drinking water for harmful bacteria and viruses. But do silver nanoparticles also kill off potentially beneficial bacteria or cause other harmful effects to water-based ecosystems? a new paper from a team of University of Missouri College of Engineering researchers says that's not the case.
October 13, 2016
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Similar nanomaterials behave differently. Why?
Nanotubes can be used for many things: electrical circuits, batteries, innovative fabrics and more. Scientists have noted, however, that nanotubes, whose structures appear similar, can actually exhibit different properties, with important consequences in their applications. Carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes, for example, while nearly indistinguishable in their structure, can be different when it comes to friction.
September 14, 2016
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Simulate 'sun and rain' detail how nanoparticles can escape from plastic coatings into the environment
If the 1967 film "The Graduate" were remade today, Mr. McGuire's famous advice to young Benjamin Braddock would probably be updated to "Plastics ... with nanoparticles." These days, the mechanical, electrical and durability properties of polymers–the class of materials that includes plastics–are often enhanced by adding miniature particles made of elements such as silicon or silver
September 30, 2016
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Simulations show how to turn graphenes defects into assets
Researchers at Penn State, the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company have developed methods to control defects in two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, that may lead to improved membranes for water desalination, energy storage, sensing or advanced protective coatings.
October 4, 2016
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Simultaneous detection of multiple spin states in a single quantum dot
Quantum dots are very small particles that exhibit luminescence and electronic properties different from those of their bulk materials. as a result, they are attractive for use in solar cells, optoelectronics, and quantum computing. Quantum computing involves applying a small voltage to quantum dots to regulate their electron spin state, thus encoding information.
March 13, 2017
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Single crystal measures radioactivity
A research team at Empa and ETH Zurich has developed single crystals made of lead halide perovskites, which are able to gage radioactive radiation with high precision. Initial experiments have shown that these crystals, which can be manufactured from aqueous solutions or low-priced solvents, work just as well as conventional cadmium telluride semi-conductors, which are considerably more complicated to produce.
September 20, 2016
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Single molecule nanocars taken for a rough ride
If you're driving a nanocar on the open road, things are bound to get sticky.
June 1, 2016
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SiP Alignment Engine is Lightwave Innovation Reviews Award Winner
PI's automated high-speed alignment engine is honored with a 2017 Lightwave Innovation Reviews Award given for unique solutions in optical communications.
March 7, 2017
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Small nanoparticles have surprisingly big effects on polymer nanocomposites
Polymer nanocomposites mix nanoparticles with polymers, which are long molecular chains. Often used to make injection-molded products, they are common in automobiles, fire retardants, packaging materials, drug-delivery systems, medical devices, coatings, adhesives, sensors, membranes and consumer goods. When a team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory tried to verify that shrinking the nanoparticle size would adversely affect the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites, they got a big surprise.
March 8, 2017
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Small, efficient solutions for a big- name pollutant
Winter cold snaps often bring tragic stories of Americans killed by carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless gas present in the emissions of gas-powered generators and vehicles. Several thousand more people are treated for carbon monoxide poisoning each year. While we currently rely on carbon monoxide detectors, new research points the way to a new approach: direct elimination of the gas .
November 23, 2016
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Smaller is better for water-splitting catalyst
Splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen is a very attractive way of converting renewable energy sources into the ultimate clean energy source--hydrogen. It is something that plants do very well in photosynthesis, but scientists have struggled to produce artificial systems that have efficiencies approaching those of plants.
April 14, 2017
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Smashing metallic cubes toughens them up
Scientists at Rice University are smashing metallic micro-cubes to make them ultrastrong and tough by rearranging their nanostructures upon impact.
October 20, 2016
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'Sniffer plasmons' could detect a single molecule of explosives
Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have found that the two-dimensional form of carbon, known as graphene, might be the ideal material for manufacturing plasmonic devices capable of detecting explosive materials, toxic chemicals, and other organic compounds based on a single molecule.
August 15, 2016
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Soft decoupling of organic molecules on metal
An international team has discovered an elegant way to decouple organic nanosheets grown on metal surfaces. After iodine intercalation, measurements at the synchrotron source BESSY II of Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin showed that a network of organic molecules behaved almost as it was free-standing. the strong influence of the metal on the network was reduced.
June 22, 2016
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Something deep within: Nanocrystals grown in nanowires
As any good carpenter knows, it's often easier to get what you want if you build it yourself. An international team using resources at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials took that idea to heart. they wanted to tailor extremely small wires that carry light and electrons.
July 29, 2016
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Solid metal has 'structural memory' of its liquid state
New work from a team including Carnegie's Guoyin Shen and Yoshio Kono used high pressure and temperature to reveal a kind of "structural memory" in samples of the metal bismuth, a discovery with great electrical engineering potential.
March 13, 2017
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Solving the problem of glare
If you have ever turned on your car's high beams while driving through fog, you've seen glare in action. as the extra light reflects off the fog, it becomes even more difficult to see what lies ahead. In compelling new research, two scientific teams have developed innovative methods for counteracting glare and reducing unwanted light much like noise-canceling headphones eliminate unwanted sound.
October 5, 2016
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Sorting machine for atoms
Physicists at the University of Bonn have cleared a further hurdle on the path to creating quantum computers: in a recent study, they present a method with which they can very quickly and precisely sort large numbers of atoms. the work has now been published in Physical Review Letters.
February 9, 2017
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Sound-shaping super-material
A super-material that bends, shapes and focuses sound waves that pass through it has been invented by scientists.
February 27, 2017
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Spain creates the AEINA nanotechnology industry association
On 30 June 2016, following several months of negotiations, Spain's AEINA nanotechnology industry association was officially incorporated.
July 13, 2016
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Special nanopowders for the synthesis of new aluminum alloys
Researchers have produced special nanopowders, which are used as modifying additives in the production of aluminum alloys. this method will significantly improve the operational properties of the foundry products, and reduce the energy costs for its final processing.
March 19, 2017
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Spectral Fingerprint Allows Control of Graphene Properties
Graphene is said to be a highly promising new material. However, the methodical insertion of chemically bound molecules and atoms to manipulate its properties remains a big challenge.
May 9, 2017
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Spectro Scientific Expands the SpectrOil 100 Series of Elemental Spectrometers, Improving Performance and Value
Engineered to expedite machine condition monitoring and quality control evaluations, SpectrOil 100 Series elemental spectrometers provide quick, laboratory-precise measurement of elemental concentrations in a variety of fluid types.
July 20, 2016
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Spider silk demonstrates Spiderman-like abilities
Our muscles are amazing structures. with the trigger of a thought, muscle filaments slide past each other and bundles of contracting fibers pull on the bones moving our bodies. the triggered stretching behavior of muscle is inherently based in geometry, characterized by a decrease in length and increase in volume (or vice versa) in response to a change in the local environment, such as humidity or heat.
January 31, 2017
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Spin filtering at room temperature with graphene
An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have reported the first demonstration of metallic spin filtering at room temperature using ferromagnet-graphene-ferromagnet thin film junction devices -- spin is a fundamental property of electrons, in addition to charge, that can be used to transmit, process and store data.
December 22, 2016
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Spin glass physics with trapped ions
One of the most striking discoveries of quantum information theory is the existence of problems that can be solved in a more efficient way with quantum resources than with any known classical algorithm.
May 27, 2016
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Spin Hall effect in decorated graphene
Although graphene has attractive properties, it is inactive for the Spin Hall effect (SHE), a spin transport phenomenon mediated by strong spin-orbit coupling, in which opposite spins are deviated in contrary directions while propagating inside a channel. Large values of SHE have been recently reported in graphene decorated with adatoms. Members of two ICN2 Groups, in collaboration with researchers in the USA and France, have produced a fully quantum simulation of this phenomenon to analyse these experimental results.
November 10, 2016
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Spin liquid on a peak
A little frustration can make life interesting. this is certainly the case in physics, where the presence of competing forces that cannot be satisfied at the same time -- known as frustration -- can lead to rare material properties.
November 7, 2016
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Sponge creates steam using ambient sunlight
How do you boil water? Eschewing the traditional kettle and flame, MIT engineers have invented a bubble-wrapped, sponge-like device that soaks up natural sunlight and heats water to boiling temperatures, generating steam through its pores.
August 22, 2016
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Spontaneous Mechanical Buckling Observed in Freestanding Graphene
A team of physicists, led by researchers at the University of Arkansas, have monitored spontaneous mechanical buckling in freestanding graphene with scanning tunneling microscopy, demonstrating it's potential as a new electronic power source.
