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372 Health - Alzheimer Resources

Misc. - Numbers

2 in 10 Alzheimer's Cases May be Misdiagnosed
Missed disease identification seems more likely in men, who may develop thinking problems earlier
July 26, 2016
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'5-D protein fingerprinting' with nanopores could give insights into Alzheimer's, Parkinson's
In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, University of Michigan engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid.
January 17, 2017
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23andMe is finally allowed to tell you if you have the genes for Parkinson's
The Food and Drug Administration finally gave 23andMe a long sought-after green light today to sell to consumers genetic tests and their accompanying health risk reports for up to 10 diseases, including late-onset Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.
April 6, 2017
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23andMe wins FDA approval to give customers health risk info
The gene testing company can now tell US customers who use its home DNA kit whether they have a genetic risk for any of 10 diseases and conditions.
April 6, 2017
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Misc. - A

A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect your Brain
Dementia expert says take up heart-healthy habits sooner rather than later
April 11, 2017
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A tiny ball of gold could help fight Alzheimer's
A new nanoparticle is so precise, it reduces side effects of a common drug
August 22, 2016
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ADDF awards $2.1 million grant for clinical study of cancer drug in Alzheimer's patients
The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) announces a $2.1 million grant awarded to R. Scott Turner, MD, PhD, of Georgetown University Medical Center to conduct a phase II clinical trial of low-dose nilotinib (marketed as Tasigna® for use as a cancer therapy) in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
September 29, 2016
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Advances made in Alzheimer's research
A major advance has been made in Alzheimer's research, say researchers. they showed how a diseased vertebrate brain can naturally react to Alzheimer's pathology by forming more neurons. Two proteins (Interleukin-4 and STAT6) have been identified to be relevant for this process.
October 20, 2016
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Aelan's researchers develop novel epigenetic biomarker for diagnosis of AD
Aelan Cell Technologies today announced the development of a novel epigenetic biomarker. An early human clinical feasibility study has indicated that serological tests using the biomarker alongside other proprietary components developed by Aelan's researchers could potentially help physicians diagnose Alzheimer's disease.
July 12, 2016
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After natural disasters, elderly survivors show cognitive decline
Loss of home, resulting depression, less contact with neighbors tied to dementia.
October 30, 2016
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Air pollution may lead to dementia in older women
Tiny, dirty airborne particles called PM2.5 invade the brain and wreak havoc, study suggests
January 31, 2017
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All brain training protocols do not return equal benefits, study reveals
Cognitive brain training improves executive function whereas aerobic activity improves memory, according to new Center for BrainHealth research at the University of Texas at Dallas.
July 18, 2016
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Alzheimer fibrils at atomic resolution
Fundamental structural difference to earlier models
August 05, 2016
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Alzheimer's Association
Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's disease
Provides Information
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Alzheimer's advance: Early stage study in mice show new drugs restore memory loss and prolong life
Breakthrough findings demonstrate a possible target and potential drug treatment to restore memory loss and extend life span in mice with neurodegeneration.
December 19, 2016
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Alzheimer's Death Toll Nearly Doubles in 15 Years
Price tag hits $259 billion a year, projected to exceed $1 trillion by 2050, report finds
March 7, 2017
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Alzheimer's disease in HIV-positive patient
The first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in an HIV-positive individual has been documented. the finding in a 71-year-old man triggers a realization about HIV survivors now reaching the age when Alzheimer's risk begins to escalate.
July 25, 2016
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Alzheimer's disease linked to the metabolism of unsaturated fats
A new study has found that the metabolism of omega-3 and omega-6 unsaturated fatty acids in the brain are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
March 22, 2017
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Alzheimer's disease proteins could be at fault for leading cause of vision loss among older people
Research provides new insight into possible causes of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss among people aged 50 and older.
November 21, 2016
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Alzheimer's disease: on the hunt for the biomarker signal for early detection
Around 100,000 Austrians suffer from Alzheimer's disease and 16,000 from Parkinson's. Experts estimate that, in view of the ageing population, these numbers are set to triple over the next 30 years. Both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are progressive degenerative diseases of the brain, which start up to 30 years before the onset of symptoms. Early diagnosis would be a huge help in combating the disease. However, the early detection tests that are available do not provide any reliable prediction about the further course of the disease and also carry the risk of producing a false positive result.
March 27, 2017
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Alzheimer's gene may show effects on brain starting in childhood
A gene associated with Alzheimer's disease and recovery after brain injury may show its effects on the brain and thinking skills as early as childhood, according to a new study.
July 14, 2016
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Alzheimer's linked to unsaturated fatty acids in the brain
While it is not yet clear what causes Alzheimer's disease, researchers are examining a variety of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle causes. new research examines some of the key brain regions involved in the development of Alzheimer's and finds several fatty acids to be associated with this form of dementia.
March 22, 2017
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Alzheimer's may be linked to defective brain cells spreading disease
Study finds toxic proteins doing harm to neighboring neurons
February 10, 2017
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Alzheimer's may soon be detected with a simple eye exam
You go in to your eye doctor for your yearly exam. While you're getting the air puffed into your eye and the light shined into the back of your brain, the doctor notices something. the retina is a little off. it's not macular degeneration or general eye deterioration. She detects the early signs of Alzheimer's.
July 12, 2016
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Alzheimer's Protein Plaques May Also Harm Heart
Deposits can cause patients' heart muscle to stiffen, keeping it from pumping properly, study suggests
November 28, 2016
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Alzheimer's research raises questions on the role of infection
A new study has shown that A-beta (Aβ), the protein that forms ▀-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease, is a normal part of the immune system - raising questions about the role infection plays in Alzheimer's disease and whether current treatment strategies should be changed.
May 26, 2016
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Alzheimer's Research UK calls for urgent preparation plan for future access to dementia treatments
Alzheimer's Research UK, the UK's leading dementia research charity, is calling for an urgent plan for managing how new medicines are brought to patients, in a report that highlights several obstacles it fears could delay delivery of the next wave of dementia treatments.
September 15, 2016
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Alzheimer's: Nicotinic receptors as a new therapeutic target
Studies have indicated that nicotine may be beneficial for memory function. Scientists are set out to shed further light on the properties attributed to nicotine by determining the precise structure of the nicotinic receptors in the hippocampus region of the brain. Using mouse models for Alzheimer's disease, they identified the a subunit of the nicotinic receptor as a target that, if blocked, prevents the memory loss associated with Alzheimer's.
August 29, 2016
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Alzheimer's: Structural properties of complex model membranes after interaction with beta-amyloid peptides open the way to the identification of new drug targets
A new report describes the structural properties of complex model membranes after the interaction with beta-amyloid peptides, involved in Alzheimer's disease, opening the way to the identification of new drug targets.
June 13, 2016
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Among antidementia drugs, memantine is associated with the highest risk of pneumonia
Among users of antidementia drugs, persons using memantine have the highest risk of pneumonia, new research shows. the use of rivastigmine patches is associated with an increased risk as well, say researchers.
November 21, 2016
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Among the oldest adults, poor balance may signal higher risk for dementia
In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers examined whether four different measures of poor physical performance might be linked to increased dementia risk for people aged 90 and older.
July 25, 2016
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Amyloid probes gain powers in search for Alzheimer's cause
Molecule offers real-time monitoring of plaques implicated in disease
July 11, 2016
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Antibiotic restores cell communication in brain areas damaged by Alzheimer's-like disease in mice
New research has found a way to partially restore brain cell communication around areas damaged by plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.
November 15, 2016
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Antidepressant use increases hip fracture risk among elderly
Antidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. the increased risk was highest at the beginning of antidepressant use and remained elevated even 4 years later.
January 11, 2017
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Antipsychotic drug use linked to 60% increased risk of mortality among people with Alzheimer's disease
Antipsychotic drug use is associated with a 60 percent increased risk of mortality among persons with Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. the risk was highest at the beginning of drug use and remained increased in long-term use. Use of two or more antipsychotic drugs concomitantly was associated with almost two times higher risk of mortality than monotherapy.
December 14, 2016
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Antipsychotic medications linked to increased risk of pneumonia in persons with Alzheimer's disease
Antipsychotic medications are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to new research. the risk of pneumonia was the highest at the beginning of antipsychotic treatment, remaining elevated also in long-term use. No major differences were observed between the most commonly used antipsychotics.
August 30, 2016
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Antipsychotic use linked to higher pneumonia risk in patients with Alzheimer's disease
Antipsychotic medications are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. the risk of pneumonia was the highest at the beginning of antipsychotic treatment, remaining elevated also in long-term use. No major differences were observed between the most commonly used antipsychotics.
August 30, 2016
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Artificial Intelligence Used to Predict Onset of Alzheimer's
At the VU University Medical Center Amsterdam researchers are harnessing the power of artificial intelligence to be able to detect early signs of Alzheimer's on MRI scans. the parenchyma exhibits small incremental changes on the scan as the disease develops, but these are difficult to spot in new patients. Only once the disease is at a later stage clinicians are able to identify the disease from the scans, but by then it's usually already exhibiting well known symptoms.
July 13, 2016
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Autoimmune conditions and dementia: What's the link?
A recent large-scale study concludes that individuals with autoimmune conditions may have an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. Although the effect size is relatively small, if the findings are replicated, they will have important clinical implications.
March 2, 2017
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Misc. - B

Benefits of cognitive training in dementia patients unclear
Positive effects of cognitive training in healthy elderly people have been reported, but data regarding its effects in patients with dementia is unclear, say investigators.
February 22, 2017
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Benzodiazepines, related drugs increase stroke risk among persons with Alzheimer's disease
The use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like drugs was associated with a 20 per cent increased risk of stroke among persons with Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study. Benzodiazepines were associated with a similar risk of stroke as benzodiazepine-like drugs.
January 16, 2017
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Big Data study discovers earliest sign of Alzheimer's development
Research underlines importance of computational power in future neurological breakthrough
July 12, 2016
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Big trash pickup for cells
Cells are garbage pickers, carefully selecting the trash they want to keep or discard
August 1, 2016
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Blue wavelength light exposure leads to subsequent increases in brain activity in prefrontal cortex
A new study found that blue wavelength light exposure led to subsequent increases in brain activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when participants were engaging in a cognitive task after cessation of light exposure.
June 13, 2016
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BMI status of older adults influences benefits accrued from memory training, study finds
In the first study to compare the results of cognitive training by body mass index (BMI) category, scientists from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research found that memory training provided only one-third the benefit to older adults with obesity than the benefit it provided to older adults without obesity.
January 10, 2017
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Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at NEOMED have just identified a major connection between areas of the brainstem - the ancient area that controls mood, sleep and metabolism - and detrimental changes to bone in a preclinical model of Alzheimer's disease.
December 1, 2016
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Brain cell death in Alzheimer's linked to structural flaw
Study reveals multiple new leads for pursuing potential treatments
July 13, 2016
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Brain imaging links Alzheimer's decline to tau protein
Using a new imaging agent that binds to tau protein and makes it visible in positron emission tomography (PET) scans, scientists have shown that measures of tau are better markers of the cognitive decline characteristic of Alzheimer's than measures of amyloid beta seen in PET scans.
May 11, 2016
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Brain infections may spark Alzheimer's, new study suggests
While still speculative, new hypothesis offers some sensible explanations to the disease.
May 30, 2016
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Brain scan combined with long-term memory test could help early Alzheimer's diagnosis
People with Alzheimer's disease could benefit from earlier diagnosis if a long-term memory test combined with a brain scan were carried out, a study suggests.
June 1, 2016
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Brain training can help in fight against dementia, meta-analysis shows
Engaging in computer-based brain training can improve memory and mood in older adults with mild cognitive impairment, say researchers, but training is no longer effective once a dementia diagnosis has been made, they add.
November 14, 2016
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Brain waves show promise against Alzheimer's protein in mice
Flickering light induces nerve cells to trigger immune response to amyloid-beta
December 6, 2016
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Brain's power to adapt offers short-term gains, long-term strains
Like air-traffic controllers scrambling to reconnect flights when a major hub goes down, the brain has a remarkable ability to rewire itself after suffering an injury. However, maintaining these new connections between brain regions can strain the brain's resources, which can lead to serious problems later, including Alzheimer's Disease, according to researchers.
April 24, 2017
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Brain-aging gene discovered
Genetic variant accelerates normal brain aging in older people by up to 12 years
March 15, 2017
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BUSM researchers participate in five-year program to develop biomarkers for small vessel disease
To better predict, study and diagnose small vessel disease in the brain and its role in vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID), Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has been selected to participate in MarkVCID, a consortium designed to accelerate the development of new and existing biomarkers for small vessel VCID.
March 2, 2017
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Busy Minds May be Better at Fighting Dementia
Computer use, crafting, social activities and games all seem to boost brain health, study finds
January 30, 2017
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Misc. - C

