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1,959 Health - Cancer Resources

Bladder Cancer

Drug based on malaria protein shows promise against treatment-resistant bladder cancer
A new study shows that a drug derived from a protein found in the malaria parasite stopped chemotherapy-resistant bladder cancer tumors growing in mice. the researchers say that the finding could lead to much-needed new treatments for cases of bladder cancer that do not respond to standard therapy.
April 20, 2017
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Low physical activity increases risk of bladder, kidney cancer
Most of us know that physical activity is good for us. But a new study shows that a chronic lack of physical activity can drastically increase the chance of developing cancer in the bladder and kidneys, and it suggests that engaging in more physical activity may reduce this risk.
May 25, 2017
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Nanopolymer PolyGPA can Detect Elusive Bladder Cancer Biomarker
Researchers have created a new technique to detect glycoproteins in biological fluids. the Purdue University team engineered an array they called polyGPA (polymer-based reverse phase glycoprotein array) and have shown proof-of-concept experiments in using it to detect the presence of glycoproteins associated with bladder cancer in patient urine samples.
December 5, 2016
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Pacific Edge announces commercial launch of Cxbladder Monitor in the U.S.
Breakthrough in clinical utility for urologists managing bladder cancer patients
December 14, 2016
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Scientists develop simple test for early, accurate warning of returning bladder cancer
Researchers from the University Hospital of Lyon tested the urine of 348 bladder cancer patients for a faulty protein called TERT, and this was able to predict when the cancer was about to return in more than 80 percent of patients. The standard method, called cytology, detected the return in only 34 percent of patients.
July 7, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - A

A Groundbreaking Gene-Editing Therapy Eliminated Cancer in Two Infants
Two infants diagnosed with an aggressive and previously incurable form of leukemia are now in remission, after British doctors say they cured the babies using so-called "designer cells."
January 26, 2017
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A new way to reset gene expression in cancer cells shows promise for leukemia treatment
Scientists have discovered a potential new target for the treatment of leukemia that potentially could augment the activity of BET inhibitors, drugs currently in clinical trials. These therapies act on histones, DNA's packaging proteins, to reset gene regulatory programs that go awry in cancer.
March 7, 2017
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Activation of specific protein could lead to acute lymphoblastic leukemia, study reveals
The discovery of a protein signature that is highly predictive of leukemia could lead to novel treatments of the leading childhood cancer, according to new study showing that competition among certain proteins causes an imbalance that leads to leukemia.
April 11, 2017
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Acute myeloid leukemia: Heart drugs may boost chemotherapy
Scientists may have identified a way to boost the effect of chemotherapy against one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults: acute myeloid leukemia.
August 31, 2017
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Additions to standard therapy do not improve progression-free survival in patients with multiple myeloma
Trial results being presented today during the 58th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego suggest two therapies that are often added to standard therapy in patients with multiple myeloma do not improve rates of progression-free survival compared with the current standard course of treatment alone. the study is the largest randomized controlled trial of post-transplant th
December 6, 2016
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AML study correlates gene mutations with 34 disease subgroups
A large, new study of adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) correlates 80 cancer-related gene mutations with five subtypes of AML, which are defined by the presence of specific chromosomal abnormalities. the findings might help guide mutation testing and treatment decisions in the future.
March 21, 2017
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Antibody drug conjugate could hold promise in improving treatment for childhood ALL
Researchers at The University of Manchester have discovered that a protein (5T4) found on the surface of cells contributes to chemotherapy resistance in the most common type of childhood leukaemia. Using a novel approach, early testing shows that targeting the protein with an antibody drug conjugate (ADC) could hold promise in improving treatment.
May 19, 2017
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Arthritis drug could treat blood cancer patients, breakthrough finds
Blood cancer sufferers could be treated with a simple arthritis drug, scientists have discovered
August 3, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - B

Best treatment option written in cancer's genetic script
Acute myeloid leukaemia study finds personalized therapy is possible
January 16, 2017
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Biotech Firm Halts 'Revolutionary' Cancer Treatment After Patient Deaths
Following the deaths of five patients, Juno Therapeutics has decided to pull the plug on an experimental cancer treatment that boosts the power of a patient's immune cells. the news comes just days after the company's rival, Kite Pharma, announced its success with a similar method, showing there's still hope for this potentially revolutionary gene therapy.
March 2, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - C

Cancer gene mutations can predict response to less intensive treatment in AML patients
Patients with the most lethal form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - based on genetic profiles of their cancers - typically survive for only four to six months after diagnosis, even with aggressive chemotherapy. But new research indicates that such patients, paradoxically, may live longer if they receive a milder chemotherapy drug.
November 23, 2016
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Cannabinoids used in combination with chemotherapy found to be effective in killing leukemia cells
New research has confirmed that cannabinoids - the active chemicals in cannabis - are effective in killing leukemia cells, particularly when used in combination with chemotherapy treatments.
June 5, 2017
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Cannabinoids used in sequence with chemotherapy are a more effective treatment for cancer, say experts
Cannabinoids - the active chemicals in cannabis - are effective in killing leukemia cells, particularly when used in combination with chemotherapy treatments, new research confirms.
June 5, 2017
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Clinical study seeks to examine new combination therapy for treating AML patients
A pair of drugs that may be a one-two punch needed to help combat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive blood cancer that kills nearly three-fourths of patients within five years of diagnosis, is the focus of a new multi-center clinical trial that will enroll patients at three sites across the U.S.
March 7, 2017
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Common drug for autoimmune disease may increase risk of myeloid neoplasms
Mayo Clinic researchers have found that azathioprine, a drug commonly used to treat autoimmune disease, may increase the risk of myeloid neoplasms. Myeloid neoplasms include a spectrum of potentially life-threatening bone marrow disorders, such as myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.
February 3, 2017
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Computer trained to predict which AML patients will go into remission, which will relapse
Researchers have developed the first computer machine-learning model to accurately predict which patients diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia, or AML, will go into remission following treatment for their disease and which will relapse.
February 9, 2017
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Cord-blood-derived natural killer cells can be modified to destroy B-cell cancers
Immune cells with a general knack for recognizing and killing many types of infected or abnormal cells also can be engineered to hunt down cells with specific targets on them to treat cancer, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Leukemia.
July 13, 2017
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Crucial cutting enzyme maps sites of DNA damage in leukemias and other cancers
Researchers map detailed sites of DNA damage that lead to abnormal genetic rearrangements
June 15, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - D

Defective ribosomes linked to aggressive form of multiple myeloma
20 to 40 percent of the patients with multiple myeloma - a type of leukaemia - have a defect in the ribosome, the protein factory of the cell. These patients have a poorer prognosis than patients with intact ribosomes. at the same time, they respond better to a drug that already exists.
December 9, 2016
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Doctors Successfully Treat Two Babies with Leukemia Using Gene-Edited Immune Cells
It'S a Promising Approach, But Still Needs a Lot More Research
January 27, 2017
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Drug Helps Some Kids With Rare Type of Leukemia
Dasatinib prolonged survival in chronic myeloid leukemia patients, study says
June 5, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - E

Engineered immune cells boost leukemia survival for some
Patients with low disease load had best outcomes in first long-term look
April 4, 2017
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Existing drugs may be able to improve therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia, mice study shows
Two drugs, already approved for safe use in people, may be able to improve therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a blood cancer that affects myeloid cells, according to results from a University of Iowa study in mice.
September 26, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - F

Fasting blocks a specific leukemia in mice
Fasting stops development of early stage leukemia, reverses mid-stage disease.
December 22, 2016
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Fasting kills cancer cells of most common type of childhood leukemia,study shows
Intermittent fasting inhibits the development and progression of the most common type of childhood leukemia, researchers have found.
December 12, 2016
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FDA advisory committee recommends Novartis' CAR-T therapy for young leukemia patients
Today the FDA's Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee, an independent panel of experts, voted unanimously to recommend to the FDA approval of Novartis' experimental CAR-T therapy called Tisagenlecleucel, also known as CTL019. This form of gene therapy has demonstrated impressive results in hard-to-treat leukemia (ALL) pediatric and adolescent patients who have relapsed or whose cancers have proven resistant to other treatment. One of the panelists Dr. Timothy Cripe of Nationwide Children's Hospital remarked, "this is the most exciting therapy I have seen in my lifetime."
July 13, 2017
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FDA approval provides new, targeted treatment option for adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell ALL
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Besponsa (inotuzumab ozogamicin) for the treatment of adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
August 17, 2017
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FDA Approves 2nd Gene Therapy For Leukemia
Yescarta fights a type of lymphoma; move is heralded as helping open 'new era' in medical care
October 19, 2017
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FDA authorizes marketing of test to aid in diagnoses of serious cancers
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of ClearLLab Reagents (T1, T2, B1, B2, M), the first agency authorized test for use with flow cytometry to aid in the detection of several leukemias and lymphomas, including chronic leukemia, acute leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN).
June 29, 2017
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FDA Panel OKs First Gene Therapy For Leukemia
Expensive but potent leukemia therapy genetically transforms patients' immune system cells to fight disease
July 13, 2017
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First genetic engineering therapy approved by the FDA for leukemia
Safety risks still an issue for the CAR-T therapy, but new hope for young patients.
August 30, 2017
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First systematic genomic analysis of patients with T-ALL may aid development of new therapies
A consortium including St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and the Children's Oncology Group has performed an unprecedented genomic sequencing analysis of hundreds of patients with T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The results provide a detailed genomic landscape that will inform treatment strategies and aid efforts to develop drugs to target newly discovered mutations.
July 4, 2017
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Formaldehyde exposure not linked to leukemia, research shows
Some scientific reports have a profound impact on government policy. Sometimes, however, there are significant shortcomings in the research - yet the policy impact continues. Critically analyzing scientific research that underlies regulatory decision making and generating new information to ensure decisions are based on sound science are crucial.
May 2, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - G

Gene Therapy Helps 2 Babies Fight Type of Leukemia
Tweaking T-cells from healthy donor allowed infants to reach remission, researchers report
January 25, 2017
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Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma
Over one-third of patients appeared disease-free 6 months after single treatment, report says
February 28, 2017
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Gene treatment to kill cancer moves a step closer to market
An advisory panel says it's time patients had access to gene-altering treatments. If approved, the first to make it to market would take on a stubborn form of leukemia.
July 12, 2017
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Gene-Based Therapy May Thwart a Tough Blood Cancer
Researchers attempt to turn immune cells into unerring killers of multiple myeloma cells
June 5, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - H

Halting lethal childhood leukemia
Scientists identify molecular therapy to prevent growth of pediatric leukemia
January 6, 2017
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Hematologist-oncologist to lead bone marrow transplantation program for treating blood-borne cancers
Hematologist-oncologist Ahmad Samer Al-Homsi MD, MBA, will lead a new bone marrow transplantation program at NYU Langone's Perlmutter Cancer Center for treating blood-borne cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, and potentially utilize transplantation as an adjunct to immunotherapy for solid tumors. He also will investigate ways to reduce graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), in which immune cells in donated blood and marrow attack the tissues of a recipient.
April 10, 2017
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Herpes virus linked to most common type of childhood cancer
Newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus -- a common virus in the herpes family -- may have an increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia, according to new research. the study suggests the risk is even greater in Hispanic children.
December 14, 2016
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How an interest in bipolar disorder drugs led to a better understanding of leukemia
A research project that began 20 years ago with an interest in how lithium treats mood disorders has yielded insights into the progression of blood cancers such as leukemia. The research centers on a protein called GSK-3.
October 31, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - I

Insights from a rare genetic disease may help treat multiple myeloma
A new class of drugs for blood cancers such as leukemia and multiple myeloma is showing promise. But it is hobbled by a problem that also plagues other cancer drugs: targeted cells can develop resistance. Now scientists have found that insights into a rare genetic disease known as NGLY1 deficiency could help scientists understand how that resistance works -- and potentially how drugs can outsmart it.
October 25, 2017
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Insights from NGLY1 deficiency could provide new approach to treat blood cancers
A new class of drugs for blood cancers such as leukemia and multiple myeloma is showing promise. But it is hobbled by a problem that also plagues other cancer drugs: targeted cells can develop resistance. Now scientists, reporting in ACS Central Science, have found that insights into a rare genetic disease known as NGLY1 deficiency could help scientists understand how that resistance works -- and potentially how drugs can outsmart it.
October 25, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - L

Leukemia breakthrough: Blood molecule key to treating AML
New research has shown that the production of heme, a blood molecule, supports the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, which is an aggressive form of blood cancer. Researchers say that suppressing heme might therefore be an effective way of treating this type of cancer, among others.
August 4, 2017
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Leukemia drug combo is encouraging in early phase I clinical trial
In a Phase I study, 8 out of 12 patients with relapsed and/or chemotherapy refractory blood cancers responded to a combination of the chemotherapy drugs thioguanine and decitabine; some of the responders had relapsed after treatment with decitabine alone, report researchers.
December 5, 2016
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Leukemia: Cancer cells killed off with diabetes drug
Scientists may have found an innovative way to kill off cancer cells in acute myeloid leukemia, all the while preserving and regenerating healthy red blood cells.
October 16, 2017
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Low-dose aspirin may cut breast cancer risk by a fifth
Taking low-dose aspirin at least three times per week may reduce women's risk of breast cancer by up to 20 percent, a new study suggests.
May 2, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - M

Metabolism harnessed to reverse aggressiveness in leukemia
Researchers have identified a new drug target for the two most common types of myeloid leukemia, including a way to turn back the most aggressive form of the disease.
May 17, 2017
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Misregulated protein breakdown promotes leukemias and brain cancer
An enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of specific amino acids in food plays a key role in the development of leukemias and brain cancer, scientists have now reported. The researchers have hence discovered a surprising link between energy metabolism and the so-called epigenetic code. The authors think that blocking this enzyme is a promising possibility to combat cancer.
November 8, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - N

Nanoparticle-programmed immune cells can slow progression of leukemia in mouse model
Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed biodegradable nanoparticles that can be used to genetically program immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells -- while the immune cells are still inside the body.
April 17, 2017
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Nanoparticles reprogram immune cells to fight cancer
A new study describes new method to transform immune cells, while inside the body, into leukemia-fighting powerhouses.
April 17, 2017
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New antibody uses 1-2 punch to potentially treat blood cancers
Preclinical studies show new antibody simultaneously targets cancer cells while making them more vulnerable to chemotherapy
June 21, 2017
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New blood cancer study with 'outstanding' results
Research reveals 'transformative outcomes' for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
April 27, 2017
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New blood test can reliably detect breast cancer in women with dense and non-dense breast tissue
A new study published in PLOS ONE demonstrates that Videssa® Breast, a multi-protein biomarker blood test for breast cancer, is unaffected by breast density and can reliably rule out breast cancer in women with both dense and non-dense breast tissue. Nearly half of all women in the U.S. have dense breast tissue.
October 25, 2017
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New drug combination targets aggressive blood cancer
A pair of drugs that may be a one-two punch needed to help combat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive blood cancer that kills nearly three-fourths of patients within five years of diagnosis, is the focus of a new multi-center clinical trial that will enroll patients at three sites across the U.S.
March 7, 2017
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New hope for more effective treatment of leukemia
Activation of a specific protein could lead to acute lymphoblastic leukemia
April 11, 2017
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New inhibitor drug shows promise in relapsed leukemia
Researchers used gilteritinib to target a common mutation
June 21, 2017
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New leukemia treatment outperforms standard chemotherapies
Researchers are working on a new treatment for an aggressive type of leukemia that outperforms standard chemotherapies.
June 8, 2017
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New microfluidic technique may provide patients with less painful test for multiple myeloma
Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells, which are white blood cells produced in bone marrow that churn out antibodies to help fight infection. When plasma cells become cancerous, they produce abnormal proteins, and the cells can build up in bone marrow, ultimately seeping into the bloodstream.
April 4, 2017
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New study correlates 80 cancer-related gene mutations with 34 AML subgroups
A large, new study of adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) correlates 80 cancer-related gene mutations with five subtypes of AML, which are defined by the presence of specific chromosomal abnormalities. the findings might help guide mutation testing and treatment decisions in the future.
March 21, 2017
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New treatment approach makes cancer cells commit suicide while sparing healthy cells
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have discovered the first compound that directly makes cancer cells commit suicide while sparing healthy cells. The new treatment approach, described in today's issue of Cancer Cell, was directed against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells but may also have potential for attacking other types of cancers.
October 9, 2017
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New treatment recommendations for a high-risk pediatric leukemia
Medical researchers have identified genetic alterations that can be used to guide treatment of pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, which has a dismal prognosis.
January 23, 2017
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Novartis gets FDA approval for novel immunocellular therapy to treat relapsed or refractory B-cell ALL
Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Kymriah™(tisagenlecleucel) suspension for intravenous infusion, formerly CTL019, the first chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy, for the treatment of patients up to 25 years of age with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that is refractory or in second or later relapse. Kymriah is a novel immunocellular therapy and a one-time treatment that uses a patient's own T cells to fight cancer. Kymriah is the first therapy based on gene transfer approved by the FDA.
August 30, 2017
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Novel approach to leukemia therapy can safely improve treatment success, reduce side effects
New University of Liverpool research, presented at an international conference, confirms that a novel approach to the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) can safely increase treatment success and reduce negative side effects.
July 12, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - O

Obesity-associated protein could be linked to leukemia development
Cancer researchers have found an obesity-associated protein's role in leukemia development and drug response which could lead to more effective therapies for the illness.
December 22, 2016
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Over 750 biomarkers identified as potentials for early cancer screening test
First comprehensive list of cancer blood biomarkers researched in last 5 years
August 1, 2016
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Overcoming immune suppression to fight against bovine leukemia
A newly developed antibody drug reactivates suppressed immune cells, decreasing the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) counts in an infected cow. The antibody could be applied to treat a variety of intractable infectious diseases in cows.
June 7, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - P

Penn researchers provide new insights into how Notch drives growth of B-cell cancers
Notch is one of the most frequently mutated genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common leukemia in adults in the United States. It is also often mutated in other common B cell tumors, such as mantle cell lymphoma.
October 23, 2017
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Personalized cell therapy combination achieves complete remission in CLL patients
Latest results from trial investigating CAR therapy to treat CLL
May 31, 2017
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Powering up fat cells could help acute myeloid leukemia patients
Killing cancer cells indirectly by powering up fat cells in the bone marrow could help acute myeloid leukemia patients, according to a new study from McMaster University.
October 16, 2017
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Pregnancy does not incur greater risk of relapse for breast cancer survivors
A recent study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that pregnancy does not incur a greater risk of relapse for survivors of breast cancer. The safety of pregnancy for women with history of breast cancer has remained a controversial topic for many years, especially in cases of estrogen-receptor (ER) positive breast cancer.
October 26, 2017
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Pregnancy poses no greater risk to breast cancer survivors
A recent study indicates that pregnancy does not incur a greater risk of relapse for survivors of breast cancer.
October 26, 2017
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Prostaglandin EI inhibits leukemia stem cells
Targeting leukemia stem cells in combination with standard chemotherapy may improve treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia
September 25, 2017
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Protein network signals found to drive myeloid leukemias
Researchers have uncovered how mutations in a protein network drive several high-risk leukemias, offering new prospects for novel therapies. An existing drug might be repurposed to treat these leukemias, and the new understanding of the molecular mechanisms at work may offer clues to other drugs yet to be developed.
June 14, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - R

Research findings could guide development of potent combination therapies for leukemia
New findings from Rockefeller University researchers could guide the development of potent combination therapies that deliver more effective and durable treatment of leukemia. In recent work published in Nature, they show it's possible to deactivate cellular programs involved in tumor growth by disrupting a protein that regulates genes.
March 7, 2017
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Research shows how TET2 protein loss can open door for mutations that drive blood cancers
Imagine this scenario on a highway: a driver starts to make a sudden lane change but realizes his mistake and quickly veers back, too late. other motorists have already reacted and, in some cases, collide. Meanwhile, the original motorist - the one who caused the problem - drives on.
April 25, 2017
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Researchers develop new way to genetically engineer T cells for treating leukemia relapse
Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington have developed a novel way to genetically engineer T cells that may be effective for treating and preventing leukemia relapse.
October 25, 2017
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Researchers discover BRCA1 gene is key for blood forming stem cells
Researchers have found that the BRCA1 gene is required for the survival of blood forming stem cells, which could explain why patients with BRCA1 mutations do not have an elevated risk for leukemia. the stem cells die before they have an opportunity to transform into a blood cancer.
January 24, 2017
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Researchers discover how epigenetic lesion can lead to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Researchers from the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program (PEBC) led by Dr. Manel Esteller at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) have discovered how an epigenetic lesion can lead to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
March 30, 2017
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Researchers find new way to prevent graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplants
Through experimental work, an international team of researchers led by City of Hope's Defu Zeng, professor of Diabetes immunology and hematopoietic cell transplantation, believe they may have found a way to prevent graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplants while retaining the transplants' positive effects on fighting leukemia and lymphoma.
April 18, 2017
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Researchers identify new cancer-causing pathway behind most aggressive type of leukemia
A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified a new cancer-causing pathway behind most cases of an aggressive type of leukemia, findings that could lead to new targeted treatment approaches. In the report published online in Cancer Discovery, the team describes finding a protein called TOX (thymocyte selection-associated high mobility box protein) that acts in concert with other oncogenes to initiate the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Expressed in 95 percent of human T-ALL cases, TOX is also required for the cancer's growth and persistence.
October 3, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - S

Scientists find possible achilles heel of treatment resistant cancers
Scientists identify two signaling proteins in cancer cells that make them resistant to chemotherapy, and show that blocking the proteins along with chemotherapy eliminate human leukemia in mouse models. Researchers suggest that blocking the signaling proteins c-Fos and Dusp1 as part of combination therapy might cure several types of kinase-driven, treatment-resistant leukemia and solid tumor cancers.
March 19, 2017
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Sheffield scientists discover that simple arthritis drug could help treat blood cancer sufferers
Blood cancer sufferers could be treated with a simple arthritis drug, scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered.
August 3, 2017
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Simple, coordinated approach can improve chances of survival for high-risk AML patients
New research shows that quickly identifying patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and speeding the process to find them a stem cell donor and performing the transplant earlier, can significantly improve their chances of surviving for at least two years after diagnosis without a relapse.
December 5, 2016
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So much care it hurts: Unneeded scans, therapy, surgery only add to patients' ills
When Annie Dennison was diagnosed with breast cancer last year, she readily followed advice from her medical team, agreeing to harsh treatments in the hope of curing her disease.
October 23, 2017
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Spot Leukaemia campaign launched to reduce delays in diagnosis
A UK leukemia charity, Leukaemia CARE, has launched the Spot Leukaemia campaign to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of leukemia after a survey revealed that leukemia diagnoses are commonly delayed due to poor understanding.
September 1, 2017
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Stem cell-based test predicts leukemia patients' response to therapy to help tailor treatment
Leukemia researchers have developed a 17-gene signature derived from leukemia stem cells that can predict at diagnosis if patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will respond to standard treatment.
December 6, 2016
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Study compares arm measures to BMI for assessing nutritional status of leukemia survivors
Arm anthropometry is a simple method to determine if a person is overweight or obese, and because it can distinguish between fat and muscle mass, unlike body mass index (BMI), it is a valuable method for assessing muscle loss in long-term survivors of childhood cancer.
March 23, 2017
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Study elucidates how obesity makes breast cancer more aggressive
Obesity leads to the release of cytokines into the bloodstream which impact the metabolism of breast cancer cells, making them more aggressive as a result. Scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München, Technische Universität München (TUM), and Heidelberg University Hospital report on this in 'Cell Metabolism'. The team has already been able to halt this mechanism with an antibody treatment.
October 23, 2017
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Study: Annual mammograms could save 1000s of lives
Study based on computer analysis has limitations; false positives a concern
August 21, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - T

Teen first in Virginia to receive cancer gene therapy in clinical trial
UVA has administered its first dose of an experimental gene therapy for a deadly form of treatment-resistant pediatric leukemia.
September 27, 2017
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Therapeutic Vaccine Promising Against a Leukemia
Made by combining immune cells, cancer cells, it's kept some study patients in remission for nearly 5 years
December 6, 2016
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Timing of mutations can have effect on health and disease
A single genetic mutation can lead to completely different diseases, depending on the time and location at which the mutation occurs. This finding emerged from the PhD study conducted by Rocio Acuña-Hidalgo of Radboudumc. For example, a mutation in the SETBP1 gene that occurs early in development leads to Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, but later in life it results in myeloid leukemia.
June 30, 2017
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Tracking down therapy-resistant leukemia cells
Scientists have succeeded in finding a small population of inactive leukemia cells that is responsible for relapse of the disease. now the way is paved for research into new therapies that prevent disease relapse by eliminating the remaining, so-called dormant leukemia cells.
December 14, 2016
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - U

UChicago Medicine working with Novartis to offer breakthrough gene therapy for pediatric ALL patients
The University of Chicago Medicine is one of a limited number of U.S. sites working to offer a breakthrough gene therapy for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which was just approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
August 31, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - V

Vitamin C may stop leukemia from progressing
Since the 1970s, researchers have taken an interest in high-dose vitamin C and its therapeutic potential for treating cancer. New research shows how vitamin C might stop leukemic stem cells from multiplying, and thus block some forms of blood cancer from advancing.
August 17, 2017
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Blood Cancers - Leukaemia, Lymphomas and Myeloma - W