September 14, 2016
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'Spooky' sightings in crystal point to extremely rare quantum spin liquid
Inside a new exotic crystal, physicist Martin Mourigal has observed strong indications of "spooky" action, and lots of it. the results of his experiments, if corroborated over time, would mean that the type of crystal is a rare new material that can house a quantum spin liquid.
December 5, 2016
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Squeezed states of light can improve feedback cooling significantly
How does the tightrope walker manage to maintain her balance and avoid that fatal drop from the sky? She carefully senses the motion of her body and vibrations of the rope and accordingly compensates any deviation from equilibrium by shifting her center of gravity. In a thermally excited system, the amplitude of the mechanical vibrations are directly linked to the system's temperature. Thus, by eliminating vibrations the system is cooled to a lower effective temperature.
November 29, 2016
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Stanford Team Builds Nano Devices Capable of Enduring Extreme Environments in Space and on Earth
Venus has a very hot surface hidden behind its thick swirling clouds. the planet is pelted with sulfuric acid rains, and has a temperature of 480 °C, which would burn any of the electronics used currently on Earth. this creates a huge challenge for researchers hoping to explore this extreme environment.
March 29, 2017
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Star Wars like holograms a step closer with new invention
Physicists from the Australian National University (ANU) have invented a tiny device that creates the highest quality holographic images ever achieved, opening the door to imaging technologies seen in science fiction movies such as Star Wars.
January 24, 2017
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Statistics improve insight into the risks of nanoparticles
By using specific statistical methods, it has become possible to improve the risk assessment of nanoparticles. this was the conclusion of the PhD thesis that Rianne Jacobs defended on 7 July 2016 at Wageningen University. Jacobs showed that these techniques can be used in risk assessment to separate two important sources of error, which makes the results of the assessment more reliable.
July 19, 2016
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STEDD Nanoscopy Method for High-Resolution Background-Free Imaging
A new fluorescence microscopy technique known as Stimulation Emission Double Depletion (STEDD) nanoscopy, which is a further development of the Simulated Emission Depletion (STED) method, has been developed by researchers from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).
February 2, 2017
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Stereochemistry: Self-amplifying selectivity
Many chemical compounds contain so-called chiral centers to which functional groups can be attached in either of two orientations. this gives rise to two different forms of the product which are mirror images of one another: Their spatial conformations are related to each other in the same way as right and left hands.
December 5, 2016
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Storing carbon dioxide underground by turning it into rock
In November, the Paris Climate Agreement goes into effect to reduce global carbon emissions. to achieve the set targets, experts say capturing and storing carbon must be part of the solution. Several projects throughout the world are trying to make that happen.
November 18, 2016
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Strem Chemicals and Dotz Nano Ltd. Sign Distribution Agreement for Graphene Quantum Dots Collaboration
Strem Chemicals, Inc., a manufacturer of specialty chemicals for research and development, and Dotz Nano Ltd., an exciting new company aimed at capitalizing on the technological innovation in the Graphene Quantum Dots (GQD) market, are proud to announce the signing of a licensing agreement.
February 17, 2017
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STReM for Enabling Laboratory Cameras to Capture High-Speed Chemical Processes
Researchers at Rice University have developed a new technique, known as super temporal resolution microscopy (STReM), to capture images of chemical processes that occur relatively faster than the ability of most laboratory cameras to grab them.
November 18, 2016
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Study explains how FFF technique can help characterize different tattoo inks
Postnova Analytics have published an application study detailing how the technique of Field-Flow Fractionation-ICP-MS can be used to study the size and chemical composition of tattoo ink nanoparticles.
August 31, 2016
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Study explains strength gap between graphene, carbon fiber
Carbon fiber, a pillar of strength in materials manufacturing for decades, isn't as good as it could be, but there are ways to improve it, according to Rice University scientists.
October 19, 2016
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Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions
Two physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium. Such phenomena are central in physics, and understanding how they occur has been a long-held and vexing goal; their behavior and related effects are key to unlocking possibilities for new electronics and other next-generation technologies.
April 26, 2017
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Study on Development of Nanodroplets in Aqueous Solutions of Polar Organics
Researchers in Russia have come together to better understand the heterogeneous nature of a polar organic liquid mixed with water. they used laser light as an instrument in two ways - phase microscopy and dynamic light scattering, which allowed them to show the presence of stable nanodroplets of tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the bulk of aqueous electrolyte solutions and to formulate a new theory that illustrates the spontaneous generation of heterogeneous nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of polar organic solutes in terms of nanodroplet development due to "twinkling" hydrogen bonds.
November 9, 2016
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Study on In-Plane Nanoantennas for Fluorescence Enhancement
Valentin Flauraud and co-authors are now congratulated for their publication in Nano Letters entitled "In-Plane Plasmonic Antenna Arrays with Surface Nanogaps for Giant Fluorescence Enhancement".
February 21, 2017
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Study on Stabilization of Gold Nanoparticles by Small Organic Ions
The potential of gold nanoparticles for a wide range of applications can be expanded using methods that help to stabilize the clusters and also control their size. KAUST researchers explain how simple organic citrate ions, obtained from readily available citric acid, are capable of interacting with the gold atoms in order to yield the stable nanoparticles required for research in the future.
March 29, 2017
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Study reveals new physics of how fluids flow in porous media
One of the most promising approaches to curbing the flow of human-made greenhouse gases into the atmosphere is to capture these gases at major sources, such as fossil-fuel-burning power plants, and then inject them into deep, water-saturated rocks where they can remain stably trapped for centuries or millennia.
August 23, 2016
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Study Reveals Potential of Reusable Carbon Nanotubes to be Used as Water Filter
A team of researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology report that a new class of carbon nanotubes could be the answer to cleaning up of toxic sludge and contaminated water. In a research paper published in the March issue of Environmental Science Water: Research and Technology, they explain that enhanced single-walled carbon nanotubes deliver a better and sustainable method to water treatment and remediation compared to the typical industry materials--silicon gels and activated carbon.
March 30, 2017
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Study Reveals Small Nanoparticles Have Big Influence on Polymer Nanocomposites
Polymer nanocomposites combine particles measuring about billionths of a meter in diameter with polymers, which are lengthy molecular chains.
March 9, 2017
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Study reveals substantial evidence of holographic universe
A UK, Canadian and Italian study has provided what researchers believe is the first observational evidence that our universe could be a vast and complex hologram.
January 30, 2017
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Study Reveals Three Layers of Graphene can Create new Type of Magnet
As metals possess a large density of electrons, the wave nature of electrons can only be viewed if metallic wires measuring a few atoms in width are created.
February 24, 2017
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Study Shows how Nanoparticles Affect Flow in Porous Media
Individuals who have combined vinegar and oil may have unknowingly observed a weird fluid phenomenon known as fingering instability. this type of phenomenon, known as viscous fingering (VF), takes place in porous media where fluids of varying viscosity meet in finger-shaped patterns due to increasing disturbances at the interface.
April 5, 2017
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Study Throws Light on Artificial Production of Silk from Whey Protein
A significant process for the artificial production of silk has been demonstrated by a Swedish-German team of researchers. These researchers used the intense X-rays from DESY's research light source PETRA III to observe how small protein pieces, called nanofibrils, lock together to develop a fiber.
January 24, 2017
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Subnatural-linewidth biphotons generated from a Doppler-broadened hot atomic vapor cell
Entangled photon pairs, termed as biphotons, have been the benchmark tool for experimental quantum optics. the quantum-network protocols based on photon-atom interfaces have stimulated a great demand for single photons with bandwidth comparable to or narrower than the atomic natural linewidth. In the past decade, laser-cooled atoms have often been used for producing such biphotons, but the apparatus is too large and complicated for engineering.
October 19, 2016
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SUN shares its Latest Achievements During the 3rd Annual Project Meeting
The results from the 3rd SUN annual meeting showed great advancement of the project.
November 2, 2016
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Super-material holds a quantum surprise
Nanometer-thin films made from strontium titanate are promising as platforms for next-generation electronics because, under the right fabrication conditions, they present high mobility and two-dimensional superconductivity simultaneously. a RIKEN team has now demonstrated that this metal oxide also exhibits unique quantum behavior when precisely doped with rare-earth lanthanum atoms.
