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106 Health - AIDS and Virus Resources

Misc. - A

Add penis bacteria to the list of HIV risk factors
Microbes that thrive in oxygen-poor places may lure virus's prey: vulnerable immune cells
July 25, 2017
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Anti-HIV medications provide durable protection against heterosexual transmission, study finds
Anti-HIV medications suppress the viral load of people living with HIV and provide durable protection against heterosexual transmission a study led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found. Researchers found a 93 percent reduction of HIV transmission when the HIV-infected person started antiretroviral therapy or ART at a higher CD4 cell count.
July 19, 2016
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ART could help reduce opportunistic infections and save lives of HIV-infected children
Reducing opportunistic infections such as TB in children with HIV could save both lives and money
July 20, 2016
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At-risk alcohol use linked to lower ART adherence among people with HIV/AIDS
Advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have allowed people living with HIV/AIDS to maintain a quality of life similar to those without HIV infection. Medication adherence is key, however, as non-adherence to ART can lead to poorer HIV suppression, decreased CD4 cell count, and an increased risk for antiretroviral drug resistance. Prior research has shown that alcohol use is common among persons living with HIV/AIDS, and that the rate of current heavy drinking may be almost double that of the general population.
July 6, 2017
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Misc. - C

Cell particles may help spread HIV infection, NIH study suggests
HIV appears to enlist the aid of nano-sized structures released by infected cells to infect new cells, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Known as extracellular vesicles (EVs), these bubble-like structures are made by many kinds of cells and, under most circumstances, are thought to ferry molecules from one cell to another, providing a means of communication. NIH scientists discovered that cells infected with HIV appear to produce EVs that manipulate prospective host cells to pass infection to other cells. the study appears in Scientific Reports.
May 10, 2017
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Certain immune reactions to viruses cause learning problems
Researchers have discovered a mechanism by which the body's immune reaction to viruses like influenza and HIV may cause learning and memory problems.
May 15, 2017
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Certain Kinds of Vaginal Bacteria can Actually Boost Hiv Risk
The Balance of Microbes can Change your Susceptibility
January 10, 2017
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Cheap Ultrasensitive HIV Sensor to Help Screen Virus in Poorer Places
At the Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid, researchers have developed a tiny, cheap, portable sensor potentially capable of detecting HIV in people within a week of infection. These days nucleic acid amplification is the clinical standard, but it's too expensive for many places around the world. Besides preventing early detection, not being able to screen blood for HIV hampers blood donation efforts.
February 21, 2017
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Chemists develop an ultra-sensitive test for cancers, HIV
Catching a disease in its earliest stages can lead to more effective therapies. Chemists have increased the likelihood of detecting these diseases via a test that is thousands of times more sensitive than current diagnostics.
March 18, 2016
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Coffee could halve death risk for patients with HIV, hepatitis C
A wealth of studies have hailed coffee for its potential health benefits, but for patients infected with both HIV and hepatitis C virus, the rewards could be even greater; a new study suggests that drinking at least three cups of coffee per day could halve their risk of all-cause mortality.
September 26, 2017
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Combination of broadly neutralizing antibodies can suppress virus in HIV-infected mice, study shows
Without antiretroviral drug treatment, the majority of people infected with HIV ultimately develop AIDS, as the virus changes and evolves beyond the body's ability to control it. But a small group of infected individuals--called elite controllers--possess immune systems capable of defeating the virus. they accomplish this by manufacturing broadly neutralizing antibodies, which can take down multiple forms of HIV.
January 25, 2017
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Congress revamps housing program to benefit areas where HIV is spreading
In a bipartisan push, Congress has restructured a federal program that provides housing assistance for people living with HIV to funnel more money into areas struggling to control the outbreak.
August 7, 2017
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Consistent treatment prevents HIV transmission among gay men
The largest study of HIV transmission to date finds that HIV-positive men whose virus levels are undetectable as a result of treatment do not transmit the virus to their sexual partners.
July 25, 2017
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Could Hormone Supplements for Menopause Return?
New study suggests the therapy won't increase risk of early death