Caffeine boosts enzyme that could protect against dementia
New analysis reveals 24 compounds that can help reduce impact of harmful proteins in the brain
March 7, 2017
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Caffeine may be able to block inflammation, new research says
This could help explain why caffeine is correlated with health benefits
January 16, 2017
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Caffeine may ward off dementia by boosting protective enzyme
A new study suggests that there may be more uses for caffeine than simply providing a morning fix. It has the potential to protect against dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders.
March 8, 2017
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Calcium Supplements May Up Women's Dementia Risk
Finding even more pronounced if blood flow to brain has been affected, study suggests
August 18, 2016
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Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk?
Fine particles from power plants and cars may be to blame for about 20 percent of cases, study suggests
February 1, 2017
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Can paint strokes help identify Alzheimer's?
A new study shows that it may be possible to detect neurodegenerative disorders in artists before they are diagnosed.
December 29, 2016
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Cancer drug restores brain dopamine, reduces toxic proteins in Parkinson, dementia
A small phase I study provides molecular evidence that an FDA-approved drug for leukemia significantly increased brain dopamine and reduced toxic proteins linked to disease progression in patients with Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies.
July 12, 2016
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Cannabinoids remove plaque-forming Alzheimer's proteins from brain cells
Scientists have found preliminary evidence that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other compounds found in marijuana can promote the cellular removal of amyloid beta, a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer's disease.
June 29, 2016
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Cedars-Sinai researchers explore whether healthy lifestyle choices can slow or prevent Alzheimer's disease
Cedars-Sinai neuroscience researchers are studying whether extensive changes in lifestyle among patients with mild cognitive impairment can slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
May 13, 2016
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Cerebral vessel disease increases Alzheimer's dementia risk
Cerebral vessel disease may be an under-recognised risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia, say researchers.
June 16, 2016
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Chemical that detects plaques in Alzheimer's brains extends lifespan of roundworms
Researchers say compound may prevent damaged proteins from accumulating
March 9, 2017
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Children of patients with C9orf72 mutations are at a greater risk of frontotemporal dementia or ALS at a younger age
The most common genetic cause of the brain diseases frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a mutation in the C9orf72 gene. Researchers have demonstrated that if an affected parent passes on this mutation, the children will be affected at a younger age (than the parent). There are no indications that the disease progresses more quickly.
February 14, 2017
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Cholesterol-fighting drugs lower risk of Alzheimer's disease
Study of Medicare beneficiaries indicates statins could be an early preventive measure against Alzheimer's
December 13, 2016
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Combating iron in the brain: Researchers find anti-aging micromolecule
The older we get, the more our brain ages. Cognitive abilities decline and the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases like dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease or having a stroke steadily increases. a possible cause is the accumulation of iron molecules within neurons, which seems to be valid for all vertebrates. In a collaborative research project, scientists found that this iron accumulation is linked to a microRNA called miR-29.
February 14, 2017
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Common cause of both neurological diseases such as dementia and motor neuron diseases
Currently, most scientists do not see a link between ALS and Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), or other dementias. new research confirms the relevance of a certain neurotoxic pathway. the article also confirms TDP-43 inhibition as a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of neurologic disorders, including Alzheimer disease.
January 23, 2017
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Common genetic variant may age the brain
Researchers have identified a common genetic variant that disrupts normal brain aging and may increase susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions.
March 15, 2017
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Common Infections Might be Causing Alzheimer's Disease
A Surprising Finding that Could Open the Doors to new Research
May 26, 2016
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Common sedatives linked to increased risk of pneumonia in people with Alzheimer's disease
Commonly used sedatives called benzodiazepines are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia when used in people with Alzheimer's disease, according to a study.
April 10, 2017
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Common sedatives raise pneumonia risk in Alzheimer's patients
New research suggests that a sedative commonly prescribed to Alzheimer's patients may significantly increase their risk of developing pneumonia.
April 10, 2017
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Commonly used anti-inflammatory drug shows potential to treat Alzheimer's disease
A research project has shown that an experimental model of Alzheimer's disease can be successfully treated with a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug.
August 11, 2016
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Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients
Results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing show unprecedented improvements in ten patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) or its precursors following treatment with a programmatic and personalized therapy. Results from an approach dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration are now available online in the journal Aging.
June 16, 2016
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Concern over high US prescribing levels of common drug linked to dementia
A new analysis raises concern over high prescription rates in the USA of a common drug used to treat overactive bladder. the drug, oxybutynin, when taken orally, is consistently linked with cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly. the analysis shows that oxybutynin, is prescribed in more than a quarter of cases of overactive bladder (27.3%), even though other more suitable drugs are available.
March 27, 2017
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Concern that radiation may contribute to development of Alzheimer's
More humans than ever are exposed to higher levels of ionizing radiation from medical equipment, airplanes, etc. a new study suggests that this kind of radiation may be a confounding factor in the neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer's.
October 27, 2016
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Contrary to decades of hype, curcumin alone is unlikely to boost health
Curcumin, a compound in turmeric, continues to be hailed as a natural treatment for a wide range of health conditions, including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. But a new review of the scientific literature on curcumin has found it's probably not all it's ground up to be. the report instead cites evidence that, contrary to numerous reports, the compound has limited -- if any -- therapeutic benefit.
January 11, 2017
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Couch potatoes face same chance of dementia as those with genetic risk factors: Research
Sedentary older adults with no genetic risk factors for dementia may be just as likely to develop the disease as those who are genetically predisposed, according to a major study which followed more than 1,600 Canadians over five years.
January 10, 2017
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Could a Chemical Found In Marijuana be a Treatment for Alzheimer'S Disease?
Researchers Have Discovered the Benefits of THC In the Brain
October 4, 2016
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Could Loneliness be an Early Sign of Alzheimer's?
People with 'biomarkers' for the brain disease were more likely to feel socially detached, study finds
November 2, 2016
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Could Slight Brain Zap During Sleep Boost Memory?
Small study says yes, for a certain type of recognition
July 28, 2016
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Could Statins Cut Alzheimer's Risk? It Depends
Type of statin used also made a difference in study, but black men did not see any benefits
December 12, 2016
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Critical protein shows promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's
In new research, researchers examine p62 -- a critical protein associated with tell-tale symptoms of Alzheimer's. the study demonstrates for the first time that p62 may have a role in reversing the effects of damaged plaques in the brain.
August 30, 2016
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Misc. - D

Deep Brain Stimulation for Early Alzheimer's?
Although treatment seems safe, benefit isn't yet clear
July 28, 2016
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Deep brain stimulation studies in Alzheimer's disease pose ethical challenges
Researchers propose guidelines to better protect patients in DBS clinical trials
January 24, 2017
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Defective brain cells disposing toxic proteins may be linked to neurodegenerative diseases
Rutgers scientists say neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's may be linked to defective brain cells disposing toxic proteins that make neighboring cells sick.
February 10, 2017
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Dementia not prevented with vitamin E, selenium, study finds
An ample body of research has shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. as a result, antioxidant supplements have been proposed as preventive measures against dementia. a new trial, however, tests the effect of vitamin E and selenium on aging men and finds no evidence that they have therapeutic value.
March 19, 2017
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Dementia on the downslide, especially among people with more education, study finds
In a hopeful sign for the health of the nation's brains, the percentage of American seniors with dementia is dropping, a new study finds. the downward trend has emerged despite something else the study shows: a rising tide of three factors that are thought to raise dementia risk by interfering with brain blood flow, namely diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.
November 21, 2016
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Dementia risk high after ICH
A large study shows that nearly a third of patients who survive an intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) will go on to develop dementia within 4 years.
May 11, 2016
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Dementia: the right to rehabilitation
Rehabilitation is important for people with dementia as it is for people with physical disabilities, according to a leading dementia expert.
March 28, 2017
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Designer compound may untangle damage leading to some dementias
NIH-funded preclinical study suggests a possible treatment for Alzheimer™ disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.
February 8, 2017
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Designer compound may untangle damage leading to some dementias
Preclinical study suggests a possible treatment for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders
February 8, 2017
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Designer protein gives new hope to scientists studying Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have designed a new protein which strongly resembles Abeta. In people with Alzheimer's, Amyloid-beta (Abeta) proteins stick together to make amyloid fibrils which form clumps between neurons in the brain. it's believed the build-up of these clumps causes brain cells to die, leading to the cognitive decline in patients suffering from the disease.
July 22, 2016
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Designing dementia friendly care homes
As the population ages and demography changes, the world is facing an unprecedented challenge of how to care for and support its older people. While the fact that people are living longer should be celebrated, the flip side is that age-related illness such as dementia are on the rise and it's important to find solutions and alleviate the difficulties people may face as a result.
May 16, 2016
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Despite Alzheimer's plaques, some seniors remain mentally sharp
Proteins linked to dementia don't diminish memory in some brains
November 16, 2016
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Developing a sensor for vitamin B12 deficiency
A world-first optical sensor has been developed that can detect vitamin B12 in diluted human blood -- a first step towards a low-cost, portable, broadscale vitamin B12 deficiency test. Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with an increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.
October 17, 2016
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Diet and exercise can reduce protein build-ups linked to Alzheimer's, study shows
A healthy diet, regular physical activity and a normal body mass index can reduce the incidence of protein build-ups that are associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, research shows.
August 16, 2016
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Diet rich in saturated fat reduces person's cognitive function making it difficult to control eating habits
A diet high in saturated fat can make your brain struggle to control what you eat, says a new study in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience.
July 29, 2016
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Discovery opens door to new Alzheimer's treatments
Researchers have discovered the role of a key protein in the development of Alzheimer's disease, outlines a new report.
November 17, 2016
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Discriminating remembrance may be marker for early stages of memory loss in older adults
People who selectively recalled positive information over neutral and negative information performed worse on memory tests conducted by University of California, Irvine neurobiologists, who said the results suggest that this discriminating remembrance may be a marker for early stages of memory loss in the elderly.
July 20, 2016
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Disrupting protein interaction may slow Alzheimer's progression
Inhibiting an interaction between two specific proteins may be a new way to target dementia. a recent study using a fruit fly model could help to design a way of slowing the progression of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases.
March 3, 2017
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Distinguishing differences in dementia using brain scans
Neuroscientists are now able to distinguish two different forms of dementia using advanced imaging techniques. this is the first step towards early recognition of dementia in patients on the basis of brain networks.
May 24, 2016
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Does a dementia diagnosis have a silver lining? Study suggests it can
Results challenge the stereotype of depression, denial and despair post-diagnosis
July 25, 2016
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Dozens of Patients Are Suing a Clinic that Gave Them Fake Alzheimer's Diagnoses
Imagine that a doctor told you that your brain was slowly starting to self-destruct, that soon your once-healthy neurons would stop functioning, that you would lose all connection with reality, with the things and people that you loved. Then imagine that you found out that not only did that doctor make it all up, but he wasn't even actually a doctor. you would be pretty pissed, right?
February 9, 2017
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Drinking tea could help stave off cognitive decline
Thanks to its high levels of antioxidants, tea has been linked to a lower risk of diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. However, its potential health benefits may not end there. Researchers have found that regular tea consumption could more than halve the risk of cognitive decline for older adults, particularly for those with a genetic risk of Alzheimer's disease.
March 28, 2017
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Driving ability of people with cognitive impairment difficult to assess: Research review
No single assessment tool is able to consistently determine driving ability in people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment, a research review has found.
July 13, 2016
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Driving, dementia: Assessing safe driving in high-risk older adults
Driving is a very complex process. Today, almost half of all drivers on the roadways are over the age of 65. with the decline of cognitive processes in older adults such as Alzheimer's disease, there is heightened concern for public safety and unsafe driving in this population. Understanding the cognitive factors that inhibit effective driving as well as recognizing older adults who may be at risk for unsafe driving is key.
July 6, 2016
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Drug candidate stabilizes essential transport mechanism in nerve cells
NAP blocks formation of 'tangles' that contribute to Alzheimer's disease
January 31, 2017
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Drug compound halts Alzheimer's-related damage in mice
Appears to reverse some neurological harm
January 25, 2017
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Drugs already in medicine cabinets may fight dementia, early data suggests
In mouse and cell studies, drugs shut down damaging stress response, protected brain.
April 25, 2017
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Misc. - E

Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage'
Normally, blood-brain barrier prevents this from happening
May 31, 2016
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Early signs of Alzheimer's detected in cerebrospinal fluid
Immune cells of the brain become active years before the disease becomes apparent
December 14, 2016
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Eating seafood once a week may protect against age-related memory loss
Eating a meal of seafood or other foods containing omega-3 fatty acids at least once a week may protect against age-related memory loss and thinking problems in older people, according to a team of researchers at Rush University Medical Center and Wageningen University in the Netherlands.
May 11, 2016
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Elderly discovered with superior memory and Alzheimer's pathology
New research on the brains of individuals 90 years and older who had superior memories until their deaths revealed widespread and dense Alzheimer's plaques and tangles in some cases, considered full-blown Alzheimer's pathology.
November 16, 2016
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Electrical brain stimulation found to improve working memory
Scientists may have found a way to improve brain connectivity. the findings may boost short-term working memory, and in the future, they may help to repair brain damage in patients with traumatic brain injury, stroke, or epilepsy.
March 15, 2017
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Even a Little Exercise May Help Stave Off Dementia
Sedentary seniors more likely to suffer mental decline, study finds
August 26, 2016
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Evidence of Alzheimer's in patients with Lewy body disease tracks with course of dementia
Patients who had a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease with dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies and had higher levels of Alzheimer's disease pathology in their donated post-mortem brains also had more severe symptoms of these Lewy body diseases during their lives, compared to those whose brains had less AD pathology.
January 5, 2017
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Evidence of brain damage found in former soccer players
Evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a potential cause of dementia caused by repeated blows to the head, has been found in the brains of former association football (soccer) players.
February 15, 2017
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Exercise may benefit elderly people with memory and thinking problems
The research involved people with vascular cognitive impairment, which is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. In vascular cognitive impairment, problems with memory and thinking skills result from damage to large and small blood vessels in the brain.
October 19, 2016
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Exercise May Help People with Memory Loss
But effects only lasted as long as activity continued, study found
October 19, 2016
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Exercise results in larger brain size and lowered dementia risk
Regular physical activity for older adults could lead to higher brain volumes and a reduced risk for developing dementia. It particularly affected the size of the hippocampus, which controls short-term memory, and its protective effect against dementia was strongest in people age 75 and older.
August 02, 2016
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Existing MCI screening tools result in more than 7% false-negative error rate, study finds
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a slight but noticeable and measurable decline in cognitive abilities, such as remembering names or a list of items. While changes may not be severe enough to disrupt daily life, a clinical diagnosis of MCI indicates an increased risk of eventually developing Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia.
May 24, 2016
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Misc. - F

FAQ: what is Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease?
A diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease is devastating enough. a diagnosis at a relatively young age adds another dimension to the illness.
July 7, 2016
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Fewer Americans Suffering from Dementia
Rates have dropped over last decade, and better education might be one reason why
November 21, 2016
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Five of the best Alzheimer's blogs
Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and affects more than 5 million people in the United States. After a diagnosis, many people with Alzheimer's and their families turn to the Internet for information on what to expect in the upcoming years. we have searched the web for the most helpful blogs for people affected by Alzheimer's.
April 5, 2017
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Flu vaccination associated with lower dementia risk in patients with heart failure
Risk was halved in those vaccinated more than three times
May 23, 2016
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Former Teen Heartthrob David Cassidy Has Dementia
David Cassidy, a teen heartthrob from the 1970s, said Monday that he is battling dementia.
February 21, 2017
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Fountain of youth? Dietary supplement may prevent and reverse severe damage to aging brain, research suggests
A dietary supplement containing a blend of thirty vitamins and minerals--all natural ingredients widely available in health food stores--has shown remarkable anti-aging properties that can prevent and even reverse massive brain cell loss, according to new research. it's a mixture scientists believe could someday slow the progress of catastrophic neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's, ALS and Parkinson's.
June 2, 2016
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From champagne bubbles, dance parties and disease to new nanomaterials
Whether it is clouds or champagne bubbles forming, or the early onset of Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes, a common mechanism is at work: nucleation processes.
November 22, 2016
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Misc. - G

Genes linked to educational attainment expressed in the brain during prenatal development
A USC co-author of the study says the genes that are correlated with educational attainment are expressed in the brain during prenatal development. some of the genes also predict risk for Alzheimer's disease, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
May 13, 2016
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GFE3 protein may help researchers modify brain activity, memory in targeted ways
Scientists at USC have developed a new tool to modify brain activity and memory in targeted ways, without the help of any drugs or chemicals.
June 7, 2016
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Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI
New research from the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas shows that strategy-based reasoning training can improve the cognitive performance for those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a preclinical stage of those at risk for Alzheimer's disease.
June 14, 2016
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Glucose deprivation in the brain triggers onset of cognitive decline, research shows
One of the earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease is a decline in glucose levels in the brain. It appears in the early stages of mild cognitive impairment -- before symptoms of memory problems begin to surface. Whether it is a cause or consequence of neurological dysfunction has been unclear, but new research at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University now shows unequivocally that glucose deprivation in the brain triggers the onset of cognitive decline, memory impairment in particular.
January 31, 2017
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Good ceramides in skin creams and shampoos may hold promise for Alzheimer's treatment
The best-selling lipid in the world, often prominently featured on skin cream and shampoo labels, appears to also hold promise for Alzheimer's treatment, scientists say.
July 25, 2016
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Google creates a new virtual reality experience: "A Walk Through Dementia"
The experiences of others can be difficult to understand -- do you see green in the same way as me? But things are even harder -- and more important -- to grasp in the world of medicine. Just what is it like to have dementia, for example? it's much more than just memory loss and confusion.
September 30, 2016
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Gram-negative bacteria may influence Alzheimer's disease pathology
For the first time, researchers have found higher levels of Gram-negative bacteria antigens in brain samples from late-onset Alzheimer's disease patients. Compared to controls, patients with Alzheimer's had much higher levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and E coli K99 pili protein.
November 30, 2016
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Gut bacteria can accelerate development of Alzheimer's disease, research shows
New research from Lund University in Sweden has shown that intestinal bacteria can accelerate the development of Alzheimer's disease. According to the researchers behind the study, the results open up the door to new opportunities for preventing and treating the disease.
February 10, 2017
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Gut bacteria may play a role in Alzheimer's disease
New research has shown that intestinal bacteria can accelerate the development of Alzheimer's disease. According to the researchers behind the study, the results open up the door to new opportunities for preventing and treating the disease.
February 10, 2017
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Misc. - H

Healthy BMI, exercise and diet can lower abnormal protein build-ups linked to Alzheimer's
A study by researchers at UCLA's Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior has found that a healthy diet, regular physical activity and a normal body mass index can reduce the incidence of protein build-ups that are associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
August 16, 2016
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Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia
Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in new Taipei City, Taiwan.
May 24, 2016
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Hey! you stole my food!: Abnormal eating behaviors in frontotemporal dementia
Frontotemporal dementia is associated with a wide variety of abnormal eating behaviors such as hyperphagia, fixations on one kind of food, even ingestion of inanimate objects, making an already difficult situation even worse. a new review gathers together the state of the art of what is known in this field, paying particular attention to the brain mechanisms involved. the information may be used for understanding eating disorders in healthy people.
June 22, 2016
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High blood pressure in middle age could be potential risk factor for Alzheimer's disease
High blood pressure in middle age can lead to impaired cognition and is a potential risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, according to a statement from the American Heart Association co-authored by Loyola Medicine neurologist Jose Biller, MD.
October 26, 2016
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High Blood Pressure May not be all Bad in Elderly
Developing it after 80 might help prevent mental decline, research suggests
January 17, 2017
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High cholesterol intake and eggs do not increase risk of memory disorders
A relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, no association was found in persons carrying the APOE4 gene variant that affects cholesterol metabolism and increases the risk of memory disorders, report researchers at conclusion of a new study.
January 9, 2017
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HRT Won't Lower Women's Alzheimer's Risk
There was some hint that long-term hormone therapy might have a benefit, but results weren't definitive
February 16, 2017
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Human amyloid-beta acts as natural antibiotic in the brain: Alzheimer's-associated amyloid plaques may trap microbes
A new study provides additional evidence that amyloid-beta protein -- which is deposited in the form of beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease -- is a normal part of the innate immune system, the body's first-line defense against infection.
May 25, 2016
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Misc. - I

In Alzheimer's, excess tau protein damages brain's GPS
Finding may explain why many Alzheimer's disease patients wander
January 19, 2017
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In Study, Beer Drinkers Found to be Less Alzheimer's-Prone
Is There Any Problem a Cold Pint Can't Solve?
May 27, 2016
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Incidence of dementia in primary care increased in the Netherlands over 23 years
The incidence of registered dementia cases has increased slightly over a 23-year period (1992 to 2014) in the Netherlands, according to a new study.
March 7, 2017
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Infection may trigger development of Alzheimer's disease
A growing body of research on Alzheimer's disease suggests an infectious trigger for the development of the disease. According to Brian Balin, PhD, professor of pathology and chair of bio-medical sciences at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, this could be the key to stopping the destructive process of Alzheimer's before it even starts.
June 2, 2016
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IRB Barcelona scientists rediscover utility of disordered proteins as therapeutic targets
Prostate cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's...these three diseases are associated with proteins that share a common feature, namely disordered regions that have no apparent rigid three-dimensional structure.
August 16, 2016
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Is Need for More Sleep a Sign of Pending Dementia?
Study finds an association but doesn't prove cause and effect
February 22, 2017
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Misc. - J

JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award
The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD) is pleased to announce that Mark W. Bondi, PhD, ABPP/CN, Professor of Psychiatry at UC San Diego and Director of the Neuropsychological Assessment Unit at the VA San Diego Healthcare System, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Alzheimer Award presented by the journal in recognition of his outstanding work on the development of a novel and promising method of staging preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on number of abnormal biomarkers that is predictive of progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD.
July 15, 2016
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Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that triggers brain cell death from strokes and injuries
Despite their different triggers, the same molecular chain of events appears to be responsible for brain cell death from strokes, injuries and even such neurodegenerative diseases as Alzheimer's.
October 7, 2016
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Johns Hopkins study highlights added risks of undiagnosed dementia in older adults
A Johns Hopkins study on data from more than 7,000 older Americans has found that those who show signs of probable dementia but are not yet formally diagnosed are nearly twice as likely as those with such a diagnosis to engage in potentially unsafe activities, such as driving, cooking, and managing finances and medications.
June 2, 2016
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Misc. - K

Keep Busy! Stay Sharp!
Study suggests a full schedule may enhance your mental prowess
May 16, 2016
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KU research on physical activity could be key to designing interventions for people with early AD
For older adults, physical activity is apt to shield against cognitive decline and forms of dementia such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, as people age and some experience cognitive impairment, they tend to become less physically active.
November 9, 2016
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Misc. - L

Lack of diagnosis creates added risks for those with dementia
Study highlights potential benefits of formal diagnosis as early as possible
June 2, 2016
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Leading dementia expert calls for greater public awareness of dementia risk factors
National Clinical Director for Dementia calls for risk awareness drive
March 8, 2016
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Leaky blood-brain barrier linked to Alzheimer's disease
Researchers using contrast-enhanced MRI have identified leakages in the blood-brain barrier of people with early Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. the results suggest that increased BBB permeability may represent a key mechanism in the early stages of the disease.
May 31, 2016
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Link between vascular disease and Alzheimer's strengthened
The more risk factors for vascular disease one has in middle age, the higher the risk may be of developing Alzheimer's disease in later life.
April 11, 2017
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Link found between traumatic brain injury and Parkinson's, but not Alzheimer's
Traumatic brain injury with a loss of consciousness may be associated with later development of Parkinson's disease but not Alzheimer's disease or incident dementia, new research indicates.
July 11, 2016
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Long-term antibiotic treatment slows progression of Alzheimer's disease through changes in gut bacteria
Long-term treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics decreased levels of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and activated inflammatory microglial cells in the brains of mice in a new study by neuroscientists from the University of Chicago.
July 21, 2016
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Long-term memory test could aid earlier Alzheimer's diagnosis
People with Alzheimer's disease could benefit from earlier diagnosis if a long-term memory test combined with a brain scan were carried out, a study suggests.
June 1, 2016
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Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain
A new study from Western University is helping to explain why the long-term use of common anticholinergic drugs used to treat conditions like allergies and overactive bladder lead to an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. the findings show that long-term suppression of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine - a target for anticholinergic drugs - results in dementia-like changes in the brain.
June 23, 2016
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Long-term use of opioid patches common among persons with Alzheimer's disease
Approximately seven per cent of persons with Alzheimer's disease use strong pain medicines, opioids, for non-cancer pain for a period longer than six months, according to a recent study. One third of people initiating opioid use became long-term users, and long-term use was heavily associated with transdermal opioid patches.
November 14, 2016
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Loving Kids May Help Lower Seniors' Dementia Risk
But negative relationships with children, spouse increased chances, study finds
May 2, 2017
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Lower weight late in life linked to greater risk for Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital have found an association between lower weight and more extensive deposits of the Alzheimer's-associated protein beta-amyloid in the brains of cognitively normal older individuals.
August 02, 2016
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Misc. - M

Major step towards Alzheimer's blood test
A research team, led by Cardiff University, has made a significant step towards the development of a simple blood test to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
August 31, 2016
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Major step towards Alzheimer's blood test
A research team has made a significant step towards the development of a simple blood test to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease. the group studied blood from 292 individuals with the earliest signs of memory impairment and found a set of biomarkers that predicted whether or not a given individual would develop Alzheimer's disease.
August 31, 2016
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MAO is a possible Alzheimer's disease biomarker
Alzheimer's disease affects more than 35 million people, a number that is expected to increase in the coming years. Currently, Alzheimer's diagnoses rely on clinical neuropathologic assessment of amyloid-beta peptide aggregates (plaques) and neurofibrillary tangles. But now researchers reveal that an enzyme already implicated in a host of neural disorders could someday serve as a biomarker.
December 6, 2016
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Marijuana Shown to Protect Brain Cells from Alzheimer's
A new study suggests that compounds found in marijuana can stave off the brain damaging effects of Alzheimer's disease. it's a promising discovery, but claims that pot can prevent this age-related brain disorder are premature. Put the pipe away, man.
June 30, 2016
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May smartphones help to maintain memory in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease?
Small trial succeeds using Goggle calendar application to maintain prospective memory (the ability to remember to do things in the future) in a patient with mild Alzheimer's disease
March 1, 2017
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Mathematical Analysis of Brush Strokes Spots Artists with Dementia
Artists often develop new creative techniques late in life, often at the same time as they begin suffering from dementia. some scientists suspect that it is the dementia itself that fosters ways of expression that haven't been tried by the artists before. at the University of Liverpool a team of researchers wanted to examine this connection further by performing fractal analysis of paintings of famous artists. Specifically, they were looking for evidence of cognitive decline within the brush strokes of art works completed before and after the onset of artists' dementia.
January 3, 2017
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MedDiet improves memory and slows cognitive decline, study shows
The Mediterranean diet can improve your mind, as well your heart, shows a study published in the open-access journal.
August 09, 2016
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Memory loss not enough to diagnose Alzheimer's
Relying on clinical symptoms of memory loss to diagnose Alzheimer's disease may miss other forms of dementia caused by Alzheimer's that don't initially affect memory, reports a new study.
September 13, 2016
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Metallic molecule offers real-time monitoring of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's
A metallic molecule being studied at Rice University begins to glow when bound to amyloid protein fibrils of the sort implicated in Alzheimer's disease. When triggered with ultraviolet light, the molecule glows much brighter, which enables real-time monitoring of amyloid fibrils as they aggregate in lab experiments.
July 11, 2016
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Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels
A new study from ÷rebro University, published in Science Signaling today, shows that heart medication reduces the build-up of plaque in the brain's blood vessels in mice. the question is if this is true also in humans? If the answer is yes, it might bring scientists a step closer to developing a medicine against Alzheimer's disease.
May 25, 2016
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Midlife Memory Lapses May be Normal Part of Aging
Midlife memory lapses may reflect a shift in how your brain forms and retrieves memories, not a decline in thinking skills, a new study suggests.
July 15, 2016
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More human-like model of Alzheimer's better mirrors tangles in the brain
A new animal model using tau tangles isolated from the brains of Alzheimer's patients rather than synthetic tau tangles paints a closer picture of the tau pathology in the AD brain, outlines a new report.
November 16, 2016
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More than half of persons with Alzheimer's disease aged 90 years or more use psychotropic drugs
Psychotropic drug use is rather common among persons aged 90 years of more diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease compared with those who were diagnosed at younger age, concludes a study in Finland. Persons aged 90 years or more used antipsychotics 5 times and antidepressants 2.5 times more often than those without the disease in the same age group.
October 3, 2016
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Mouse model points to potential new treatment for Alzheimer's disease
Treatment with an inhibitor of 12/15-lipoxygenase, an enzyme elevated in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), reverses cognitive decline and neuropathology in an AD mouse model, reports a new study. the effects were observed after the AD-like phenotype was already established in the mice, which is promising for its potential therapeutic use, as neuropathology tends to develop many years before the appearance of AD symptoms in patients.
January 5, 2017
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Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease
The tidal wave approaches. In the coming decades, Alzheimer's disease is projected to exact a devastating economic and emotional toll on society, with patient numbers in the US alone expected to reach 13.5 million by mid-century at a projected cost of over a trillion dollars.
August 30, 2016
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Multivariate approach helps improve MMSE test for Alzheimer's disease
Currently, cognitive impairment of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is measured using the 'Mini-Mental State Examination' (MMSE) test, which involves monitoring answers to five types of questions and using an algorithm to score patients. However, the MMSE test has received criticism, with factors such as educational background being shown to affect scores.
August 23, 2016
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Mystery solved? Biologists find a unique version of a filament-forming protein in human cells that insects lack
Biologists have found a unique version of a filament-forming protein in human cells that insects lack. Providing structural support and protection against such conditions as blistering, cataracts and dementia, intermediate filament proteins (IFs) reside in every cell in the human body.
July 7, 2016
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Misc. - N