September 2, 2016
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Super-Resolution Imaging Made Possible by Fabricating Hyperlens Devices
For many centuries, lens makers have worked hard to make a perfect lens with the ability to produce pristine and perfect images. In the year 1873, Ernst Abbeâ€'a German physicist and optical scientistâ€'found out the diffraction limit of the microscope.
April 24, 2017
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Super-resolution microscope builds 3-D images by mapping negative space
Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a method for making three-dimensional images of structures in biological material under natural conditions at a much higher resolution than other existing methods. the method may help shed light on how cells communicate with one another and provide important insights for engineers working to develop artificial organs such as skin or heart tissue.
September 6, 2016
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Super-resolution microscopy of hydrogels
Chaitanya Ullal, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has won a Faculty Early Career Development Award (CAREER) from the National Science Foundation (NSF). He will use the five-year, $556,091 award to study the structure of hydrogels - jelly-like materials that have some of the properties of solids, but are largely composed of water
April 21, 2017
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Super-resolution spectral imaging to monitor dynamic processes in real time
Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between light and matter, offering numerous important applications in fields ranging from materials science to astronomy.
April 26, 2017
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Supercomputer simulation reveals 2-D glass can go infinitely soft
Scientists in Japan have revealed that if a glassy solid possesses a planar (sheet-like) structure, it can exhibit enhanced thermal vibration motion due to the same mechanism known for the planar crystals (two-dimensional crystals), by using large-scale simulations on supercomputers.
December 13, 2016
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Superfilter nanomask protects from invisible killers
The novel mask, developed by Professor Wallace Leung of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, is made out of multiple layers of different types of nanofibres, which filter nanosized particles.
June 5, 2016
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Superlens Made from Nanobeads Enables the "Invisible" to be Seen
Nanobeads are all around us, and are used in many products from sunscreen to white paint. a new revolutionary application is revealing hidden aspects to these beads.
August 16, 2016
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Supporting responsible development of nanotechnology
Nanotechnology environmental, health, and safety activities have become a hallmark of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Well-coordinated nanoEHS research and development (R&D) is essential to ensuring a future in which responsible development of nanotechnology provides maximum benefit to society and the environment. These efforts are pivotal in contributing to American innovation and to advancing manufacturing and economic competitiveness.
May 31, 2016
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Surf's up: Magnetic waves on the edge
For the first time, a new class of magnetic materials, called topological magnon insulators, was revealed. this novel material can conduct magnetic waves along their edges, without conduction through the bulk material.
June 13, 2016
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Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals: a simple route to developing new sensors
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have found a material used for decades to color food items ranging from corn chips to ice creams could potentially have uses far beyond food dyes.
March 24, 2017
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Sustainability projects offer potential seeds for a more just future
It is rare to hear environmental scientists sounding positive about the future. But that's exactly what's happening now with an international group of researchers. Because over the past two years, they have been gathering examples of positive initiatives of various kinds from communities around the world. they believe that there are aspects of these projects that can be used either alone, or in combination with one another to build a better, more sustainable future.
October 5, 2016
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Swapping substrates improves edges of graphene nanoribbons
It is now feasible to make a prized material for spintronic devices and semiconductors -- monolayer graphene nanoribbons with zigzag edges.
August 1, 2016
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Switching oxygen on and off
Oxygen atoms are highly reactive, yet the world does not spontaneously burn, even though everything is surrounded by this aggressive element. Why? the reason is that normal O2 molecules, are not particularly reactive.
March 14, 2017
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Synthesizing Graphene from a Simple Hydrocarbon Precursor
A team of international researchers have created a new technique to synthesize single-layer graphene from a simple precursor, namely, ethene. Ethene is also called ethylene and is the smallest alkene molecule with only two atoms of carbon.
May 5, 2017
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Synthesized microporous 3D graphene-like carbons
Zeolites' nanoporous systems are an ideal template for the synthesis of three-dimensional graphene architecture, but the high temperatures required for their synthesis cause the reactions to occur non-selectively. the team from the IBS Center for Nanomaterials and Carbon Materials lowered the temperature required for the carbonization by embedding lanthanum ions, a silvery-white metal element, in zeolite pores.
June 28, 2016
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Synthetic chemistry in a very small space
Thanks to a new process from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), it is now possible to systematically test a large number of chemical reactions in a very small space and within a short time. It enables freely selectable molecules embedded in solid materials to react with each other in a nanometer-sized space.
August 31, 2016
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Synthetic nanoparticles achieve the complexity of protein molecules
Chemists at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated that synthetic nanoparticles can achieve the same level of structural complexity, hierarchy and accuracy as their natural counterparts - biomolecules. the study, published in Science ("Emergence of hierarchical structural complexities in nanoparticles and their assembly"), also reveals the atomic-level mechanisms behind nanoparticle self-assembly.
January 23, 2017
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Misc. - T

Tailored AFM probes created via 3-D direct laser writing
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique that allows researchers to analyze surfaces at the atomic scale, and it's based on a surprisingly simple concept: a sharp tip on a cantilever "senses" the topography of samples.
August 08, 2016
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Talking speckles
The amount of light, passing through an opaque layer, can be enhanced using smart techniques. at the same time, the amount of reflected light diminishes, researchers of the University of Twente now show. it's as if light speckles have a conversation of their own.
October 22, 2016
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Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis
Scientists from the University of Southampton have reengineered the fundamental process of photosynthesis to power useful chemical reactions that could be used to produce biofuels, pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals.
September 7, 2016
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Temperature difference propels droplets
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a new way of driving fluid droplets across surfaces in a precisely controlled way. the method could open up new possibilities for highly adaptable microfluidic devices, as well as for de-icing technologies, self-cleaning surfaces, and highly efficient condensers.
October 14, 2016
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Textile fiber waste helps improve the sustainability of materials
Researchers from UPM have developed a panel with textile waste that improves both the thermal and acoustic conditions of buildings and reduces the energy impact associated to the production of construction materials and greenhouse gases emissions.
September 7, 2016
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Thanks to nanoparticles, glass now has smart potential
Australian researchers at the University of Adelaide have developed a method for embedding light-emitting nanoparticles into glass without losing any of their unique properties -- a major step towards 'smart glass' applications such as 3D display screens or remote radiation sensors.
June 7, 2016
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The 308 PV Spectrophotometer for your Microscope
The 308 PVT™ is a cost effective, manual solution to add UV-visible-NIR absorbance, reflectance, fluorescence and polarization spectroscopy to your microscope.
January 10, 2017
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The beginning of nanotechnology at the 1959 APS meeting
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times ..." the classic lines that open a Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, rendered in a minuscule type size, netted Tom Newman $1,000 and a letter from Richard Feynman.
November 22, 2016
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The bond of two stars of chemistry: graphene and porphyrin
Porphyrins, the same molecules that convey oxygen in haemoglobin and absorb light during photosynthesis, can be joined to the material of the future, graphene, to give it new properties. this was recently shown by a team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich, in which a Spanish researcher also participated (Nature Chemistry, "Fusing tetrapyrroles to graphene edges by surface-assisted covalent coupling"). the resulting hybrid structures could be used in the field of molecular electronics and in developing new sensors.
January 5, 2017
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The dynamic surface tension of water
The surface tension of a liquid is a measure of the cohesive forces that hold the molecules together. It is responsible for a water drop assuming a spherical shape and for the effects of surfactants to produce bubbles and foams. the value of the surface tension of water at room temperature is known accurately to four significant figures and is recommended as a standard for the calibration of other devices.
April 3, 2017
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The First Time Ever, Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Complete REACH Registration
OCSiAl and its core product TUBALL™ single wall carbon nanotubes have opened a new substance in the EU's Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation with the successful registration of TUBALL™ under the number 01-2120130006-75-0000. this registration proves that TUBALL™ single wall carbon nanotubes fully comply with REACH regulations, and are now available at industrial volumes.
October 14, 2016
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The GloQube Glow Discharge System for TEM and Surface Modification
Quorum Technologies, market and technology leaders in electron microscopy coating and cryogenic preparation products, announce the release of the GloQube, a new, compact, easy to use glow discharge system primarily for users of TEM.
June 8, 2016
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The hidden inferno inside your laser pointer
If you thought that a kid's room, a Norwegian Nobel Laureate and a laser pointer had nothing in common, two UA physicists are about to enlighten you.
December 23, 2016
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The hot attraction of gold
Gold had long been considered a non-magnetic metal. But researchers at Tohoku University recently discovered that gold can in fact be magnetized by applying heat (Nature Communications, "Observation of temperature-gradient-induced magnetization").