Dietary supplement may help older adults to keep warm
Older adults are known to be more sensitive to the cold, and new research has found that a nutritional supplement called L-carnitine might one day be used as a way to jump-start the body's central heating.
September 6, 2017
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September 12, 2017
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Cumin: Six health benefits
Cumin is a spice that comes from the Cuminum cyminum plant. It is native to Asia, Africa, and Europe, but it is widely used in cooking throughout the world. It is the second most popular spice after black pepper.
September 29, 2017
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Misc. - D

Defective HIV proviruses hinder immune system response and cure
Mutant forms of HIV complicate disease monitoring and distract the immune system from the functional virus
April 19, 2017
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Discovery of additional viral reservoir reveals new target for HIV cure research
HIV cure research to date has focused on clearing the virus from T cells, a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. Yet investigators in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have found the virus persists in HIV-infected macrophages. Macrophages are large white blood cells found in tissues throughout the body including the liver, lung, bone marrow and brain.
April 17, 2017
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Drinking three or more cups of coffee a day linked to reduced mortality risk in HIV-HCV patients
Patients infected by both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at specific risk of end-stage liver disease and greater risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In addition, HIV infection accelerates the progression of chronic hepatitis C to fibrosis and development of cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. In these HIV-HCV co-infected patients, drinking at least three cups of coffee each day halved the risk of all-cause mortality according to a new study published in the Journal of Hepatology.
September 25, 2017
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Drug combination reduces risk of HIV infection among teen males
NIH-funded study suggests PrEP therapy, approved for adults, is safe for youth.
September 5, 2017
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Drug Helped Protect Gay Teen Males From HIV
Small study found Truvada worked when taken daily, but some strayed from regimen
September 5, 2017
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Docs Seeing More Multidrug Resistant HIV Patients
People resistant to older medication also have problems with newer drug, study finds
December 1, 2016
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Dual therapy effective as second-line treatment for patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations
ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP, a clinical trial running in parallel in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa (Cameroon, Burkina Faso, and Senegal), shows that dual therapy with lamivudine and a boosted protease inhibitor is effective as second-line treatment in patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations. Such treatment de-escalation will reduce costs, side effects, and the need for virological monitoring of patients.
May 29, 2017
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Misc. - E

Effects of HIV: what happens to the body?
When a person first contracts HIV, the virus will affect their body in several stages. If left untreated, HIV is likely to lead to AIDS.
March 15, 2017
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Endo Pharmaceuticals Agrees To Remove Opioid Painkiller Linked To HIV Outbreak From The Market
Weeks after the Food and Drug Administration said opioid painkiller Opana ER should be removed from the market amid concerns about the potential for abuse, Endo Pharmaceuticals has agreed to pull the drug, which has been linked to serious outbreaks of HIV and hepatitis C.
July 7, 2017
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Misc. - F

FDA Requests Opioid Painkiller Be Removed From the Market, Citing Abuse Risks, HIV Outbreak
The Food and Drug Administration has asked Endo Pharmaceuticals, the manufacturer of Opana ER, an extended-release semi-synthetic opioid painkiller, to remove the drug from the market, after the agency concluded that the drug's potential for abuse outweighed its therapeutic value.
June 8, 2017
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First large-scale clinical study of long-acting injectable HIV drug begins
The first large-scale clinical trial of a long-acting injectable drug for HIV prevention began today. the study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, will examine whether a long-acting form of the investigational anti-HIV drug cabotegravir injected once every 8 weeks can safely protect men and transgender women from HIV infection at least as well as the anti-HIV medication Truvada taken daily as an oral tablet.
December 21, 2016
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First new HIV vaccine efficacy study in seven years has begun
South Africa hosts historic NIH-supported clinical trial.
November 28, 2016
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Misc. - G