Wistar scientists discover marker for PMN-MDSCs in the blood of cancer patients
Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are a population of immune cells that have been implicated in tumor resistance to various types of cancer treatment, including targeted therapies, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Polymorphonuclear cells represent the largest population of MDSCs. However, fully understanding the biology and clinical importance of these cells has been hampered by a lack of markers that set them apart from normal neutrophils.
August 05, 2016
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Bone Cancer

3D implants and robotic surgery set to advance the way physicians surgically treat tumors
A major new Australian research project using 3D implants and robotic surgery is set to radically advance the way physicians surgically treat tumors and bone cancer.
October 30, 2017
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Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests
A subset of bone cancer patients may respond to IGF1R inhibitors based on their genetic profile
June 23, 2017
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Existing drugs could help patients with rare form of bone cancer
Patients with a rare bone cancer of the skull and spine--chordoma--could be helped by existing drugs, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, University College London Cancer Institute and the Royal National Orthopedic Hospital NHS Trust. In the largest genomics study of chordoma to date, published today (12th October) in Nature Communications, scientists show that a group of chordoma patients have mutations in genes that are the target of existing drugs, known as PI3K inhibitors.
October 12, 2017
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Nano-Based Chemotherapy Targets Tumor Cells that Spread to Bone
Breast cancer that spreads usually infiltrates bone, causing fractures and severe pain. In such cases, chemotherapy is ineffective as the environment of the bone protects the tumor, even as the drug has toxic side effects elsewhere in the body.
September 26, 2017
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New drug hope for rare bone cancer patients
Chordoma patients could be helped by existing drugs, scientists suggest
October 12, 2017
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New Study Shows MR-HIFU Effective for Treating Bone Tumors in Children
Nine children were successfully treated for osteoid osteoma, a benign bone tumor, by doctors from Children's National Health System in Washington, DC. The completion of the clinical trial marks a triumph for the new, noninvasive treatment method called magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU).
August 29, 2017
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New therapeutic approach offers hope for individuals with debilitating bone cancer
An Australian-led research team has demonstrated a new therapeutic approach that can re-build and strengthen bone, offering hope for individuals with the debilitating bone cancer, multiple myeloma.
June 29, 2017
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Brain Cancer - A

A unique amino acid for brain cancer therapy
Photodynamic therapy is often used to treat brain tumors because of its specificity -- it can target very small regions containing cancerous cells while sparing the normal cells around it from damage. It works by injecting a drug called a photosensitizer into the bloodstream, where it gathers in cells, and then exposing the drug-filled cells to light.
June 23, 2017
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Brain Cancer - B

Blood test can effectively rule out breast cancer, regardless of breast density
With over a 99 percent negative predictive value, a liquid biopsy test can help clinicians manage difficult-to-diagnose dense breast patients
October 25, 2017
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Blood test to detect brain metastases while still treatable
Cancer researchers are closer to creating a blood test that can identify breast cancer patients who are at increased risk for developing brain metastasis, and also monitor disease progression and response to therapy in real time.
August 4, 2017
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Brain cancer could be prevented with olive oil compound
The health benefits of olive oil are wide-ranging; studies have linked the fat to reduced risk of obesity and heart disease, as well as cognitive improvements. Now, new research suggests that olive oil may also help to prevent brain cancer.
June 5, 2017
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Brain cancer could be treated with Zika virus
A new study looks into the potential of the Zika virus to target and kill brain cancer cells. The results, so far, are encouraging, but researchers suggest that there is a long way to go until a safe and effective treatment is reached.
September 5, 2017
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Brain cancer patients live longer wearing electric cap designed to zap tumors
After decade of stalled treatment improvements, cap is a modest, pricey step forward.
April 3, 2017
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Brain cancer: Study sheds light on unexpected link between glioma and blood sugar
Having high blood sugar or Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of developing most cancers. However, studies have found that brain cancers such as glioma are less common in people with Diabetes and high blood sugar. Now, a new study begins to shed light on this surprising link. Could it be, the researchers ask, that brain tumors have a strong effect on blood glucose levels?
May 4, 2017
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Brain tumor cells' adaptation to oxygen deprivation mapped
The most aggressive variant of brain tumor -- glioblastoma -- has an average survival rate of 15 months. There is therefore an urgent need for new treatment strategies for this group of patients. A research team has now identified new factors which may affect the tumor cells' ability to resist treatment.
August 16, 2017
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Brain tumor scientists map mutation that drives tumors in childhood cancer survivors
Neuroscientists have uncovered the genetic basis for why many long-term survivors of childhood cancer develop meningiomas, the most common adult brain tumor, decades after their treatment with cranial radiation.
August 4, 2017
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Brain tumor: New inhibitor may fight glioblastoma expansion
New research has identified a key mechanism that allows cancerous growths to proliferate, or multiply, in the brain. This has led scientists to develop a new drug that could be used to inhibit malignant cells.
July 25, 2017
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Brain tumor's 'addiction' to common amino acid could be its weakness
Starving a childhood brain tumor of the amino acid glutamine could improve the effect of chemotherapy
November 1, 2017
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Brain Cancer - C

Caution needed for drugs in development for most common malignant pediatric brain tumor
Researchers have studied how a crucial cancer-related protein plays a role in one of the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood.
March 21, 2017
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Cedars-Sinai surgeons use high-definition imaging device to map the brain during surgery
Cedars-Sinai neurosurgeons have begun using a high-definition imaging device to see inside the brain during surgery, allowing them to map safer pathways to reach and remove tumors.
December 9, 2016
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Chemical engineers help nanoparticles better target brain tumors
Getting drugs into the brain by cloaking them within nanoparticles that can sneak through the blood-brain barrier has been the focus of a lot of nanotechnology research over the past few years. There's quite a bit of progress toward that goal, including some notable successes.
May 23, 2017
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Clinical trial of immunotherapy shows promising results for patients with melanoma brain tumors
Two years ago, when Kathy Roberts was 54, she started having pain in her ankle. She ignored it. Then it became swollen, and she had more and more trouble walking. So she went to a series of doctors trying to figure out the problem. Finally, she was referred to someone who ran some tests and gave her a diagnosis: stage 4 melanoma that had spread from a spot on her ankle to her bones, liver, lungs and brain.
June 27, 2017
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Complete remission of brain metastasis of difficult-to-treat tumor
Tumor-targeting immune cells appeared to spontaneously reactivate after biopsy of recurrent, subcutaneous lesion
August 28, 2017
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Could the Zika Virus Help Battle a Deadly Brain Cancer?
Research is early, but appears promising
September 5, 2017
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Brain Cancer - D

Dogs help in breast carcinoma research
Cancer of the mammary glands in dogs is very similar to human breast carcinoma. For this reason, treatment methods from human medicine are often used for dogs. Conversely, scientific knowledge gained from canine mammary tumors may also be important to human medicine. Researchers were able to show how similar these tumors are in both dogs and humans.
June 6, 2017
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Brain Cancer - E

'Electric Cap' May Help Fight a Deadly Brain Tumor
Study found significant increase in survival 2 years after diagnosis
April 3, 2017
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Brain Cancer - G

Genetic drivers of deadly brain cancer uncovered
Scientists have uncovered a variety of genetic mutations that, in combination, can fuel the development of glioblastoma, which is an aggressive, hard-to-treat brain cancer.
August 14, 2017
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Genome analysis helps keep deadly brain cancer at bay for five years
An analysis of a patient's deadly brain tumor helped doctors identify new emerging mutations and keep a 55-year old woman alive for more than five years, researchers report.
February 15, 2017
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Going beyond genetics yields clues to challenging childhood brain cancer
Changes in the epigenetics suggest a prognostic marker for childhood ependymomas and similarities with DIPG tumors, report scientists.
November 23, 2016
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Graphene Sensor Detects Individual Brain Cancer Cells
A team of scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) managed to use graphene as a sensor capable of differentiating between healthy astrocyte brain cells and their glioblastoma doppelg㭧ers. the technique works on individual cells that are placed in contact with graphene, which is just a lattice of carbon only one atom thick.
January 5, 2017
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Guiding brain tumor surgery with nanoprobes
Researchers in China have developed two pH-responsive nanoprobes to guide brain-tumor surgery via the magnetic resonance (MR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) signals activated upon their self-assembly in acidic tumor extracellular fluid.
June 21, 2017
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Brain Cancer - H

How does excess weight drive breast cancer? Study sheds light
Obesity is a known risk factor for breast cancer, but precisely how does excess weight drive the disease? A new study has shed some light, revealing the process by which obesity increases the aggression of breast cancer cells.
October 23, 2017
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Brain Cancer - I

Immunotherapy for glioblastoma well tolerated; survival gains observed
Small, phase one trial of a dendritic cell vaccine supports further study in larger trials
April 14, 2017
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Immunotherapy, gene therapy combination shows promise against glioblastoma
In a new study, gene therapy deployed with immune checkpoint inhibitors demonstrates potential benefit for devastating brain cancer.
January 4, 2017
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Incurable childhood brain tumors split into 10 new diseases
Many types have mutations that could be targeted by existing drugs
September 28, 2017
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Brain Cancer - K

Key controller of biological machinery in cell's 'antenna' discovered
A new discovery of a regulatory enzyme working at the primary cilium could lead to treatments for the brain tumor medulloblastoma, outlines a new report.
June 6, 2017
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Knowing risk, screening and signs of breast cancer
October is a month that is known for pumpkin picking, hayrides and beautiful fall foliage. The month is also synonymous with breast cancer awareness and features walks, fundraisers and nationwide comradery to raise awareness, as well as funds, to beat the disease. This cause is as important as ever, with approximately 1 in 8 women in the United States developing invasive breast cancer during her lifetime.
October 23, 2017
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Brain Cancer - L

Lack of 'editing' in microRNAs can potentially drive brain cancers
Scientists in the UK and India have observed a "significant" lack of 'editing' in microRNAs in brain tissue of brain cancer patients.
June 16, 2017
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Large-scale study finds genetic errors associated with brain cancer
Hundreds of thousands of people in the United States are living with a brain tumor. Gliomas are a particular category of malignant brain tumor that includes glioblastoma - a tumor with a low survival rate. new research uncovers genetic variants associated with an increased risk of glioma.
March 28, 2017
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London Freemasons award grant to medical charity to support scientists looking to cure brain tumors
Pioneering charity Brain Tumour Research has been awarded a £150,000 grant over three years by London Freemasons.
August 23, 2017
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Brain Cancer - M

Majority of women at higher risk for breast cancer decline MRI screenings, study finds
Some women, because of genetic predisposition, personal, or family history, have a higher than average lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. For those women, earlier magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for cancer screening.
October 26, 2017
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Many High-Risk Women Skip MRI Breast Cancer Screenings
Knowing they're at increased risk for breast cancer isn't enough to persuade many women to get MRI screenings -- even if they're free.
October 26, 2017
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Material Developed to Act as Window for Accessing Brain with Ultrasound
Ultrasound energy has the potential to manipulate brain tissues that are difficult to access using direct methods. The problem is that the cranium attenuates the ultrasound signal so much that it becomes practically ineffective. A team of researchers in California and Mexico have developed a special material for ultrasound to pass through that can be placed within the cranium to work as a window for delivering therapy. The material would replace a small piece of the cranium and remain in place as long as the patient needs to have the brain accessed with ultrasound.
August 4, 2017
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MGH researchers discover regulators of gene expression programs in medulloblastoma
Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers have identified a mechanism that controls the expression of genes regulating the growth of the most aggressive form of medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor. In their report published online in Cancer Discovery, the team also identifies potential targets for future treatments.
February 24, 2017
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Molecule stops fatal pediatric brain tumor
Scientists have found a molecule that stops the growth of an aggressive pediatric brain tumor. the tumor is always fatal and primarily strikes children under 10 years old.
February 27, 2017
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Molecules that could help to prevent the development of brain tumors
Researchers have identified molecules which are responsible for metastatic lung cancer cells binding to blood vessels in the brain.
August 3, 2017
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Brain Cancer - N

Nanomedicine opens door to precision medicine for brain tumors
Early phase Northwestern Medicine research has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors.
July 12, 2017
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Neuroscientists pinpoint key gene controlling tumor growth in brain cancers
Discovery could result in more accurate prognoses, help fuel development of new treatments
March 9, 2017
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New approach to destroying deadly brain tumors
A new strategy for treating brain tumors may extend or save the lives of patients diagnosed with one of the deadliest forms of cancer, according to a study.
June 13, 2017
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New fluid makes ultrasound images easier to interpret during brain surgery
The fluid, which resembles brain tissue, makes ultrasound images easier to interpret during an operation. this will make it easier for surgeons to remove brain tumours more accurately.
February 22, 2017
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New link between gene fusion and bladder and brain cancer
A study sheds new light on gene fusion in bladder and brain cancer.
August 30, 2017
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New molecule may inhibit growth of aggressive pediatric brain tumor
Northwestern Medicine scientists have found a molecule that stops the growth of an aggressive pediatric brain tumor. the tumor is always fatal and primarily strikes children under 10 years old.
February 27, 2017
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New pathway identified as a target for precision medicine against a common brain tumor
Findings raise hopes for developing combination targeted therapy to treat medulloblastoma and other tumors linked to over-activation of an important signaling pathway
November 2, 2017
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New treatment for glioblastoma multiforme
Medical researchers have developed a new pharmacological agent to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the deadliest brain cancer.
December 28, 2016
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New Way to Deliver Chemo Agent Helps Reach Brain Tumors
While there are fairly effective medications that can kill brain tumors, getting them to their targets is so challenging that they're often next to useless for cancers of the brain. Japanese scientists from Kawasaki Institute of Industrial Promotion, The University of Tokyo, and Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a shell for epirubicin, a common chemotherapy agent, that helps it to cross the blood-brain barrier and reach a tumor significantly more effectively than before.
September 12, 2017
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Brain Cancer - O

Olive oil component may help prevent cancer developing in the brain
A compound found in olive oil may help to prevent cancer developing in the brain, a study shows.
June 2, 2017
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Olive oil nutrient linked to processes that prevent cancer in brain
A compound found in olive oil may help to prevent cancer developing in the brain, a study shows
June 2, 2017
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Onalespib could be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, preclinical studies show
This study showed that the targeted drug onalespib reduced the expression of cell-survival proteins such as AKT and endothelial growth factor receptor in glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells from patient tumors.
November 2, 2017
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Brain Cancer - P

PID1 gene enhances effectiveness of chemotherapy on brain cancer cells
The gene PID1 enhances killing of medulloblastoma and glioblastoma cells, investigators have found. Medulloblastoma is the most commonly occurring malignant primary brain tumor in children; glioblastoma is the most commonly occurring malignant primary brain tumor in adults.
April 11, 2017
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Potential for more targeted treatments of neuroblastoma tumors
Genetic variations appear to pre-dispose children to developing certain severe forms of neuroblastoma, according to new research. The findings lay the groundwork for developing more targeted treatments for particularly deadly variations of the cancer.
June 19, 2017
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Patient plays saxophone while surgeons remove brain tumor
Music is not only a major part of Dan Fabbio's life, as a music teacher it is his livelihood. So when doctors discovered a tumor located in the part of his brain responsible for music function, he began a long journey that involved a team of physicians, scientists, and a music professor and culminated with him awake and playing a saxophone as surgeons operated on his brain.
August 30, 2017
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Precision medicine advances pediatric brain tumor diagnosis and treatment
Largest study to date finds genomic sequencing and copy number analysis can provide vital information
January 19, 2017
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Preclinical studies show effectiveness of targeted therapy for glioblastoma
The targeted therapy onalespib has shown effectiveness in preclinical studies of glioblastoma by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James).
November 2, 2017
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Promising brain cancer vaccine developed at Roswell Park receives orphan drug status from FDA
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has awarded orphan drug status to a promising immunotherapy vaccine developed at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. The FDA notified MimiVax LLC, a Roswell Park spinoff company, on Aug. 3 that its application for orphan status for SurVaxM as treatment for glioblastoma, a type of brain cancer, had been approved.
August 8, 2017
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Promising new strategy to attack the most lethal brain tumor in children
Researchers have revealed new insight into how the most deadly pediatric brain tumor, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), may develop. they also have identified a compound that targets the "on" switch for cancer-promoting genes, which resulted in shrinking tumor size and increased survival in an animal model of DIPG. Preparations for a clinical trial are now under way.
March 7, 2017
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Brain Cancer - R

Radiation therapy critical to treating brain tumors, but linked to significant adverse effects
Radiation therapy (RT) using high-energy particles, like x-rays or electron beams, is a common and critical component in successfully treating patients with brain tumors, but it is also associated with significant adverse effects, such as neuronal loss in adjacent healthy tissues.
June 9, 2017
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Radiation therapy vital to treating brain tumors, but it exacts a toll
Researchers say treatment alters neural networks and may cause long-term cognitive impairment
June 9, 2017
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Researchers develop new approach to build better blood-brain barrier model
Delivering drugs to the brain is no easy task. The blood-brain barrier -a protective sheath of tissue that shields the brain from harmful chemicals and invaders - cannot be penetrated by most therapeutics that are injected into a person's blood stream. But for treating diseases of the central nervous system and cancers such as glioblastoma, it's essential to get drugs across this barrier and deliver them to where they are needed most.
June 6, 2017
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Researchers discover new combination therapy strategy for brain, blood cancers
A new potential strategy to personalize therapy for brain and blood cancers has now been discovered by researchers.
February 28, 2017
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Researchers discover potential new target for treating glioblastoma
Scientists have found a way to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma, a type of brain cancer with low survival rates, by targeting a protein that drives growth of brain tumors, according to research.
January 24, 2017
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Researchers identify genetic mutations that predict better prognosis for neuroblastoma patients
The collaborative work, in which UPV/EHU and Achucarro Center researchers have participated, has served to identify some genetic mutations that will help to improve the treatment of this disease
May 19, 2017
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Researchers identify new factors that may affect brain tumor cells' ability to resist treatment
The most aggressive variant of brain tumor - glioblastoma - has an average survival rate of 15 months. There is therefore an urgent need for new treatment strategies for this group of patients. A research team from Lund University in Sweden has now identified new factors which may affect the tumor cells' ability to resist treatment. The study has been published in Cell Reports.
August 16, 2017
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Researchers kill brain cancer in mice with combination immunotherapies
A combination of drugs known as SMAC Mimetics and immune checkpoint inhibitors amplifies kill rates of cancer tumor cells in laboratory testing.
February 15, 2017
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Researchers to investigate cellular changes leading to development of glioblastoma
Glioblastoma is the most common of malign brain tumors in adults, and it currently has no cure.
October 16, 2017
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Revolutionary approach for treating glioblastoma works with human cells
Researchers reach critical milestone for treating brain cancer
February 1, 2017
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Brain Cancer - S

Scientists discover enzyme that supports brain tumor growth
Researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have discovered that an enzyme helps brain tumors to grow. This finding offers the potential for new tumor treatment approaches.
May 26, 2017
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Scientists discover new biomarker to help determine aggressiveness of brain cancer
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new biomarker for glioma, a common type of brain cancer, that can help doctors determine how aggressive a cancer is and that could eventually help determine the best course of treatment.
December 6, 2016
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Scientists discover promising target to treat highly aggressive brain tumor in infants
Using state-of-the-art gene editing technology, scientists from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have discovered a promising target to treat atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) -- a highly aggressive and therapy resistant brain tumor that mostly occurs in infants. T
April 11, 2017
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Scientists identify biomarker for progression, drug response in brain cancer
Accurately subtyping glioblastoma tumors could lead to diagnostics, precision therapy
October 16, 2017
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Scientists identify key defect in brain tumor cells
Researchers have identified a novel genetic defect that prevents brain tumor cells from repairing damaged DNA.
February 2, 2017
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Scientists to test Zika virus on brain tumors
In a revolutionary first, scientists will test whether the Zika virus can destroy brain tumor cells, potentially leading to new treatments for one of the hardest to treat cancers.
May 19, 2017
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Smart drug targets the deadliest brain cancer for destruction
Scientists have designed a smart drug that only targets and kills GBM brain cancer cells. they have validated the compound that sensitizes GBM tumors to chemotherapy and results in a significant extension of life in an animal model.
November 21, 2016
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Some glioblastoma patients benefit from 'ineffective' treatment, researchers say
A subgroup of patients with a devastating brain tumor called glioblastoma multiforme benefited from treatment with a class of chemotherapy drugs that two previous large clinical trials indicated was ineffective against the disease, according to a study.
December 22, 2016
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'Sticky' nanoparticles promise more precise drug delivery for brain cancer
A Yale research team has found that by tinkering with the surface properties of drug-loaded nanoparticles, they can potentially direct these particles to specific cells in the brain.
May 22, 2017
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Studies help shed light on aggressive brain cancer
One study shows how glioblastomas quickly evolve, the other points to a promising type of therapeutic
May 3, 2017
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Superfluid is now helping brain surgeons
A superfluid, which resembles brain tissue, makes ultrasound images easier to interpret during an operation. this will make it easier for surgeons to remove brain tumors more accurately, say researchers.
February 22, 2017
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Suppressing a DNA-repairing protein in brain could be key to treating aggressive tumors
Inhibiting a DNA-repairing protein in brain could be key to treating aggressive tumors, say researchers.
January 10, 2017
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Surface modification of nanomedicines enhances their therapeutic effect on brain tumors
For a cancer drug to be successful, it needs to reach the malignant tumor site. Researchers in Japan have now found a way for increasing the effectiveness of drug delivery to certain types of brain tumors, by packing epirubicin, a known antitumor agent, in specially designed polymeric micelles.
September 12, 2017
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Brain Cancer - T

Targeted radiosurgery better than whole-brain radiation for treating brain tumors
Study shows effectiveness of radiosurgery in controlling spread of brain cancer after surgery
February 16, 2017
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Therapy response in brain tumor cells is linked to disease prognosis
The brain tumor form glioblastoma is difficult to treat and has very poor prognosis. In a new study, scientists show that a type of stem cell in the tumor is present in different states, with different response to drugs and radiation. the results may open an avenue towards development of new treatment strategies designed to reverse therapy resistant cell states to more sensitive states.
December 13, 2016
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Brain Cancer - V

Vaccine Targeting Brain Tumors Seems Safe in Study
Combo therapy may also extend survival of glioblastoma patients, but more research needed
April 14, 2017
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Brain Cancer - W

Wearable Medical Device Boosts Brain Cancer Survival Rates
A wearable medical device has proven effective among patients with brain cancer.
April 10, 2017
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Brain Cancer - Z

Zika could one day help combat deadly brain cancer
Zika's damaging neurological effects might someday be enlisted for good -- to treat brain cancer.
September 5, 2017
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Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells
Virus potentially could be used to treat deadly disease
September 5, 2017
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Zika virus selectively infects and kills glioblastoma cells in mice
The Zika virus may infect and kill a specific type of brain cancer cells while leaving normal adult brain tissue minimally affected, according to a new study supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a part of the National Institutes of Health. In the paper, published online on September 5 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers describe the impact of ZIKV on glioblastoma cells in both human tissue samples and mice.
September 5, 2017
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Breast Cancer - Numbers

3 Key Lifestyle Factors Can Lower Breast Cancer Odds
Stay trim, exercise and cut back on drinking, review findings suggest
May 23, 2017
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Breast Cancer - A

A new Drug and Nanoparticle Combination for Triple Negative Breast Cancer
A research team from the UK has developed a prospective new drug for confronting the highly aggressive "triple negative" breast cancer (TNBC), as well as a nanoparticle for delivering the drug directly into the cancer cells.
March 17, 2017
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ACCC introduces new online site to improve treatment and management of metastatic breast cancer
The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), partnered with the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade, the Cancer Support Community, and the Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance (MBC Alliance), announced today the launch of a new online site designed to provide important educational information supporting patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer.
December 14, 2016
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Active ingredient of pungent substances slows growth of breast cancer cells
Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. this was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Prof Dr Dr Dr habil Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumour cells. In the journal "Breast Cancer - Targets and Therapy", the researchers from Ruhr-Universitat Bochum presented their findings together with colleagues from the Augusta clinics in Bochum, the hospital Herz-Jesu-Krankenhaus Dernbach and the Centre of Genomics in Cologne.
December 20, 2016
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Acupuncture treatments after mastectomy help women cope with post-operative symptoms
Women who had acupuncture treatments after breast cancer surgery at Abbott Northwestern Hospital had a greater reduction in pain, nausea, and anxiety and were better able to cope on the first post-operative day compared with patients who had traditional care, according to a study published in the Oncology Nursing Forum in November.
November 30, 2016
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Adelaide researchers find new driver for breast density linked to cancer risk
Adelaide researchers are one step closer to breast cancer prevention after finding a new driver for breast density, an identified risk factor for breast cancer.
January 24, 2017
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African-American women twice as likely to choose autologous breast reconstruction, study shows
African American women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer are more likely than white women to undergo autologous breast reconstruction using their own tissue, rather than implant-based reconstruction, reports a study in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.
August 02, 2016
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Age-specific overall risk of breast, ovarian cancer among women with BRCA1/2 genetic mutations
Researchers conducted an analysis that included nearly 10,000 women with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutations to estimate the age-specific risk of breast or ovarian cancer for women with these mutations, according to a study.
June 19, 2017
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Angelina Jolie's Mastectomy and Gene Testing Rise
But, researchers did not find a corresponding increase in breast removal surgeries
December 14, 2016
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Aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer: Advantages over tamoxifen in early-stage disease
Longer survival, later recurrences/ Evidence for late-stage disease much poorer
December 29, 2016
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Aspirin may cut breast cancer risk for women with diabetes
Researchers have long known that diabetes can increase a woman's risk of breast cancer. A new study, however, suggests that this risk could be significantly reduced with long-term use of low-dose aspirin.
June 12, 2017
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Axillary web syndrome: Symptoms and treatment
The most frequent cause of axillary web syndrome is surgery for breast cancer. It is not known exactly why this complication occurs in some patients.
July 11, 2017
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Breast Cancer - B