July 27, 2016
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The impact of electrochemistry on micro- and nanorobot design
Micro- and nanorobots are micro- and nanoscale devices capable of autonomous motion in their environment. the catalytic conversion of chemical to mechanical energy -- an ubiquitous process in biological systems -- also is the basis for many of the nanoscale engine systems that nanotechnology researchers are developing. These nanomachines can convert chemical energy from the environment (fuel, food) to kinetic motion.
May 16, 2017
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The intravenous swim team
Drexel University researchers, led by MinJun Kim, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, have successfully pulled off a feat that both sci-fi fans and Michael Phelps could appreciate. Using a rotating magnetic field they show how multiple chains of microscopic magnetic bead-based robots can link up to reach impressive speeds swimming through in a microfluidic environment. Their finding is the latest step toward using the so-called "microswimmers" to deliver medicine and perform surgery inside the body.
July 28, 2016
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The Pennsylvania State University Chose the Xeuss 2.0 HR SAXS/WAXS Instrument
The Materials Characterization lab at the Pennsylvania State University's Materials Research Institute recently purchased a Xeuss 2.0 HR SAXS/WAXS system equipped with a Pilatus3 200K detector and SWAXS module to replace their current X-ray scattering instrument installed ten years ago.
November 4, 2016
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The power of three
Palladium-catalyzed organic reactions, such as Sonogashira cross-coupling, may be made more efficient and substrate-tolerant as a result of new findings at A*STAR.
November 16, 2016
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The prototype of a chemical computer detects a sphere
Chemical computers are becoming ever more of a reality - this is being proven by scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. It turns out that after an appropriate teaching procedure even a relatively simple chemical system can perform non-trivial operations.
March 9, 2017
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The quantum sniffer dog
As humans, we sniff out different scents and aromas using chemical receptors in our noses. In technological gas detection, however, there are a whole host of other methods available. One such method is to use infrared lasers, passing a laser beam through the gas to an adjacent separate detector, which measures the degree of light attenuation it causes.
October 22, 2016
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The repulsion trick: a self-solving puzzle for organic molecules
Jülich researchers have succeeded in controlling the growth of organic molecules using a special trick (Nature Materials, "Controlling the growth of multiple ordered heteromolecular phases by utilizing intermolecular repulsion").
March 16, 2017
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The science of watching paint dry; new nanotech research could improve everyday essentials, from paints to sunscreen
New research has described a new physical mechanism that separates particles according to their size during the drying of wet coatings. the discovery could help improve the performance of a wide variety of everyday goods, from paint to sunscreen.
March 18, 2016
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The search for disorder in order
Quantum effects are normally seen only at the atomic level, but certain materials, known as quantum matter, can show macroscopic properties that are direct manifestations of quantum effects.
October 28, 2016
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The self-driving microscope
Light-sheet microscopy is one of the most powerful method for imaging the development and function of whole living organisms. However, achieving high-resolution images with these microscopes requires manual adjustments during imaging.
November 10, 2016
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The shape of melting in two dimensions
Snow falls in winter and melts in spring, but what drives the phase change in between?
February 1, 2017
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The sound of quantum vacuum
Quantum mechanics dictates sensitivity limits in the measurements of displacement, velocity and acceleration. a recent experiment at the Niels Bohr Institute probes these limits, analyzing how quantum fluctuations set a sensor membrane into motion in the process of a measurement.
December 22, 2016
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The strangeness of slow dynamics
In a recent article published in Physical Review Letters, researchers from the Nanomagnetism group at nanoGUNE reported so-far unknown anomalies near dynamic phase transitions (DPTs). Such anomalies do not exist in corresponding thermodynamic phase transitions (TPTs), and thus, they constitute a distinct difference between DPTs and TPTs, even though their equivalency was the key outcome of more than two decades of research by many groups around the globe.
March 15, 2017
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The Sustainable Nanotechnologies Project shares its latest achievements
The results from the 3rd SUN annual meeting showed great advancement of the project. the meeting was held in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK on 4-5 October 2016 where the project partners presented the results obtained during the second reporting period of the project.
October 30, 2016
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The Sustainable Nanotechnologies Project's Final Events: bringing Nano Environmental Health and Safety Assessment to the Wider Discussion on Risk Governance of Key Enabling Technologies
The EU FP7 Sustainable Nanotechnologies (SUN) Project is coming to its end in March 2017.
November 2, 2016
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The thinnest photodetector in the world is just 1.3 nanometers thick
The Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) has developed the world's thinnest photodetector, that is a device that converts light into an electric current.
November 9, 2016
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Theorists solve a long-standing fundamental problem
Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats – the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called "statistical" and the other "dynamical."
August 30, 2016
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Therapon Develops new Nanoparticles with UV Protection in 5,000 SPF Range
Therapon's R&D team has developed UV radiation absorbing silicon particle based on quantum physics properties. the nanoparticles have proven to trap up to 98 percent of the full sun energy spectrum, UVA and UVB, while remaining colorless on skin.
September 23, 2016
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Thermo Fisher Scientific announces Acquisition of High-Performance Electron Microscopy Manufacturer, FEI
Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., the world leader in serving science, and FEI Company, the leader in high-performance electron microscopy, today announced that their boards of directors have unanimously approved Thermo Fisher's acquisition of FEI for $107.50 per share in cash. the transaction represents a purchase price of approximately $4.2 billion.
May 30, 2016
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Thin diamond crystal reflects many colors of light in all directions
Physicists and mathematicians at the University of Twente have discovered by advanced calculations that a thin diamond-like photonic nanostructure reflects a surprisingly broad range of colors of light omnidirectionally. Hence, a diamond-like photonic crystal has great potential as a back reflector for solar cells to boost their efficiency as well as for tiny on-chip light sources.
April 24, 2017
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Thin diamond crystal reflects many colors of light in all directions
Through advanced calculations physicists and mathematicians have discovered that a thin, diamond-like photonic nanostructure reflects a surprisingly broad range of colors of light, from all angles. this causes the material to have great potential as a back reflector to enhance the efficiency of solar cells or tiny on-chip light sources.
May 1, 2017
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Thin, flexible, light-absorbent material for energy and stealth applications
Transparent window coatings that keep buildings and cars cool on sunny days. Devices that could more than triple solar cell efficiencies. Thin, lightweight shields that block thermal detection. These are potential applications for a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material just developed by engineers.
February 2, 2017
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Thinking outside the nanocluster box
When small numbers of metal atoms cluster, they can behave more like molecules or superatoms, with electrons shared among all of the atomic nuclei. These nanoclusters exhibit novel chemical, electrical and optical behavior that may lead to the development of new catalysts, opto-electronic structures and other components for nanotechnology.
December 12, 2016
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This is how Hot the Arctic is Right Now
This Heat Wave is One for the Record Books
May 26, 2016
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Thomas Swan and NGI Announce Unique Partnership
Thomas Swan the UK's leading 2D materials supplier agrees to provide development materials to the National Graphene Institute to boost UK research and commercialisation.
July 29, 2016
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Through a glass, warmly: Nanomaterials can help make windows more efficient
A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory is using nanomaterials to improve the energy efficiency of existing single-pane windows in commercial and residential buildings. the team was recently awarded a $3.1 million grant from DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to develop a technology that could help achieve that goal. the nanofoam the team is developing -- known as a nanocellular composite with super thermal insulation and soundproofing -- uses gas bubbles less than 100 nanometers in diameter to block the transfer of heat and sound through glass windows while allowing visible light to pass through and maintain a clarity similar to normal windows.
June 1, 2016
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Tiniest imperfections make big impacts in nano-patterned materials
A research team at Clarkson University reports an interesting conclusion that could have major impacts on the future of nano-manufacturing. Their analysis for a model of the process of random sequential adsorption (RSA) shows that even a small imprecision in the position of the lattice landing sites can dramatically affect the density of the permanently formed deposit.
June 28, 2016
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Tiny graphene radios may lead to Internet of Nano-Things
For wireless communication, we're all stuck on the same traffic-clogged highway – it's a section of the electromagnetic spectrum known as radio waves.
November 1, 2016
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Tiny joints for reconfigurable microstructure
Micrometer-sized robots have great potential for example in medicine, as they may locally deliver drugs or perform accurate surgery. Scientists are therefore looking for ways to develop robots at this miniature scale.