'Nanobottles' offer blueprint for enhanced biological imaging
A pan-European team of researchers involving the University of Oxford has developed a new technique to provide cellular 'blueprints' that could help scientists interpret the results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping.
October 27, 2016
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Natural tooth repair method, using Alzheimer's drug, could revolutionize dental treatments
A new method of stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp using an Alzheimer's drug has been discovered by a team of researchers.
January 9, 2017
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Need for standardised guidelines to fight Alzheimer's disease
Some 47 million people worldwide suffer from some form of dementia. Scientists are working feverishly to find a cure for the most common form, Alzheimer's. at the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen, Prof Gunhild Waldemar issued an appeal for researchers to work together and draw up standardised guidelines for early identification and treatment of the disease.
May 31, 2016
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Neuropsychologist pinpoints risk factors for dementia
Dementia strikes one in 14 people in the UK over 65, and 47 million people worldwide.Yet scientists are still urgently trying to find why the disease affects some but not others.
August 19, 2016
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Never before seen images of early stage Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have used the MAX IV synchrotron in Lund -- the strongest of its kind in the world - to produce images that predate the formation of toxic clumps of beta-amyloid, the protein believed to be at the root of Alzheimer's disease. the unique images appear to contradict a previously unchallenged consensus. Instead of attempting to eliminate beta-amyloid, or so-called plaques, the researchers now suggest stabilizing the protein.
March 13, 2017
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New algorithms may revolutionize drug discoveries, and our understanding of life
A new set of machine learning algorithms that can generate 3-D structures of tiny protein molecules may revolutionize the development of drug therapies for a range of diseases, from Alzheimer's to cancer.
February 7, 2017
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New analysis shows correlation between testosterone-lowering therapy for prostate cancer and dementia
A new analysis of patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer shows a connection between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) - a testosterone-lowering therapy and a common treatment for the disease - and dementia, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
March 30, 2017
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New approach to treating Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have introduced a new approach to treat Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death among in older adults. the exact causes of Alzheimer's disease are still unknown, but several factors are presumed to be causative agents.
February 28, 2017
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New biochip test helps identify individuals at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers today unveiled results from a new blood test to help identify which patients are at an elevated risk of Alzheimer's disease. the findings, presented at the 68th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo in Philadelphia, showed that the biochip test, which allows multiple tests to be run on one blood sample, was as accurate as existing molecular tests that analyze DNA.
August 03, 2016
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New biochip-based blood test detects elevated risk for Alzheimer's disease
Researchers today unveiled results from a new blood test to help identify which patients are at an elevated risk of Alzheimer's disease. the findings showed that the biochip test, which allows multiple tests to be run on one blood sample, was as accurate as existing molecular tests that analyze DNA.
August 03, 2016
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New blood test helps detect MCI stage of Alzheimer's disease
A research team, led by Dr. Robert Nagele from Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine and Durin Technologies, Inc., has announced the development of a blood test that leverages the body's immune response system to detect an early stage of Alzheimer's disease - referred to as the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage - with unparalleled accuracy. In a "proof of concept" study involving 236 subjects, the test demonstrated an overall accuracy, sensitivity and specificity rate of 100 percent in identifying subjects whose MCI was actually caused by an early stage of Alzheimer's disease.
June 8, 2016
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New clinical study to test promising Diabetes drug in people with MND
Could a Diabetes drug be used for Motor Neurone Disease?
March 10, 2017
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New clues about the aging brain's memory functions
Dopamine D2 receptor is linked to the long-term episodic memory, which function often reduces with age and due to dementia, report researchers. this new insight can contribute to the understanding of why some but not others are affected by memory impairment, they say.
June 29, 2016
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New dementia app helps memory loss patients find memories
People suffering from Alzheimer's and other forms of age-related dementia sometimes have trouble recognizing friends and family or knowing what to talk about when they visit. a new app offers to help patients stay connected to their memories -- and thus to their friends and family -- and perhaps will even help them keep a conversation going.
August 03, 2016
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New experimental system sheds light on how memory loss may occur
Spatial memory decays when the entorhinal cortex is not functioning properly, a new mouse model shows. the study, say the authors, provides new information about how dysfunction of this circuit may contribute to memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.
June 30, 2016
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New function discovered for compound that may help slow aging
Researchers have found that a compound called rapamycin has unusual properties that may help address neurologic damage such as Alzheimer's disease, and reduce the cellular senescence associated with aging.
April 5, 2017
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New genetic variants associated with extreme old age
The search for the genetic determinants of extreme longevity has been challenging, with the prevalence of centenarians (people older than 100) just one per 5,000 population in developed nations. But a recently published study that combines four studies of extreme longevity, has identified new rare variants in chromosomes 4 and 7 associated with extreme survival and with reduced risks for cardiovascular and Alzheimer's disease.
April 25, 2017
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New imaging method shows how genes activate in the living brain
This could help us develop better treatments for Alzheimer's
August 10, 2016
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New imaging technique in Alzheimer's disease opens up possibilities for new drug development
Tau PET is a new and promising imaging method for Alzheimer's disease. a case study in Sweden now confirms that tau PET images correspond to a higher degree to actual changes in the brain. According to the researchers behind the study, this increases opportunities for developing effective drugs.
September 28, 2016
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New insight into how Alzheimer's disease begins
A new study offers important insight into how Alzheimer's disease begins within the brain. the researchers found a relationship between inflammation, a toxic protein and the onset of the disease. the study also identified a way that doctors can detect early signs of Alzheimer's by looking at the back of patients' eyes.
November 18, 2016
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New insight into the most common genetic cause of ALS, FTD
Novel function uncovered for the C9orf72 protein that is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia
June 30, 2016
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New laser activated technique sheds light on memory loss conditions
New method uses near infrared light to shed light on memory loss conditions
February 3, 2017
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New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid could lead to early detection of Alzheimer's disease
New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid heighten the chance of early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Results from a large European study, led by researchers at the Karolinska Institutet, are now published in the medical journal BRAIN.
July 8, 2016
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New molecular discovery may help identify drug therapies to prevent dementia
Scientists pinpoint protein in brain pathway that enhances memory
January 10, 2017
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New report highlights increasing cost of caring for people with Alzheimer's and dementia
The national cost of caring for those with Alzheimer's and dementia is estimated to be $259 billion this year, according to a new report from the Alzheimer's Association.
March 13, 2017
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New research adds evidence on potential treatments targeting amyloid beta in Alzheimer's
New research could provide additional clues for future treatment targets to delay Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, according to the group's latest findings.
July 28, 2016
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New research provides insight into how exercise helps retain old memories
Research has found that exercise causes more new neurons to be formed in a critical brain region, and contrary to an earlier study, these new neurons do not cause the individual to forget old memories, according to research by Texas A&M College of Medicine scientists, in the Journal of Neuroscience.
August 03, 2016
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New roadmap can help guide researchers to speed up biomarker-based research on Alzheimer's disease
Biomarkers could revolutionise the early detection of and therapy for Alzheimer's disease. However, experts attending the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) in Copenhagen criticized that the big breakthroughs are slow in coming because of a lack of priorities in research. a roadmap should help to push along advances in this area.
June 1, 2016
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New strategy to obtain a specific type of amyloid-beta aggregate that may underlie neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease
For the first time, researchers describe how to prepare a specific type of aggregate of the amyloid-beta protein with the ability to perforate the cell membrane. what causes neuron death and the subsequent cognitive decline in Alzheimer┤s disease is still unknown.
September 13, 2016
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New study demonstrates no risk of contracting dementia through blood transfusion
Previous studies have shown that neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's can be induced in healthy laboratory animals, causing concern that dementia diseases can be transmitted between individuals, possibly via blood transfusions. However, in a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, a team from Karolinska Institutet shows that the diseases are not transmitted.
June 29, 2016
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New study may help unveil structure and behavior of neurotoxic oligomers in Alzheimer's disease
Much of the research on Alzheimer's disease has focused on the amyloid beta protein, which clumps together into sticky fibrils that form deposits in the brains of people with the disease. In recent years, attention has turned away from the fibrils themselves to an intermediate stage in the aggregation of amyloid beta. "Oligomers" consisting of a few molecules of the protein stuck together are more mobile than the large, insoluble fibrils and seem to be much more toxic.
June 13, 2016
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New study of fMRI aims to develop efficient real-time method to detect brain activation in AD patients
Researchers at University Hospitals Case Medical Center are beginning a study of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to detect how brain activation in patients in early and middle stages of Alzheimer's disease compares to people without it.
July 20, 2016
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New study of Phase II Alzheimer's drug pipeline reveals more ways to combat disease
A new analysis of the Phase II Alzheimer's drug pipeline, conducted by ResearchersAgainstAlzheimer's (RA2), revealed 57 new Alzheimer's drugs. According to the analysis, nearly twice as many mechanisms of action are being tested in Phase II than in Phase III clinical trials.
October 7, 2016
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New study to learn about risk factors for Alzheimer's disease in older Latino adults
Rush University Medical Center has launched a unique, cohort study called Latino Core to learn about the aging process and risk factors for Alzheimer's disease in older Latino adults.
February 22, 2017
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New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory
Although brains–even adult brains–are far more malleable than we used to think, they are eventually subject to age-related illnesses, like dementia, and loss of cognitive function.
June 15, 2016
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New treatment strategy against Alzheimer's disease?
New research suggests that Alzheimer's disease may trigger increased expression of an enzyme called lysozyme, which attempts to counteract amyloid build-up in the brain.
September 7, 2016
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New type of cell that clears waste from the brain discovered
Scientists have found a previously unknown type of cell that clears waste away from the brain. they suggest that their findings will increase our understanding of the brain's biology and of diseases such as dementia and stroke.
May 2, 2017
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Newly-discovered mechanism for compound may help prevent neurologic damage
Researchers at Oregon State University have found that a compound called rapamycin has unusual properties that may help address neurologic damage such as Alzheimer's disease.
April 5, 2017
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NIH award expands landmark Alzheimer's biomarker study
ADNI adds novel methods for recruitment, testing disease risk.
September 12, 2016
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No risk of contracting dementia through blood transfusion
Previous studies have shown that neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's can be induced in healthy laboratory animals, causing concern that dementia diseases can be transmitted between individuals, possibly via blood transfusions. However, in a new study shows that the diseases are not transmitted.
June 29, 2016
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Novel mechanism identified to protect the brain from many neurodegenerative conditions
Scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have identified a novel mechanism that could be used to protect the brain from damage due to stroke and a variety of neurodegenerative conditions, including sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease.
March 8, 2016
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Novel wearable device can track activities of dementia patients, help in combat training
Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed a multi-modal sensing device that can track the fine-grained activities and behavior of people with dementia – and it could help in Army combat training, too.
September 2, 2016
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NYU Langone launches Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Family Support Program for caregivers
Two new grants from the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) will enable new Yorkers with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and their families, to get the most comprehensive care and support services available in the New York City area.
July 20, 2016
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Misc. - O

Occupational therapy holds potential to provide clinical benefits to dementia patients
A French observational study in real life showed that dementia patients benefiting from occupational therapy sessions report relevant clinical benefits over the intervention period, according to a research study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease this month. the research suggested the influence of occupational therapy on reducing behavioral troubles, caregivers' burden and amount of informal care over the intervention period and a stabilization over the 3-months period thereafter.
December 22, 2016
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Occupational therapy may have the potential to slow down functional decline and reduce behavioral troubles
Dementia patients benefiting from occupational therapy sessions report relevant clinical benefits over the intervention period, according to a research study. the research suggested the influence of occupational therapy on reducing behavioral troubles, caregivers' burden and amount of informal care over the intervention period and a stabilization over the 3-months period thereafter.
December 22, 2016
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Odor identification test may help detect early-stage Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), New York State Psychiatric Institute, and NewYork-Presbyterian reported that an odor identification test may prove useful in predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer's disease.
July 26, 2016
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Old Drug Boosts Brain's Memory Centers
But more research needed before recommending methylene blue to those with memory loss, scientist says
June 28, 2016
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Omega-3 fatty acids could promote clearance of metabolites in the brain, research shows
New research published online in the FASEB Journal suggests that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are found in fish oil, could improve the function of the glymphatic system, which facilitates the clearance of waste from the brain, and promote the clearance of metabolites including amyloid-▀ peptides, a primary culprit in Alzheimer's disease.
October 26, 2016
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One in 4 elderly Australian women have dementia
At least a quarter of Australian women over 70 will develop dementia according to study
March 17, 2017
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Misc. - P