Bad Diet in Youth May Up Early Breast Cancer Risk
Study found an association, but didn't prove unhealthy foods caused disease
February 23, 2017
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Beating Breast Cancer But Still Paying a Price
Small study suggests few long-term survivors receive adequate symptom relief
December 14, 2016
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Big data brings breast cancer research forwards by 'decades'
Scientists have created a 'map' linking the shape of breast cancer cells to genes turned on and off, and matched it to real disease outcomes, which could one day help doctors select treatments, according to a study.
February 1, 2017
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Bioinformatics brings to light new combinations of drugs to fight breast cancer
In spite of the many drugs available to treat breast cancer, resistance continues to be a problem
December 20, 2016
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Biomarker tests in breast cancer: Decision on chemotherapy remains difficult
Preliminary MINDACT results allow evaluation of the disadvantages of omitting chemotherapy; little specific information on advantages
December 29, 2016
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Blocking key nutrient uptake may be effective way of treating triple negative breast cancer
Cancer rewires the metabolism of tumor cells, converting them into lean, mean, replicating machines. But like Olympic athletes who rely on special diets to perform, tumor cells' amped-up metabolism can also make them dependent on specific nutrients for survival.
November 21, 2016
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Blood test that detects changes in tumor DNA predicts survival of women with advanced breast cancer
A blood test that spots cancer-linked DNA correctly predicted that most of those patients with higher levels of the tumor markers died significantly earlier than those with lower levels, results of a multicenter study of 129 women with advanced breast cancer show.
February 1, 2017
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Brain microenvironment makes HER2-positive breast cancer metastases resistant to treatment
Study identifies novel resistance mechanism, potential treatment strategy
May 24, 2017
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BRCA1: Mystery of breast cancer risk gene solved, 20 years after its discovery
More than 20 years after scientists revealed that mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose women to breast cancer, scientists have pinpointed the molecular mechanism that allows those mutations to wreak their havoc.
October 4, 2017
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Breakthrough: Breast cancer relapse linked to fat metabolism
Although great strides have been made in the treatment of breast cancer, relapse is still a major issue that has defied investigation. a new study might pave the way to reducing relapse rates by identifying rogue cells earlier.
May 16, 2017
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Breast and ovarian cancers: Large study improves estimates of genetic risk
New study that followed 10,000 women provides more accurate, age-related estimates of the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. It also suggests that family history and the location of the mutations on the gene should be taken into account.
June 19, 2017
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Breast cancer adjuvant treatment discordance linked to general distrust in healthcare system
Nearly one-third of women with breast cancer went against their doctor's advice and chose not to begin or complete the recommended adjuvant anti-cancer therapy to kill residual tumor cells following surgery, according to a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher.
November 1, 2017
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Breast cancer and Mirena IUD: What's the link?
Mirena is a hormonal intrauterine device. Similarly to other hormonal IUDs, it releases levonorgestrel, a synthetic form of the naturally occurring hormone progesterone.
September 1, 2017
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Breast cancer cells recycle their own ammonia waste as fuel
Repressing ammonia metabolism stunts tumor growth in mice, findings may inform design of new therapies
October 19, 2017
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Breast cancer cells spread in an already-armed mob
Most tumor-driving mutations are carried from original malignancy, study suggests
May 10, 2017
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Breast cancer cells undergo stiffening state prior to becoming malignant, study shows
A study published now on Nature Communications shows that breast cancer cells undergo a stiffening state prior to acquiring malignant features and becoming invasive. the discovery made by a research team led by Florence Janody, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC; Portugal), identifies a new signal in tumor cells that can be further explored when designing cancer-targeting therapies.
May 16, 2017
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Breast Cancer Decline May Have Saved 322,000 Lives
But advances in care may not have helped black women as much as whites, report finds
October 3, 2017
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Breast cancer drug dampens immune response, protecting light-sensing cells of the eye
The breast cancer drug tamoxifen appears to protect light-sensitive cells in the eye from degeneration, according to a new study in mice. the drug prevented immune cells from removing injured photoreceptors.
March 13, 2017
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Breast Cancer 'Immunotherapy' Helps Some
A minority of women with 'triple-negative' tumors responded to Tecentriq, but they responded well
April 3, 2017
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Breast cancer linked to bacterial imbalances
Study compares bacterial composition in healthy versus cancerous breast tissue
October 6, 2017
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Breast cancer patient finds new hope with potentially revolutionary treatment
City of Hope patient Susan Young has had a remarkable response to a potentially revolutionary new treatment, a combination of the p53 cancer vaccine and a drug that blocks a specific cancer-aiding protein.
December 21, 2016
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Breast cancer patients could benefit from controversial hormone
An international team of researchers is tackling the controversy over what some scientists consider to be a 'harmful' hormone, arguing that it could be a game changer in the fight against recurring breast cancers that are resistant to standard treatments.
December 9, 2016
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Breast cancer patients forego post-surgery treatment due to mistrust, study suggests
Other factors, including prognosis, influenced noncompliance; building trust in medical institutions key
November 1, 2017
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Breast cancer patients who use social media express more satisfaction about treatment decisions
Women who engaged on social media after a breast cancer diagnosis expressed more deliberation about their treatment decision and more satisfaction with the path they chose, a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds.
July 29, 2016
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Breast Cancer Radiation 'Less Scary' Than Thought
Majority of patients report more tolerable experience than they expected
September 25, 2017
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Breast Cancer Radiation May be Risky for Smokers
Long-term chances of heart attack, lung cancer higher for women who light up, study finds
March 29, 2017
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Breast Cancer Screening Less Likely in Minorities
More study is needed to understand the disparity, researchers say
December 16, 2016
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Breast cancer study in India shows how the country can avoid crisis
A new study examining breast cancer awareness in India has found that a lack of early diagnosis is leading the country towards an epidemic. They found that educating men could be key to encouraging women to seek help earlier.
August 14, 2017
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Breast cancer study predicts better response to chemotherapy
It is known from previous research that the ER-beta estrogen receptor often has a protective effect. a new study has found that this effect is more pronounced in patients that undergo chemotherapy.
December 14, 2016
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Breast Cancer Survivors and Life-Extending Therapy
Study estimates nearly 15,000 lives saved over decade if all who needed hormone treatment got it
February 2, 2017
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Breast cancer update: Sentinel node biopsy guidelines encourage 'less is more' approach
New recommendations from breast cancer experts on sentinel lymph node biopsy reinforce the most recent "less-is-more" guidelines for early-stage disease. But a researcher who helped create the guidelines said many surgeons still perform full lymph node dissection routinely.
December 13, 2016
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Breast cancer: a visual guide to self-examination
Monthly breast self-examination can help detect abnormalities or changes that may be signs of cancer.
April 12, 2017
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Breast cancer: Anatomy and early warning signs
Certain changes in the breast may be early signs of breast cancer. Knowing what these changes look like can help people access the right treatment, as soon as possible.
April 18, 2017
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Breast cancer: Bacterial deficiency linked with onset
Researchers examined the bacterial makeup of breast tissue in women with breast cancer and found that it has insufficient levels of a certain bacterial genus called Methylobacterium.
October 9, 2017
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Breast cancer: Maternal high-fat diet raises risk across generations
New research conducted on pregnant female mice shows that exposure to a high-fat diet can increase the risk of breast cancer across generations. These findings may consolidate understanding of breast cancer factors and help to improve prevention.
July 4, 2017
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Breast cancer: Study identifies a molecular mechanism of drug resistance in ER+ tumors
The majority of breast cancers are estrogen-receptor positive and often treated with anti-estrogen drugs such as tamoxifen. However, resistance to the hormone therapy eventually develops in a large number of patients, leaving them with few options. Now, new research reveals a molecular explanation for this type of drug resistance and could lead to new therapies and better treatment decisions for estrogen-driven breast tumors.
March 21, 2017
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Breast cancers found by mammography do not regress if left untreated
Breast cancers detected by mammography screening do not spontaneously disappear or regress if left untreated, according to a new study. the scientific findings contradict claims that many cancers found via mammography may simply "go away' if left undiscovered or untreated.
May 1, 2017
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Breast-feeding reduces breast cancer risk, says new report
A review of the latest scientific research on breast cancer shows that there is strong evidence that breast-feeding can reduce women's risk of premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancers.
August 3, 2017
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Breast microbiome/bacterial differences identified between healthy, cancerous tissue
Researchers have identified evidence of bacteria in sterilely obtained breast tissue and found differences between women with and without breast cancer.
August 03, 2016
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Breast rashes: Which symptoms suggest cancer?
Rashes have a habit of attracting attention. the skin may react to a number of triggers with redness, swelling, itching, pain, roughness, or other symptoms.
April 26, 2017
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Breast Screenings Still Best for Early Detection
Newer treatments, early diagnoses are improving outcomes for women with the disease, experts say
October 12, 2017
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Breast thermography: Technology, benefits, and cancer signs
Breast thermography is a non-invasive and painless test, with no radiation involved. It can detect and monitor early warning signs of breast cancer.
April 17, 2017
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Breast ultrasound: Why it is done and what to expect
A breast ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create a black and white image of breast tissues and structures.
September 1, 2017
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Breast Cancer - C

Cancer prognosis improves in young women treated with breast conserving surgery
A new analysis indicates that breast cancer prognoses have improved over time in young women treated with breast conserving surgery. The analysis included 1331 patients younger than 40 years treated with breast conserving surgery and whole breast radiotherapy in a single cancer centre in Italy between 1997 and 2010.
August 9, 2017
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Cheese may raise breast cancer risk, but yogurt could reduce it
Dairy foods have their pros and cons; though they are a good source of calcium, they can also be high in fat. When it comes to the effects of dairy foods on breast cancer risk, a new study finds that they can be just as conflicting.
March 1, 2017
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'Chemo Brain' and Breast Cancer Survivors
Altered thinking must be acknowledged as 'one of the difficulties of treatment,' specialist says
January 11, 2017
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Chemoresistance in breast cancer is related to varying tumor cell populations
Drug resistance could be overcome after a 'drug holidays' period
April 27, 2017
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Cognitive dysfunction in breast cancer patients linked to post-traumatic stress
Subtle cognitive dysfunction and decline in breast cancer patients was largely independent of chemotherapy but associated with cancer-related post-traumatic stress in a German multisite study.
May 4, 2017
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'Cold Caps' May Halt Breast Cancer Hair Loss
Devices reduce blood flow to hair follicles during chemotherapy treatments
December 9, 2016
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Columbia University Medical Center to evaluate Biocept's Target Selector platform to diagnose LM in breast cancer patients
Biocept, Inc., a leading commercial provider of clinically actionable liquid biopsy tests designed to improve the outcomes of cancer patients, announces that Columbia University Medical Center will conduct a study to evaluate the clinical utility of the Company's Target Selector™ platform to diagnose leptomeningeal metastases in patients with breast cancer.
December 30, 2016
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Comparison of screening recommendations indicates annual mammography
Starting at age 40 prevents the most cancer deaths
August 21, 2017
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Computer accurately identifies and delineates breast cancers on digital tissue slides
Deep-learning network possible step toward automating biopsy slide analysis
May 10, 2017
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Controversial hormone could fight against recurring breast cancers
An international team of researchers involving the University of Adelaide is tackling the controversy over what some scientists consider to be a "harmful" hormone, arguing that it could be a game changer in the fight against recurring breast cancers that are resistant to standard treatments.
December 9, 2016
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Could outdoor light exposure at night heighten breast cancer risk?
High exposure to outdoor lighting at nighttime may be a risk factor for breast cancer development, a new study suggests.
August 17, 2017
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Breast Cancer - D

Depression drug can alleviate joint pain in postmenopausal women treated for breast cancer
A drug typically used to treat depression and anxiety can significantly reduce joint pain in postmenopausal women being treated for early stage breast cancer, according to new SWOG research to be presented Friday at a special plenary presentation at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
December 9, 2016
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Diabetes drug may be effective against deadly form of breast cancer, study suggests
Researchers have discovered that a metabolic enzyme called AKR1B1 drives an aggressive type of breast cancer. the study, 'AKR1B1 promotes basal-like breast cancer progression by a positive feedback loop that activates the EMT program,' suggests that an inhibitor of this enzyme currently used to treat Diabetes patients could be an effective therapy for this frequently deadly form of cancer.
March 7, 2017
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Diabetes medication could be effective therapy for aggressive type of breast cancer
Around 15-20% of breast cancers are classified as "basal-like." this form of the disease, which generally falls into the triple-negative breast cancer subtype, is particularly aggressive, with early recurrence after treatment and a tendency to quickly spread, or metastasize, to the brain and lungs. There are currently no effective targeted therapies to this form of breast cancer, which is therefore often fatal.
March 7, 2017
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Direct communication could increase rate of women returning for breast cancer screening with MRI
A study published in the journal Health Communications shows that women at high risk for breast cancer who received a letter informing them of their options for additional imaging with contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast (in addition to a letter sent to their primary care physician) were more likely to return to the center for additional screening with MRI. the letter, which is included in the published paper, may help breast imaging centers navigate the complex legal, ethical and institutional landscapes in a way that increases the likelihood that women will follow through with American Cancer Society breast cancer screening recommendations for adjunct breast screening in women at elevated risk.
March 9, 2017
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Doctors Orders Differ from Mammogram Guidelines
Study finds that most still recommend the breast cancer screen for women in their early 40s
April 10, 2017
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Double Mastectomy May Mean a Hit to the Paycheck
Aggressive surgery for breast cancer might cause women to miss over a month of work
October 9, 2017
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Double mastectomy tied to more missed work
As more breast cancer patients are choosing to remove both breasts, researchers examine the impact this aggressive surgery has on their employment
October 9, 2017
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Drug combination produces synergistic effect against growth of triple-negative breast cancer
In the hunt for novel treatments against an aggressive form of breast cancer, researchers combined a new protein inhibitor with a chemotherapy drug to create a powerful combination that resulted in cancer cell death.
September 26, 2017
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Drug discovery approach predicts health impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals
Breast cancer researchers from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a novel approach for identifying how chemicals in the environment–called environmental estrogens–can produce infertility, abnormal reproductive development, including "precocious puberty," and promote breast cancer.
December 29, 2016
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Breast Cancer - E

Early Stage Breast Cancer and Double Mastectomy
Removing healthy breast is unlikely to extend survival, but some doctors don't mention this, researchers say
December 21, 2016
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Early-phase trial demonstrates shrinkage in pediatric neural tumors
In an early-phase clinical trial of a new oral drug, selumetinib, children with the common genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas, tumors of the peripheral nerves, tolerated selumetinib and, in most cases, responded to it with tumor shrinkage. NF1 affects 1 in 3,000 people. the study results appeared Dec. 29, 2016, in the new England Journal of Medicine.
December 29, 2016
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Enzyme that regulates DNA repair may offer new precision treatments for breast and ovarian cancer
Researchers have identified an enzyme called UCHL3 that regulates the BRCA2 pathway, which is important for DNA repair, report scientists.
December 12, 2016
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Exercise can counteract treatment side-effects, improve cardiovascular fitness in women with advanced breast cancer
Taking part in regular exercise can reduce fatigue and pain, and improve cardiovascular health and quality of life in women being treated for advanced breast cancer, according to new research.
November 2, 2017
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Exercise most important lifestyle change to help reduce risk of breast cancer recurrence
for patients with breast cancer, physical activity and avoiding weight gain are the most important lifestyle choices that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and death, according to an evidence-based review.
February 21, 2017
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Exposure to BPA Substitute, BPS, Multiplies Breast Cancer Cells
Bisphenol S (BPS), a substitute for the chemical bisphenol a (BPA) in the plastic industry, shows the potential for increasing the aggressiveness of breast cancer through its behavior as an endocrine-disrupting chemical, a new study finds.
April 3, 2017
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Breast Cancer - F

False positives from mammogram screening can be detrimental to future care
A study conducted by the University of Illinois, Chicago, and published this week by the American Association for Cancer Research, indicates that women who experience a false positive after mammogram screening are more likely to delay or avoid future screening appointments.
February 10, 2017
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Fat rats show why breast cancer may be more aggressive in patients with obesity
In an animal model of obesity and breast cancer, tumor cells in obese animals but not lean animals had especially sensitive androgen receptors, allowing these cells to magnify growth signals from the hormone testosterone.
August 7, 2017
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FDA approves Verzenio for advanced metastatic breast cancer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new drug Verzenio (abemaciclib) for the treatment of advanced or metastatic hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer.
October 2, 2017
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Foods to eat and foods to avoid to fight breast cancer
While there is no one single food or diet that can prevent or cause breast cancer, diet is an area in which individual choices can make a real difference.
April 3, 2017
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Breast Cancer - G

GE Clears First Mammography System That Lets Patients Control Breast Compression
GE Healthcare won FDA clearance for the first mammography system, the Senographe Pristina Dueta, that lets women undergoing an exam to control how much the device compresses the breasts. As the woman is prepared for the exam, she is handed a small remote control that has a plus and minus buttons on it. The breast is then positioned by the technologist between the compression plates and from then on the patient has control in terms of how much compression she's willing to take.
September 6, 2017
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Genetic variant of p53 gene linked to breast cancer risk in premenopausal African American women
African American women who carry the genetic variant could have an increased risk of breast cancer before menopause
February 27, 2017
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Good News for Older Women with Early Breast Cancer
A diagnosis of DCIS doesn't lower life expectancy in patients over 50, study finds
January 27, 2017
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Ground-breaking new breast cancer drugs have manageable toxicity profile for most patients
A ground-breaking new class of oral drugs for treating breast cancer, known as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, are generally well-tolerated, with a manageable toxicity profile for most patients. This is the conclusion of a comprehensive review of toxicities and drug interactions related to this class of drugs, recently published in The Oncologist.
July 13, 2017
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Growing body of evidence supports use of mind-body therapies in breast cancer treatment
Meditation and yoga get highest grades for improving quality of life, study shows
April 24, 2017
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Breast Cancer - H

Hair Dyes Tied to Higher Breast Cancer Risk
Study findings differ by race, but one expert says they're inconclusive
June 19, 2017
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Hair dyes, relaxers tied to raised breast cancer risk
New research finds evidence of a link between use of certain hair products, such as dyes and relaxers, and raised risk of breast cancer in women. The findings also suggest that the effect is different between black and white women.
June 16, 2017
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Half of breast cancer patients experience severe side effects
Study finds side effects cause extra burden for patients, health care system
January 24, 2017
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HCI scientists uncover new way that bones get destroyed through breast cancer
Once breast cancer spreads through the body, it can degrade a patient's healthy bones, causing numerous problems. Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have identified a new way that bones get destroyed through cancer. and they've also learned how to block that destruction with a new drug. Initial tests with patients show promising results.
January 25, 2017
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High cholesterol diagnosis tied to lower breast cancer risk
After investigating 14 years of study data on over 1 million people, researchers found that women diagnosed with high cholesterol had a lower odds of developing breast cancer, compared with women without high cholesterol.
August 30, 2017
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High-Risk Women and Breast Cancer Gene Test
Only half got BRCA screen, and more than half of those who didn't said doctors never recommended it
February 7, 2017
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High-Tech Mammograms: More Cancer, False Positives
Digital technology leads to 'marked improvement' in detection rates, radiology expert says
February 28, 2017
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Hologic Genius 3D Tomosynthesis Mammography System FDA Approved for Better Visualization of Dense Breasts
Hologic received FDA approval to offer its Genius 3D Mammography system as superior to traditional 2D mammography for screening of women with dense breasts. Though Genius 3D has been available in the U.S. since 2011, recently performed clinical studies have demonstrated that "the exam improves invasive breast cancer detection while reducing unnecessary recalls among women of all breast densities, including those with dense breasts," according to Hologic.
June 9, 2017
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Hormonal contraceptives and hair dyes linked to increased risk of breast cancer
In her recent doctoral dissertation, researcher Sanna Heikkinen from the University of Helsinki and Finnish Cancer Registry evaluates the contribution of the use of hormonal contraceptives and hair dyes to the spectrum of breast cancer risk factors.
March 9, 2017
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Hormone stimulation for fertility preservation did not increase relapse rate in women with breast cancer
Women who received hormone stimulation for fertility preservation did not have a higher relapse rate in breast cancer compared with unexposed control women in a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. The results could influence the clinical practice for young cancer patients wishing to pursue fertility preservation.
November 6, 2017
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How decision-making habits influence the breast cancer treatments women consider
A new study finds that more than half of women with early stage breast cancer considered an aggressive type of surgery to remove both breasts. The way women generally approach big decisions, combined with their values, impacts what breast cancer treatment they consider, the study also found.
August 15, 2017
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How family and friends influence breast cancer treatment decisions
New study finds half of women relied on 3 or more people to help them process treatment options
June 28, 2017
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How is breast cancer related to the axillary lymph nodes?
The lymphatic system is one of the body's chief infection fighters. This system contains lymph, which is a type of fluid, and lymph nodes, which are positioned in key areas in the body.
October 16, 2017
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Breast Cancer - I

iBreastExam: Low Cost, Point-of-Care Breast Health Test
UE Lifesciences, a company with offices in the U.S. and India, has developed the iBreastExam, a low-cost point-of-care breast health test for use by community workers in low resource settings.
December 2, 2016
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Immune 'hotspots' could help predict the risk of breast cancer relapse in patients, study finds
Scientists from The Institute of Cancer Research, London has developed a new test through which women at a greater risk of relapsing from breast cancer within 10 years of diagnosis can be identified.
August 4, 2017
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Immune system plays dual role in breast cancer
The immune system plays a paradoxical role in the spread of breast cancer. some immune cells contribute to metastasis, while other cells can be activated to strengthen the effect of chemotherapy, outlines new research.
February 7, 2017
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Immunotherapy combination offers new hope for women with early stage triple negative breast cancer
A Yale Cancer Center clinical trial combining the immune checkpoint inhibitor (durvalumab/MEDI4736) with chemotherapy as preoperative treatment for early stage triple negative breast cancer disclosed a 71% pathologic complete response to the combination treatment in the initial phase I trial.
June 2, 2017
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Inflammatory breast cancer: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
Inflammatory breast cancer is when cancer cells block the lymph vessels in the skin of the breast.
April 4, 2017
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Innovation Fund Announces National Funding for Promoting Biomedical Technologies
Envision is a nano-sized anti-cancer drug capable of destroying a breast tumor without damaging the surrounding tissue. Or imagine a self-healing skin graft developed from nanomaterials that treat the wounds of those with diabetes. These two biomedical technologies alone could be capable of greatly improving the quality of life for patients and saving millions in healthcare costs for Canadians.
October 13, 2017
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Invasive lobular carcinoma: Symptoms, subtypes, diagnosis, and treatment
Invasive lobular carcinoma is a type of cancer that starts in the milk glands of the breast and spreads easily to surrounding tissue.
March 31, 2017
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Is an anticancer drug helping cancer to spread?
It sounds counterintuitive, but a new study shows that the side effects of a chemotherapy drug may enable breast cancer to spread.
August 8, 2017
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Breast Cancer - J

Just one alcoholic drink a day increases breast cancer risk, exercise lowers risk
Drinking just one glass of wine or other alcoholic drink a day increases breast cancer risk, finds a major new report.
May 23, 2017
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Just one small glass of wine per day increases breast cancer risk
Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women across the globe. New research suggests that as little as one alcoholic drink per day can increase breast cancer risk, while exercise and a healthful diet lowers the risk.
May 23, 2017
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Breast Cancer - L

Life-Changing Technology Shouldn't Have to Wait
Braster S.A. is a Poland-based company founded by scientists with a mission -- to save lives by giving women an easier, more effective and more comfortable way to conduct breast self-examinations at home. they believed that through regular home screening, more women would be able to detect breast cancer at an earlier stage, thereby living longer, healthier lives.
May 16, 2017
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Life-threatening childhood brain cancer: New insight
The most common type of malignant childhood brain cancer has been identified as seven separate conditions each needing a different treatment, new research has revealed.
May 23, 2017
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Living with breast cancer: Statistics on survival rates by stage
More than 80 percent of people diagnosed with breast cancer recover and go on to live for at least 10 years.
April 10, 2017
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Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival
Weak social ties linked to higher risk of recurrence, early death, researchers report
December 12, 2016
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Low-Dose Aspirin May Lower Breast Cancer Risk
But experts say it's too soon to recommend it for this purpose
May 1, 2017
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Breast Cancer - M