Gene editing strategy eliminates HIV-1 infection in live animals
A permanent cure for HIV infection remains elusive due to the virus's ability to hide away in latent reservoirs. But now, scientists show that they can excise HIV DNA from the genomes of living animals to eliminate further infection.
May 1, 2017
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GW researcher awarded NIH grant to study how cocaine use affects HIV infection
Following studies showing that cocaine influences the replication and transcription of HIV, a researcher at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) was awarded more than $2.3 million from the National Institutes of Health to look deeper into the involved molecular mechanisms that allow this effect to happen.
October 5, 2017
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Misc. - H

Health Risks Grow as Kids Born with HIV Age
About 10,000 Americans were infected at birth, and many are now young adults with medical issues, study finds
March 31, 2017
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HIV breakthrough: Scientists remove virus in animals using gene editing
Worldwide, tens of millions of people are living with HIV. While scientists and medical professionals do not yet have a permanent cure for the virus, researchers have just made a breakthrough: they managed to eliminate the HIV-1 infection in mice.
May 4, 2017
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HIV cases on the rise among those in their 50s in Europe
A new study has found that one in every six persons diagnosed with HIV is over the age of 50 years. This new study was published yesterday (26th September 2017) in the journal Lancet HIV.
September 27, 2017
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HIV 'fingerprint' tool could greatly assist vaccine development
Scientists hope that their new method of "fingerprinting" the shields of sugar molecules that HIV surrounds itself with in order to evade the immune system will improve, and therefore speed up the development of effective vaccines.
March 28, 2017
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HIV hijacks surface molecule to invade cell
NIH discovery could lead to new drugs to prevent HIV infection.
July 12, 2017
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HIV infection boosted by seized cell signaling
New research from the National Institutes of Health has identified a crucial phase in the HIV infection process, where the virus enters its genetic material into healthy cells. This discovery could eventually lead to treatments blocking transmission in its early stages.
July 17, 2017
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HIV lesions: Pictures and treatments
Lesions are abnormal growths on the skin. Skin lesions are common in people who have HIV.
March 22, 2017
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HIV May Double Odds of Heart Attack
Study suggests that tools used to predict risk need tweaking for those with AIDS-causing virus
December 21, 2016
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HIV patients have nearly twice the heart attack risk
Risk for heart attack, stroke is vastly underestimated in HIV patients
December 21, 2016
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HIV status may affect the progression of HPV infection to cervical pre-cancer
HIV-positive women were more likely to have human papillomavirus infection progress to pre-cancerous cervical lesions
June 1, 2017
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HIV swollen lymph nodes: Symptoms, causes, and treatment
Alymph node is a small, bean-shaped mass of tissue that helps to defend the body against infections. Lymph nodes are sometimes incorrectly referred to as glands; however, glands make or secrete substances, whereas lymph nodes only act as filters.
March 13, 2017
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HIV therapy for breastfeeding mothers can virtually eliminate transmission to babies
For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India.
July 18, 2016
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HIV: A therapeutic advance for resource-limited settings
A clinical trial running in parallel in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa, shows that dual therapy with lamivudine and a boosted protease inhibitor is effective as second-line treatment in patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations. Such treatment deescalation will reduce costs, side effects, and the need for virological monitoring of patients.
May 29, 2017
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HIV: Could new injection work as effectively as daily drugs?
A new, long-acting antiretroviral injection might be an effective alternative to daily oral doses of the same medication in the case of HIV, a new clinical trial suggests.
July 25, 2017
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HIV: new math model may help to predict strains for vaccine development
A major challenge in the development of an HIV vaccine is the fact that the virus is continually evolving, and it is very difficult to predict which direction it will take. Now, a new study shows how ideas from two disparate fields - stock price prediction and particle diffusion in liquids - can help. Inspired by the financial model, the researchers develop a diffusion-based tool that accurately predicted how an HIV surface protein evolved in a patient population over 30 years.
April 7, 2017
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HIV: The benefits of prophylaxis of tuberculosis are confirmed
Long-term follow-up confirms that tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis in HIV-infected people is more than ever relevant in resource-limited countries.
October 10, 2017
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Home HIV test kits: Uses, what to expect, and benefits
The face of HIV has changed enormously in recent years. People living with HIV who are receiving appropriate medical care can live almost as long as people who do not have HIV.
March 13, 2017
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Home-based kit could be effective means for HIV testing of heterosexuals
Research led by William Robinson, PhD, Associate Research Professor of Behavioral & Community Health Sciences at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, has found that 86% of heterosexuals who are at high risk for HIV would use a home-based test kit provided by mail and 99% would seek treatment based on a positive result. This self-administered alternative may lead a group whose high risk is under-recognized to treatment sooner.
July 31, 2017
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HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV
Women who took part in ASPIRE, a trial that found a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral (ARV) drug called dapivirine was safe and helped protect against HIV, will soon be offered the opportunity to use the ring as part of a new study called HOPE.
July 19, 2016
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Misc. - I