People with dementia have right to cognitive rehabilitation, says expert
Rehabilitation is important for people with dementia as it is for people with physical disabilities, according to a leading dementia expert.
March 28, 2017
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Pat Summitt's Death and Early Alzheimer's
Legendary coach's final role: fighting the brain disease
June 28, 2016
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PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease
The effort to find ways to detect and diagnose preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) has taken a big step forward with the use of positron emission tomography (PET), a "nuclear medicine" for imaging processes in the body, when PET is used with a special 'tracer' that binds to the amyloid plaques in the brain that are a characteristic cause of AD.
May 25, 2016
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PET imaging with special tracer can detect, diagnose early Alzheimer's disease
Small molecule compound 'PiB' binds to amyloid plaque
May 24, 2016
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PET points to tau protein as leading culprit in Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's is a devastating and incurable disease marked by beta-amyloid and tau protein aggregations in the brain, yet the direct relationship between these proteins and neurodegeneration has remained a mystery. new molecular imaging research is revealing how tau, rather than amyloid-deposition, may be more directly instigating neuronal dysfunction.
June 14, 2016
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PET scans can stage Alzheimer's disease in living people
Alzheimer's is a disease of protein aggregation. Amyloid-beta (A▀) protein fibrils are terrible little fragments of protein that tangle up in Gordian knots, like earbud cords stuffed hastily in your pocket, and they build up and form creeping, spreading structures in the brain called plaques.
March 8, 2016
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Physical fitness may offer protection from Alzheimer's disease, other dementias
Recent research suggests that exercise might provide some measure of protection from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.
May 16, 2016
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Pre and post testing show reversal of memory loss from Alzheimer's disease in 10 patients
Small trial succeeds using systems approach to memory disorders
June 16, 2016
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Promising discovery for a non-invasive early detection of Alzheimer's disease
A team of scientists has pioneered new technology that detects in human blood platelets the pathological oligomeric forms of brain tau protein in patients with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, leading toward high relevance findings for the research community.
December 22, 2016
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Promising new methods for early detection of Alzheimer's disease
New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid heighten the chance of early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. These findings may have important implications for early detection of the disease, the choice of drug treatment and the inclusion of patients in clinical trials.
July 8, 2016
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Poison in the brain
Studying formation of putatively toxic structures in neuronal nuclei of Alzheimer's patients
September 15, 2016
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Postmenopausal hormone therapy exceeding ten years may protect from dementia
Postmenopausal estrogen-based hormone therapy lasting longer than ten years was associated with a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease in a large study. the study explored the association between postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy, Alzheimer's disease, dementia and cognition in two nation-wide case-control studies and two longitudinal cohort studies. the largest study comprised approximately 230,000 Finnish women and the follow-up time in different studies was up to 20 years.
February 16, 2017
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Pot May Restrict Blood Flow to Brain: Study
It's too early to say if this contributes to mental decline, Alzheimer's expert says
December 30, 2016
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Powerful defenders of the brain discovered, with big implications for disease and injury
A rare and potent type of immune cell has been discovered around the brain, suggesting the cells may play a critical role in battling Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis and other diseases. by harnessing the cells' power, doctors may be able to develop new treatments for disease, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries -- even migraines.
December 19, 2016
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Precision NanoSystems NanoAssemblr™ Chosen for Horizon 2020 Project to develop Novel RNA Therapeutics
Precision NanoSystems NanoAssemblr™ platform has been selected for the controlled manufacture of nanomedicines as part of the multinational B-SMART (Brain-Specific, Modular and Active RNA Therapeutics) translational research project. this €6 million initiative, funded by the EU Horizon 2020 program, aims to use RNA-based therapeutics to silence the production of disease-causing proteins for a range of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's.
March 29, 2017
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Misc. - Q

Quest Diagnostics introduces digital cognitive assessment tool to help physicians assess patients with dementia
Quest Diagnostics, the world's leading provider of diagnostic information services, today announced CogniSense™, a digital cognitive assessment tool that aids in a physician's assessment, diagnosis and care management of individuals with cognitive dysfunction. CogniSense is designed to overcome several limitations of conventional paper-based cognitive assessment, such as lack of objective, easily trackable data over time and integration to electronic health records.
August 08, 2016
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Misc. - R

Raising brain protein alleviates symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mouse model
Boosting levels of a specific protein in the brain alleviates hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease in a mouse model of the disorder, according to new research published online August 25, 2016 in Scientific Reports.
August 25, 2016
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Rapid blood pressure drops in middle age linked to dementia in old age
Temporary episodes of dizziness or light-headedness when standing could reduce blood flow to the brain with lasting impacts
March 10, 2017
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Rapid number naming test can detect cognitively impaired people with AD
For the first time, researchers have determined that a brief, simple number naming test can differentiate between cognitively healthy elderly individuals and cognitively impaired people with Alzheimer's disease (AD), including those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as well as those with AD dementia.
July 6, 2016
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Regular physical exercise could lead to higher brain volumes and decreased dementia risk
Using the landmark Framingham Heart Study to assess how physical activity affects the size of the brain and one's risk for developing dementia, UCLA researchers found an association between low physical activity and a higher risk for dementia in older individuals. this suggests that regular physical activity for older adults could lead to higher brain volumes and a reduced risk for developing dementia.
August 02, 2016
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Research findings may provide highly effective therapeutic strategy for treatment of Alzheimer's, AMD
for the first time, researchers at LSU Health new Orleans have shown that a protein critical to the body's ability to remove waste products from the brain and retina is diminished in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), after first making the discovery in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain.
March 8, 2016
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Research hints at underlying cause for Alzheimer's drug trial failures
A certain form of immunotherapy targeted to Alzheimer's patients may be ineffective when that patient also has Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, report scientists. While these drugs showed promise in animal studies, clinical trials have failed to show similar benefits in human patients.
October 3, 2016
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Research paves way for development of new drugs to prevent cancer and Alzheimer's
A new generation of drugs that prevent cancer and Alzheimer's could be developed, thanks to research from the University of Warwick.
August 03, 2016
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Research sheds more light on midlife memory decline
Research sheds new light on what constitutes healthy aging of the brain
July 13, 2016
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Research sheds new light on biological processes underlying neurodegeneration in AD
Progranulin is a central protein in both neuronal survival and neurodegenerative diseases. It is thus not surprising that altered progranulin levels represent a universal theme shared across several common neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer's Disease, for instance, reduced brain levels of progranulin contribute to the specific amyloid disease pathology, while increased levels appear to protect against this pathology. In genetic forms of another type of dementia, namely frontotemporal dementia (FTD), progranulin levels can be reduced.
May 26, 2016
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Research shines more light on role of proteins in maintaining synaptic transmission
Synapses are the power junctions that allow living creatures to function. Popularly associated with learning and memory, they play a more fundamental role in our existence by regulating everything from breathing, sleeping and waking and other bodily functions.
August 17, 2016
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Researchers detect blood-brain barrier leakage in people with early AD using contrast-enhanced MRI
Researchers using contrast-enhanced MRI have identified leakages in the blood-brain barrier of people with early Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. the results suggest that increased BBB permeability may represent a key mechanism in the early stages of the disease.
May 31, 2016
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Researchers discover new biological pathway involved in Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have identified a new biological pathway involved in Alzheimer's disease. In experiments using fruit flies, blocking the pathway reduced the death of brain cells, suggesting that interfering with the pathway could represent a promising new strategy to treat the disease in human patients.
July 13, 2016
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Researchers discover new natural tooth repair method using Alzheimer's drug
A new method of stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp using an Alzheimer's drug has been discovered by a team of researchers at King's College London.
January 9, 2017
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Researchers find a potential target for anti-Alzheimer treatments
Scientists have identified a gene that may provide a new starting point for developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD). the USP9 gene has an indirect influence on the so-called tau protein, which is believed to play a significant role in the onset of Alzheimer's disease. this discovery may open a new door to developing active ingredients to treat Alzheimer's disease.
January 11, 2017
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Researchers identify genetic switch that may be potential target for Alzheimer's disease
A team at the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre (CSC), based at Imperial College London, has found an important part of the machinery that switches on a gene known to protect against Alzheimer's Disease.
September 20, 2016
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Researchers identify how amyloid beta linked to Alzheimer's disease could trigger Parkinson's
Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are different neurodegenerative conditions that can sometimes affect the same person, which has led scientists to investigate possible links between the two. now one team, reporting in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, has identified how amyloid beta, the protein fragment strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease, can induce cellular changes that might lead to Parkinson's.
October 12, 2016
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Researchers identify out of control immune system linked to neurodegenerative diseases
AN out of control immune system has been identified as a possible cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.
May 13, 2016
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Researchers make successful vaccine formulation that targets proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease
With more than 7.5 million new cases of Alzheimer's disease a year, the race to find a vaccine and effective treatment for dementia is growing by the day.
July 12, 2016
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Researchers produce images that predate formation of beta-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have used the MAX IV synchrotron in Lund - the strongest of its kind in the world - to produce images that predate the formation of toxic clumps of beta-amyloid, the protein believed to be at the root of Alzheimer's disease. the unique images appear to contradict a previously unchallenged consensus. Instead of attempting to eliminate beta-amyloid, or so-called plaques, the researchers now suggest stabilizing the protein.
March 13, 2017
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Researchers reveal how neurodegenerative diseases spread through the brain
Synapses, the place where brain cells contact one another, play a pivotal role in the transmission of toxic proteins. this allows neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's to spread through the brain, scientists conclude. If the spreading of these toxic proteins could be prevented, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases might be slowed down substantially.
November 9, 2016
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Researchers reveal presence of toxic protein aggregates in the human brain
The following factors facilitate the formation of putatively toxic structures in the neuronal nuclei of Alzheimer's patients.
September 16, 2016
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Researchers uncover mechanism that may help prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have uncovered a mechanism that helps block the accumulation of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease. Tapping into this natural process may therefore help prevent or treat the condition.
March 14, 2017
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Researchers unlock specific mechanisms behind Aα-induced cytoxicity in Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that leads to dementia via advanced neuronal dysfunction and death. a person with Alzheimer's disease suffers loss of control over thought, memory and language abilities. Additionally, the disease takes an emotional, social and economic toll on family members of individuals living with the disease. Alzheimer's disease is also a burden for health care system in the U.S., with as many as 5 million Americans living with the disease in 2013, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and that number is expected to continue rising.
February 14, 2017
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Researchers unveil new data, diagnostic tool at the world's largest Alzheimer's forum
A new diagnostic tool that can identify Alzheimer's disease long before the onset of symptoms has been presented by researchers. they add that the tool also highlights the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Ontario.
July 26, 2016
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Researchers Use Nanoprobe to Measure Levels of Alzheimer's-Associated Proteins in Living Cells
Researchers from the Rowland Institute at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have utilized a unique nanoprobe devised by the Harvard/Rowland scientists to determine key protein levels in living, cultured cells.
June 16, 2016
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Researchers working to develop simple blood test to predict onset of Alzheimer's disease
A research team, led by Cardiff University, has made a significant step towards the development of a simple blood test to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
August 31, 2016
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Resveratrol appears to restore blood-brain barrier integrity in Alzheimer's disease
Resveratrol, given to Alzheimer's patients, appears to restore the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, reducing the ability of harmful immune molecules secreted by immune cells to infiltrate from the body into brain tissues, say researchers.
July 27, 2016
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Risks of dementia and Alzheimer's disease develop at high rates in older kidney transplant recipients
Dementia and Alzheimer's disease develop at elevated rates in older kidney transplant recipients and may threaten the health of their transplanted organ as well as their own survival.
December 16, 2016
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Roadmap for biomarker research on Alzheimer's disease should lead to better results
Biomarkers could revolutionize the early detection of and therapy for Alzheimer's disease. However, experts have criticized that the big breakthroughs are slow in coming because of a lack of priorities in research. a roadmap should help to push along advances in this area.
May 31, 2016
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Roots of Alzheimer's disease can extend as far back as the womb
Vitamin a deficiency could 'program' brain tissue
January 27, 2017
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Rutgers study discovers that chemical used to detect amyloid plaques increases roundworm lifespan
While many anti-aging drugs don't live up to their claim, a tightly replicated study by Rutgers and a group of researchers from around the country discovered that a chemical used to detect amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's extended the lifespan of thousands of roundworms similar in molecular form, function and genetics to humans.
March 10, 2017
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Misc. - S