Mammogram Guidelines Have Changed, But Are Doctors Listening?
Study finds that most still recommend the breast cancer screen for women in their early 40s
April 10, 2017
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Mammography trends show improved cancer detection, more biopsies
The shift from film to digital technology appears to have improved cancer detection rates for diagnostic mammography, but also has increased the abnormal interpretation rate, which may lead to more women undergoing biopsies for benign conditions, according to a new study.
February 28, 2017
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Mammography versus thermography: Comparing the benefits
Breast cancer screening is used to identify breast cancer in women who have no physical symptoms. It is hoped that finding breast cancer early will enable women to undergo less invasive treatments, with better outcomes.
March 29, 2017
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Many Breast Cancer Patients Bail on Treatment
Many breast cancer patients skip recommended treatment after surgery because they lack faith in the health care system, a new study indicates.
November 6, 2017
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Many Women Skip Mammograms After False Positive
But imaging experts stress that doing so may raise risk for actual breast cancer
February 9, 2017
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Massive drop in mortality from breast cancer
The rate of mortality from breast cancer has fallen by one third over the last 30 years. this is due to improvements in early detection, the refinement of treatment concepts and the development of new ones. Today, an important issue for breast cancer experts is also how they can improve the quality of life of their patients.
March 9, 2017
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Mastectomy Study Confirms 'Angelina Jolie Effect'
Preventive breast cancer surgeries rose after the actress publicized her decision
September 25, 2017
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Mayo researchers discover important differences in breast tissue microbiome of women with cancer
A team of Mayo Clinic researchers has identified evidence of bacteria in sterilely-obtained breast tissue and found differences between women with and without breast cancer. the findings are published in the Aug. 3 issue of Scientific Reports.
August 03, 2016
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Measuring breast density
What are the different levels of breast density and how many women have "dense breasts"?
September 4, 2017
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Medicaid Cuts Tied to Delayed Breast Cancer Diagnoses
Tennessee's 2005 Medicaid rollback could forecast what might happen if GOP health plans become law, some say
June 26, 2017
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Metastasized breast cancer: Surgery prior to drug treatment not beneficial
Women suffering from metastasized breast cancer do not benefit from surgery performed prior to drug treatment, new research indicates. This could cause a paradigm shift in treatment of the disease.
June 8, 2017
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Metastatic breast cancers: Characterizing the profile of metastases for improved treatment
A new study offers a better understanding of the progression of breast cancer. the conclusions could have an impact on care for patients suffering from a metastatic breast cancer. this is one of the first studies based on the analysis of multiple metastases obtained at the time of patient autopsies.
April 24, 2017
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More Asian-American Women Getting Breast Cancer
Out of 7 nationality groups studied, only Japanese women didn't have an overall increase in the disease
April 14, 2017
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More patients with early-stage breast cancer may be able to avoid chemotherapy in the future
For women with intermediate risk recurrence score from 21-gene expression assay, less may be more
February 16, 2017
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More women opting to remove a healthy breast after cancer diagnosis
An increasing number of women diagnosed with cancer in one breast choose to have the other breast surgically removed as well, according to a new study co-led by the American Cancer Society.
March 29, 2017
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Most women unaware of breast density's effect on cancer risk, study finds
Most women don't know that having dense breasts increases their risk for breast cancer and reduces a mammogram's ability to detect cancer, according to a study. a random phone survey of 1,024 Virginia women ages 35 to 70 found that just 1 in 8 women were aware that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, while just 1 in 5 women knew that dense breasts reduced the sensitivity of mammograms to find tumors.
November 21, 2016
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MRI contrast agent locates and distinguishes aggressive from slow-growing breast cancer
Researchers target tumor protein
September 25, 2017
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MRI contrast agent locates and distinguishes aggressive from slow-growing breast cancer
A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent being tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University not only pinpoints breast cancers at early stages but differentiates between aggressive and slow-growing types.
September 25, 2017
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MSK scientists discover epigenetic mechanism promoting breast cancer
Bottom Line: Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have identified, for the first time, an epigenetic mechanism promoting breast cancer. the team found that inhibition of the PI3K pathway leads to activation of ER-dependent transcription through the epigenetic regulator KMT2D.
March 24, 2017
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Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles Could Overcome Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients.
December 14, 2016
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Breast Cancer - N

Nanoparticle paves the way for new triple negative breast cancer drug
A potential new drug to tackle the highly aggressive 'triple negative' breast cancer - and a nanoparticle to deliver it directly into the cancer cells - have been developed by UK researchers.
March 16, 2017
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Nanoparticles could be used to overcome treatment-resistant breast cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients.
December 14, 2016
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Natural compound could improve treatment of triple-negative breast cancer
More than 100 women die from breast cancer every day in the United States. Triple-negative breast cancers, which comprise 15 to 20 percent of all breast tumors, are a particularly deadly type of breast disease that often metastasize to distant sites.
January 24, 2017
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NCI-funded TMIST study compares 2-D and 3-D mammography for finding breast cancers
Study will help women make informed decisions about screening tests in the future.
September 26, 2017
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Never Too Old for a Mammogram?
Researchers find benefits for some women up to the age of 90
November 28, 2016
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New Cancer Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Aggressive Brain Tumors
By boosting the power of a patient's immune cells, researchers from the City of Hope Beckman Research Institute have demonstrated the potential for a revolutionary new therapy to treat a particularly aggressive form of brain cancer. But given the limited results, many questions remain.
December 29, 2016
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New compound boosts treatment for aggressive breast cancer
Although breast cancer survival rates are overall very high, some forms of cancer are more difficult to treat than others. However, a new compound proves highly effective against these types by targeting a protein that makes cancer cells resistant to treatment.
August 3, 2017
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New data reveals significant correlation between OA breast imaging results and histologic data of breast masses
Seno Medical Instruments, Inc., the company pioneering the development of opto-acoustic (OA) technology as a new tool to improve the process of diagnosing breast cancer, today announced results from two analyses of the company's European MAESTRO post-market surveillance study.
December 14, 2016
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New findings support use of integrative therapies for treating breast cancer patients
In newly updated clinical guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO), researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center with an interdisciplinary team of colleagues at MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and other institutions in the U.S. and Canada, analyzed which integrative treatments are most effective and safe for patients with breast cancer.
April 24, 2017
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New gene discovered that is driving drug resistance
A gene that is 'revving the engine of cancer' against the world's most common breast cancer drug has been discovered by scientists.
April 4, 2017
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New gene identified as cause, early indicator of breast cancer
When mutated, a gene known for its ability to repair DNA, appears to instead cause breast cancer, scientists report. Mutations of the gene are known to be present in both early onset breast and ovarian cancer. now scientists have shown that the stem, or progenitor cells, which should ultimately make healthy breast tissue, can also have GT198 mutations that prompt them to instead make a perfect bed for breast cancer.
March 18, 2016
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New genetic variants contribute to the risk of breast cancer in women, study reveals
A new study reveals seventy-two novel genetic variants that are responsible for breast cancer risk. Published in the journals Nature and Nature Genetics, of these 72 variants, 65 are common variants that predispose patients to breast cancer and a further seven variants predispose particularly to estrogen -receptor negative breast cancer - the subcategory of cases that do not respond to hormonal treatments.
October 24, 2017
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New genomics study aims to evaluate effectiveness of blood test in detecting breast cancer
Cancer researchers at Intermountain Medical Center and the Intermountain Precision Genomics Program in Salt Lake City are launching an exciting, new three-year study to determine if a blood test that looks for DNA from a cancer tumor can be used to complement mammography to improve the way breast cancer is diagnosed.
October 11, 2017
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New insights into mechanisms of breast cancer development and resistance to therapy
Why does breast cancer develop and how come certain patients are resistant to established therapies? Researchers have gained new insights into the molecular processes in breast tissue. they identified the tumor suppressor LATS as a key player in the development and treatment of breast cancer.
January 9, 2017
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New MRI contrast agent differentiates between aggressive and slow-growing breast cancers
A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent being tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University not only pinpoints breast cancers at early stages but differentiates between aggressive and slow-growing types.
September 25, 2017
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New online tool offers opioid prescribing recommendations after surgery
How many prescription pain pills should a patient receive after breast cancer surgery? Or a hernia repair? Or a gallbladder removal?
October 16, 2017
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New study reveals late spread of breast cancer and backs key role of early diagnosis
These results show that catching and treating breast cancer before it spreads is a realistic goal
August 14, 2017
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New technique can test effectiveness of treatments for breast cancer metastases in bone
A new laboratory technique developed by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions can rapidly test the effectiveness of treatments for life-threatening breast cancer metastases in bone.
April 21, 2017
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New X-ray technique could improve bomb detection and breast cancer treatment
An exciting X-ray imaging technology has been successfully developed to the point where it is now ready for translation into all kinds of beneficial applications, including potentially life-saving uses in security and healthcare.
December 13, 2016
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No Extra Risk to 'Nipple-Sparing' Cancer Surgery
Research suggests that the cosmetically superior procedure comes with no added risk
July 19, 2017
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Novartis to collaborate with IBM Watson Health for improving outcomes in advanced breast cancer
Novartis today announced a first-of-its-kind collaboration with IBM Watson Health on an initiative to optimize cancer care and improve patient outcomes. The two companies will collaborate to explore development of a cognitive solution that uses real-world data and advanced analytical techniques with the aim to provide better insights on the expected outcomes of breast cancer treatment options.
June 5, 2017
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Novel approach can reveal personalized breast cancer treatments
Researchers have developed a new way to approach breast cancer treatment. First, they search for the proteins that drive tumor growth, and then test in the lab drugs that potentially neutralize these specific biological drivers.
March 28, 2017
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Novel compound that engages 'second arm' of immune system reduces breast tumors, metastases
A compound able to reverse the allegiance of innate immune system cells - turning them from tumor enablers into tumor opponents - caused breast tumors in mice to shrink and withdraw from distant metastases, scientists report.
March 8, 2017
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Breast Cancer - O

One of the most common viruses in humans may promote breast cancer development
Findings could lead to new prevention strategies
August 1, 2016
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Breast Cancer - P

PARP inhibitor may be effective against some TNBC lacking BRCA mutations
The investigational PARP inhibitor talazoparib caused regression of patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) that had BRCA mutations and also those that did not have BRCA mutations but had other alterations in DNA damage-repair pathways.
November 1, 2017
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PHD2-knockdown overcomes breast cancer cell death in response to glucose starvation
B55α is one of the regulatory subunits of the PP2A phosphatase. this phosphatases has been associated to the control of many biological functions but the multiplicity of complexes that can be formed by the combination of different subunits renders this protein hard in its understanding. the Massimiliano Mazzone group (VIB-KU Leuven) has recently demonstrated that PP2A/B55α promotes the growth of colorectal cancer, by dephosphorylating PHD2 and modifying its enzymatic properties. PHD2 is a member of a family of enzymes crucial for the cellular response to hypoxia.
March 22, 2017
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Pioneering Nanobiodevice Could Quickly Isolate Cancer Biomarkers with High Resolution
Like DNA, ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a type of polymeric biomolecule essential for life, playing important roles in gene processing. Short lengths of RNA called microRNA are more stable than longer RNA chains, and are found in common bodily fluids.
March 9, 2017
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Place matters in late diagnosis of colorectal cancer, study finds
In addition to a person's race or ethnicity, where they live can matter in terms of whether they are diagnosed at a late stage for colorectal cancer, according to a recent study.
January 9, 2017
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Poor diet during teens, early adulthood may raise breast cancer risk
The risk of developing premenopausal breast cancer may be higher for women who have a poor diet during adolescence and early adulthood, new research finds.
March 1, 2017
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Potential drug candidates halt prostate and breast cancer growth
Two new drug candidates have now been designed to target prostate and triple negative breast cancers. the new research demonstrates that a new class of drugs called small molecule RNA inhibitors can successfully target and kill specific types of cancer.
March 9, 2017
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Potential drug offers hope for therapy-resistant breast cancer patients
UT Southwestern Simmons Cancer Center researchers have shown that a first-in-class molecule can prevent breast cancer growth when traditional therapies stop working.
August 8, 2017
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Protective effect of ER-beta more pronounced in breast cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy
It is known from previous research that the ER-beta estrogen receptor often has a protective effect. a new study from Lund University in Sweden has found that this effect is more pronounced in patients that undergo chemotherapy.
December 14, 2016
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Proteins which suppress the growth of breast cancer tumors discovered
A type of protein has been discovered that could hold the secret to suppressing the growth of breast cancer tumors, say scientists.
June 12, 2017
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Breast Cancer - R

Rate of mastectomies decreases with adoption of breast tumor margin guidelines, study finds
What this means in the overtreatment debate for breast cancer
June 5, 2017
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Regular use of aspirin can lower risk of breast cancer for women
A new study identifies low-dose aspirin as a potential cancer prevention tool
May 1, 2017
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Research shows how adipose tissue reduces efficiency of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients
According to research published online in The FASEB Journal, repeated irradiation of breast fat (also known as adipose tissue) produces an inflammatory response that ultimately reduces the efficiency of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. This research was based on a recent discovery that there is an inflammatory interaction between breast tumors and adipose tissue.
June 8, 2017
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Researchers develop two-pronged approach to personalize breast cancer treatment
The goal of cancer therapy is to destroy the tumor or stop it from growing and spreading to other parts of the body. Reaching toward this goal, a team of researchers from various institutions, including Baylor College of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has developed a new way to approach breast cancer treatment.
March 28, 2017
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Researchers discover key to drug resistance in common breast cancer treatment
Three-quarters of all breast cancer tumors are driven by the hormone estrogen. These tumors are frequently treated with drugs to suppress estrogen receptor activity, but unfortunately, at least half of patients do not respond to these treatments, leaving them with drug-resistant tumors and few options. Now, scientists have found that two immune system molecules may be key to the development of drug resistance in estrogen-driven breast cancers.
March 19, 2017
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Researchers discover mutation hotspots that act like backseat drivers for breast cancer development
Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered 'hotspots' of mutations in breast cancer genomes, where mutations thought to be inactive 'passengers' in the genome have now been shown to possibly drive further cancerous changes. Reported in Nature Genetics today, the study found 33 mutation hotspots, which act like backseat drivers for cancer development.
January 23, 2017
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Researchers discover novel mechanism to stop the spread of breast cancer
Controlling the levels of the TIP60 protein, which is a tumor suppressor, could potentially prevent the spread of breast cancer cells, a team of has found.
November 23, 2016
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Researchers examine link between income level and cancer diagnosis
Do wealthier people receive too much medical care? In a Perspective article recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, H. Gilbert Welch, MD, and Elliott Fisher, MD, of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice examine the association between income level and cancer diagnosis.
June 8, 2017
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Researchers explore impact of hair products on breast cancer risk
Can use of hair products have an impact on breast cancer risk for women? That is a question explored by Rutgers University investigators -- and colleagues from Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and Moffitt Cancer Center. Lead author of the work Adana A.M. Llanos, PhD, MPH of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers School of Public Health along with author Elisa V. Bandera, MD, PhD of Rutgers Cancer Institute, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Rutgers School of Public Health share more about the work which examined use of hair dyes, hair relaxers and cholesterol-based hair products in African-American and Caucasian women.
June 14, 2017
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Researchers find key genetic driver for rare type of triple-negative breast cancer
New mouse model leads to surprising discovery that sheds light on metaplastic breast cancer
January 6, 2017
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Researchers quantify immune cells associated with future breast cancer risk
Researchers have quantified the numbers of various types of immune cells associated with the risk of developing breast cancer, outlines a new report.
February 8, 2017
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Researchers provide "benchmark" amid changing breast cancer screening guidelines
Different professional organizations and societies continue to disagree over the best time to start and discontinue breast cancer screening, as well as what the optimal interval time should be between mammograms.
April 12, 2017
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Researchers receive $2 million PCORI funding to analyze use of decision aids in breast cancer treatment
A research team at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice has received a $2 million funding award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to conduct a research project that is likely to change the way women and their doctors make decisions about breast cancer surgery.
August 02, 2016
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Researchers stumble onto a new role for breast cancer drug
Tamoxifen stops immune cells from destroying injured eye cells in mice
May 31, 2017
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Researchers synthesizing new, first-in-class drug to stop growth of ER-positive breast cancer
Researchers at UT Health San Antonio and two partner institutions are developing a new, first-in-class agent that has stopped the growth of estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) breast cancer in its tracks. The new agent is a molecule called ERX-11 that has blocked the growth of recurring breast cancer tumors.
August 30, 2017
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Researchers uncover mechanism of resistance used by triple negative breast cancer
Breast cancer cells are evasive, finding ways to bypass drugs designed to stop their unchecked growth. In a new study, researchers uncovered a mechanism of resistance used by a particularly aggressive breast cancer type, and revealed a possible drug combination that could stop cancer growth and also help to prevent resistance.
January 20, 2017
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'Rewired' cells show promise for targeted cancer therapy
Human immune cells rationally engineered to sense, respond to tumor signal
December 12, 2016
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Risk of breast cancer's return continues long after treatment ends
A recent analysis has found that even 20 years after receiving a diagnosis of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, the risk of the cancer's return looms large. Should treatment be extended?
November 9, 2017
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Rogue proteins involved in breast cancer point to potential treatment options
For patients with difficult-to-treat cancers, doctors increasingly rely on genomic testing of tumors to identify errors in the DNA that indicate a tumor can be targeted by existing therapies. But this approach overlooks another potential marker -- rogue proteins -- that may be driving cancer cells and also could be targeted with existing treatments.
March 28, 2017
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Role of common risk factors in ER-positive, ER-negative breast cancer
Researchers have examined the role of common risk factors in the development of ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. the study sheds new light on how a woman's age, weight, and menopausal status affect her risk for breast cancer.
January 9, 2017
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Breast Cancer - S

Scalp cooling can lessen chemotherapy-induced hair loss in some breast cancer patients
Scalp cooling can lessen some chemotherapy-induced hair loss - one of the most devastating hallmarks of cancer - in certain breast cancer patients, according to a new multicenter study from UC San Francisco, Weill Cornell Medicine and three other medical centers.
February 15, 2017
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Scientists create innovative drug design strategy to improve breast cancer treatment
A new study offers a novel structure-based drug design strategy aimed at altering the basic landscape of this type of breast cancer treatment.
November 21, 2016
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Scientists find link between p53 gene in African American women and breast cancer risk
Scientists at the Wistar Institute in collaboration with Roswell Park Cancer Institute found a significant association between a rare genetic variant of the p53 gene present in African American women and their risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal age.
February 27, 2017
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Scientists identify bone degradation process within metastatic breast cancer
Phase 1 clinical trial shows promising results with new drug
January 25, 2017
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Scientists identify chain reaction that shields breast cancer stem cells from chemotherapy
Working with human breast cancer cells and mice, researchers say they have identified a biochemical pathway that triggers the regrowth of breast cancer stem cells after chemotherapy.
February 22, 2017
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Searching for the 'signature' causes of BRCAness in breast cancer
Mutation pattern or 'signature' linked to defects in 2 genes points to other ways an important DNA repair mechanism can be shut off in breast cancer
August 21, 2017
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Severe Side Effects from Breast Cancer Therapy
Digestive troubles, pain, skin irritation and arm swelling among possible problems
January 24, 2017
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Single-cell diagnostics for breast cancer
Women diagnosed with breast cancer may benefit from having the molecular subtype of different cells within their tumors identified, argue researchers. While breast cancer is often treated as a whole, they discuss the growing consensus that cancer cells within a tumor can have multiple origins and respond variably to treatment. The authors advocate for more accurate diagnostic tests to capture molecular irregularities between tumor cells.
October 24, 2017
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Some Breast Cancer Drugs and Blood Vessel Damage
But findings from small study are unlikely to change current practice, doctors say
December 9, 2016
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Soy component could improve breast cancer treatment
Emerging research suggests that genistein, a component of soy, could protect a gene that suppresses the development of cancerous tumors.
November 1, 2017
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Soy May be Protective for Breast Cancer Survivors
Study of 6,200 women finds the food linked to lower risk of death after nearly a decade of follow-up
March 7, 2017
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Statins linked to lower rates of breast cancer and mortality
A 14 year study in more than one million people has found that women with high cholesterol have significantly lower rates of breast cancer and improved mortality. The research suggests that statins are associated with lower rates of breast cancer and subsequent mortality.
August 28, 2017
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Stereotactic partial breast radiation decreases treatment time from six weeks to just days
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers found in a recent phase one clinical trial that stereotactic partial breast radiation was as safe as traditional radiation but decreased treatment time from six weeks to just days.
May 9, 2017
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Study estimates number of U.S. women living with metastatic breast cancer
A new study shows that the number of women in the United States living with distant metastatic breast cancer (MBC), the most severe form of the disease, is growing. This is likely due to the aging of the U.S. population and improvements in treatment. Researchers came to this finding by estimating the number of U.S. women living with MBC, or breast cancer that has spread to distant sites in the body, including women who were initially diagnosed with metastatic disease, and those who developed MBC after an initial diagnosis at an earlier stage.
May 18, 2017
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Study estimates number of U.S. women living with metastatic breast cancer
The number of women in the United States living with distant metastatic breast cancer, the most severe form of the disease, is growing, new research shows.
May 18, 2017
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Study finds increase in early stage breast cancer diagnoses after Affordable Care Act took effect
A Loyola University Chicago study published this month has found an increase in the percentage of breast cancer patients who were diagnosed in early Stage 1, after the Affordable Care Act took effect.
June 23, 2017
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Study finds 'striking' use of double mastectomy
Nearly half of early stage breast cancer patients considered having double mastectomy and one in six received it -- including many who were at low risk of developing a second breast cancer, a new study finds.
December 21, 2016
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Study identifies protein in tumor microenvironment that promotes breast cancer spread
To understand what makes breast cancer spread, researchers are looking at where it lives - not just its original home in the breast but its new home where it settles in other organs. What's happening in that metastatic niche where migrated cancer cells are growing?
February 16, 2017
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Study identifies recurrent genomic alterations in subset of breast cancer
A genomic analysis study by Rutgers Cancer Institute of new Jersey investigators and other colleagues has identified recurrent genomic alterations in a subset of breast cancer that are typically associated with a form of thyroid cancer and an intestinal birth defect known as Hirschsprung disease.
December 9, 2016
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Study in early stage breast cancer shows that even small tumors can be aggressive
Even small tumors can be aggressive, according to a study in patients with early stage breast cancer. Researchers found that nearly one in four small tumors were aggressive and patients benefited from chemotherapy. Aggressive tumors could be identified by a 70-gene signature.
September 4, 2017
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Study on mice demonstrates the action of strawberries against breast cancer
Strawberry extract can inhibit the spread of laboratory-grown breast cancer cells, even when they are inoculated in female mice to induce tumors, new research shows. However, the scientists do point out that these results from animal testing can not be extrapolated to humans.
April 19, 2017
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Study: Breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant radiation have lower risk of second primary tumor
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers launched a first of its kind study comparing the long-term benefits of radiation therapy in women with breast cancer either before surgery (neoadjuvant) or after surgery (adjuvant). Their study, published in the June 30 issue of Breast Cancer Research, found that patients who have neoadjuvant radiation therapy have a significantly lower risk of developing a second primary tumor at any site.
July 17, 2017
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Study reveals effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer
Researchers analyzed data confirming the improved outcomes in both short- and long-term survival in patients that underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to surgery for triple-negative breast cancer. The study included 213 patients at 8 Italian cancer centers whose diagnoses were characterized by clinical, molecular, and therapeutic features of triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of cancer with limited treatment options.
July 25, 2017
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Study shows how breast cancer cells spread late in disease development
Breast cancer cells that spread to other parts of the body break off and leave the primary tumor at late stages of disease development, scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have found.
August 14, 2017
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Study: Half of women treated for early stage breast cancer report severe side effects
Nearly half of women treated for early stage breast cancer reported at least one side effect from their treatment that was severe or very severe, a new study finds.
January 24, 2017
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Symptoms from other causes may be mistaken for side effects of breast cancer drug
Women taking tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer were less likely to continue taking the drug if they suffered nausea and vomiting, according to new data presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium today.
December 9, 2016
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Synthetic nanochannels for iodide transport
Exchange of iodide (iodine ions) between bloodstream and cells is crucial for the health of several organs and its malfunctioning is linked to goiter, hypo- and hyperthyroidism, breast cancer, and gastric cancer. Researchers have devised nanostructures that function as channels for iodide transport in cell membranes. This study may lead to diagnosis and treatment of iodide transport disorders.
June 8, 2017
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Synthetic nanochannels for iodide transport
Exchange of iodide (iodine ions) between bloodstream and cells is crucial for the health of several organs and its malfunctioning is linked to goiter, hypo- and hyperthyroidism, breast cancer, and gastric cancer.
June 8, 2017
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Breast Cancer - T