In adolescents, oral Truvada and vaginal ring for HIV prevention are safe, acceptable
NIH-funded clinical trials are first of their kind to include younger adolescent girls.
July 25, 2017
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Increasing rates of new HIV infections threaten 74 countries
AIDS deaths are falling in most countries worldwide, but the rate of new infections increased in several countries over the past decade, threatening to undermine efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030, a new scientific paper shows.
July 20, 2016
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Injectable ART may have same effectiveness as standard oral treatments
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) intramuscularly administered may have the same effectiveness as current oral treatments. This is the main conclusion of the Phase II clinical trial carried out by 50 centers around the world - 9 in Spain - to which the team of Dr. Daniel Podzamczer, principal investigator of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and Chief of the HIV and STD Unit of the Infectious Diseases Service of Bellvitge University hospital (HUB) has contributed. The results of the trial, published by the prestigious journal The Lancet, pave the way to the implantation of all-injectable antiretroviral therapies with a lower frequency of administration, which would imply a significant improvement of the quality of life of HIV patients.
August 3, 2017
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Is the AIDS Epidemic Winding Down in the U.S.?
Infection rate could be as low as 12,000 people a year by 2025, researchers report
May 17, 2017
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Misc. - J

JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals
Programs to reduce the high risk of HIV infection among transgender people are urgently needed–but efforts are hindered by a lack of accurate information on HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, and specific risk factors facing this key population. a special supplement to JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes presents essential information to meet the challenges of HIV prevention in the transgender population. the journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
July 20, 2016
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Misc. - L

Link found between HIV treatment, neuronal degeneration
Certain protease inhibitors, among the most effective HIV drugs, lead to the production of the peptide beta amyloid, often associated with Alzheimer's disease, and may be the cause of cognitive problems, report researchers.
December 16, 2016
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Living Longer and Aging with HIV
Although HIV makes aging more complicated, plenty of people have had the disease for years, even decades, and are doing well.
December 27, 2016
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Misc. - M

Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners
The War on Drugs, mass incarceration of drug users, and the failure to provide proven harm reduction and treatment strategies has led to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis, and hepatitis B and C infection among prisoners–far higher than in the general population.
July 19, 2016
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Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding
For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India.
July 19, 2016
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More than two million people co-infected with HIV, hepatitis C
An estimated 2.3 million people living with HIV are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) globally, a new study has found. Very little was known about the extent of HIV/HCV coinfection prior to this study, which was the first global study of its kind.
March 8, 2016
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Misc. - N