Scientists detail structure of molecule implicated in Alzheimer's disease
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have detailed the structure of a molecule that has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Knowing the shape of the molecule -- and how that shape may be disrupted by certain genetic mutations -- can help in understanding how Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases develop and how to prevent and treat them.
December 21, 2016
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Scientists discover gene that may open new door to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease
Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine of the University of Luxembourg have identified a gene that may provide a new starting point for developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease. the USP9 gene has an indirect influence on the so-called tau protein, which is believed to play a significant role in the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
January 11, 2017
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Scientists discover how misfolded proteins can damage cells' energy-producing powerhouses
Working with yeast and human cells, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have discovered an unexpected route for cells to eliminate protein clumps that may sometimes be the molecular equivalent of throwing too much or the wrong trash into the garbage disposal. Their finding, they say, could help explain part of what goes awry in the progression of such neurodegenerative diseases as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.
March 3, 2017
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Scientists discover how proteins in the brain build-up rapidly in Alzheimer's
Researchers have identified -- and shown that it may be possible to control -- the mechanism that leads to the rapid build-up of the disease-causing 'plaques' that are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.
July 18, 2016
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Scientists discover RNA methylation could strengthen memory formation
New insight into the process that converts experiences into stable long-term memories has been uncovered by neurobiologists from the University of California, Irvine and the University of Queensland.
June 23, 2016
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Scientists find link between brain infections and Alzheimer's
The study, published this week, focused on the protein known as Amyloid Betas. A-Betas are the major component found in the Beta-Amyloid plaques that clump together in Alzheimer's patients brains, the same plaques that cause the degeneration of the brain and memory loss over time. Until now, the role of Amyloid betas were not fully understood. this new hypothesis set forth by the team at Harvard may change everything the science and medical community knows about A-betas.
May 26, 2016
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Scientists find tau protein as better marker of Alzheimer's disease
A buildup of plaque and dysfunctional proteins in the brain are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. While much Alzheimer's research has focused on accumulation of the protein amyloid beta, researchers have begun to pay closer attention to another protein, tau, long associated with this disease but not studied as thoroughly, in part, because scientists only recently have developed effective ways to image tau.
May 12, 2016
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Scientists identify potential drug treatment in fight against Alzheimer's disease
An international team of scientists has announced a new advance in the fight against Alzheimer's disease by identifying a new drug target for not only improving symptoms of brain degeneration -- but also to extend the life-span of the terminally ill mice.
December 21, 2016
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Scientists keep a molecule from moving inside nerve cells to prevent cell death
Findings may have implications for Lou Gehrig's, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases
August 03, 2016
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Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning
A molecule that enables strong communication between our brain and muscles appears to also aid essential communication between our neurons, scientists report.
June 23, 2016
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Scientists surprised to discover lymphatic 'scavenger' brain cells
The brain has its own inbuilt processes for mopping up damaging cellular waste -- and these processes may provide protection from stroke and dementia. Scientists discovered a new type of lymphatic brain 'scavenger' cell by studying tropical freshwater zebrafish -- which share many of the same cell types and organs as humans.
May 1, 2017
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Scientists uncover potential driver of age- and Alzheimer's-related memory loss
Scientists have made an important discovery toward the development of drugs to treat age-related memory loss in diseases like Alzheimer's. they found that reduced levels of a protein called Rheb result in spontaneous symptoms of memory loss in animal models and are linked to increased levels of another protein known to be elevated in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients.
December 6, 2016
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Sedentary older adults likely to develop dementia as those with genetic risk factors, research finds
Sedentary older adults with no genetic risk factors for dementia may be just as likely to develop the disease as those who are genetically predisposed, according to a major study which followed more than 1,600 Canadians over five years.
January 10, 2017
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Sedatives May Raise Pneumonia Risk in Alzheimer's
Researchers suspect people may breathe saliva or food into their lungs due to fatigue from the drugs
April 10, 2017
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Shape-changing enzyme suggests how small doses of anti-HIV drug might treat Alzheimer's
Molecular roadmap provides key evidence supporting proposal to launch clinical trials of efavirenz as an Alzheimer's treatment
June 28, 2016
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Shedding new light on protein aggregates and the diseases they cause
Researchers have developed a system capable of quickly screening millions of yeast cells to measure protein aggregates. Proteins regulate all of the processes that keep cells alive, but when misfolded they can clump into large aggregations, a phenomenon associated with diseases including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's.
July 13, 2016
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Should we rethink of causes of dementia?
A new theory for the causes of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases has been developed, involving an out-of-control immune system.
May 12, 2016
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Silent seizures recorded in the hippocampus of two patients with Alzheimer's disease
Seizure-like activity in key memory structure may contribute to cognitive symptoms, offering new therapeutic target
May 1, 2017
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'Silent' Seizures Tied to Alzheimer's Symptoms
Researchers suggest they're a potential target for treating the disease
May 2, 2017
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Slowly pulling proteins apart reveals unexpected path to stability
Proteins are long strings of amino acids jumbled together like earphones left inside of a pocket for too long. But while a protein's mess of intertwined knots may look haphazard, their specific folds are extremely important to their biological functions. Misfolded proteins are thought to be the genesis of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and cystic fibrosis, just to name a few.
August 09, 2016
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Smartphone calendars may alleviate memory compromise in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease
The patient is a retired teacher who had reported memory difficulties 12 months prior to the study. These difficulties referred to trouble remembering names and groceries she wanted to purchase, as well as frequently losing her papers and keys. According to the patient and her husband, the main difficulties that she encountered were related to prospective memory (e.g., forgetting medical appointments or to take her medication).
March 1, 2017
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'Sniff test' may be useful in diagnosing early Alzheimer's disease
Adds to evidence that decline in sense of smell occurs alongside cognitive decline
December 20, 2016
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Some with Alzheimer's Brain Plaques Stay Sharp
Study finding raises question of whether something protected their brains
November 14, 2016
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Stiff arteries can negatively impact memory and vital brain processes
As we age, our arteries gradually become less flexible, making it harder for the heart to pump blood throughout the body. this hardening of the arteries occurs faster in people with high blood pressure and increases the risk for heart problems. Using a new mouse model, researchers have found that stiffer arteries can also negatively affect memory and other critical brain processes.
August 26, 2016
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Stiff arteries linked with memory problems, mouse study suggests
Using a new mouse model, researchers have found that stiffer arteries can also negatively affect memory and other critical brain processes. the findings may eventually reveal how arterial stiffness leads to Alzheimer's and other diseases involving dementia.
August 26, 2016
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Stroke prevention may also reduce dementia
Ontario's stroke prevention strategy is also reducing incidence of dementia among people 80+
May 1, 2017
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Studies do not provide clear information on benefits of cognitive training in dementia patients
"The effects of cognitive training in dementia patients have been studied actively during recent decades but the quality and reliability of the studies varies," says licenced neuropsychologist Eeva-Liisa Kallio. She reviewed 31 randomized controlled trials on cognitive training in dementia patients.
February 22, 2017
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Study addresses safety concerns for older adults with diagnosed, undiagnosed dementia
Researchers have examined how often older adults who have diagnosed and undiagnosed dementia engage in potentially unsafe activities.
June 22, 2016
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Study details molecular roots of Alzheimer's
Cellular 'housekeeping' molecule's structure linked to neurodegeneration
December 20, 2016
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Study examines efficacy of two treatments for mild cognitive impairment
A randomized controlled study has evaluated the effects of two treatments for mild cognitive impairment. Authors examined the efficacy of group-based cognitive intervention (GCI) and home-based cognitive intervention (HCI) in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and intervention effects on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).
July 27, 2016
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Study examines how frequently older adults with diagnosed and undiagnosed dementia perform unsafe activities
Dementia currently affects some 5 million people in the U.S., and that number is expected to triple by 2050. Having dementia affects the way you think, act, and make decisions.
June 23, 2016
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Study finds link between tooth loss and elevated risk of dementia
In a study of 1566 community-dwelling Japanese elderly who were followed for 5 years, the risk of developing dementia was elevated in individuals with fewer remaining teeth.
March 8, 2017
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Study finds link between vitamin D levels and risk of cognitive decline in Chinese elderly
Produced primarily in the skin upon exposure to sunlight, Vitamin D is necessary for maintaining healthy bones and muscles. It is now believed to also play a significant role in maintaining healthy brain function. An increased risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases has been observed in those with low vitamin D levels, and studies from Europe and North America have linked low vitamin D levels with future cognitive decline.
July 27, 2016
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Study finds positive changes in patient's personal outlook, quality of life post dementia diagnosis
Results from a study of patients with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or early dementia indicates that their outlook isn't as dark as expected.
July 26, 2016
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Study links dopamine D2 receptor to long-term episodic memory
A European study led by Umea University Professor Lars Nyberg, has shown that the dopamine D2 receptor is linked to the long-term episodic memory, which function often reduces with age and due to dementia. this new insight can contribute to the understanding of why some but not others are affected by memory impairment. the results have been published in the journal PNAS.
June 29, 2016
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Study looks at how relationship to dementia patient can affect caregiver's depression
Too often overlooked is the risk of depression in caregivers of patients with dementia, and a new study focuses on how depressive symptoms may differ depending on the familial relationship between caregiver and patient.
October 13, 2016
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Study of classical Chinese medical literature finds references similar to Alzheimer's disease
A new study of classical Chinese medical texts identifies references to age-related memory impairment similar to modern-day Alzheimer's disease, and to several plant-based ingredients used centuries ago -- and still in use today -- to treat memory impairment.
September 20, 2016
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Study pinpoints how PSEN1 gene mutations can cause early onset Alzheimer's disease
A University of Adelaide analysis of genetic mutations which cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease suggests a new focus for research into the causes of the disease.
June 27, 2016
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Study sheds new light on role of Tau proteins in certain brain diseases
In a study published in the journal PNAS scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) present new findings on the role of the protein Tau in certain brain diseases. Their report which is based on laboratory studies suggests that the drug "Rolofylline" could possibly alleviate learning and memory problems associated with aggregating Tau proteins.
October 7, 2016
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Study shows possibility to reduce antipsychotic use among nursing home residents with dementia
The use of antipsychotic medication in nearly 100 Massachusetts nursing homes was significantly reduced when staff was trained to recognize challenging behaviors of cognitively impaired residents as communication of their unmet needs, according to a new study led by Jennifer Tjia, MD, MSCE, associate professor of quantitative health sciences.
April 17, 2017
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Study suggests new strategy for treating Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common form of dementia. In search for new drugs for AD, the research team, led by Professor Mi Hee Lim of Natural Science at UNIST has developed a metal-based substance that works like a pair of genetic scissors to cut out amyloid-α (Aα), the hallmark protein of AD.
February 28, 2017
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Study suggests 'use it or lose it' to defend against memory loss
Researchers have identified a protein essential for building memories that appears to predict the progression of memory loss and brain atrophy in Alzheimer's patients. Their findings suggest there is a link between brain activity and the presence of this protein.
August 03, 2016
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Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults
A new grant to the Indiana University Center for Aging Research from the National Institute on Aging funds the first study to assess the potential benefits and harms to family members of early dementia screening of older adults.
June 24, 2016
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Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer's
Cubresa Inc., a medical imaging company that develops and markets molecular imaging systems, today announced that their compact SPECT (Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography) scanner was used in a study by Dalhousie University and Mount Saint Vincent University researchers in Halifax, Nova Scotia to help evaluate the diagnostic potential of a new molecular label that could lead to the early detection of Alzheimer's disease in living patients.
November 28, 2016
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Study: Unsaturated fatty acid metabolism associated with progression of Alzheimer's disease
A new study published in PLOS Medicine's Special Issue on Dementia has found that the metabolism of omega-3 and omega-6 unsaturated fatty acids in the brain are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
March 22, 2017
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Substance present in ayahuasca brew stimulates generation of human neural cells
Harmine increases the number of neural progenitors, cells that give rise to neurons, study suggests
December 6, 2016
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Sudden BP Drops Tied to Higher Dementia Odds
Dizziness, faintness on standing could be sign of danger to brain, but study couldn't prove cause and effect
October 11, 2016
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Syngene's G:BOX Chemi XX6 used to help identify biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease
Syngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis solutions, is pleased to announce its G:BOX Chemi XX6 multi-application imager is being utilised by scientists at the University of Brescia for analysing nitrated proteins. this is providing the researchers with accurate information on changes in proteins and may help to identify biomarkers related to Alzheimer's disease.
March 17, 2017
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Misc. - T