Tamoxifen May Get Blamed for Unrelated Symptoms
Perceived side effects might lead some to stop taking the breast cancer preventative, study finds
December 9, 2016
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Targeted radiotherapy limits side effects of breast cancer treatment
Breast cancer patients who have radiotherapy targeted at the original tumor site experience fewer side effects five years after treatment than those who have whole breast radiotherapy, and their cancer is just as unlikely to return, according to trial results.
August 3, 2017
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Targeting acid metabolite reduces size and spread of breast cancer
It's a metabolite found in essentially all our cells that, like so many things, cancer overexpresses. Now scientists have shown that when they inhibit 20-HETE, it reduces both the size of a breast cancer tumor and its ability to spread to the lungs.
July 12, 2017
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Targeting breast cancer metabolism to fight the disease
How does a cancer cell burn calories? new research shows that breast cancer cells rely on a different process for turning fuel into energy than normal cells.
November 28, 2016
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Technique to minimally disrupt lower suspensory ligaments improves breast reduction outcomes
Research led by Frank Lau, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery at LSU Health new Orleans School of Medicine, has found that long-term breast reduction outcomes can be improved by using techniques that minimally disrupt the lower breast suspensory ligaments. the paper, the Sternum-Nipple Distance is Double the Nipple-Inframammary Fold Distance in Macromastia, is published Ahead-of-Print online in the Annals of Plastic Surgery.
April 14, 2017
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Teen invents bra that could detect breast cancer early
Mexican student wins a global entrepreneur award for designing a bra that aids with early breast cancer detection.
May 8, 2017
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Test gives accurate prognosis for breast cancer patients with 'ultralow' risk
A new test may help to identify breast cancer patients with the lowest risk of death, therefore helping them to avoid unnecessarily aggressive treatment.
June 29, 2017
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Test identifies breast cancer patients with lowest risk of death
Long-term survival with minimal treatment seen in ultralow risk patients, study finds
June 29, 2017
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The way breast cancer genes act could predict your treatment
Effective treatment options for breast cancer can be predicted based on the way certain breast cancer genes act or express themselves, a researcher has concluded.
February 21, 2017
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Three-week radiation therapy treatment given post mastectomy is safe and effective
A shorter course of radiation therapy given to breast cancer patients following mastectomy is safe and effective and cuts treatment time in half. that is according to data from a phase II clinical trial by investigators who examined a hypofractionated regimen given over three weeks versus the traditional six week course of treatment.
May 2, 2017
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Triple-negative breast cancer: Nanodelivery of new drug shows promise
Using nanoparticles to deliver an experimental drug directly into triple-negative breast cancer cells could be an effective way to fight this very aggressive cancer, which has very few treatment options. the drug is a peptide that is unstable, and delivering it directly into cells means that it can reach its target before degrading.
March 17, 2017
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Triple-negative breast cancer: What you need to know
Triple-negative breast cancer is different from the three more common types of breast cancer. It is harder to treat and aggressive.
September 4, 2017
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TSRI researchers develop new drug candidates to target prostate and triple negative breast cancers
Scientists on the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have designed two new drug candidates to target prostate and triple negative breast cancers.
March 9, 2017
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Tucatinib (ONT-380) progressing in pivotal trial against HER2+ breast cancer
Twenty-seven percent of 50 heavily pretreated patients with stage IV HER2+ breast cancer saw clinical benefit from the drug Tucatinib (ONT-380) , with at least 'stable disease' at 24 or more weeks after the start of treatment.
January 11, 2017
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Two drug combinations may reduce mortality rates in breast cancer patients, study reveals
Patient health records revealed two drug combinations that may reduce mortality rates in breast cancer patients, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
December 9, 2016
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Breast Cancer - U

U.S. breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015
Gap in death rates between whites and blacks closing in several states
October 3, 2017
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UGA researchers pinpoint factors that drive sharp rise in breast cancer genetic testing
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University of Georgia.
October 20, 2017
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Understanding and treating ER-positive breast cancer
Certain breast cancers occur as a direct result of the many hormone receptors on the surface of breast cells. These receptors are made up of proteins that accept hormones that tell the cell when to grow. In cases of cancerous cells, the cell begins to grow uncontrollably.
April 7, 2017
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UVA examines scalpel-free surgery's potential to help the body destroy breast cancer cells
In its latest pioneering effort to harness the power of focused ultrasound to battle disease, the University of Virginia Health System is examining the scalpel-free surgery's potential to enable the body to identify and destroy metastatic breast cancer cells.
November 8, 2017
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Breast Cancer - V

Vaccine shows promising results for early-stage breast cancer patients
HER2-targeted dendritic cell vaccines stimulate immune responses and regression of HER2-expressing early-stage breast tumors
January 3, 2017
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Videssa Breast Blood Diagnostic Test for Breast Cancer
Provista Diagnostics, a company based in New York City, has developed the Videssa Breast blood-based proteomic test to detect breast cancer. At present, after an abnormal mammogram doctors are faced with a difficult decision: whether to carry out an invasive biopsy or not. "When a mammogram yields an abnormal result, the challenge for every clinician is to decide which patients need follow-up, further imaging or biopsy,' said Josie R. Alpers, MD, a radiologist at Avera McKennan Hospital & University Health Center.
May 30, 2017
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Breast Cancer - W

With breast cancer, the best treatment may be no treatment
Mammography, the boob-smooshing imaging technique used to detect breast cancer, has an overdiagnosis problem. Doctors have long known that some portion of the tumors revealed by the scans might never become life-threatening--but they haven't been able to discern harmless growths from those that grow and spread.
June 8, 2017
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Women with diabetes who use low-dose aspirin have reduced breast cancer risk
A new study of nearly 149,000 women with diabetes over 14 years showed an overall 18% reduced breast cancer risk for women who used low-dose aspirin compared to those who did not. The study design and results are published in an article in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
June 8, 2017
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Women with more social connections have higher breast cancer survival, study shows
In a large study of women with invasive breast cancer, socially integrated women -- those with the most social ties, such as spouses, community ties, friendships and family members -- were shown to have significantly lower breast cancer death rates and disease recurrence than socially isolated women.
December 13, 2016
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Women's decision-making habits combined with values impact choice of breast cancer treatment
A new study finds that more than half of women with early stage breast cancer considered an aggressive type of surgery to remove both breasts. The way women generally approach big decisions, combined with their values, impacts what breast cancer treatment they consider, the study also found.
August 17, 2017
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Worldwide statistics on breast cancer: Diagnosis and risk factors
Breast cancer is the only cancer that is considered universal among women worldwide.
April 26, 2017
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Cervical Cancer

1 in 4 men have genital HPV infections that cause or are linked to cancer
Researchers suggest boosted vaccination as 45% of men overall had some type of HPV.
January 20, 2017
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2 Doses of HPV Vaccine Effective for Younger Teens
Global study supports revised regimen for those under 15
November 22, 2016
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Artificial intelligence image detection technique offers low-cost, improved screening for cervical cancer
Artificial intelligence--commonly known as A.I.--is already exceeding human abilities. Self-driving cars use A.I. to perform some tasks more safely than people. E-commerce companies use A.I. to tailor product ads to customers' tastes quicker and with more precision than any breathing marketing analyst.
April 24, 2017
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Cervical cancer just got much deadlier–because scientists fixed a math error
Past estimates forgot to exclude women who had their cervixes removed.
January 23, 2017
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Cervical cancer mortality rates may be underestimated
A new analysis reveals that for most women, the risk of dying from cervical cancer is higher than previously thought. Unlike prior estimates that also included women who had undergone a hysterectomy and were therefore no longer at risk, this analysis only included women with a cervix. the study also revealed significant racial differences in the risk of dying from cervical cancer.
January 23, 2017
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Change in cervical cancer screening guideline linked to reduced identification of chlamydia cases
A 2012 cervical cancer screening guideline change is associated with reduced testing for cervical cancer and chlamydia and reduced identification of chlamydia cases in young women. Screening for chlamydia, the most commonly diagnosed bacterial sexually transmitted infection worldwide, is often conducted with cervical cancer screening.
July 11, 2017
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CPRIT awards $1.5 million grant to reduce burden of cervical cancer in West Texas
Navkiran Shokar, M.A., M.P.H, M.D., has received nearly $1.5 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in West Texas.
March 8, 2017
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Education may help increase awareness of HPV risk and vaccination rates in college-age men
Male collegiate athletes have high rates of risk factors for infection with the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV), but have low HPV vaccination rates and low awareness of their personal health risks, according to a study in the November issue of The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer.
October 26, 2017
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Five important things everyone should know about cervical cancer
There are several types of gynecologic cancers that affect the female reproductive system, including endometrial, ovarian, cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancer.
October 3, 2017
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Henrietta Lacks Film Highlights Research Issues
The story of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American cervical cancer patient whose tumor cells changed the course of biomedical research, will debut on HBO on Saturday in a new movie starring Oprah Winfrey.
April 21, 2017
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HIV status may affect the progression of HPV infection to cervical pre-cancer
HIV-positive women were more likely to have human papillomavirus infection progress to pre-cancerous cervical lesions
June 1, 2017
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HPV Test Alone OK for Cervical Cancer Screening Over 30: Expert Panel
New advisory says women can get the screen once every 5 years, in lieu of Pap tests every 3 years
September 12, 2017
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HPV testing leads to faster, more complete diagnosis of possible cervical precancer
HPV is a virus that can cause cervical, vaginal, penile and anal cancers. More than 520,000 cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year, causing around 266,000 deaths. A common screening procedure for cervical cancer is the Pap smear, which tests for the presence of precancerous or cancerous cells on the cervix.
June 22, 2017
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HPV vaccine also prevents uncommon childhood respiratory disease, study suggests
The vaccine that protects against cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV) also prevents an uncommon but incurable childhood respiratory disease, according to a new study.
November 9, 2017
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HPV vaccine as cancer prevention is a message that needs to catch on
New infection stats should be 'a wake-up call' to spur lagging vaccination rates
April 28, 2017
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HPV vaccine could drastically reduce cervical and other cancers globally
The latest HPV vaccine could prevent most HPV infections -- and millions of cancers -- worldwide, according to new researchers.
June 12, 2017
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HPV Vaccine May Prevent Rare Childhood Disease
The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, first developed to help guard against cervical cancer, also seems to protect against a rare, chronic childhood respiratory disease, a new study suggests.
November 9, 2017
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HPV Vaccine Safe for Adult Women: Study
Analysis of millions of recipients finds no link to 44 different illnesses
October 18, 2017
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HPV: Vaccination and test reduce cancer risk by more than 90%
Every year there are around 400 new cases of cervical cancer and a total of approximately 800 cancers associated with HPV (human papilloma virus). Two measures could reverse this trend: the nonavalent HPV vaccination and HPV screening by means of smear tests as secondary prevention. This combination is able to reduce the cancer risk by more than 90%.
October 30, 2017
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Improved vaccine that protects against nine types of HPV is highly effective
Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with almost 300,000 deaths occurring each year. More than 80 percent of these deaths occur in developing nations. The advent of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines has significantly reduced the number of those who develop and die from cervical cancer.
September 6, 2017
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New Cervical Biopsy Device Showing Promise in Improving Comfort, Quality of Results
Following a suspicious-looking pap smear, a colposcopy is often required. In addition to a visual inspection, a sample of cervical cells has to be taken, a painful procedure that involves an imposing looking instrument.
August 8, 2017
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New study estimates overall prevalence of genital HPV infection among men in the U.S.
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various cancers, and a new study published online by JAMA Oncology estimates the overall prevalence of genital HPV infection in men ages 18 to 59.
January 19, 2017
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New study finds huge disparities in survival for patients with HPV-related cancers
A new study found large disparities by sex, race, and age in survival for patients diagnosed with different cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that improvements in HPV vaccination and access to cancer screening and treatment are needed.
November 6, 2017
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New tech promises easier cervical cancer screening
'Pocket colposcope' removes need for speculum, may enable self-screening
May 31, 2017
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Pocket Colposcope for Cervical Cancer Screening by Anyone Anywhere
Scientists at Duke University have developed a handheld colposcope that can be used for cervical screening. The slender wand can be attached to a smartphone or laptop to display images of the cervix.
June 2, 2017
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Physicians evaluate new device to test for cervical cancer
Research finds the new device is less painful and minimizes discomfort
August 3, 2017
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Previous screening results important for decision about smear tests after age 60
Being screened again after the age of 60 reduces the risk of cervical cancer in women who have previously had abnormal smear tests and in women who did not have smear tests in their 50s, researchers show. Their study is important for setting guidelines on the age at which screening can be discontinued.
October 25, 2017
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Reduced radiation can maintain high cure rates in patients with HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers
Human papillomavirus-positive oropharynx cancers (cancers of the tonsils and back of the throat) are on rise. After radiation treatment, patients often experience severe, lifelong swallowing, eating, and nutritional issues. However, new clinical trial research shows reducing radiation for some patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas can maintain high cure rates while sparing some of these late toxicities.
December 27, 2016
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Researchers describe mechanism linking HPV infection and cancer
Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary cause of cervical cancer and a subset of head and neck cancers worldwide. A University of Colorado Cancer Center paper describes a fascinating mechanism that links these two conditions -- viral infection and cancer. The link, basically, is a family of enzymes called APOBEC3. These APOBEC3 enzymes are an essential piece of the immune system's response to viral infection, attacking viral DNA to cause disabling mutations.
August 23, 2017
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Robot radiology: Low cost A.I. could screen for cervical cancer better than humans
Artificial intelligence--commonly known as A.I.--is already exceeding human abilities. Self-driving cars use A.I. to perform some tasks more safely than people. E-commerce companies use A.I. to tailor product ads to customers' tastes quicker and with more precision than any breathing marketing analyst.
April 24, 2017
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Robot radiology: Low cost A.I. could screen for cervical cancer better than humans
An artificial intelligence image detection method has the potential to outperform PAP and HPV tests in screening for cervical cancer; Low-cost technique could be used in less-developed countries, where 80 percent of cervical cancer deaths occur
April 24, 2017
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Scientists get best view yet of cancer-causing virus HPV
New details of the structure of the human papillomavirus (HPV) may lead to better vaccines and HPV anti-viral medications, according to research.
January 23, 2017
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Study finds low cervical cancer screening rates among women with mental illness
Women enrolled in California's Medicaid program (Medi-Cal) who have been diagnosed with severe mental illness have been screened for cervical cancer at much lower rates than other women, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
April 17, 2017
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Study finds low HPV vaccination rates among childhood cancer survivors
"More than ever before, young cancer survivors are living long lives after treatment, but their health is more vulnerable. It's concerning that the majority of survivors are not taking full advantage of HPV vaccination, which is widely available and can help them stay cancer-free. Oncologists and primary care physicians are trusted resources for young survivors, and while barriers to HPV vaccination certainly exist, this study suggests that starting a conversation can help break down at least one."
August 29, 2017
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TCGA study identifies genomic features of cervical cancer
Investigators with the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel genomic and molecular characteristics of cervical cancer that will aid in the subclassification of the disease and may help target therapies that are most appropriate for each patient.
January 24, 2017
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Two in every five people in the US carry Human Papilloma Virus
Latest estimates of the prevalence of the human papilloma virus (HPV) in the US were published this month. Among the adult population, genital HPV was identified in 45% of men and 40% of women. the prevalence of oral HPV was 11.5% among men and 3.3% among women.
April 7, 2017
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U.S. Cervical Cancer Deaths May be Underestimated
Rates rose when latest study excluded women who'd already undergone hysterectomy
January 23, 2017
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U.S. Vaccine Guidelines for Flu, HPV Updated
CDC panel revises immunization advisory for vaccines affecting adults
February 7, 2017
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Uptake of HPV vaccination is worryingly low among childhood cancer survivors
A US national survey reports that even children who have had cancer previously, and are therefore at increased risk of developing further cancers, are not receiving vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV).
August 25, 2017
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Women should continue cervical cancer screening as they approach age 65
Adjusted rates for cervical cancer do not decline until age 85, signaling a need for ongoing surveillance, according to a new study
May 1, 2017
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Colon Cancer - Numbers

30% reduction in deaths from bowel cancer
The rate of new cases of bowel cancer in Austria has fallen by around 20% in the last ten years, while the associated mortality rate has fallen by nearly 30%. this trend is primarily due to improvements in preventive screening colonoscopy, in which precancerous stages are removed before the disease can take hold.
April 19, 2017
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Colon Cancer - A

A new genetic marker accounts for up to 1.4 percent of cases of hereditary colon cancer
Scientists have identified a new genetic marker that accounts for up to 1.4 percent of cases of hereditary colon cancer. Patients with mutations in this gene, if identified, could follow a clinical approach much more consistent with their genetics.
October 10, 2017
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Alcohol consumption in Europe puts population at increased risk of digestive cancers, report reveals
A United European Gastroenterology (UEG) report published on July 4, 2017 reveals details of alcoholic consumption in all 28 states of the European Union, with an average of 2 alcoholic drinks being consumed per day by EU citizens. Based on the average alcohol consumption, the report calculates that the EU population has a 21% increased risk of developing colorectal cancer.
July 4, 2017
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Antibiotics may increase the risk of bowel cancer
According to a recent study published in the journal Gut, long-term use of antibiotics during adulthood increases the likelihood of developing precursors to bowel cancer. the research, once again, underlines the vital role of gut bacteria.
April 5, 2017
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Aspirin slows spread of colon, pancreatic cancer in tumor cells
Aspirin may slow the spread of some types of colon and pancreatic cancer cells, investigators have found. Their study looks at the interaction between aspirin and blood platelets in cancer cells.
December 14, 2016
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Colon Cancer - B

Bacterium promotes colorectal tumor growth
Recent research finds a bacterium that drives tumor growth in colorectal cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related death.
July 14, 2017
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Benefits of Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer Treatment
Please give me an overview of biomarkers and the role that they play in colorectal cancer treatment.
October 2, 2017
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Bowel cancer: new function of known biomarkers discovered
EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors) are involved in the development and progression of many types of cancer and bowel cancer (colon carcinoma) in particular. So-called anti-EGFR antibodies are used in the treatment of bowel cancer patients, to inhibit EGFR. However, for reasons that are not yet clear, not all patients benefit from this treatment.
April 13, 2017
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Colon Cancer - C

Camera Sees Endoscope Tip Through Body by Eliminating Scattered Light
Safely tracking the location of the tip of an endoscope while it's inside the body has posed a serious challenge for biomedical engineers. The benefit of tracking can help to guide an endoscope to its target quickly and accurately. X-rays can be used, but unnecessary radiation is not advised.
September 6, 2017
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Cancer-death button gets jammed by gut bacterium
A type of bacterium is associated with the recurrence of colorectal cancer and poor outcomes, research show. Scientists found that Fusobacterium nucleatum in the gut can stop chemotherapy from causing a type of cancer cell death called apoptosis.
July 27, 2017
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Chance of colon cancer recurrence nearly cut in half in people who eat nuts
Something as simple as eating tree nuts may make a difference in the long-term survival of patients with colon cancer, a new study concludes.
May 18, 2017
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Chemo Overused in Younger Colon Cancer Patients?
Study found the treatment often wasn't beneficial, but cancer expert says more research is needed
January 25, 2017
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Cleveland Clinic researcher awarded $2.6 million grant to create innovative models of colorectal cancer
Cleveland Clinic researcher Emina Huang, M.D., a colorectal surgeon in the Digestive Disease and Surgery Institute and a staff member in the Lerner Research Institute's Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, has been awarded a collaborative five-year, $2.6 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to create innovative models of colorectal cancer that will enhance understanding of how the disease develops and spreads.
October 31, 2017
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Clinical trial tests frankincense as potential breast, colon cancer treatment
Cancer surgeon and researcher Nancy DeMore is leading a clinical trial using frankincense to try to treat breast and colon cancer at the Medical University of South Carolina. The study was inspired by a research specialist in DeMore's lab.
October 11, 2017
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Colon and rectal cancer seem to be on the rise–in millennials
And obesity is probably a culprit
February 28, 2017
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Colon cancer patients with healthy lifestyle have longer disease-free survival, study finds
A study of 992 patients with stage III colon cancer found that those who reported a healthy lifestyle during and following adjuvant (post-surgery) treatment had a 42% lower chance of death and a trend for lower chance of cancer recurrence than those who had less healthy lifestyles. The study will be presented at the upcoming 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago.
May 18, 2017
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Colon cancer rates rising among younger white adults -- and falling among blacks
When Crawford Clay discovered blood on his shorts at the end a routine run in the spring of 2014, he did not know the stains were a symptom of a condition that also afflicted his family.
August 8, 2017
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Colon Cancer Rising Among Gen Xers, Millennials
And an old adversary -- the obesity epidemic -- may be the cause, U.S. researchers say
February 28, 2017
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Colon cancer: Greater surgical precision using robotic surgery
Up until now, the removal of bowel tumors in the lesser pelvis (rectal cancers) involved a major, generally invasive operation. This operation can now be done in a much gentler way using an innovative procedure, robotic surgery. Thanks to a better three-dimensional view of the operating area and robotic instruments that allow highly accurate surgery to be performed in the anatomically constricted space of the lesser pelvis, surgical trauma and incisions for the operation can be kept to a minimum, while, at the same time, achieving excellent surgical results.
June 26, 2017
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Colonoscopy Probe for Diagnosing Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Researchers at Vanderbilt University developed a colonoscopy endoscope that performs Raman spectroscopy, giving it the power to spot molecules in the gut related to the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Currently, diagnosis of IBD is an inexact science that typically requires the patient to try different therapies that eventually point to which type of IBD (ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease) is present. this can take years in some cases, putting a great toll on people suffering from the disease before treatment options are identified.
January 5, 2017
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Colorectal Cancer Death Rates Up For Young Whites
A new report about colorectal cancer reveals an unexplained trend: Death rates are rising among white people under the age of 55 but dropping for African-Americans in the same age group.
August 8, 2017
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Colorectal cancer is on the rise among younger adults
Unhealthy lifestyle linked to increase in tumor incidence, death rates
March 1, 2017
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Colorectal cancer: Adding SIRT to chemotherapy boosts survival
Adding selective internal radiation therapy to standard first-line mFOLFOX6 chemotherapy in patients with liver-only or liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer led to notable increases in median overall survival for patients with right-sided primary tumors, new research reveals.
July 7, 2017
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Colorectal cancer: Increasing fiber intake may lower death risk
Increasing fiber intake may help to improve survival for patients in the early stages of colorectal cancer. This is the conclusion of a new study recently published in JAMA Oncology.
November 2, 2017
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Colorectal cancer: New, less toxic drug target uncovered
A team of researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London, in the United Kingdom, set out to explore novel therapeutic options for treating bowel cancer. They found a drug target that promises to be less toxic than existing drugs.
October 18, 2017
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Colorectal Cancers on the Rise in Younger Adults
Three different doctors over 3 years dismissed Ashley Flynn's complaints.
November 30, 2016
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Colon Cancer - D

Doctors Have Built a Magnetic Robot to Gently Explore your Colon
As you get older, colonoscopies become an important part of maintaining your health, allowing doctors to spot potentially fatal diseases like colon cancer before they progress too far. So medical researchers are hoping to make the procedure safer, and slightly less invasive, using a tiny capsule that's remotely steered around using a magnet outside your body.
May 9, 2017
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Does the microbiome play a role in the effectiveness of colorectal cancer treatment?
Connection between bacteria, chemotherapy discovered
April 24, 2017
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Colon Cancer - E

Environmental enrichment triggers mouse wound repair response
Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. a study now reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response.
April 25, 2017
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Experts join forces to study affordable malaria drug for treating colorectal cancer
Experts from St George's University of London, and St George's Hospital have joined forces to investigate whether a common and cheap malaria drug can be used also against cancer.
March 7, 2017
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Colon Cancer - F

Fiber-Rich Diet Boosts Survival From Colon Cancer
A diet rich in fiber may lessen the chances of dying from colon cancer, a new study suggests.
November 2, 2017
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Follow-up colonoscopies associated with a significantly lower incidence of bowel cancer
Patients at risk of developing bowel cancer can significantly benefit from a follow-up colonoscopy, finds new research.
April 28, 2017
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Colon Cancer - G

Genetic test that predicts prognosis could benefit early-stage colon cancer patients
Early-stage colon cancer patients could benefit in the future from specific genetic tests that forecast their prognosis and help them make the right decision regarding chemotherapy. Two of the biomarkers involved are the MACC1 gene, high levels of which promote aggressive tumor growth and the development of metastasis, and a defective DNA mismatch repair (dMMR) system, which plays a role in tumor formation. Life expectancy is longer for patients with dMMR tumors and with low MACC1 gene activity.
July 26, 2017
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Grape extracts may protect against colon cancer
Colon cancer is a very common form of cancer, affecting tens of thousands of people across the United States. Researchers may have just moved closer to a prevention strategy for this condition, as a compound that suppresses colon cancer stem cells is found in grapes.
June 19, 2017
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Grape-based compounds could pave way for new treatments to prevent colon cancer
Compounds from grapes may kill colon cancer stem cells both in a petri dish and in mice, according to a team of researchers.
June 19, 2017
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Grape-based compounds kill colon cancer stem cells in mice
Compounds from grapes may kill colon cancer stem cells both in a petri dish and in mice, according to a team of researchers.
June 19, 2017
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Colon Cancer - H

HCI receives $8.8 million NIH grant to lead colon cancer study
Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah will head an international study to find out how lifestyle and other health factors impact colon and rectal cancer outcomes. HCI was awarded an $8.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to lead and expand an ongoing project in colon cancer research.
December 19, 2016
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Heart Risks May Boost Women's Colon Cancer Risk
This was true even in normal-weight women, study suggests
February 1, 2017
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High intensity exercise training may reduce chances of developing colon cancer
Population studies strongly suggest that colon cancer risk is reduced in those who are physically active. Enlarged crypt lesions in the colon are early signs of increasing risk of colon cancer. These investigators proposed that HIIT not only enhances sport performance, but may also reduce the chances of developing colon cancer -- a disease suffered by many people in developed countries.
October 26, 2017
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How does a high-fat diet raise colorectal cancer risk?
While the evidence of a link between an unhealthful diet and colorectal cancer is robust, the underlying mechanisms for this association have been unclear. A new study, however, may have uncovered an explanation.
July 10, 2017
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Hypophysectomy: Procedure, recovery, and complications
A hypophysectomy is the surgical removal of the pituitary gland to treat cancerous or benign tumors. Most of the reported pituitary tumors that are removed turn out to be benign.
August 8, 2017
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Colon Cancer - I