April 28, 2017
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Tiny transformers: Chemists create microscopic and malleable building blocks
Taking a page from Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels", a team of scientists has created malleable and microscopic self-assembling particles that can serve as the next generation of building blocks in the creation of synthetic materials.
July 18, 2016
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Tip-assisted chemistry enables chemical reactions at femtoliter scale
In one of the latest issues of Chemical Communications, there is an article created by Prof. Daniel Ruiz-Molina and Dr Mireia Guardingo, from the ICN2 Nanostructured Functional Materials Group, together with Prof. Felix Busque, from the Chemistry Department at Autonomous University of Barcelona.
November 16, 2016
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Titanium + gold = new gold standard for artificial joints
Titanium is the leading material for artificial knee and hip joints because it's strong, wear-resistant and nontoxic, but an unexpected discovery by Rice University physicists shows that the gold standard for artificial joints can be improved with the addition of some actual gold.
July 20, 2016
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To e-, or not to e-, the question for the exotic 'Si-III' phase of silicon
It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of silicon when it comes to computing, solar energy, and other technological applications. Yet there is still so much to learn about how to harness the capabilities of element number fourteen.
April 4, 2017
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Tokyo Institute of Technology research: new Aspect of Atom Mimicry for Nanotechnology Applications
Tokyo Tech researchers show dendrimers that mimic the electron valency of atoms can also mimic polymerisation yielding controlled one and two-dimensional arrays of nanocontainers.
December 6, 2016
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Tough aqua material for water purification
Water purification processes usually make use of robust membranes for filtering off contaminants while working at high pressures. can materials employing water as major component be made strong enough to suit such a demanding application?
January 19, 2017
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Tough new hydrogel hybrid doesn't dry out
If you leave a cube of Jell-O on the kitchen counter, eventually its water will evaporate, leaving behind a shrunken, hardened mass – hardly an appetizing confection. the same is true for hydrogels. Made mostly of water, these gelatin-like polymer materials are stretchy and absorbent until they inevitably dry out.
June 27, 2016
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Towards better metallic glasses
Researchers have used state-of-the-art computer simulation to test a theory from the 1950s that when atoms organize themselves into 3D pentagons they supress crystallisation.
October 25, 2016
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Towards green, lightweight and highly efficient silk nanofiber-based air filters
The serious threat of particulate matter (PM) air pollution to human health spurs development of advanced filter technologies. Particular efforts have been made in designing air filters with both high filtration efficiency and low airflow resistance by utilizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and electrospun polymer and inorganic nanofibers.
July 13, 2016
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Towards mastering terahertz waves with graphene
The terahertz waves span frequency ranges between the infrared spectrum (used, for example, for night vision) and gigahertz waves (which find their application, among other, in Wi-Fi connections). Terahertz waves allow for the detection of materials that are undetectable at other frequencies. However, the use of these waves is severely limited by the absence of suitable devices and materials allowing to control them.
March 7, 2017
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Tracing barnacles' footprint with atomic force microscopy
Barnacle's larvae leave behind tiny protein traces on a ship hull: but what is the type of protein and what is the protein-surface interaction? Conventional techniques can only identify dissolved proteins, and in large quantities.
August 18, 2016
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Transparent ceramics make super-hard windows
Scientists have synthesised the first transparent sample of a popular industrial ceramic at DESY. the result is a super-hard window made of cubic silicon nitride that can potentially be used under extreme conditions like in engines, as the Japanese-German team writes in the journal Scientific Reports.
March 17, 2017
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'Tree-on-a-chip' device may be used to make small robots move
Trees and other plants, from towering redwoods to diminutive daisies, are nature's hydraulic pumps. they are constantly pulling water up from their roots to the topmost leaves, and pumping sugars produced by their leaves back down to the roots. this constant stream of nutrients is shuttled through a system of tissues called xylem and phloem, which are packed together in woody, parallel conduits.
March 19, 2017
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Triple Source for the Xeuss 2.0 at the University of Strathclyde
Xenocs is very proud to announce the sale of a Xeuss 2.0 HR SAXS/WAXS equipment to the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow. It will be the first SAXS/WAXS laboratory system in the world equipped with a Triple Source Module, which is an innovation 2016 from Xenocs.
October 3, 2016
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Triple treatment for heat-exchangers: new nano-coatings have an anti-adhesive, anti-corrosive and antimicrobial effect
When processing milk and juice, the food industry is using heat exchangers in numerous steps throughout the process. to have no risk to the consumers, heat exchangers have to be free from microbes. Especially in the numerous grooves and recesses of the heat exchanger, persistent biofilms can remain stuck.
April 11, 2017
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TUM Scientists Use Nanostructures to Protect Mortar from Moisture
Moisture can destroy mortar over time -- for example when cracks form as a result of frost. a team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has found an unusual way to protect mortar from moisture: When the material is being mixed, they add a biofilm -- a soft, moist substance produced by bacteria.
July 26, 2016
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Tunable and flexible 2D organic-inorganic hybrid photodetectors
Photodetectors with a spectral response from the ultraviolet (UV) to visible light have significant importance in modern industrial and scientific applications such as imaging, communication, environmental monitoring and day and nighttime surveillance.
March 9, 2017
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Tungsten Ditelluride Could be the Future of Topologically Protected Quantum Computing
For the first time, scientists from the University of Pennsylvania have produced a single, three-atom-thick layer of a distinctive two-dimensional (2D) material known as tungsten ditelluride. the outcomes of the research have been reported in the 2D Materials journal.
February 9, 2017
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Turning back time: Watching rust transform into iron
Using a state-of-the-art microscopy technique, experimenters at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have witnessed a slow-motion, atomic-scale transformation of rust--iron oxide--back to pure iron metal, in all of its chemical steps.
April 5, 2017
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Turning up the heat for perfect (nano)diamonds
Quantum mechanics, the physics that governs nature at the atomic and subatomic scale, contains a host of new physical phenomena to explore quantum states at the nanoscale. Though tricky, there are ways to exploit these inherently fragile and sensitive systems for quantum sensing. One nascent technology in particular makes use of point defects, or single-atom misplacements, in nanoscale materials, such as diamond nanoparticles, to measure electromagnetic fields, temperature, pressure, frequency and other variables with unprecedented precision and accuracy.
February 14, 2017
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Tweaking a molecule's structure can send it down a different path to crystallization
Silky chocolate, a better medical drug, or solar panels all require the same thing: just the right crystals making up the material. Now, scientists trying to understand the paths crystals take as they form have been able to influence that path by modifying the starting ingredient.
April 17, 2017
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Tweaking the perfect recipe
Smart nanomaterials that respond to an external stimulus are a new breed of material that could shake up almost every area of science from healthcare to heavy industry. a KAUST-led research team has cooked up a new way to make magnetic-field-responsive nanowires whose properties can be tailored for a specific task simply by adjusting the length of time they are baked in an oven (Scientific Reports, "Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications").
July 15, 2016
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Two new Catalysts Help in Effectively Eliminating Harmful Chlorine Compounds from Water
Recently, two new catalysts have been developed by the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw in partnership with the Jagiellonian University in Cracow and the Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce. These catalysts have been designed especially for effective treatment of tap water and also for the elimination of harmful chlorine compounds.
October 20, 2016
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Two recent court decisions make climate scientists' e-mails public
Groups rejecting climate science see some success in FOIA efforts.
August 03, 2016
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Two-dimensional melting of hard spheres experimentally unravelled after 60 years
After extensive research, scientists from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Oxford have found experimental evidence that sheds new light on the melting of two-dimensional substances. Findings from the study could be used to support technological improvements to thin film materials such as graphene.
April 21, 2017
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Two-dimensional materials 'as revolutionary as graphene'
Extremely thin stacks of two-dimensional materials, which could deliver applications fine-tuned to the demands of industry, are set to revolutionise the world in the same way that graphene will.
July 29, 2016
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Misc. - U

U.S. EPA finalizes reporting and record keeping requirements on nanoscale materials
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is requiring one-time reporting and recordkeeping requirements on nanoscale chemical substances in the marketplace. These substances are nano-sized versions of chemicals that are already in the marketplace.
January 12, 2017
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U.S. military stresses importance of nanotechnology
If there is one lesson to glean from Picatinny Arsenal's new course in nanomaterials, it's this: never underestimate the power of small.
June 16, 2016
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UA Engineers Work on Creating Phonons with Nature-Defying Characteristics
Over the years, development in the fields of energy and electronics has promoted advances in information technology, biomedicine and energy. a team of researchers from the University of Arizona (UA) are introducing a new field - photonics.