Nanoparticle biosensor able to detect HIV only one week after infection
In addition, the total test time is 4 hours, 45 minutes, meaning clinical results could be obtained on the same day. the research is published today in the journal PLOS ONE.
February 15, 2017
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Nanotechnology approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half
Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.
February 21, 2017
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Nanotechnology based gene editing to eradicate HIV brain reservoir in drug abusers
Opiate abuse is a significant risk factor for HIV infection, and in combination they can have a devastating effect on the brain. Scientists at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine are studying new therapies that can short-circuit HIV infection and mitigate the damaging effects that opiate addiction has on the central nervous system.
February 15, 2017
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New category of immunotherapy appears safe to use in patients with both cancer and HIV
A new category of immunotherapies called checkpoint inhibitors that has been highly effective against many different cancers appears safe to use in patients with both advanced malignancies and HIV, a population excluded from earlier trials of such therapies, according to an early-phase trial.
November 7, 2017
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New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year, study reveals
A major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 (GBD 2015) study, published today in the Lancet HIV journal, reveals that although deaths from HIV/AIDS have been steadily declining from a peak in 2005, 2.5 million people worldwide became newly infected with HIV in 2015, a number that hasn't changed substantially in the past 10 years.
July 20, 2016
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New model could provide understanding of how HIV infection damages the brain
HIV infects certain cells in the brain called microglia, and infected microglia release toxic and inflammatory molecules that can impair or kill surrounding neurons. Researchers have been limited in their ability to study HIV in microglia, but in a new FEBS Journal study, investigators developed a new model of HIV infection in microglia using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology.
November 8, 2017
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New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half
Successful results have utilized nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients.
February 24, 2017
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New research highlights worldwide risk of HIV, Hepatitis C epidemics
Among people who inject drugs due to inadequate provision of infectious disease prevention programs
October 24, 2017
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New test detects latent HIV more accurately, moves closer to cure
Researchers are moving closer to fully curing HIV by designing a more accurate, cost effective, and efficient test for detecting how much of the virus is left in the human body.
May 30, 2017
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New trial examines use of nanotechnology to improve delivery of drugs to HIV patients
Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.
February 24, 2017
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NIAID scientists illuminate mechanism of increased cardiovascular risks with HIV
Tick saliva molecule blocks process in human cells, nonhuman primates.
August 30, 2017
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NIDA announces recipients of 2017 Avant-Garde Awards for HIV/AIDS research
NIH awards highlight novel approaches to HIV prevention and treatment.
April 5, 2017
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NIH launches prospective study of Zika and HIV co-infection during pregnancy
The National Institutes of Health has launched a study to determine the potential risks that infection with the Zika virus might pose for pregnancies in which the mother is also infected with HIV. At this point, little is known about whether Zika virus infection poses additional risks for maternal or infant health in pregnancies already complicated by HIV.
July 10, 2017
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NIH research helps explain how antibody treatment led to sustained remission of HIV-like virus
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have found that the presence of the protein alpha-4 beta-7 integrin on the surface of HIV and its monkey equivalent – simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV – may help explain why an antibody protected monkeys from SIV in previous experiments.
February 15, 2017
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NIH-supported first HIV vaccine efficacy study begins in South Africa
The first HIV vaccine efficacy study to launch anywhere in seven years is now testing whether an experimental vaccine regimen safely prevents HIV infection among South African adults. the study, called HVTN 702, involves a new version of the only HIV vaccine candidate ever shown to provide some protection against the virus.
November 28, 2016
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Number of HIV-positive cancer patients in the U.S. projected to decrease through 2030
As the population of people living with HIV in the United States ages, the burden of cancer for these patients is expected to shift away from cancers linked to AIDS and toward malignancies that affect the general population, according to a new study led by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researcher.
April 5, 2017
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Nutritious food could improve medication adherence and health in HIV-positive and Diabetes patients
HIV-positive people who received healthy food and snacks for six months were more likely to adhere to their medication regimens, and they, as well as people with type 2 diabetes, were less depressed and less likely to make trade-offs between food and healthcare, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
January 25, 2017
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Misc. - O

Opioids by Injection May Drive HIV Outbreaks
Indiana case offers a lesson for other rural communities
July 20, 2016
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Misc. - P