Increasing the age limit for Lynch syndrome genetic testing may save lives
Raising the age limit for routine genetic testing in colorectal cancer could identify more cases of families affected by Lynch syndrome, a condition that accounts for around 5 percent of all colon cancers.
May 29, 2017
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Interscope EndoRotor now Cleared in U.S. as new Way to Remove Colon Lesions
Interscope, a company out of Worcester, MA, landed FDA clearance for its EndoRotor device that, in a single step, dissects, resects, and retrieves mucosal lesions within the GI tract. In the U.S. the device is indicated for use within the colon, shaving off diseased mucosa in conjunction with endoscopic mucosal resectiont (EMR), and sucking up the debris to remove it from the body. These days lesions are typically removed using snares and forceps, tools that in many cases leave pieces of the targeted lesions intact.
May 4, 2017
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Colon Cancer - L

Loss of ARID1A protein drives onset, progress of colon cancer
How a tumor-suppressing protein interacts with genetic enhancers to silence cancer genes in a newly developed model system
December 12, 2016
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Colon Cancer - M

Many Dialysis Patients May not Need Colonoscopies
Study finds that a limited life span offsets the benefits of the screening test
March 24, 2017
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Many Early Colon Cancers Linked to Inherited Genes
One in 6 diagnosed under 50 has at least one gene mutation that ups risk, study says
December 14, 2016
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Colon Cancer - N

New analysis reveals high rate of colon cancer screening among dialysis patients
A new analysis reveals a relatively high rate of colon cancer screening among US patients on dialysis, even though they rarely stand to benefit from such screening. the findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN).
March 24, 2017
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New model could speed up colon cancer research
Introducing genetic mutations with CRISPR offers a fast and accurate way to simulate the disease
May 1, 2017
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New study finds enhanced impact of drug combination for FAP patients
People with an inherited syndrome called familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) have a 100% lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer if they do not seek appropriate medical care.
November 7, 2017
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New system for treating colorectal cancer can lead to complete cure
Novel three-step pretargeted radioimmunotherapy offers safe, effective treatment
November 2, 2017
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New web calculator could reliably predict chances of survival for bowel cancer patients
"How long do I have, doctor?" For many cancer patients, following the initial shock of their diagnosis, thoughts quickly turn to estimating how much precious time they have left with family and friends or whether certain treatments could prolong their life.
June 16, 2017
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New web calculator to more accurately predict bowel cancer survival
'How long do I have, doctor?' For many cancer patients, following the initial shock of their diagnosis, thoughts quickly turn to estimating how much precious time they have left with family and friends or whether certain treatments could prolong their life.
June 16, 2017
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Newly discovered DNA enhancers help switch on colorectal cancer
Study finds recurrent changes in DNA activate genes, promote tumor growth
March 7, 2017
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Novartis, Bristol-Myers Squibb collaborate to examine combination therapies for metastatic colorectal cancer
Novartis today announced it has entered into a clinical research collaboration in which Bristol-Myers Squibb will investigate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of Mekinist (trametinib) in combination with Opdivo (nivolumab) and Opdivo + Yervoy (ipilimumab) regimen as a potential treatment option for metastatic colorectal cancer in patients with microsatellite stable tumors where the tumors are proficient in mismatch repair (MSS mCRC pMMR).
June 5, 2017
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Colon Cancer - P

Parts of Mediterranean diet shown to prevent colorectal cancer
The benefits of the so-called Mediterranean diet have been hailed in the news over recent years. Now, new research looks closely at the elements of the diet that could help to prevent the risk of colorectal cancer.
July 3, 2017
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Poor metabolic health in some normal-weight women may increase risk for colorectal cancer
Poor metabolic health associated with increased risk for colorectal cancer in normal-weight postmenopausal women
February 1, 2017
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Pre-existing illness delays bowel cancer diagnosis
The researchers from the University of Exeter analyzed clinical data from over 4,500 patients across the UK who were later diagnosed with bowel cancer. In a study published in the British Journal of Cancer, they looked at whether pre-existing illness affected the time it took them to get a cancer diagnosis, making it one of the first studies to investigate this.
July 4, 2017
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Probiotic bacteria can change intestinal flora of patients with colon cancer, study finds
"The probiotic strains used in this study are a promising positive factor for the continued development of treatments for colon cancer," confirms Yvonne Wettergren, Associate professor in Molecular Medicine at the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy.
September 25, 2017
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Colon Cancer - R

Raising age limit for routine genetic testing in colorectal cancer could identify more cases of Lynch syndrome
Raising the age limit for routine genetic testing in colorectal cancer could identify more cases of families affected by Lynch syndrome, a condition that accounts for around 5% of all colon cancers, according to new research to be presented at the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today (Monday). Professor Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, head of the Radboud university medical center expert center on hereditary cancers, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, will tell the conference that there is an urgent need to find families carrying a mutation for Lynch syndrome in order to decrease mortality from the disease.
May 29, 2017
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Researchers discover potential chemical 'silver bullet' to reduce risk of colon cancer
In preclinical experiments, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a new way in which colon cancer develops, as well as a potential "silver bullet" for preventing and treating it. The findings may extend to ovarian, breast, lung, prostate and potentially other cancers that depend on the same mechanism for growth.
July 26, 2017
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Researchers identify odorant troenan that can inhibit colorectal cancer growth
Growth of colorectal cancer cells can be inhibited with the odorant troenan. this is reported by the research team headed by Prof Dr Dr Dr habil. Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber from Ruhr-Universität Bochum in the journal "PLOS One". the researchers detected the olfactory receptor OR51B4 in tumour cells taken from the rectum and colon cancer cell lines. they analysed which odorant activates the receptor and in what way the activation affects the cells.
March 23, 2017
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Researchers Use Nanodiscs to Deliver Customized Therapeutic Vaccine for Cancer Treatment
Researchers at the University of Michigan have had initial success in mice using nanodiscs to deliver a customized therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of colon and melanoma cancer tumors.
December 27, 2016
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Review highlights link between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer development
Recent evidence from animal models suggests a role for specific types of intestinal bacteria in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). If a microbial imbalance in the gut could actively contribute to CRC in humans, dietary-based therapeutic interventions may be able to modify the composition of the gut microbiome to reduce CRC risk, as discussed in a review article published in BioResearch Open Access, a peer-reviewed open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
December 9, 2016
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Review highlights significant progress in developing new biologic drugs to treat colorectal cancer
New biologic drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies and immunotherapies in clinical development, designed to target metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) and stimulate the immune system to destroy tumor cells are a significant advance in treatment over conventional chemotherapy. A comprehensive overview of novel approaches to combating CRC, the fourth most common type of tumor worldwide that has already metastasized when diagnosed in more than 50% of patients, is presented in Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
August 29, 2017
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Colon Cancer - S

Scientists discover why some cancers may not respond to immunotherapy
Scientists have discovered that people with cancers containing genetic mutations JAK1 or JAK2, which are known to prevent tumors from recognizing or receiving signals from T cells to stop growing, will have little or no benefit from the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab. this early-stage research has allowed them to determine for the first time why some people with advanced melanoma or advanced colon cancer will not respond to pembrolizumab, an anti-PD-1 treatment.
February 6, 2017
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Serrated polyps plus conventional adenomas may mean higher risk for colorectal cancer
Researchers find that people with both serrated polyps and conventional adenomas may be at higher risk for colorectal cancer than people with conventional adenomas alone
October 11, 2017
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Should Colon Cancer Screening Start at 45, not 50?
 
October 30, 2017
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Simple blood test could improve treatment for many stage 2 colon cancer patients
A simple blood test could improve treatment for more than 1 in 6 stage 2 colon cancer patients, suggests new Mayo Clinic research. The researchers also discovered that many patients who could benefit from the test likely aren't receiving it.
June 21, 2017
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Single-cell analysis pave way for more accurate cancer prognosis
For the first time, researchers have applied single-cell transcriptomics to colorectal cancer (CRC) -- the third most common cancer in the world -- and discovered that this method could lead to improved patient stratification and eventually, a more accurate prognosis of CRC patients
March 21, 2017
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Study looks into specific elements of Mediterranean diet for colorectal health
The benefits of a "Mediterranean diet" (MD) are well-known when it comes to colorectal protection, but it's hard to know specifically what elements of the diet are the healthiest.
June 30, 2017
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Study shows effectiveness of 3 months of chemotherapy in colon cancer patients after surgery
"In this case, less is more. We're now able to spare many patients with colon cancer unnecessary side effects of an additional 3 months of chemotherapy without compromising results. This study is an excellent example of how existing treatments can be refined to work even better for patients," said ASCO Expert Nancy Baxter, MD.
June 5, 2017
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Colon Cancer - T

Targeted Radiotherapy Combined with Immunotherapy Kills 100% of Colorectal Cancer
Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and from MIT are reporting the development of a new combination therapy that completely eliminates colon cancer, at least in laboratory mice. The technique is a type of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers radioactive particles directly to tumors on the backs of targeting antibodies that seek out those tumors.
November 7, 2017
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Tree nuts may lower risk of colon cancer recurrence, death
Consuming at least 2 ounces of tree nuts every week may significantly reduce the risk of cancer recurrence for patients who have been treated for stage III colon cancer, and it could more than halve their risk of death.
May 18, 2017
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Triple-combination therapy patch shrinks tumors, prevents recurrence in colon cancer mice model
Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a hydrogel patch that can adhere to tumors in a preclinical model of colon cancer, delivering a local, combination treatment as the elastic gel breaks down over time. the new technique may allow clinicians to one day use diagnostic colonoscopy equipment to immediately deliver treatment without the need for open surgery at a later date.
July 29, 2016
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Triple-therapy patch delivers local treatment, prevents recurrence in colon cancer model
Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a hydrogel patch that can adhere to tumors in a preclinical model of colon cancer, delivering a local, combination treatment as the elastic gel breaks down over time. the new technique may allow clinicians to one day use diagnostic colonoscopy equipment to immediately deliver treatment without the need for open surgery at a later date
July 29, 2016
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Colon Cancer - U

UA researchers seek to better understand NHE8 protein's role in GI disorders, colon cancer
About 1.6 million Americans suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which encompasses several painful and complex disorders that include Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
July 27, 2017
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University of Birmingham researchers receive £1.5 million to find new treatments for bowel cancer
Charity Cancer Research UK has awarded the University of Birmingham £1.5 million to fund a five-year research program aimed at finding new treatments for bowel cancer.
November 2, 2017
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UTHealth researchers identify less invasive way to screen for colorectal cancer
Specific strains of bacteria in the gut are significantly associated with colorectal cancer, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. the study, which also identified a less invasive and less expensive way to screen for colorectal cancer, was recently published in the journal Gut.
April 18, 2017
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Colon Cancer - W

What is colorectal cancer? how does colon cancer differ from rectal cancer?
Colorectal cancer is a combined term to describe the malignant tumors that occur in the large intestine; the colon being the upper part of the large intestine and the rectum being the lowest part of the large intestine.
March 31, 2017
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Whole grains may prevent colorectal cancer
Together, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund have reviewed the data available on the diet, weight, and lifestyle of 29 million people in a bid to discover the most effective ways to prevent colorectal cancer.
September 12, 2017
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Endometrial Cancer

Birth control pills may protect against some cancers for decades
When it comes to oral contraceptives, women often hear about the increased cancer risk they pose. a new study, however, finds that the using birth control pills may protect against certain cancers for at least 30 years.
March 27, 2017
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Less invasive hysterectomy for early-stage endometrial cancer finds clinical support
Researchers found similar rates of disease-free survival and no difference in overall survival among women who received a laparoscopic or abdominal total hysterectomy for stage I endometrial cancer, according to a study.
March 28, 2017
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Esophageal Cancer

Case Western Reserve University awarded $6 million grant to continue research on Barrett's Esophagus
The National Cancer Institute recently awarded a $6 million grant to the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine to continue research on Barrett's Esophagus, a potentially fatal condition caused by long-term acid reflux. Reflux can cause tissue lining the esophagus to transform into tissue similar to that found in the intestine, significantly increasing esophageal cancer risk.
May 31, 2017
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'Cell of origin' for Barrett's esophagus identified
Researchers have discovered that Barrett's esophagus starts in a previously unknown area of unique cells in the lining of the food pipe. They hope that the discovery will lead to better screening and treatment of the condition, which can lead to esophageal cancer.
October 12, 2017
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Esophageal cancer 'cell of origin' identified
In mice, basal progenitor cells give rise to Barrett's esophagus, a precursor to cancer
October 11, 2017
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Esophageal cancer: Loss of muscle mass represents a significant risk to survival
Esophageal cancer patients who suffer loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) during neoadjuvant therapy (chemotherapy prior to surgery) survive, on average, 32 months less than patients with no sarcopenia, new research concludes.
February 14, 2017
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Novel calculator more easily identifies patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant chemoradiation
A calculator to guide treatment choice in esophageal cancer has been developed by a team of researchers. the tool helps identify which patients may benefit from treatment before surgery.
March 2, 2017
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Oral cavity bacterium linked to development and progression of esophageal cancer
A type of bacterium usually found in the human mouth, Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), has been found to be related to the prognosis of esophageal cancer in Japanese patients by researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan. the bacteria are a causative agent of periodontal disease and though it can be found among the intestinal flora, it hasn't been the focus of much research until now.
December 9, 2016
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Surprisingly long learning curve for surgeons operating on esophageal cancer
A surgeon who operates on esophageal cancer must have performed 60 operations to prevent any lack of experience adversely affecting the long-term survival of the patients, according to a major Swedish cohort study. the finding has potential significance for clinical practice.
March 8, 2016
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Treatment improved overall survival in elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer
Elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer that received treatment had an increased 5-year overall survival when compared to patients who received observation with no treatment.
April 27, 2017
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Zinc can halt the growth of cancer cells, study says
Study may provide a road map for treatment and prevention
September 28, 2017
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Zinc may help stop growth of esophageal cancer
Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have discovered that zinc targets and blocks a specific calcium channel in esophageal cancer cells, preventing them from proliferating.
October 2, 2017
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Zinc may help to prevent, treat esophageal cancer
Research led by the University of Texas at Arlington reveals how zinc can target esophageal cancer cells and halt their growth, thereby bringing us closer to new prevention and treatment strategies for the disease.
September 29, 2017
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Head and Neck Cancer

Diabetes drug takes aim at cancer's fuel source
Shuts down cancer cell's primary way of making energy in patients with head and neck cancer
January 25, 2017
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Innovative approaches to improve personalized radiation therapy for head and neck cancer patients
Researchers are able to use the radiosensitivity index within a mathematical framework to select the optimum radiotherapy dose for each patient based on their individual tumor biology, outlines a new report.
May 31, 2017
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Moffitt researchers hope to improve personalized radiation therapy for head and neck cancer patients
Radiation therapy is one of the most common treatments used to fight cancer, with an estimated 500,000 people each year receiving radiation therapy either alone or in combination with other treatments. Patients are often treated with a "one-size-fits-all" approach of a particular radiation dose and schedule according to tumor type, location, and the stage of growth.
May 31, 2017
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Novel vaccine therapy can generate immune responses in patients with HPV-related head and neck cancer
A novel vaccine therapy can generate immune responses in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa), according to researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania. The treatment specifically targets human papillomavirus (HPV), which is frequently associated with HNSCCa, to trigger the immune response.
May 31, 2017
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UCLA-led research finds promising results for more personalized head and neck cancer treatment
Researchers have found that people with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and the KRAS-variant inherited genetic mutation have significantly improved survival when given a short course of the drug cetuximab in combination with standard chemotherapy and radiation.
December 23, 2016
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Varian's New Flagship Radiotherapy System Now in Europe
Varian has released its Halcyon image-guided volumetric intensity modulated radiotherapy system (IMRT) in Europe at University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium. The system, recently FDA cleared, is designed to be speedier during prep, while delivering therapy, and providing an assessment of results. The number of steps that technicians have to undertake for each patient have been reduced to a third, compared to previous Varian systems. The first patient in Europe to be treated with the Halcyon was a 80-year-old with head & neck cancer.
October 26, 2017
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Kidney Cancer - Renal Cell Carcinoma

Combination therapy may lead to new standard of care for kidney cancer patients
Combination therapy with two immunotherapy drugs produces an unprecedented doubling of response rates from 20 percent to 40 percent, new study shows.
July 6, 2017
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Combination therapy shows efficacy, safety in treating metastatic renal cell cancer
A new cooperative research study including Norris Cotton Cancer Center's Lionel Lewis, MB BCh, MD, finds that nivolumab plus ipilimumab therapy demonstrated manageable safety, notable antitumor activity, and durable responses with promising long term overall survival in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). The multi-institutional study known as the CheckMate 016 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of nivolumab plus ipilimumab in combination and found that the combination treatment showed enhanced antitumor activity compared with monotherapy in tumor types such as melanoma.
July 26, 2017
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Investigational drug shows promise for hard-to-treat renal cancer
The investigational compound savolitinib appears to have antitumor activity in patients with c-MET-driven papillary renal cell carcinoma, according to the results of a phase II study released at the 2017 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando, FL.
March 1, 2017
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Kidney cancer prognosis: What you need to know
Kidney cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the United States.
June 19, 2017
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Study of California kidney cancer shows declining incidence, end of a trend
A study of kidney cancer incidence in California over 25 years is the first report to demonstrate that the rising rate of kidney cancer seen in the US over the past two decades may have ended.
August 18, 2017
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Liver Cancer - Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Advanced liver cancer: Selective internal radiation therapy safer than sorafenib
While advanced or inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with selective internal radiation therapy showed similar overall survival to patients receiving sorafenib, it caused significantly fewer treatment-related adverse effects and delivered significantly better quality of life.
April 25, 2017
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A faster, more accurate test for liver cancer
It's estimated that about 788,000 people worldwide died of liver cancer in 2015, the second-leading cause of cancer deaths, according to the latest statistics from the World Health Organization. One of the major challenges in combatting this disease is detecting it early because symptoms often don't appear until later stages.
August 23, 2017
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Can an aspirin a day keep liver cancer away?
A new study found that daily aspirin therapy was significantly associated with a reduced risk in hepatitis B related liver cancer.
October 20, 2017
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Can Aspirin Stop Liver Cancer in Hep B Patients?
Study from Taiwan finds link between aspirin use and reduced cancer risk
October 20, 2017
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Cause of cancer form in the liver identified
Researchers have identified the two genes whose mutation cause a serious cancer form found in the liver. The result sets concrete goals for future treatment of the otherwise incurable disease.
October 12, 2017
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Chronic liver inflammation promotes cancer by suppressing immunosurveillance, study finds
Chronic inflammation is known to drive many cancers, especially liver cancer. Researchers have long thought that's because inflammation directly affects cancer cells, stimulating their division and protecting them from cell death. But University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers have now found that chronic liver inflammation also promotes cancer by suppressing immunosurveillance -; a natural defense mechanism in which it's thought the immune system suppresses cancer development.
November 8, 2017
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Daily aspirin could ward off liver cancer
A new study offers further evidence of the anticancer effects of aspirin, after finding that regular use of the drug could help to lower the risk of liver cancer.
October 20, 2017
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Digital assay of circulating tumor cells may improve diagnosis, monitoring of liver cancer
Use of an advanced form of the commonly used polymerase chain reaction method to analyze circulating tumor cells may greatly increase the ability to diagnose early-stage cancer, increasing the likelihood of successful treatment.
January 19, 2017
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Drinking coffee daily may halve liver cancer risk
If you enjoy your morning cup of joe, the results of a recent study will be welcome news. Researchers have found that drinking just one cup of coffee per day could cut the risk of hepatocellular cancer - the most common form of liver cancer - by a fifth.
May 30, 2017
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How chronic inflammation tips the balance of immune cells to promote liver cancer
Study explains success of some types of cancer immunotherapy, provides new targets for the development of additional immunotherapies
November 8, 2017
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Integrated Heart/Cancer on a Chip Helps Discover Side Effects of Drugs
At Kyoto University in Japan researchers have created what they call an Integrated Heart/Cancer on a Chip (iHCC) that was designed to help discover side effects of anti-cancer and other medications. The microfluidic system, which is smaller than a common glass slide used with microscopes, consists of healthy myocardial cells populating some chambers and cancerous liver cells living in different chambers, each pair making up a unique line of testing.
August 28, 2017
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Interferon-beta producing stem cell-derived immune cell therapy on liver cancer
Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived myeloid cells (iPS-ML) that produce the anti-tumor protein interferon-beta (IFN-beta) have been produced and analyzed. Using human iPS-ML in a mouse model, they found that the cells migrate to and deliver IFN-beta to liver tumors thereby reducing cancer proliferation and increasing survival time.
March 28, 2017
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Liver tumor growth in mice slowed with new chemo-immunotherapy treatment
Researchers explore improved treatment strategies for hepatocellular cancer
February 28, 2017
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miR-122 target sites in liver cancer: study links three genes to patient survival
A new study shows that a molecule that regulates liver-cell metabolism and suppresses liver-cancer development interacts with thousands of genes in liver cells, and that when levels of the molecule go down, such as during liver-cancer development, the activity of certain cancer-promoting genes goes up. The findings could one day help doctors better predict survival in liver cancer patients and help determine whether the molecule -- called microRNA-122 -- should be developed as an anticancer drug.
August 22, 2017
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Nanomedicine Researchers Discover New Use for 70-Year-Old Drug
A recent study reveals that a 70-year-old malaria drug is capable of blocking immune cells in the liver allowing the arrival of nanoparticles at their intended tumor site, thus overcoming a major obstacle of targeted drug delivery, according to a team of researchers headed by Houston Methodist.
November 7, 2017
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Nanotechnology Advancement for Minimally Invasive Treatment of Liver Cancer
The American Cancer Society reports that every year, over 700,000 new liver cancer cases are diagnosed globally.
November 30, 2016
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New analysis reveals low incidence of liver cancer in patients with cirrhosis
Although one of the most serious complications of cirrhosis is liver cancer, or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), an analysis of health records revealed that the 10-year incidence of HCC in UK patients with cirrhosis is four percent or lower.
February 1, 2017
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One more piece in the puzzle of liver cancer identified
Scientists are one step closer to unraveling the mechanisms behind liver cancer. the researchers discovered that RAF1, a protein known as an oncogene in other systems, unexpectedly acts as a tumour suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.
December 21, 2016
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Putting it to the test
Researchers develop faster, more accurate test for liver cancer that can be administered anywhere
August 23, 2017
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Researchers aim to examine therapeutic effect of iPS-ML producing interferon-β on liver cancer
All causes of the most common form of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), are not yet known, but the risk of getting it is increased by hepatitis B or C, cirrhosis, obesity, diabetes, a buildup of iron in the liver, or a family of toxins called aflatoxins produced by fungi on some types of food.
March 29, 2017
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Researchers develop new diagnostic and prognosis method for early detection of liver cancer
An international team of researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, with colleagues at Sun Yet-sun University Cancer Center and other collaborating institutions, have developed a new diagnostic and prognosis method for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), based on a simple blood sample containing circulating tumor DNA.
October 9, 2017
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Study findings could one day help doctors better predict survival of liver cancer patients
A new study of a molecule that regulates liver-cell metabolism and suppresses liver-cancer development shows that the molecule interacts with thousands of genes in liver cells, and that when levels of the molecule go down, which often happens during liver-cancer development, the activity of certain cancer-promoting genes goes up.
August 23, 2017
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Study documents gene mutation as cause of cancer form in the liver
There is no effective treatment for the cancer form found in the liver called fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma, which is mainly found among children and young people. Operation of the tumor is the only treatment available, but after five years less than 40 percent of the patients are alive. Therefore, it is vital to establish the cause of this form of cancer.
October 12, 2017
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These jolly, candy-colored 3D-printed livers help doctors treat tumors
The liver is a wonderful thing. It goes great on crackers and it can keep your blood from becoming septic. But it's almost impossible to operate on that strange, fleshy mass without lots of luck and preparation. Luckily there's now a better way to prepare.
March 7, 2017
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Tracking unstable chromosomes helps predict lung cancer's return
Scientists have found that unstable chromosomes within lung tumors increases the risk of cancer returning after surgery, and have used this new knowledge to detect relapse long before standard testing.
April 26, 2017
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Lung Cancer - A