August 18, 2016
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UCLA Physicists Mapped Coordinates of Numerous Individual Atoms in Nanoparticle
Perfection is very rate in the world of the minuscule: nearly all materials have flaws on the atomic level. Imperfections such as atoms of one type swapped for another, missing atoms, and misaligned atoms can uniquely decide a material's properties and function.
February 2, 2017
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Ultra-Fast and Simple Method to Fabricate Different Forms of Copper Hydroxide Nanostructures
Copper based nano structures have gained much attention in today's modern devices. a team of Nano-fabricated Energy Devices lab in University of Tehran have used an ultra-fast and simple method for fabrication of different types of these structures. by applying electric field in the ammonium hydroxide based solutions dense arrays of copper based nanostructures in short duration of time in the order of below 1 min (or even in the order of just 1 second) have been achieved.
December 30, 2016
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Ultra-short pulse lasers increase precision of diamond sculpting
Diamonds come top of Mohs scale of mineral hardness, which ranks materials according to their ability to scratch another one. Besides leading to brilliant gemstones, that property means they are ideal for cutting and drilling other materials.
October 19, 2016
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Ultracold atoms in a 'Rydberg-dress'
Many properties of our everyday world can be explained if atoms are thought of as small, solid marbles, which feel each other only if brought in direct contact with each other. the temperature of the air surrounding us, for example, is the result of uncountable, continuously occurring collisions between its constituents.
August 10, 2016
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Ultrafast imaging reveals the electron's new clothes
When a negatively charged electron zips through a lattice of atoms, the nearby positively charged atoms shift closer to the electron. Scientists demonstrated how the movement of electrons deforms the lattice and causes the electron to look as if it is being "dressed'' by the deformation. These changes drastically alter the flow of electric current.
April 21, 2017
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Ultrahigh sensitivity graphene infrared detectors for imaging and spectroscopy
Researchers from the Graphene Flagship, working at the University of Cambridge, UK, Emberion, UK, the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO), Spain, Nokia UK, and the University of Ioannina, Greece have developed a novel graphene-based pyroelectric bolometer that detects infrared (IR) radiation to measure temperature with an ultrahigh level of accuracy.
January 31, 2017
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Ultralight, high-performance graphene composite watch unveiled
An ultralight high-performance mechanical watch made with graphene is unveiled today in Geneva at the Salon International De La Haute Horlogerie thanks to a unique collaboration.
January 16, 2017
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Ultrathin, flat lens resolves chirality and color
Many things in the natural world are geometrically chiral, meaning they cannot be superimposed onto their mirror image. Think hands -- right and left hands are mirror images but if you transplanted a right hand onto a left, you'd be in trouble. Certain molecules are chiral, including DNA and amino acids.
June 23, 2016
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Understanding and predicting self-assembly
To mimic complex natural proteins' capabilities as sensors, catalysts, and more using synthetic materials that can withstand industrial conditions, scientists must first know how to finesse the building blocks they'll use. Molecular Foundry staff worked with scientists to discover a new design rule that controls the way in which polymer building blocks adjoin to form the backbones that run the length of tiny biomimetic sheets.
June 7, 2016
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Understanding Beetle Exoskeleton Could Lead to new and Improved Artificial Materials
What can a beetle tell us about good design principles? Quite a lot, actually.
January 12, 2017
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Understanding breakups could help improve nanoscale printing and spraying
As interest and demand for nanotechnology continues to rise, so will the need for nanoscale printing and spraying, which relies on depositing tiny drops of liquid onto a surface. now researchers from Tsinghua University in Beijing have developed a new theory that describes how such a nanosized droplet deforms and breaks up when it strikes a surface.
January 30, 2017
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Understanding crystal growth in butterfly wings
Tiny, individual crystals on the underside of a Mexican butterfly's wings give the insect a distinctive green color that allows it to hide from predators. Researchers at the University of Fribourg's Adolphe Merkle Institute, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany, and Murdoch University in Western Australia, have shown for the first time how these crystals might grow.
April 27, 2017
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Understanding hydrogen electrocatalysis
Electrocatalysis will play an increasingly important role in future in the transition to more sustainable energy. Thanks to chemist Isis Ledezma Yanez, we now know more about the hydrogen evolution process. PhD defence on the 9th of June.
June 8, 2016
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Understanding the motion of vortex domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires
Almost all information that exists in contemporary society is recorded in magnetic media, like hard drive disks. Researchers are studying the motion of vortex domain walls -- local regions of charge that collectively store information via their configuration -- driven by magnetic fields in ferromagnetic nanowires, which are configured in a straight line with an asymmetric Y-like branch.
March 7, 2017
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Understanding the way liquid spreads through paper
Molecules move randomly, colliding with each other in continual motion. you can even smell this process at times; it's how perfume spreads across a room when the air is still. the process is termed diffusion and the theory of diffusion can be applied to liquid spreading through paper, too - a process at work in a range of everyday products, from ink pens to paper sampling patches for medical tests.
November 30, 2016
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Understanding what's happening inside liquid droplets (w/video)
For most people, the drip, drip, drip of a leaking faucet would be an annoyance. But for Georgia Institute of Technology Ph.D. candidate Alexandros Fragkopoulos, what happens inside droplets is the stuff of serious science.
March 7, 2017
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Uncovering the secrets of water and ice as materials
Water is vital to life on Earth and its importance simply can't be overstated -- it's also deeply rooted within our conscience that there's something extremely special about it. Yet, from a scientific point of view, much remains unknown about water and its many solid phases, which display a plethora of unusual properties and so-called anomalies that, while central to water's chemical and biological importance, are often viewed as controversial.
December 6, 2016
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Unrevealed Characteristics of 2D Materials Could Dramatically Transform Tech Industry
It is a well-known fact that the concept of two-dimensional (2D) materials is a thought-provoking one. Humans exist in a three-dimensional world in which any observed thing has height, depth, and width. However, in the year 2004 when graphene, which is a carbon material distinctive in its absolutely flat, one-atom-thick composition, was produced for the maiden time, the thought-provoking concept came into existence and became an uninvestigated area in materials science.
February 13, 2017
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University of Manchester Launches new Company to develop and Commercialise Graphene-Based Products
Graphene Enabled Systems Limited, headquartered in the University's Innovation Centre (UMIC) on Grafton Street in Manchester, is wholly owned by the University and is led by its newly appointed CEO, Andrew Wilkinson.
June 16, 2016
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University of Puerto Rico and NASA back in the News -- XEI Reports
XEI Scientific Inc. reports on the launch of NASA rocket carrying the RockSat-X payload from the University of Puerto Rico which incorporates a plasma radical source from XEI.
August 23, 2016
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Unlocking the secrets of creeping concrete
College students have used it to make cheap furniture, China has had shortages of it, and main character Michael Scott of "The Office" once famously buried his face in it. Concrete is everywhere -- a ubiquity owed to its strength as a building material. Despite its strength, however, it has a pernicious but inescapable tendency to "creep," or deform progressively under mechanical stress, which leads to crumbling bridges and cracked roads.
August 02, 2016
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Unmasking the molecule
Atom and bond arrangements help determine a molecule's identity. Researchers adapted a new technique called "itProbe," based on the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), to produce images of structure and bonding in a single molecule, essentially unmasking the molecules.
August 09, 2016
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Use of nanomaterials and nanoscale products for wastewater treatment
The German Environment Agency has published the factsheet "Use of nanomaterials and nanoscale products for wastewater treatment".
May 30, 2016
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Using kinetics, not temperature, to make nanocrystalline ceramic coatings
Researcher Pylin Sarobol explains an elegant process for ultrafine-grained ceramic coatings in a somewhat inelegant way: sub-micron particles splatting onto a surface.
February 21, 2017
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Using graphene, researchers bring theorized mechanism of conduction to life
Humans have harnessed large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum for diverse technologies, from X-rays to radios, but a chunk of that spectrum has remained largely out of reach. this is known as the terahertz gap, located between radio waves and infrared radiation, two parts of the spectrum we use in everyday technologies including cell phones, TV remotes and toasters.
October 3, 2016
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Using lasers to create ultra-short pulses
Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have entered new territory with regard to the pulsing of electron beams. Their method could soon be used to develop electron microscopes suitable for ultra-short time scales such as needed for observing the motion of atoms.