Taking out the cellular 'trash' at the right place and the right time
New possibilities for the regulation of molecular processes
October 20, 2016
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Tau PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease increases opportunities for developing effective drugs
Tau PET is a new and promising imaging method for Alzheimer's disease. a case study from Lund University in Sweden now confirms that tau PET images correspond to a higher degree to actual changes in the brain. According to the researchers behind the study, this increases opportunities for developing effective drugs.
September 28, 2016
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Test Might Gauge Alzheimer's Risk in Young Adults
But doctors say the concept is not ready for clinical use yet
July 6, 2016
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The first-in-human clinical trial targeting Alzheimer's tau protein
For the first time, targeting the other feature of Alzheimer's disease, tau, has given fruitful results. In an unprecedented study, active vaccination in humans has resulted in a favorable immune response in 29 out of the 30 patients with only minor side effects.
December 12, 2016
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The lasting effects of ministrokes may contribute to dementia
Investigators report preclinical research showing that microinfarcts induce prolonged dysfunction in brain areas estimated to be 12-times larger than the visible injury site. Data from c-Fos assays and in vivo hemodynamic imaging reveal how individually miniscule microinfarcts might collectively contribute to broader brain dysfunction in patients with vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.
January 16, 2017
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Therapies that target dementia in early stages critical to success
Targeting dementia in the earlier stages of the condition could be critical for the success of future therapies, say researchers who have found that the very earliest symptoms of dementia might be due to abnormal stability in brain cell connections rather than the death of brain tissue, which comes after.
March 28, 2017
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This Prostate Cancer Therapy May Up Dementia Risk
Study found chances doubled, but did not prove androgen deprivation caused damage to brain
October 13, 2016
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Three Alzheimer's genetic risk factors linked to immune cell dysfunction
A new study has uncovered details of how a type of immune cell helps the brain get rid of the tiny amyloid-beta aggregates that can clump together to form the plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's. the researchers found that TREM2 mutations can derail the immune cell's plaque-clearing activity, as can two other genes already known to increase a person's risk for Alzheimer's: APOE and APOJ (known as clusterin).
July 20, 2016
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Tiny micro-vesicle structures may help predict probability of developing Alzheimer's dementia
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say tiny micro-vesicle structures used by neurons and other cells to transport materials internally or dispose of them externally carry tell-tale proteins that may help to predict the likelihood of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) developing into full-blown Alzheimer's disease (AD).
July 6, 2016
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Toxic substance acrolein may play role in preventing fibrillation linked to Alzheimer's disease
Scientists from RIKEN in Japan have discovered that acrolein–a toxic substance produced in cells during times of oxidative stress–in fact may play a role in preventing the process of fibrillation, an abnormal clumping of peptides that has been associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neural diseases. the key to this new role is a chemical process known as 4+4 cycloaddition, where two molecules with "backbones" made up of four-atom chains come together to form a ring-like structure with eight atoms.
June 1, 2016
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Training helps those with mild cognitive impairment, study shows
Strategy-based reasoning training can improve the cognitive performance for those with mild cognitive impairment, a preclinical stage of those at risk for Alzheimer's disease, a new study shows.
June 13, 2016
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Transcranial alternating current stimulation during sleep can enhance memory in healthy people
When you sleep, your brain is busy storing and consolidating things you learned that day, stuff you'll need in your memory toolkit tomorrow, next week, or next year. for many people, especially those with neurological conditions, memory impairment can be a debilitating symptom that affects every-day life in profound ways.
July 28, 2016
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Treatment approach used in cancer holds promise for Alzheimer's disease
New Alzheimer's treatment could be delivered as nasal spray, say scientists. Researchers have developed a novel treatment that could block the development of Alzheimer's disease using microscopic droplets of fat to carry drugs into the brain.
October 20, 2016
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Treatments for Alzheimer's Proving Elusive
Finding a treatment to reverse or stop Alzheimer's disease is proving elusive.
December 13, 2016
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TSRI study sheds light on how mitochondrial calcium can affect learning and memory
While calcium's importance for our bones and teeth is well known, its role in neurons–in particular, its effects on processes such as learning and memory–has been less well defined.
August 26, 2016
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Two existing drugs halt neurodegeneration in mice
Researchers have made a major leap forward in the treatment of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, after identifying two existing drugs that prevented brain cell death in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease.
April 20, 2017
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Misc. - U

UAlberta scientists finding ways to inhibit 'rogue' protein believed to be key player in Alzheimer's
Every day tens of thousands of Canadians unwillingly find themselves becoming shadows of their former selves. they grasp onto moments of clarity--fleeting windows of time--before slipping away again into confusion; robbed of memories, talents and their very personalities.
February 16, 2017
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UCLA study shows how the brain initiates repair by generating replacement cells after stroke
UCLA researchers have shown that the brain can be repaired – and brain function can be recovered – after a stroke in animals. the discovery could have important implications for treating a mind-robbing condition known as a white matter stroke, a major cause of dementia.
December 21, 2016
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Understanding how chemical changes in the brain affect Alzheimer's disease
A new study is helping to explain why the long-term use of common anticholinergic drugs used to treat conditions like allergies and overactive bladder lead to an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. the study used mouse models to show that long-term suppression of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine -- a target for anticholinergic drugs -- results in dementia-like changes in the brain.
June 22, 2016
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Understanding psychological dimensions of dementia can improve care, says new report
To help people live well with dementia we need a better understanding of its psychological impact, according to a new report.
November 14, 2016
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Unique visual stimulation may be new treatment for Alzheimer's
Noninvasive technique reduces beta amyloid plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease
December 6, 2016
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University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk
Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and occurs in all ethnic and racial groups. It affects more than 5 million people age 65 and older in the United States alone and there is currently no effective treatment or cure. by identifying the genetic factors that contribute to Alzheimer's disease risk or protect against it, researchers hope to improve diagnosis, treatments and potentially prevent the disease.
June 24, 2016
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Unmasking Alzheimer's risk in young adults
The risk for developing devastating Alzheimer's disease may be detectable in healthy adults younger than expected, and new studies reveal how.
July 6, 2016
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Unraveling how a brain works, block by high-tech block
Researchers modernizing cognitive skills testing to detect deficits, problem-solving strategies and more
November 17, 2016
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Untangling a cause of memory loss in neurodegenerative diseases
NIH-funded mouse study identifies a possible therapeutic target for a family of disorders.
October 12, 2016
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Using herpes drugs to slow down Alzheimer's disease could become reality
The first clinical study to investigate if herpes virus drugs can have an effect on fundamental Alzheimer's disease processes has been launched. the research group has previously demonstrated a correlation between herpes virus infection and an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease.
December 13, 2016
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Using magnets to improve memory
The ability to remember sounds, and manipulate them in our minds, is incredibly important to our daily lives -- without it we would not be able to understand a sentence, or do simple arithmetic. new research is shedding light on how sound memory works in the brain, and is even demonstrating a means to improve it.
March 27, 2017
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Using tau imaging as diagnostic marker for Alzheimer disease
The accumulation of ?-Amyloid and tau proteins in the brain is hallmark pathology for Alzheimer disease. Recently developed positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, including [18F]-AV-1451, bind to tau in neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. So, could tau imaging become a diagnostic marker for Alzheimer disease and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the neurodegenerative disorder that destroys brain cells?
July 25, 2016
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Misc. - V

Vicious circle of platelets
Alzheimer's disease patients may benefit from anti-platelet therapyeimer's disease patients may benefit from anti-platelet therapy
May 31, 2016
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Virtual reality may be new way to prevent cognitive decline in elderly people
Ping Jiang and her Helsinki Challenge semifinalist team Senior Cognitive Booster want to increase the cognitive abilities of elderly people with the help of virtual reality.
April 5, 2017
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Vitamins a and C help erase cell memory
Discovery important in development of cells for regenerative medicine
October 12, 2016
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Misc. - W

Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC
Two studies involving University of Waterloo researchers presented this week at the 2016 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Toronto highlight a new diagnostic tool that can identify Alzheimer's disease long before the onset of symptoms as well as the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Ontario.
July 27, 2016
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Western diet increases Alzheimer's risk
Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer's disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer's disease are rising worldwide. the most important risk factors seem to be linked to diet, especially the consumption of meat, sweets, and high-fat dairy products that characterize a Western Diet.
August 25, 2016
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Western dietary pattern linked to risk of developing Alzheimer's disease
Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer's disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer's disease are rising worldwide. the most important risk factors seem to be linked to diet, especially the consumption of meat, sweets, and high-fat dairy products that characterize a Western Diet. for example, when Japan made the nutrition transition from the traditional Japanese diet to the Western diet, Alzheimer's disease rates rose from 1% in 1985 to 7% in 2008, with rates lagging the nutrition transition by 20-25 years.
August 25, 2016
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What's the 'SuperAgers' Mental Secret?
Some folks stay sharp into their 80s, 90s, and brain scans may show why
April 4, 2017
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When is It Worth Worrying About Dementia?
If you didn't know better, you'd think Alzheimer's disease is the plot of a bad horror movie: a creeping silent killer steals your memories, distorts your experiences of the present, and transforms your family's love into dutiful pity.
April 28, 2017
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Will heart medication help treat Alzheimer's disease?
Heart medication reduces the build-up of plaque in the brain's blood vessels in mice, new research shows. the question is if this is true also in humans; if the answer is yes, it might bring scientists a step closer to developing a medicine against Alzheimer's disease.
May 25, 2016
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Women may have better verbal memory skills than men during early stages of Alzheimer's disease
Women may have better verbal memory skills than men even when their brains show the same level of problems metabolizing glucose, which occurs in people with Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the October 5, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
October 5, 2016
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Misc. - X

Xanax, Valium May Boost Pneumonia Risk in Alzheimer's Patients
Researchers suspect people may breathe saliva or food into their lungs due to fatigue from the drugs
April 10, 2017
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Misc. - Y

Year in review: Alzheimer's drug may clarify disease's origins
Treatment shows early promise in sweeping away amyloid brain plaques
December 14, 2016
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