A biosensor is able to detect tumors at early stages
Before a malignant tumor is developed, the immune system tries to fight against proteins that are altered during their formation, producing certain cancer antibodies. a biosensor developed by scientists from the Complutense University of Madrid has been able to detect these defensive units in serum samples of patients with colorectal and ovarian cancer. the developed method is faster and more accurate than traditional methods.
January 11, 2017
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A Braf kinase-inactive mutant induces lung adenocarcinoma
The initiating oncogenic event in half of human lung adenocarcinomas is still unknown, a fact that complicates the development of selective targeted therapies. Researchers have demonstrated that the expression of an endogenous Braf kinase-inactive isoform in mice triggers lung adenocarcinoma in vivo, indicating that BRAF-inactivating mutations are initiating events in lung oncogenesis. The paper indicates that the signal intensity of the MAPK pathway is a critical determinant in tumor development.
August 2, 2017
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A novel cancer immunotherapy shows early promise in preclinical studies
GARP could be a novel diagnostic marker for cancer and targeting it with an antibody prevented metastasis to the lungs in a mouse model of breast cancer, report scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina in an article in Cancer Research
January 11, 2017
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Adding radiation to chemotherapy may dramatically improve survival for advanced NSCLC
Randomized phase II trial finds progression-free survival expectancy nearly tripled with addition of consolidative stereotactic radiation therapy for limited metastatic disease
September 25, 2017
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Adding radiation treatments to inoperable lung cancer increases survival by up to one year
Patients with unresectable, or inoperable, lung cancer are often given a dismal prognosis, with low rates of survival beyond a few years. Researchers exploring combination therapies have recently discovered improved survival rates by up to one year when patients treated with a newly formulated chemotherapy regimen are also given radiation therapy.
August 25, 2017
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Advanced form of proton therapy shows promise for treating lung cancer recurrence
Few curative options exist for treating recurrent disease
March 17, 2017
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Advanced image analysis technique identifies genetic cell mutations in patients with lung cancer
Researchers have used positron emission tomography (PET) to successfully identify genetic cell mutations that can cause lung cancer. the research, published in the featured article of the April 2017 issue of "The Journal of Nuclear Medicine," shows that an advanced image analysis technique, radiomics, can non-invasively identify underlying cell mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). More people in the United States die from lung cancer than from any other type of cancer, and NSCLC is the most common form.
April 3, 2017
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African-American patients have increased gene mutations in tobacco-related tumors, study finds
African-Americans typically have worse outcomes from smoking-related cancers than Caucasians, but the reasons for this remain elusive. However, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have taken a big step toward solving this puzzle. The scientists found that African-American patients had an increased mutation rate in several genes, including the best known in tobacco-related tumors, TP53.
July 25, 2017
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Artificial Stem Cells Promote Tissue Healing Minus Side Effects
A collaboration between researchers at North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University have apparently created a synthetic mimic of cardiac stem cells. These may end up being used instead of natural stem cells while reducing or eliminating side effects that may arise from stem cell therapy.
January 12, 2017
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Anti-inflammatory therapy cuts risk of lung cancer
Cardiovascular study gives researchers a unique opportunity to explore and disrupt cancer's progression
August 28, 2017
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Anti-inflammatory therapy reduces incidence of lung cancer
In most clinical trials for cancer therapy, investigators test treatments in patients with advanced disease. But a recent cardiovascular secondary prevention study has given researchers a unique opportunity: to explore the effectiveness of giving a drug to patients before cancer emerges.
August 28, 2017
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Lung Cancer - B

Biologists identify key step in lung cancer evolution
Blocking the transition to a more aggressive state could offer a new treatment strategy
May 10, 2017
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Blood biopsy test reads platelets to detect human lung cancer
Researchers have designed a different approach to the liquid biopsy. Rather than looking for evidence of cancer DNA or other biomarkers in the blood, their test (called thromboSeq) could diagnose non-small cell lung cancer with close to 90 percent accuracy by detecting tumor RNA absorbed by circulating platelets, also known as thrombocytes. Non-small cell lung cancers make up the majority of lung cancer cases.
August 14, 2017
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Blood test can predict early lung cancer prognosis
Cancer cells obtained from a blood test may be able to predict how early-stage lung cancer patients will fare, a team of researchers has shown.
August 30, 2017
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Blood test could predict best treatment for lung cancer
A blood test could predict how well small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients will respond to treatment, according to new research.
November 21, 2016
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Blood tumor markers could be useful in monitoring therapeutic outcomes for lung cancer patients
For many years, oncologists have known that cancers can secrete complex molecules into the blood and that levels of these molecules can be easily measured. These so-called 'tumor markers' are traditionally associated with a single dominant cancer type, for example Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) linked to prostate cancer, Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) to colorectal cancer, CA125 to ovarian cancer, CA19.9 to pancreatic cancer and CA27.29 to breast cancer.
September 6, 2017
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Bronchial carcinoma: Added benefit of crizotinib not proven
Dossier contains no data or no suitable data on ROS1-positive NSCLC
January 11, 2017
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Lung Cancer - C

Chinese startup Infervision emerges from stealth with an AI tool for diagnosing lung cancer
Roughly 600,000 people in China die from lung cancer every year. Already the leading cause of death in the pollution-choked and chain-smoking-prone nation, the incidence of lung cancer among China's citizens is actually going to increase to 800,000 cases per year by 2020.
May 8, 2017
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Could 'Safer' Filtered Cigarettes Be More Deadly?
New report suggests they're tied to rising rates of an aggressive lung cancer
May 22, 2017
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Lung Cancer - D

Delayed Chemo can Still Benefit in Lung Cancer
Patient recovery may mean longer time to the treatment, but study suggests it can still have benefit
January 6, 2017
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Discovery could guide immunotherapy for lung cancer
Scientists have discovered a new type of immune cell that could predict which lung cancer patients will benefit most from immunotherapy treatment, according to a new study.
June 19, 2017
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Drug offers some Hope for a Deadly Lung Cancer
Immunotherapy may triple 5-year survival rate for certain patients with advanced disease, study finds
April 4, 2017
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Lung Cancer - E

Epigenetic changes triggered by cigarette smoke may be earliest step in lung cancer development
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have preliminary evidence in laboratory-grown, human airway cells that a condensed form of cigarette smoke triggers so-called "epigenetic" changes in the cells consistent with the earliest steps toward lung cancer development.
September 12, 2017
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Lung Cancer - F

Fast, precise cancer care is coming to a hospital near you
Of all the cancers in the world, lung cancer is the deadliest. This year, the National Cancer Institute estimates it will kill 150,000 people, despite a growing number of more targeted therapies. Part of the problem is there are a lot of different mutations that can cause the most common form of it: non-small cell lung cancer.
June 26, 2017
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FDG PET shows tumor DNA levels in blood are linked to NSCLC aggressiveness
Insights derived from FDG PET could improve treatment selection for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer
November 6, 2017
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Fear of diagnostic low-dose radiation exposure is overstated, experts assert
Researchers assert that exposure to medical radiation does not increase a person's risk of getting cancer. the long-held belief that even low doses of radiation, such as those received in diagnostic imaging, increase cancer risk is based on an inaccurate, 70-year-old hypothesis, according to the authors.
January 9, 2017
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First immunotherapy for mesothelioma on the horizon, early research suggests
Malignant pleural mesothelioma or MPM is a rare cancer, but its incidence has been rising. This cancer is usually associated with asbestos exposure, and patients have a median life expectancy of only 13-15 months. All patients relapse despite initial chemotherapy, more than 50% of them within six months after stopping treatment. There are currently no effective therapeutic options for patients with MPM.
June 5, 2017
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Lung Cancer - G

Gene-Targeted Drugs Fight Advanced Lung Cancers
Medications show promise for non-small cell type
June 5, 2017
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Lung Cancer - H

How cancer cells flood the lung
Lung cancer patients are particularly susceptible to malignant pleural effusion, when fluid collects in the space between the lungs and the chest wall. Researchers have discovered a novel mechanism that causes this to happen. Their study also shows that various active substances could potentially be used to treat this condition.
May 19, 2017
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Lung Cancer - I

Immunotherapy drug gives non-small-cell lung cancer patients extra four months of life with fewer side effects compared to chemotherapy
Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer survive four months longer with fewer side effects on an immunotherapy drug called atezolizumab compared to chemotherapy, according to a phase 3 clinical trial.
December 13, 2016
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Invasive lung cancer cells display symbiosis: Key to metastasis
Leader cells pull along supportive followers
May 12, 2017
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Lung Cancer - K

Kinase-inactive BRAF mutation triggers lung adenocarcinoma development
The initiating oncogenic event in almost half of human lung adenocarcinomas is still unknown, a fact that complicates the development of selective targeted therapies. Yet these tumors harbor a number of alterations without obvious oncogenic function including BRAF-inactivating mutations. Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have demonstrated that the expression of an endogenous Braf (D631A) kinase-inactive isoform in mice (corresponding to the human BRAF(D594A) mutation) triggers lung adenocarcinoma in vivo, indicating that BRAF-inactivating mutations are initiating events in lung oncogenesis.
August 2, 2017
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Lung Cancer - L

Largest genome-wide study of lung cancer susceptibility identifies new causes
A huge study identified several new variants for lung cancer risk that will translate into improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in lung cancer risk.
June 13, 2017
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Light cigarettes have likely contributed to rise of lung adenocarcinoma, study shows
A new study shows that so-called "light" cigarettes have no health benefits to smokers and have likely contributed to the rise of a certain form of lung cancer that occurs deep in the lungs.
May 22, 2017
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Liquid Biopsy for Lung Cancer Provides Rapid Results at Low Cost and No Trauma
Lung cancers tend to develop rapidly, changing how they respond to medication in unexpected ways. this makes it hard to decide which treatments are most effective without trying them first, resulting in lost time and missed opportunities. Biopsies and CT scans are the most commonly used methods of evaluating whether a treatment is working. Biopsies are invasive and can only be done infrequently, while CT scans offer limited information and expose the patient to X-ray radiation.
January 4, 2017
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'Liquid biopsies' may help predict prognosis of early-stage lung cancer patients
Cancer cells obtained from a blood test may be able to predict how early-stage lung cancer patients will fare, a team from the University of Michigan has shown.
August 30, 2017
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Liquid biopsies provide more information about disease course in non-invasive manner
A new study, to be presented at the ESMO 19th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, shows that so-called "liquid biopsies", blood tests that detect circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA), may not only sound an early alert that a treatment's effect is diminishing, but may also help explain why -sometimes offering clues about what to do next.
June 30, 2017
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Liquid biopsies: A non-invasive look at treatment response
A new study shows thatso-called "liquid biopsies", blood tests that detect circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA), may not only sound an early alert that a treatment's effect is diminishing, but may also help explain why -sometimes offering clues about what to do next.
June 30, 2017
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Lung biopsy procedure: What to expect
A lung biopsy procedure is a type of medical operation, often involving removing tissue or growths from the lungs.
June 12, 2017
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Lung cancer complications: Signs, treatment, and outlook
Cancer is a disease caused by unhealthy cells inside the body growing out of control. Lung cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells that start off in one or both lungs.
March 22, 2017
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Lung cancer in pictures: what does it look like?
Lung cancer can be a worrying diagnosis. this type of cancer is aggressive and can quickly spread to other organs, such as the pancreas and liver.
March 23, 2017
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Lung cancer patients may benefit from delayed chemotherapy after surgery
Patients with a common form of lung cancer may still benefit from delayed chemotherapy started up to four months after surgery, according to a team of researchers.
January 5, 2017
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Lung cancer screening could save money as well as lives, research shows
Lung cancer screening programs should target high-risk people and identify other tobacco-related conditions, suggests a new report.
June 29, 2017
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Lung-Sparing Surgery May Up Mesothelioma Survival
Treatment nearly doubled survival or more, study finds
December 23, 2016
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Lung Cancer - M

Mayo Clinic researchers identify genetic promoter that drives lung cancer formation
Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper published this week in Cancer Cell, Mayo Clinic researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation.
January 19, 2017
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Melanoma drug offers considerable added benefit for patients with advanced NSCLC
Pembrolizumab was initially introduced for the treatment of melanoma. Since July 2016, the monoclonal antibody has also been available for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in adults whose tumours express the T-cell receptor ligand PD-L1 and who have received a prior chemotherapy regimen. the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) examined in a dossier assessment whether the drug offers an added benefit over the appropriate comparator therapy also for these patients.
November 22, 2016
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Mesothelioma shows promising response to existing immunotherapy drug
An existing immunotherapy drug called pembrolizumab appears to be effective in the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma, a rare and aggressive lung cancer that is primarily caused by exposure to asbestos. Writing in the Lancet Oncology, researchers describe the first study to show a positive result from using the antibody drug against this rare cancer.
March 31, 2017
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Mesothelioma: New trial to fight cancer caused by asbestos
Patients with a hard-to-treat type of cancer are being given new hope in a ground-breaking clinical trial.
May 19, 2017
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Metastatic lung cancer: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
While cancer may develop in one area of the body, it has the ability to spread to other areas. When cancer spreads in this way, it is said to have metastasized, and is known as metastatic cancer.
March 16, 2017
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Lung Cancer - N

Nanoelectronic barcoding on lab on a chip could monitor health, germs and pollutants
Imagine wearing a device that continuously analyzes your sweat or blood for different types of biomarkers, such as proteins that show you may have breast cancer or lung cancer.
June 12, 2017
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Nanoparticle exposure can trigger dormant viruses in lung tissue cells
Nanoparticles from combustion engines can activate viruses that are dormant in lung tissue cells. this is the result of a study by researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum M�, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), which has now been published in the journal 'Particle and Fibre Toxicology'.
January 16, 2017
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Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancer
Simple technique is based on cancer DNA and seems accurate for use after chest CT scan, researchers say
February 27, 2017
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New blood test offers potential for faster, targeted treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer
Identification of 'actionable mutations' within 72 hours can shorten lag time between diagnosis and optimal treatment, reports the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
April 19, 2017
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New FDA-approved drug helps patients fight against late-stage lung cancer
A new drug has been approved by the FDA in the fight against lung cancer. Tecentriq is being used by patients like Cornelius Bresnan, who had late-stage cancer.
December 2, 2016
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Non-small cell lung cancer: Treatment, symptoms, and outlook
There are two main types of lung cancer: non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer.
March 17, 2017
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NSCLC patients treated with surgery may benefit from delayed chemotherapy, study shows
A new study suggests patients who recover slowly from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) surgery may still benefit from delayed chemotherapy started up to four months after surgery, according to a new study published online by JAMA Oncology.
January 5, 2017
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Lung Cancer - P

Pancoast syndrome: Tumors, symptoms, and treatment
Pancoast syndrome is the term given to the unique set of symptoms that accompany a Pancoast tumor - a type of lung cancer.
March 8, 2017
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Pembrolizumab shows promise in treatment of mesothelioma
Pembrolizumab, an antibody drug already used to treat other forms of cancer, can be effective in the treatment of the most common form of mesothelioma, according to a new study. the work is the first to show a positive impact from checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy drugs on this disease.
March 19, 2017
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Physical, psycho-social interventions in advanced lung cancer patients improve functional capacity
Physical exercise and psycho-social interventions in patients with advanced stage lung cancer improved functional capacity, which may be linked to quality of life benefits. Dr. Quist of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark presented these findings today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan.
October 19, 2017
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Pneumonia and lung cancer: Symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments
Pneumonia and lung cancer both occur in the lungs and share a number of overlapping symptoms.
April 7, 2017
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Prototype drug uses novel mechanism to treat lung cancers
Lung cancer tumors were prevented in mice by a novel small molecule that directly activates a tumor suppressor protein, report researchers in a new article.
May 16, 2017
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Public reporting of lung cancer surgery outcomes provides valuable information about quality of patient care
The first publicly accessible national report of outcomes from lobectomy has now been released by experts.
January 19, 2017
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Lung Cancer - R

Report describes VHA clinical demonstration project for lung cancer screening
Implementing a comprehensive lung cancer screening program was challenging and complex according to a new article that describes a lung cancer demonstration project conducted at eight academic Veterans Health Administration hospitals.
January 30, 2017
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Research findings could guide more personalized therapies for lung cancer patients
Scientists have discovered a new type of immune cell that could predict which lung cancer patients will benefit most from immunotherapy treatment, according to a Cancer Research UK-funded study published today (Monday) in Nature Immunology.
June 19, 2017
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Research shows cellular component may play vital role in how lung cancer spreads
A cellular component known as the Golgi apparatus may play a role in how lung cancer metastasizes, according to researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center whose findings were reported in the Nov. 21 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
November 21, 2016
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Researchers identify mechanism of oncogene action in lung cancer
Researchers have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper, researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation.
January 19, 2017
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Researchers identify new regulators of brain metastases in lung cancer patients
Research from McMaster University has identified new regulators of brain metastases in patients with lung cancer.
August 9, 2017
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Lung Cancer - S

Scientists identify 'cellular post office' that could be key to preventing spread of lung cancer
Scientists at the Universities of York and Texas have found that a component of cancer cells, which acts like a 'cellular post office', could be the key to preventing the spread of lung cancer to other parts of the body.
November 24, 2016
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Scientists step closer to halting spread of lung cancer
A component of cancer cells, which acts like a 'cellular post office', could be the key to preventing the spread of lung cancer to other parts of the body, scientists have discovered.
November 24, 2016
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Short and long sleep, and sleep disturbances associated with increased risk of dementia and lung cancer
Difficulties in initiating or maintaining sleep at middle-age are associated with an increased risk of dementia, according to a new study. The 20-year follow-up study was conducted among 2,682 men participating the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Study.
May 24, 2017
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Small cell lung cancer: Symptoms, treatment, and outlook
Small cell lung cancer is characterized by the presence of cancerous tumor cells in the lung tissues.
March 19, 2017
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Small cell versus non-small cell lung cancer: what are the differences?
Small cell and non-small cell are the two types of lung cancers. Both cancers affect the lungs but they have several key differences, including how they are treated and their average progression time.
March 21, 2017
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SmartPractice donates $50,000 to support TGen's development of liquid biopsies
In support of efforts to find better ways of diagnosing and monitoring breast cancer patients, SmartPractice today donated $50,000 to the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).
June 30, 2017
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Some lung cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy even after disease progression
Some advanced lung cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy even after the disease has progressed as evaluated by standard criteria, according to new research. the findings pave the way for certain patients to continue treatment if the disease is not progressing according to new, more specific, criteria.
May 4, 2017
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Stage 3 lung cancer: Symptoms, treatment, and outlook
Stage 3 lung cancer is often described as late, locally advanced or advanced lung cancer.
March 19, 2017
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Stages of lung cancer: Symptoms, changes, and outlook
There are two main types of lung cancer: non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer. Each has its own system of staging, a process that determines the extent to which a cancer has spread.
March 6, 2017
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STS releases first publicly accessible report of outcomes from lung cancer surgery
The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) has released the first publicly accessible national report of outcomes from lobectomy, a lung cancer procedure that removes a portion of the lung. the surgical outcomes data are from the Society's General Thoracic Surgery Database (GTSD), one of three components in the world-renowned STS National Database, which is widely considered the gold standard for medical specialty outcomes databases.
January 20, 2017
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Study shows impact of CT lung cancer screening on smoking cessation in high-risk people
New research published in the scientific journal Thorax has found that smokers who undergo a CT scan of their lungs are more likely to quit smoking.
July 28, 2017
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Study uncovers new genetic variants for lung cancer risk
A new study conducted by an international team of lung cancer researchers, including Professor John Field from the University of Liverpool, have identified new genetic variants for lung cancer risk.
July 10, 2017
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Subtle molecular changes along the upper digestive tract could guide cancer therapy
Based on a new molecular study of tissues biopsied from various parts of the upper digestive tract, researchers have identified significant, if subtle, differences in gene mutations and other factors that could help in developing more tailored treatment options for cancer patients.
June 30, 2017
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Suicide risk elevated among lung cancer patients
Of all cancers, people with lung cancer are at greatest risk of committing suicide, finds new research presented at the American Thoracic Society's 2017 international conference.
May 24, 2017
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Survival Odds Improving for Lung Cancer Patients
In a finding that offers some hope to those fighting lung cancer, researchers report that survival rates have improved among those with early stage disease.
October 26, 2017
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Survival of early stage lung cancer patients improves with advancement in surgery, radiation
With the advancement of surgical and radiation therapy strategies for stage 1 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), more patients are being treated, resulting in higher survival rates, according to a study published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
October 26, 2017
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Lung Cancer - T

Taking loads of vitamin B could increase your risk of lung cancer
The price of supplements might be pretty steep.
August 23, 2017
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To screen or not to screen for lung cancer?
Counseling and shared decision-making visit helps high-risk individuals decide
March 13, 2017
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Lung Cancer - U

Using a genetic signature to overcome chemotherapy-resistant lung cancer
Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often respond to standard chemotherapy, only to develop drug resistance later, and with fatal consequences. But what if doctors could identify those at greatest risk of relapse and provide a therapy to overcome or avoid it?
May 23, 2017
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UTA awards new grants for research projects that focus on cancer, drug testing, and health of youth
The University of Texas at Arlington has awarded three new seed grants for interdisciplinary research projects that propose new ways to treat skin cancer, provide a new technique for more rapid and cost-effective evaluation of chemotherapy drugs, and to develop innovative programs to reduce the mental health risks of homeless youth.
June 30, 2017
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Lung Cancer - V

Vitamin B linked to increased lung cancer risk
Although vitamin B supplements claim to increase energy and improve metabolism, a new study finds a relationship between high doses of certain B vitamins and an increased risk of lung cancer in male smokers.
August 23, 2017
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Lung Cancer - W

White blood cell count predicts response to lung cancer immunotherapy
White blood cell counts can predict whether or not lung cancer patients will benefit from immunotherapy, according to new research.
May 4, 2017
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Lung Cancer - Y

Yoga can be beneficial to people with lung cancer and their caregivers
In a feasibility trial of people with advanced lung cancer receiving radiation therapy, and their caregivers, yoga was beneficial to both parties. These findings will be presented at the upcoming 2017 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium in San Diego, California.
October 24, 2017
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Yoga May Boost Lung Cancer Patients, Caregivers
For advanced lung cancer patients, yoga appears to help improve their overall physical function, stamina and mental health.
November 7, 2017
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Misc. - Numbers

3D printed robot enters battle against cancer
The Stormram 4, as the robot is named, is made from 3D-printed plastic and is driven by air pressure. The advantage of plastic is that the robot can be used in an MRI scanner. Carrying out a biopsy (removing a piece of tissue) during a breast cancer scan in an MRI significantly increases accuracy.
July 3, 2017
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3D scaffold map to help the search for new cancer treatments
Researchers have produced the first three-dimensional (3D) map of a molecular 'scaffold' called SgK223, known to play a critical role in the development and spread of aggressive breast, colon and pancreatic cancers.
October 30, 2017
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4 in 10 U.S. Adults Under 60 Carry HPV
But vaccine should turn the tide against virus that can cause cancer, sexual health expert says
April 6, 2017
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15 Cancer Symptoms Men Ignore
You eat pretty well (some days) and get regular exercise (most days). But if you're like a lot of men, a trip to the doctor isn't on your to-do list. That can be bad if it means you brush off early signs of cancer.
September 1, 2017
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15 Cancer Symptoms Women Shouldn't Ignore
Women's bodies are always changing. Sometimes changes that seem normal can be signs of cancer, though.
September 1, 2017
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107 cancer papers retracted due to peer review fraud
New papers were found through investigations into previous fraud.
April 21, 2017
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Misc. - A