March 15, 2017
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Using light to make gold crystal nanoparticles
A team of University of Florida researchers has figured out how gold can be used in crystals grown by light to create nanoparticles, a discovery that has major implications for industry and cancer treatment and could improve the function of pharmaceuticals, medical equipment and solar panels.
July 8, 2016
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Using light to propel water
A new system developed by engineers at MIT could make it possible to control the way water moves over a surface, using only light. this advance may open the door to technologies such as microfluidic diagnostic devices whose channels and valves could be reprogrammed on the fly, or field systems that could separate water from oil at a drilling rig, the researchers say.
April 25, 2017
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Using sound waves to move liquids at the nanoscale
A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale.
November 18, 2016
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Using spider-silk as a superlens to increase a microscope's potential
Scientists at the UK's Bangor and Oxford universities have achieved a world first: using spider-silk as a superlens to increase the microscope's potential.
August 19, 2016
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Using terahertz laser, scientists change the macromolecular conformation of a polymer
Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP) have, for the first time, successfully used a terahertz laser to induce permanent changes in the conformation of a polymer, giving it an increased pattern of crystallization. Conformational changes are very important for macromolecular science because they can change the characteristics of a material and, in the case of proteins, can make it either possible or impossible for them to perform a certain biological function.
June 7, 2016
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UTSA Researchers Receive Grant to develop Water-Purifying Nanomaterial
A $65,000 grant to create a nanomaterial that can perform the work of a water treatment plant has been given to Heather Shipley, chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Burzik Professor in Engineering Design at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), and Kelly Nash, associate professor of physics by the National Science Foundation.
March 31, 2017
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Misc. - V

Versatile optical laser will enable innovative experiments at atomic-scale measurements
The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) facility, near Hamburg, Germany, was built with one objective -- to provide pulses of light short enough, bright enough, and of small enough wavelength to observe processes that would otherwise be too fast and/or too infrequent to measure in real-time.
December 12, 2016
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Vibrating oxides
When one type of an oxide structure called perovskite is exposed to both water vapor and streams of electrons, it exhibits behavior that researchers had never anticipated: the material gives off oxygen and begins oscillating, almost resembling a living, breathing organism.
October 3, 2016
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Vitrimers: the rise of recyclable plastics
Society often considers the use of plastics as non-sustainable since many synthetic materials can hardly be recycled today.
March 19, 2017
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Vorbeck, Reliance Join Hands to develop Graphene-Enhanced Synthetic Elastomer Products
Reliance Industries Ltd, one of Asia's top petrochemical production companies, and Vorbeck Materials Corp., a leading producer of graphene and graphene-based products, announced today that they have signed a joint development agreement to develop graphene-enhanced synthetic elastomer products.
September 14, 2016
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Misc. - W

Watching molecular machines at work
When one cell divides into two - that is how all forms of life are propagated - the newly born daughter cells have to be equipped with everything they will need in their tiny lives. Most important of all is that they inherit a complete copy of the genetic information from their mother cell.
August 11, 2016
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Watching molecular machines at work
When one cell divides into two - that is how all forms of life are propagated - the newly born daughter cells have to be equipped with everything they will need in their tiny lives. Most important of all is that they inherit a complete copy of the genetic information from their mother cell.
September 27, 2016
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Watching the orbital angular momentum of plasmons on a nanoscale with subfemtosecond time resolution
A team of Israeli and German researchers from Technion in Haifa and the universities of Kaiserslautern, Duisburg-Essen and Stuttgart have been able to reveal for the first time the dynamics of the orbital angular momentum of plasmons. the researchers used a combination of extremely high-quality single crystals of gold, ultrafast laser pulses and an electron microscope.
March 17, 2017
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Water droplets as miniaturized test tubes
Modern laboratory technology cannot only help develop new medicine, but also make quicker diagnoses of higher precision. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed laboratory equipment that facilitates the search for active substances and the examination of cell samples. Thus, costs are reduced by a factor of up to one hundred.
May 12, 2017
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Water, water - the two types of liquid water
There are two types of liquid water, according to research carried out by an international scientific collaboration. this new peculiarity adds to the growing list of strange phenomena in what we imagine is a simple substance.
November 10, 2016
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Wave energy researchers dive deep to advance clean energy source
One of the biggest untapped clean energy sources on the planet – wave energy – could one day power millions of homes across the U.S. But more than a century after the first tests of the power of ocean waves, it is still one of the hardest energy sources to capture.
October 18, 2016
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Wayne State Professor Awarded NSF I-Corps Grant to Enhance Nanowire Gas Sensors
Guangzhao Mao, Ph.D., chair and professor of chemical engineering in the College of Engineering at Wayne State University, was recently awarded a $50,000 Innovation Corps (I-Corps) grant from the National Science Foundation. the Wayne State I-Corps team includes graduate student Mohamed Kilani as the entrepreneurial lead and Edward Kim, an advisor from Wayne State's Technology Commercialization Office, as the mentor. the I-Corps program at NSF aims to develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem, helping scientific discoveries develop into new technologies, products, processes and services that benefit society.
January 16, 2017
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'Weighing' atoms with electrons
The different elements found in nature each have their distinct isotopes. for carbon, there are 99 atoms of the lighter stable carbon isotope 12C for each 13C atom, which has one more neutron in its nucleus.
October 11, 2016
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Weak atomic bond, theorized 14 years ago, observed for first time
A Purdue University physicist has observed a butterfly Rydberg molecule, a weak pairing of two highly excitable atoms that he predicted would exist more than a decade ago.
November 1, 2016
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Wearable terahertz scanning device made with carbon nanotube detector elements
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a portable and wearable terahertz scanning device made using arrays of carbon nanotubes, for non-invasive inspection of three-dimensional objects without requiring bulky peripheral optical components.
November 15, 2016
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Wearable, low-cost nanowire sensor to measure skin hydration
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a wearable, wireless sensor that can monitor a person's skin hydration for use in applications that need to detect dehydration before it poses a health problem. the device is lightweight, flexible and stretchable and has already been incorporated into prototype devices that can be worn on the wrist or as a chest patch.
January 30, 2017
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What a twist: silicon nanoantennas turn light around
A team of physicists from ITMO University, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and University of Texas at Austin have developed an unconventional nanoantenna that scatters light in a particular direction depending on the intensity of incident radiation. the research findings will help with the development of flexible optical information processing in telecommunication systems.
November 16, 2016
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What Are you Doing for National Nanotechnology day on October 9th?
National Nanotechnology day will feature a series of community-led events and activities on or around October 9th to help to raise awareness of nanotechnology, how it is currently used in products that enrich our daily lives, and the challenges and opportunities it holds for the future.
September 13, 2016
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What makes the spin flip over?
The Einstein-de-Haas effect shows that magnetism results from the angular momentum of electrons and is considered as the macroscopic evidence of electron spin. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and at the Institut NeEL at the CNRS in Grenoble were the first to investigate this effect for an individual spin and formulated it as the new "Quantum Einstein-de-Haas effect". I
August 10, 2016
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What's Better than One SmartLab Diffractometer? Two!
Sometimes one of a good thing is not enough. In this case, the Central Analytical Research Facility (CARF) at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) has just commissioned a pair of Rigaku SmartLab X-ray diffractometers to cater for their demanding requirements.
August 09, 2016
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When magnetism meets topology
The search for exotic particles is one of the most fascinating pursuits of modern physics. While this area of research is traditionally associated with elementary particles created in high-energy physics, simple 'quasi-particles', with sometimes highly unconventional properties, can also emerge in the complex, many-body world of materials. One such particle is the Weyl fermion. First postulated by Hermann Weyl in 1929, the Weyl fermion is a solution to the Dirac equation of fermion fields that describes a massless fermion with definite handedness
July 20, 2016
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When ultrafast laser pulse meets magnetic materials
Ultrafast non-equilibrium magnetization in correlated spin systems is extensively studied in recent years. at both fundamental and application levels, ultrafast laser pulse excitation and dynamics measurement provide an effective path to the fast optical detection, as well as for the control of the magnetic order.
February 17, 2017
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Where nanotechnology can learn from green chemistry
The intersection of nanotechnology and green chemistry presents an excellent opportunity to ensure that both fields can learn from each other, argues John C. Warner in Green Chemistry and Letters ("Purpose and intent at the intersection of nanotechnology and green chemistry").
October 27, 2016
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Why friction properties of graphene depend on the number of layers
Based on simulations, friction properties of the two-dimensional carbon graphene were studied by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in cooperation with researchers of the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM and scientists in China and the USA. In contact with monolayer graphene, friction is higher than in case of multi-layered graphene or graphite.