Pathway to 'rejuvenating' immune cells to fight cancers and infections
A new discovery of the mechanism of T cell exhaustion will lead to treatments to enhance immunotherapies against cancers and such viruses as HIV.
June 27, 2017
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Penile bacteria may be risk factor for HIV infection in men, study shows
A ten-fold increase in some types of bacteria living under the foreskin can increase a man's risk of HIV infection by up to 63 percent, according to a new study out today by researchers at Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH) at the George Washington University (GW). This study, which was published in the journal mBio, shows for the first time that penile bacteria may be a previously unrecognized risk factor for HIV infection in men. In addition, the researchers suggest that this risk factor may be sexually transmissible.
July 25, 2017
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Plant compound 'much more effective' than traditional anti-HIV drug
Azidothymidine, the first drug that was approved in the fight against AIDS in the 1980s, is still a main component in the medication mix commonly prescribed to HIV patients today. But new research may have found a plant-derived chemical compound that is much more effective than azidothymidine.
June 16, 2017
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Prince Harry, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine organize roundtable to address needs of youth with HIV/AIDS
New pledges will ensure young people are given a voice when forming future research and policies
July 13, 2017
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Misc. - R

Research shows high risk for cardiovascular and kidney disease in people with HIV
HIV patients and their doctors are urged to be more aware of the additional health risks associated with treated HIV infection. This follows new research that shows HIV patients at high risk for a heart attack or stroke are also at substantially greater risk for chronic kidney disease and vice versa.
November 7, 2017
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Researchers caution against using antibodies to prevent HIV transmission from mother to child
HIV+ mothers who possess a strong neutralizing antibody response may be more likely to pass the virus on to her infant through breast feeding. In addition, infants born to mothers with a strong antibody response are significantly more likely to have a serious illness or death, regardless of whether or not they acquire the virus.
October 31, 2017
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Researchers design inhibitory peptide to unleash defence mechanisms against fungal pathogens
For most people, a simple case of thrush or athlete's foot can be quickly and easily treated using over-the-counter anti-fungal creams and pills. However, even with medication, fungal pathogens can overwhelm a weakened immune system and cause systemic infections - as in people with HIV/AIDS, or organ transplant recipients, for example - posing a severe health risk.
July 19, 2016
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Researchers develop new strategy that can revolutionize HIV vaccine design
Vaccines are an essential tool for preventing and treating serious infectious diseases such as polio, chicken pox and measles. But so far it has not been possible to develop vaccines capable of contributing to the treatment and prevention of chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and hepatitis C.
May 17, 2017
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Researchers estimate number of infants born in the U.S. with perinatal HIV infection
A new article published online by JAMA Pediatrics estimates there were 69 perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections among infants born in the United States in 2013 (1.75 per 100,000 live births), down from an estimated 216 perinatal HIV infections among infants born in 2002 (5.37 per 100,000 live births).
March 19, 2017
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Researchers receive NIH grant to launch HIV prevention study of gay and bisexual men
The National Institutes for Health (NIH) has awarded Dr. Christian Grov and his colleagues $2.4 Million to launch a 2-year nationwide HIV prevention study of gay and bisexual men. Gay and bisexual men account for nearly two-thirds of new HIV diagnoses among men, with men of color being hardest hit by the ongoing epidemic.
July 19, 2017
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Misc. - S

Scientists develop synthetic molecule effective at kicking and killing HIV
In lab animals, a particle developed by UCLA, Stanford, NIH scientists awakens dormant virus cells and then knocks them out
October 5, 2017
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Sexual Relationships When You're HIV-Positive
Don't worry: you can have good sex and a healthy relationship with your partner, even if one of you has HIV.
December 27, 2016
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South African child in HIV remission without drugs
A 9-year-old child from South Africa has been living with HIV in drug-free remission for 8.5 years, scientists announced at the ninth International AIDS Society conference, held in Paris, France. Researchers report that this is the third instance of prolonged HIV remission in a child after anti-HIV treatment.
July 26, 2017
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Studies shed new light on why young women in South Africa experience high rates of HIV infection
Evidence by the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) consortium of South African and North American researchers will be presented on July 18 at the International AIDS 2016 Conference in Durban, shedding new light on why young women in South Africa have high rates of HIV infection.
July 18, 2016
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Study confirms efficacy of PrEP in reducing risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men
The last phase of ANRS IPERGAY has confirmed that "on-demand" pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective method of reducing the risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men and who report high-risk behavior. These results will be presented at AIDS 2016 in Durban, South Africa (18 to 22 July). from late 2016, a vast research program, ANRS PREVENIR, will assess PrEP on a large scale in Paris and its suburbs (France).
July 20, 2016
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Study finds 18% increase in HIV treatment success rates
Researchers have been successful in increasing HIV treatment success rates by almost 18 percent.
March 19, 2017
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Study highlights barriers to HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa
Barriers to diagnosis and lack of access to modern medications have combined to place caregivers and HIV-positive patients in sub-Saharan Africa between a rock and a hard place. a new study shows that physicians are often forced to choose between controlling seizures, which can occur if the disease goes undiagnosed for too long, or treating the underlying HIV infection.
December 23, 2016
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Study: PrEP program for men who have sex with men could lead to long-term cost savings
Providing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication to men who have sex with men who are at high risk of HIV infection (equivalent to less than 5% of men who have sex with men at any point in time) in England would be cost-effective, and could help to prevent up to one in four cases of HIV, according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.
October 19, 2017
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Misc. - T

Teaching happiness to men with HIV boosts their health
Learning skills for positive emotions result in less HIV in blood and less anti-depressant use
April 17, 2017
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Text messaging effective support in treatment of HIV and tuberculosis
Mobile phone text messaging is a powerful tool for improving quality of care, researchers show. A new study has developed and tested a method in Mozambique, helping patients with severe diseases to follow through with their treatments.
June 22, 2017
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TMDU-led researchers identify protein critical to early stages of cellular HIV infection
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-led researchers identify a protein critical to the early stages of infection of cells by HIV, offering a potential target for anti-HIV treatment
August 8, 2017
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Trial reveals value of tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis in HIV-infected people
Long-term follow-up in the ANRS TEMPRANO trial confirms that tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis in HIV-infected people is more than ever relevant in resource-limited countries.
October 10, 2017
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Misc. - U

USC scientist finds new approach to prevent HIV infection
Medical treatment that targets human proteins rather than ever-mutating viruses may one day help HIV-positive people whose bodies have built a resistance to "cocktails" currently used to keep them healthy, according to a Keck School of Medicine of USC researcher.
August 23, 2017
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UTHealth participates in study to evaluate effectiveness of new injectable HIV medication
The HIV Prevention Trials Network, which includes McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, has launched a study to evaluate whether a new injectable medication can work as well as an existing oral pill to safely protect against HIV among men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men.
April 18, 2017
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Misc. - W

Western blot and ELISA tests for HIV: what to expect
The Western blot and ELISA tests are two blood antibody tests that may detect HIV.
March 7, 2017
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What does it take for an AIDS virus to infect a person?
Study identifies characteristics of HIV-1 strains that mediate sexual transmission
January 10, 2017
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When preventing HIV, bacteria in the vagina matter
Some microbes appear to break down drug in prophylactic gel, making it less effective
June 1, 2017
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WHO releases new guidelines on self-testing to improve uptake of HIV diagnosis
In advance of World AIDS Day, the World Health Organization (WHO) has released new guidelines on HIV self-testing to improve access to and uptake of HIV diagnosis.
November 30, 2016
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Women diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy twice as likely to suffer more domestic violence
A diagnosis of HIV during pregnancy makes domestic violence twice as likely to start for some women after their baby has been born, according to new research led by a Drexel University researcher.
July 31, 2017
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