December 5, 2016
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Winner announced for NNI's EnvisioNano nanotechnology image contest
The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) is pleased to announce the winners of the latest round of EnvisioNano, a nanotechnology image contest for students. Ben Davis and Ryan Hines, members of the Maschmann Lab at the University of Missouri, won for their image Graphene Shows its Stripes. they work on innovative methods to machine nanomaterials like graphene in order to capitalize on the transformative properties of these materials. Congratulations to Ben and Ryan!
June 23, 2016
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WITec Establishes new Office in China
WITec GmbH, industry leading manufacturer of scanning-probe nano-analytical microscopy systems, has opened a new office in Beijing.
November 16, 2016
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With great power comes great laser science
It is a very unusual kind of laser: researchers at the photonics institute at TU Wien (Vienna) have built a device which emits ultrashort flashes of infrared light with extremely high energy. "It is very hard to combine these three properties - long infrared wavelength, short duration and high energy", says Valentina Shumakova. "But this combination is exactly what we need for many interesting strong-field applications."
September 13, 2016
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Wood filter with added nanoparticles removes toxic dye from water
Engineers at the University of Maryland have developed a new use for wood: to filter water. Liangbing Hu of the Energy Research Center and his colleagues added nanoparticles to wood, then used it to filter toxic dyes from water.
April 21, 2017
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Workshop on Electron Microscopy Focuses on Contributions of Berkeley Lab
A workshop on "Future Electron Microscopy" held on 11th October, 2016 at the ALS User Support Building demonstrated the depth and breadth of electron microscopy at Berkeley Lab.
October 17, 2016
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World-first pinpointing of atoms at work for quantum computers
Scientists can now identify the exact location of a single atom in a silicon crystal, a discovery that is key for greater accuracy in tomorrow's silicon based quantum computers.
June 8, 2016
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World's fastest gas detector
Using new photonics technology, European scientists are developing a multi-gas detector that can spot dozens of harmful emissions with a single sensor in milliseconds.
November 18, 2016
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World's fastest quantum simulator operating at the atomic level
Kenji Ohmori has collaborated with Matthias Weidemuller, Guido Pupillo, Claudiu Genes and their coworkers to develop the world's fastest simulator that can simulate quantum mechanical dynamics of a large number of particles interacting with each other within one billionths of a second.
November 16, 2016
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World's First Installation of Multi-Technique, Nanoscale IR Spectroscopy System at a Synchrotron Source
The SOLEIL Synchrotron, Saint Aubin, France, and Anasys Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA, USA, announce the world's first commissioning at a synchrotron source of the nanoIR2-s, a nanoscale IR spectroscopy system, providing both AFM-IR and IR scattering SNOM (s-SNOM) capabilities with spatial resolution as low as 10 nm.
November 2, 2016
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World's most powerful X-ray takes a 'sledgehammer' to buckyballs
The discovery, led by Associate Professor Brian Abbey at La Trobe in collaboration with Associate Professor Harry Quiney at the University of Melbourne, has been published in the journal Science Advances. Their findings reverse what has been accepted thinking in crystallography for more than 100 years.
September 12, 2016
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World's 'smallest magnifying glass' makes it possible to see individual chemical bonds between atoms
For centuries, scientists believed that light, like all waves, couldn't be focused down smaller than its wavelength, just under a millionth of a metre. Now, researchers led by the University of Cambridge have created the world's smallest magnifying glass, which focuses light a billion times more tightly, down to the scale of single atoms.
November 11, 2016
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Misc. - X

X-ray imaging captures material defect process at the atomic scale
From blacksmiths forging iron to artisans blowing glass, humans have for centuries been changing the properties of materials to build better tools - from iron horseshoes and swords to glass jars and medicine vials.
January 17, 2017
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X-ray laser glimpses how electrons dance with atomic nuclei in materials
From hard to malleable, from transparent to opaque, from channeling electricity to blocking it: Materials come in all types. a number of their intriguing properties originate in the way a material's electrons "dance" with its lattice of atomic nuclei, which is also in constant motion due to vibrations known as phonons.
September 27, 2016
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X-rays from copper source set new gold standard for measuring industrial materials
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have produced and precisely measured a spectrum of X-rays using a new, state-of-the-art machine. the instrument they used to measure the X-rays took 20 years to develop, and will help scientists working at the agency make some of the world's most accurate measurements of materials for use in everything from bridges to pharmaceuticals. It will also ensure that the measurements of materials from other labs around the world are as reliable as possible.
May 12, 2017
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X-ray microscope optics resolve 50-nm features while eliminating chromatic aberrations
X-ray microscopes are commonly used in combination with full-field imaging techniques in spectromicroscopy applications, where they allow the chemical structures of materials to be analyzed and visualized simultaneously. However, the performance of these microscopes is often affected by problems with chromatic aberrations-- optical effects that limit the resolution or degree of fineness to which images of the material structures can be acquired--and previous solutions to the problem have often proved difficult to manufacture and implement.
May 2, 2017
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X-ray optics on a chip
Waveguides are widely used for filtering, confining, guiding, coupling or splitting beams of visible light. However, creating waveguides that could do the same for X-rays has posed tremendous challenges in fabrication, so they are still only in an early stage of development.
August 18, 2016
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X-ray-free electron laser reveals radiosensitizing effects at molecular level
While the effect of radiosensitizing molecules in radiation-based cancer therapies has been known for a long time, the exact molecular mechanisms behind it - the capacity of the radiosensitizer to locally augment the radiation damage to tumor cells by intratumoral administration of the agent - are yet to be deciphered.
June 17, 2016
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XEI Scientific Partners with Electron Microscopy Sciences to Promote and Sell its Products in North and South America
XEI Scientific, Inc., the world leader in remote RF plasma cleaning of carbon contamination in SEM, FIB, and other vacuum chambers, is pleased to announce an exclusive partnership with EMS, Electron Microscopy Sciences, to sell and promote Evactron® products in North and South America.
July 26, 2016
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Xenocs Acquires SAXSLAB
Xenocs SAS and SAXSLAB Aps announce that Xenocs has acquired 100% of SAXSLAB shares in an all cash transaction.
January 4, 2017
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Xeuss 2.0 HR Equipment - Installation & Training at Sichuan University
The Xeuss 2.0 HR SAXS/WAXS system was installed in May 2016 at the State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
June 29, 2016
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Misc. - Y

Young Nanoscientist India Award 2017 Winner Announced
The Nanotechnology Forum for Indian Scientists (NT Forum) has recently announced Dr Narayan Pradhan as the winner of its 'Oxford Instruments Young Nanoscientist India Award 2017'.
March 8, 2017
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Misc. - Z

Zapping bacteria with sanitizers made of paper
Imagine wearing clothes with layers of paper that protect you from dangerous bacteria.
May 2, 2017
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Zebrafish want to hang out with moving 3-D robotic models of themselves
Authenticity is an important trait, and zebrafish take it especially seriously. An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering discovered that zebrafish engage more with 3D-moving robotic models of themselves than with other stimuli.
October 22, 2016
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ZEISS and Raith join forces for Helium Ion Microscopy and Nanofabrication
New partnership strengthens global sales activities for unique ZEISS ORION NanoFab platform
February 28, 2017
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ZEISS Invites you to Join the Multi-Scale Journey at Microscopy & Microanalysis (M&M)
ZEISS announces they will be showcasing the latest microscopy innovations and advancements at Microscopy & Microanalysis (M&M) 2016, July 24- 28, 2016, in Columbus, OH. ZEISS experts will be on hand at Booth #902 to offer a variety of lunch and after-hour technology seminars.
July 20, 2016
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Zenyatta Graphene Obtained from Albany Graphite Helps Improve Performance of Rubber Composites
Zenyatta Ventures Ltd. recently made an announcement on the successful initial test results obtained from research carried out by Dr. Alan Dalton at the University of Sussex, UK ("Sussex") with the help of graphene converted from the Company's high-purity graphite. the use of Zenyatta graphene in rubber composite and emulsion applications was tested by Sussex.
April 7, 2017
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Zeroing in on the true nature of fluids within nanocapillaries
Shrinking the investigation of objects down to the nanometer scale often reveals new properties of matter that have no equivalent for their bulk analysis. this phenomenon is motivating many current studies of nanomaterials which can reveal fascinating new phenomena.
January 10, 2017
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