A better way to measure the stiffness of cancer cells
Laser technique peers through individual cells to gauge stiffness with unprecedented speed
February 28, 2017
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A gene's journey from covert to celebrated
Unmasking a previously misunderstood gene, scientists discover an unlikely potential drug target for gastrointestinal cancers.
January 23, 2017
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A glow stick that detects cancer?
Researchers devise a novel probe to identify and measure microscopic cell activity
May 1, 2017
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A mechanical trigger for toxic tumor therapy
Ultrasound-sensitive nanoparticle aggregates target toxic doses of chemotherapy drugs to tumors while minimizing systemic toxicity
June 15, 2017
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A nanoparticle based contrast agent for dual modal imaging of cancer
Researchers from PSG College of Technology, India have developed nano-contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as optical imaging of cancer cells.
June 19, 2017
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A new magnetic nanoparticle tool to track circulating tumour cells
Cancerous tumours are known to release cells into the bloodstream, and it is these circulating tumour cells (CTC) that are the sources of metastatic tumours -- tumours that spread and form in distant locations in the body and can eventually kill patients.
November 22, 2016
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A new microscope uses light to "cut" through tissue samples and find cancer
It could help surgeons remove cancerous breast tissues all at once.
June 27, 2017
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A new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses
A new study by Lyle Hood, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes a new device that could revolutionize the delivery of medicine to treat cancer as well as a host of other diseases and ailments (Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, "Nanochannel Implants for Minimally-Invasive Insertion and Intratumoral Delivery").
December 1, 2016
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A new role for an old immune cell may lead to novel therapies for infection and cancer
A new study has identified a previously undescribed role for a type of unconventional T cell with the potential to be used in the development of new therapies for infection and cancer.
March 1, 2017
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A new weapon for the war on cancer
Cancerous tumors are formidable enemies, recruiting blood vessels to aid their voracious growth, damaging nearby tissues, and deploying numerous strategies to evade the body's defense systems. But even more malicious are the circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that tumors release, which travel stealthily through the bloodstream and take up residence in other parts of the body, a process known as metastasis.
June 28, 2017
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A Pill to Replace Needles: Interview with Mir Imran, Chairman and CEO of Rani Therapeutics
Operating within InCube Labs, a multi-disciplinary life sciences R&D lab based in Silicon Valley, Rani Therapeutics is developing a novel approach for the oral delivery of large-molecule drugs such as basal insulin, which is currently delivered via injections. By replacing painful injections with a painless, easy-to-take pill, the technology has the potential to drastically improve the lives of millions of patients suffering from diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and many other chronic conditions.
July 4, 2017
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A tiny device offers insights to how cancer spreads
Researchers develop a fluidic device to track over time which cancer cells lead the invasive march
September 12, 2017
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A tiny device offers insights to how cancer spreads
As cancer grows, it evolves. Individual cells become more aggressive and break away to flow through the body and spread to distant areas.
September 12, 2017
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A tubular structure to stop cell growth
TORC1 is an enzyme complex that controls the normal growth of our cells; but, when too active, it can promote diseases such as cancer. A new study describes how sugar regulates the activity of TORC1, through a surprising mechanism. In the absence of sugar, TORC1s assemble into a tubular structure, rendering them inactive and thus cell growth stops.
October 4, 2017
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A new way to slow cancer cell growth
Researchers have identified a new way to potentially slow the fast-growing cells that characterize all types of cancer. By removing a specific protein from cells, they were able to slow the cell cycle, which is out of control in cancer. The findings were made in kidney and cervical cancer cells and are a long way from being applied in people, but could be the basis of a treatment option in the future.
May 25, 2017
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'Achilles' heel' of key anti-cancer protein
Researchers have discovered that a protein called Importin-11 protects the anti-cancer protein PTEN from destruction by transporting it into the cell nucleus. the research suggests that the loss of Importin-11 may destabilize PTEN, leading to the development of lung, prostate, and other cancers.
February 13, 2017
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Adenocarcinoma: Types, diagnosis, and treatment
Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that forms in the glands, the cells that secrete substances within or out of the body.
August 2, 2017
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Advancing cancer immunotherapy with computer simulations and data analysis
Supercomputers help researchers classify patients' immune response, design clinical trials and analyze immune repertoire data
May 17, 2017
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After Cancer, Higher Risk of Severe Heart Attack
Cardiologists, oncologists must work together, researcher says
December 1, 2016
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Age-old malaria treatment found to improve nanoparticle delivery to tumors
Nanomedicine researchers find new use for 70-year-old drug
November 6, 2017
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Age-old malaria treatment found to improve nanoparticle delivery to tumors
A new study shows that a 70-year-old malaria drug can block immune cells in the liver so nanoparticles can arrive at their intended tumor site, overcoming a significant hurdle of targeted drug delivery, according to a team of researchers led by Houston Methodist.
November 6, 2017
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Aggressive care in final days of life for advanced cancer patients not linked to better outcomes
For patients with advanced cancer, aggressive care -- chemotherapy, mechanical ventilation, acute hospitalizations and intensive care unit admissions -- at the end of life is commonplace. Yet until now, little is known about the relationship between patients' and families' satisfaction with this aggressive care within the last 30 days of life.
May 25, 2017
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Air pollution linked to mortality from kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer
Air pollution is classified as carcinogenic to humans given its association with lung cancer, but there is little evidence for its association with cancer at other body sites. In a new large-scale prospective study led by the Barcelona Institute of Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by the "la Caixa" Foundation, and the American Cancer Society, researchers observed an association between some air pollutants and mortality from kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer.
October 31, 2017
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Alcohol intake is linked to cancer, something most Americans are unaware of, warns ASCO
Alcohol consumption is a definite risk factor for several cancers, irrespective of whether intake is light, moderate or heavy, according to a statement released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).
November 9, 2017
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Alternative Cancer Therapy Linked to Earlier Death
There's not much research into these therapies, study authors said
August 17, 2017
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Alternative medicine use instead of proven cancer therapies results in worse survival
Patients who choose to receive alternative therapy as treatment for curable cancers instead of conventional cancer treatment have a higher risk of death, according to researchers from the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at Yale School of Medicine and Yale Cancer Center. The findings were reported online by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
August 11, 2017
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"Alternative" medicine's toll on cancer patients: Death rate up to 5X higher
Researchers hope the data will guide patients to effective treatments.
August 16, 2017
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Alternative theory on how aspirin may thwart cancer
Lab studies point to platelet action as key to anti-tumor effect
February 8, 2017
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American Cancer Society awards new $792,000 grant to Yale researcher
The American Cancer Society, the largest non-government, not-for-profit funding source of cancer research in the United States, has approved funding of a new research grant totaling $792,000 to a researcher at Yale University. the grant is among 109 national research and training grants totaling more than $45 million that will fund investigators at 75 institutions across the United States; 102 are new grants while seven are renewals of previous grants. the grants go into effect July 1.
May 4, 2017
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Amino acids in diet could be key to starving cancer
Cutting out certain amino acids -- the building blocks of proteins -- from the diet of mice slows tumor growth and prolongs survival, according to new research.
April 19, 2017
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AMSBIO introduce range of cancer exosome samples
AMSBIO has introduced a range of purified cancer exosome samples to help researchers study the role of exosomes in cancer development and metastasis.
June 21, 2017
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An elegans solution: Worm genetic screen maps cell-to-cell communication in human cancer
A new genetic approach in worms provides a roadmap for the mesenchymal-to-epithelial communication that drives human cancer, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina Hollings Cancer Center in Developmental Cell
May 23, 2017
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An Innovative new Cancer Therapy Hijacks Bacteria to Fight Tumors
Researchers from South Korea have engineered a strain of bacteria that infiltrates tumors and fools the body™ immune system into attacking cancer cells. In experiments, the modified bacteria worked to reduce cancer in mice, raising hope for human trials.
February 8, 2017
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Annual Report to the Nation: Cancer Death Rates Continue to Decline
Special section on survival finds significant improvement for all but two cancer sites.
March 31, 2017
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Ancient ink for cancer treatment
For hundreds of years, Chinese calligraphers have used a plant-based ink to create beautiful messages and art. Now, one group reports in ACS Omega that this ink could noninvasively and effectively treat cancer cells that spread, or metastasize, to lymph nodes.
September 27, 2017
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Another Study Ties Obesity to Certain Cancers
Digestive organs may be hardest hit by too much weight, study suggests
March 1, 2017
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Anti-inflammatory, anti-stress drugs taken before surgery may reduce metastatic recurrence
The body's stress inflammatory response is an active agent of cancer metastasis, researchers say
August 7, 2017
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Anti-tumor effect of novel plasma medicine caused by lactate
Researchers have developed cold plasma-activated Ringer's solution for chemotherapy. the solution has anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo that derive from the lactate component.
December 14, 2016
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Anticancer nanomaterials created by simulating underwater volcanic conditions
Researchers have developed anticancer nanomaterials by simulating the volcano-induced dynamic chemistry of the deep ocean. the novel method enables making nanoclusters of zinc peroxide in an environmentally friendly manner, without the use of additional chemicals. the as-synthesised zinc peroxide nanoparticles can be used as a tool for cancer therapy and against other complicated diseases.
May 12, 2017
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Are stem cells the link between bacteria and cancer?
New mechanism of stomach gland regeneration reveals impact of Helicobacter pylori infection
August 17, 2017
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Arsenic can cause cancer decades after exposure ends
Arsenic in drinking water may have one of the longest dormancy periods of any carcinogen. By tracking the mortality rates of people exposed to arsenic-contaminated drinking water in a region in Chile, the researchers provide evidence of increases in lung, bladder, and kidney cancer even 40 years after high arsenic exposures ended.
October 24, 2017
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Artificial intelligence to support cancer detection, study says
A novel artificial intelligence powered endoscopic system developed in Japan has been proved to automatically detect colorectal adenomas at the time of colonoscopy.
October 30, 2017
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Artificial intelligence uncovers new insight into biophysics of cancer
Machine-learning predicts never-before-seen cancer-like phenotype
January 27, 2017
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Aspirin slashes risk of gastrointestinal cancer
A large-scale study finds that the long-term use of aspirin cuts the chances of developing digestive cancers almost in half.
October 31, 2017
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ASTRO issues new clinical guideline for management of oropharyngeal cancer with radiation therapy
The American Society for Radiation Oncology today issued a new clinical guideline for the management of oropharyngeal cancer. the guideline, "Radiation therapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: An ASTRO Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guideline," is available as a free access article in Practical Radiation Oncology, ASTRO's clinical practice journal.
April 17, 2017
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At last, a clue to where cancer metastases are born
Scientists have discovered why some cancers may reoccur after years in remission. Importantly, the scientists demonstrated that the escaping tumor cells reach the bloodstream by entering blood vessels deep within the dense tumor core, upending the long-held belief that metastatic cells come from a tumor's invasive borders.
May 2, 2017
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Avocado seed husk may help to treat heart disease, cancer
From lowering cholesterol to aiding weight loss, the potential benefits of avocado consumption have been well documented. A new study, however, suggests that further rewards could be reaped from a part of the fruit that we normally discard: the husk of the seed.
August 21, 2017
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Avoiding over-the-counter heartburn medications could save cancer patients' lives
Medications for heartburn, gastric issues could lower possibility of survival and recovery for cancer patients
December 16, 2016
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Misc. - B

Bacteria used as factories to produce cancer drugs
Researchers at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability in Denmark have developed a method of producing P450 enzymes - used by plants to defend against predators and microbes - in bacterial cell factories. The process could facilitate the production of large quantities of the enzymes, which are also involved in the biosynthesis of active ingredients of cancer drugs.
June 2, 2017
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Bacteria used as factories to produce cancer drugs
Researchers have developed a method of producing P450 enzymes -- used by plants to defend against predators and microbes -- in bacterial cell factories. The process could facilitate the production of large quantities of the enzymes, which are also involved in the biosynthesis of active ingredients of cancer drugs.
June 2, 2017
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Bad feelings can motivate cancer patients
Study finds that anger, guilt can inspire positive health habits
April 25, 2017
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Bad luck may play a big role in cancer--but prevention tactics still matter
Study doubles down on earlier work that led to big, some say pointless, controversy.
March 23, 2017
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Battling flames increases firefighters' exposure to carcinogens
The threat of getting burned by roaring flames is an obvious danger of firefighting, but other health risks are more subtle. For example, firefighters have been found to develop cancer at higher rates than the general population. Now researchers have measured how much firefighters' exposure to carcinogens and other harmful compounds increases when fighting fires. Their study also points to one possible way to reduce that exposure.
October 18, 2017
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Belly fat protein may cause cancer
A new study makes two significant discoveries: firstly, it shows how non-cancerous cells turn into tumorous ones when "helped" by a certain protein, and secondly, it suggests that the source of this protein may lie in the belly fat that so many of us struggle with.
August 25, 2017
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Beta blockers capable of reducing stress signaling may enhance effectiveness of immunotherapy
While the development of therapies designed to block "checkpoints" within the immune system has been one of the most exciting and noteworthy advances in cancer research in recent years, it's also been one of the most puzzling, leaving researchers to ask: Why don't these new therapies work for more patients, and why is their efficacy in controlling cancerous tumors often short-lived? A research team from Roswell Park Cancer Institute has shown that at least one answer -; and an excellent opportunity for unleashing the full potential of these promising immunotherapies -; may lie in the body's "fight or flight" reaction to stressors and in drugs already widely used to control and temporarily disable this stress response.
August 31, 2017
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Better 3D-printed scaffolds help scientists study cancer
Testing treatments for bone cancer tumors may get easier with new enhancements to sophisticated support structures that mimic their biological environment, according to Rice University scientists.
February 8, 2017
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Better understanding of pre-metastatic niches could lead to new preventive therapies
Metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related death and its appearance remains a phenomenon that is difficult to predict and manage. we now know that, prior to the arrival of the cancer cells, tumours prepare the ground in the organ that they will later colonise. These areas with ideal conditions for the onset of metastasis are called pre-metastatic niches and targeting them will help improve patient survival.
March 17, 2017
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Better use of current drugs to target cancer
Drugs used in the clinic to understand a new way that cancer stem cells can be killed
June 22, 2017
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Biochemical pathways of kidney disease revealed
Fruit flies used to further our understanding of cysts, cancer
May 2, 2017
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Biochemists simulate a protein-folding chaperone's functional dance
Using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, a research team has demystified the pathway of interdomain communication in a family of proteins known as Hsp70s -- a top target of dozens of research laboratories trying to develop new anti-cancer drugs, antibiotics and treatments for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.
August 29, 2017
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Biologists develop new way to inhibit cancer cell cleanup mechanism
The genomes of cancer cells--cells that do not obey signals to stop reproducing--are riddled with genetic mutations, causing them inadvertently to make many dysfunctional proteins. Like all other cells, cancer cells need to be vigilant about cleaning themselves up in order to survive. Now, biologists in the laboratory of Ray Deshaies, Caltech professor of biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, have developed a new way to inhibit the cancer cell cleanup mechanism, causing the cells to fill up with defective proteins and thus self-destruct.
February 28, 2017
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Biomarkers for identifying tumor aggressiveness
Future early-stage colon cancer patients could benefit from specific genetic tests that forecast their prognosis and help them make the right decision regarding chemotherapy. Two of the biomarkers are the MACC1 gene, high levels of which promote aggressive tumor growth and the development of metastasis, and a defective DNA mismatch repair (dMMR) system, which plays a role in tumor formation. Life expectancy is longer for patients with dMMR tumors and with low MACC1 gene activity.
July 26, 2017
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Biosimilar drugs could cut US health spending by $54 billion over next decade
But regulatory rules still key to achieving future savings
October 23, 2017
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Biovica appoints Samuel Rotstein as Scientific Advisor
Dr Rotstein received his Ph.D at Karolinska Institutet and has worked as an oncologist for almost 40 years. He was previously Head of Department at the Oncology Clinic at Danderyd Hospital where he together with his colleagues built and managed a highly-appreciated breast cancer clinic. As one of Sweden's leading oncologists, he was honored last year with the Swedish Breast Cancer Patient Advocacy Association's (BRO) Award 2016. Samuel Rotstein is currently working as a physician at Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital.
May 26, 2017
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Birth defects, cancer linked
Some children born with birth defects may be at increased risk for specific types of cancer, according to a new review.
August 15, 2017
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Blood biopsy test reads platelets to detect human lung cancer
Researchers have designed a different approach to the liquid biopsy. Rather than looking for evidence of cancer DNA or other biomarkers in the blood, their test (called thromboSeq) could diagnose non-small cell lung cancer with close to 90 percent accuracy by detecting tumor RNA absorbed by circulating platelets, also known as thrombocytes. Non-small cell lung cancers make up the majority of lung cancer cases.
August 14, 2017
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Blood samples may provide patient radiosensitivity answers
How much radiation or chemotherapy can a certain person handle? With help from blood or tissue testing, it may be possible to answer this question in advance, which in turn could improve treatment, say researchers.
October 9, 2017
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Blood test for HPV could help identify cancer patients suitable for lower treatment doses
A blood test for the human papillomavirus, or HPV, may help researchers forecast whether patients with throat cancer linked to the sexually transmitted virus will respond to treatment, according to preliminary findings from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.
October 4, 2017
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Blood vessels and the immune system talk to each other
Implications for cancer treatment
April 3, 2017
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BR Nanoparticles Used in Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Cancer Therapy
Combined photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy for cancer was created by Sangyong Jon, a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at KAIST, along with his team using Bilirubin (BR) nanoparticles.
September 27, 2017
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Breakthrough discovery reveals positive correlation between sugar and cancer
A nine-year joint research project conducted by VIB, KU Leuven and VUB has led to a crucial breakthrough in cancer research. Scientists have clarified how the Warburg effect, a phenomenon in which cancer cells rapidly break down sugars, stimulates tumor growth. This discovery provides evidence for a positive correlation between sugar and cancer, which may have far-reaching impacts on tailor-made diets for cancer patients.
October 13, 2017
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Breakthrough research could potentially improve detection and treatment of anal cancer
Specialists at The Christie and The University of Manchester have made a breakthrough which could potentially improve detection and treatment of anal cancer, as well as have wider implications for other cancers.
August 16, 2017
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Breast-feeding tied to lower risk of endometriosis diagnosis
A study that followed thousands of women for more than 20 years has found that breast-feeding is linked to a lower risk of being diagnosed with endometriosis.
September 1, 2017
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Brain Training for Cancer Survivors' Nerve Damage
Neurofeedback seems to offers relief from chemo-induced pain, research finds
March 3, 2017
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Bright red fluorescent protein created
After years of trying, biologists have succeeded in creating an extremely bright red fluorescent protein in the lab. this is good news for researchers, including cancer and stem cell researchers, who use fluorescent proteins to track essential cellular processes.
November 23, 2016
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Misc. - C

Cadmium may raise risk of endometrial cancer
Women may be at higher risk of endometrial cancer if they have raised levels of cadmium, a toxic metal that mimics estrogen in the body. So suggest researchers from the University of Missouri in Columbia, in a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE.
August 11, 2017
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California says a popular herbicide causes cancer
But three out of four health agencies disagree.
June 28, 2017
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Cambridge is giving cancer the 3D VR treatment
It's always good to hear that scientists are bringing the latest technology to the fight against cancer, but virtual reality doesn't seem like an obvious addition to the arsenal. Yet it's VR and 3D visualization that Cambridge University researchers are planning to explore under a multi-million pound grant.
February 10, 2017
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Can a Blood Test Detect Cancers Earlier?
Researchers move 'a step forward,' assessing DNA fragments for colon, breast, ovarian and lung tumors
August 16, 2017
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Can big data help cancer patients avoid ER visits?
What if doctors could look into a crystal ball and predict which of their patients might be at risk of getting sick enough to go to the emergency room? for at least one group of patients, that's exactly what researchers are trying to do.
January 30, 2017
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Can cannabinoids be used to treat cancer?
When cannabinoids activate signaling pathways in cancer cells they can stimulate a cell death mechanism called apoptosis, unleashing a potent anti-tumor effect.
November 6, 2017
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Can childhood cancer treatments affect survivors' sex lives in adulthood?
A recent analysis showed that although adult survivors of childhood cancer did not differ overall from their peers in terms of their satisfaction with their sex lives and romantic relationships, those who received cancer treatments that were especially toxic to the nervous system were least likely to have had intercourse, be in a relationship, or have children.
February 6, 2017
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Cancer cells cast a sweet spell on the immune system
Researchers try to wake up immune cells by focusing on the sugars on the tumor surface
March 21, 2017
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Cancer cells grow by exploiting their neighbours
Cancer cells grow by stealing energy from neighboring cells, researchers have discovered.
January 25, 2017
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Cancer cells shown to co-opt DNA 'repair crew'
In experiments with human colon cancer cells and mice, a team led by scientists say they have evidence that cancer arises when a normal part of cells' machinery generally used to repair DNA damage is diverted from its usual task. the findings, if further studies confirm them, could lead to the identification of novel molecular targets for anticancer drugs or tests for cancer recurrence, the investigators say.
May 8, 2017
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Cancer commandeers immature immune cells to aid its successful spread
Cancer commandeers immature immune cells to aid its spread, report scientists. More typically, immature immune cells might help us fight cancer, but scientists have now shown cancer can commandeer the cells to help it spread.
April 7, 2017
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Cancer death rate has dropped 25 percent since 1991 peak
Annual ACS report identifies significant disparities in cancer burden by gender, race
January 5, 2017
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Cancer cells destroyed in just 3 days with new technique
Cancer cells are relentless, possessing the vexatious ability to develop resistance to current therapies and making the disease hugely challenging to treat. However, an exciting new study may have identified cancer's weak spot; the discovery has already led to the near-eradication of the disease in cell cultures.
November 7, 2017
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Cancer cells destroyed with dense metal found in asteroids
Cancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research.
November 2, 2017
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Cancer detection with sugar molecules
Scientists have synthesized a complex sugar molecule which specifically binds to the tumor protein Galectin-1. This could help to recognize tumors at an early stage and to combat them in a targeted manner.
August 14, 2017
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Cancer detection with sugar molecules
Scientists from the University of Würzburg have synthesized a complex sugar molecule which specifically binds to the tumor protein Galectin-1. This could help to recognize tumors at an early stage and to combat them in a targeted manner.
August 14, 2017
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Cancer drug could promote regeneration of heart tissue
An anticancer agent in development promotes regeneration of damaged heart muscle -- an unexpected research finding that may help prevent congestive heart failure in the future.
February 3, 2017
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Cancer drug parity laws lower costs for many, but not everyone
In an analysis of the impact of parity laws, researchers report modest improvements in costs for many patients. However, patients who were already paying the most for their medications, saw their monthly costs go up.
November 9, 2017
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Cancer drug stimulates tripolar mode of mitosis
Taxanes inhibit cell division and make cancer cells sensitive to radiation therapy. A current study has investigated the underlying mechanisms of this action - and which biomarkers may be useful for predicting the success of therapy.
September 12, 2017
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Cancer drugs that halt tumors can also shrink them
A class of drugs known as CDK4/6 inhibitors, which have been approved for treating some types of breast cancer, may have much more to offer than previously thought. Not only can they stop tumors from growing by halting cell division, but they can also "spur the immune system to attack and shrink" them.
August 17, 2017
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Cancer fighting robots are great but still need a human touch
Commentary: Medical robots that improve breast cancer diagnosis should be celebrated, but their rise shouldn't be at the expense of the patient's experience.
July 12, 2017
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Cancer hijacks natural cell process to survive
Cancer tumors manipulate a natural cell process to promote their survival suggesting that controlling this mechanism could stop progress of the disease, according to new research.
June 26, 2017
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Cancer in the family: One spouse's diagnosis can lower household income
Caring for a husband or wife with cancer significantly diminishes family income, according to researchers who tracked changes in employment and income among working-age couples in Canada.
April 24, 2017
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Cancer is way more likely to kill you if you rely on 'natural' therapies
Chemotherapy is brutal, but crucial.
August 16, 2017
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Cancer metastases may originate from primary tumor without involving lymph system
Research by several leading scientists including Rakesh Jain, PhD, Director of the Edwin L. Steele Laboratory for Tumor Biology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and supported in part by the National Foundation for Cancer Research, has provided the first evidence that the century-old model for cancer metastasis - where cancer spreads from primary tumor to nearby lymph nodes, and then to other organs - may not apply in all cases.
July 13, 2017
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'Cancer Pen' Lets Docs Spot Tumor Cells in Seconds
Tool might one day allow more complete removal of malignant tissue, less time on operating table
September 6, 2017
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Cancer research's reproducibility problem faces a second test
Scientists and drug developers are always looking for new ways to hit cancer where it hurts. Recently, they've been focusing on metabolic pathways--how cancer cells hijack cells to support their own growth. One of the most promising new treatments for leukemia, for example, targets a single metabolic gene. And much of its therapeutic promise is built on the results of a 7-year-old study, published in Cancer Cell, that has been cited over 1,000 times.
June 27, 2017
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Cancer signaling pathway could illuminate new avenue to therapy
Researchers have better defined a pro-growth signaling pathway common to many cancers that, when blocked, kills cancer cells but leaves healthy cells comparatively unharmed. the study could establish new avenues of therapeutic treatments for many types of solid tumors.
November 23, 2016
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Cancer spread is increased by a high fat diet, ground-breaking evidence shows
Researchers discover new cancer spreading protein
December 6, 2016
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Cancer therapy may work in unexpected way, study finds
Antibodies to the proteins PD-1 and PD-L1 have been shown to fight cancer by unleashing the body's T cells, a type of immune cell. Now, researchers have shown that the therapy also fights cancer in a completely different way, by prompting immune cells called macrophages to engulf and devour cancer cells.
May 18, 2017
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Cancer therapy: Tracking real-time proton induced radiation chemistry in water
Researchers use laser-based particle acceleration with picosecond time resolution to investigate ultrafast radiation chemistry that occurs immediately after the interaction of protons in water
March 27, 2017
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Cancer uses immature immune cells as support system for successful metastasis, study shows
More typically, these immature immune cells might help us fight cancer, but scientists have now shown cancer can commandeer the cells to help it spread.
April 6, 2017
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Cancer-causing benzene found in e-cigarette vapors operated at high power
Significant levels of cancer-causing benzene in e-cigarette vapors can form when the devices are operated at high power, scientists have found.
March 8, 2017
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Cancer-related fatigue: Exercise, psychological therapies best treatments
For patients with cancer-related fatigue, exercise is likely to be last on the list of appealing activities. According to a new study, however, physical activity is the best way to combat this common side effect.
March 3, 2017
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Cancer: 40 percent of all cases related to obesity, overweight
A new report warns about the role of obesity in cancer. As many as 40 percent of all cancers are related to obesity, according to the new research, which suggests that these cancers would be preventable if weight was kept under control.
October 4, 2017
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Cancer: Existing drug may prevent treatment-induced infertility
For premenopausal women undergoing cancer treatment, one of the most distressing complications can be infertility. A new study describes how a class of drugs once investigated as a cancer treatment may have the potential to prevent female infertility caused by radiotherapy.
September 4, 2017
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Cancers evade immunotherapy by 'discarding the evidence' of tumor-specific mutations
Discovery could explain widespread acquired resistance among patients treated with immune checkpoint blockade drugs
January 5, 2017
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Cancers linked to obesity account for 40% of all cancers in the US, report states
Being obese or overweight is linked to an increased risk of developing 13 types of cancer, according to the latest Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute. These cancers accounted for approximately 40% of all cancers diagnosed in the US, in 2014.
October 4, 2017
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Cannabinoids and chemotherapy in combination kill cancer cells
A new study confirms that cannabinoids, which are a class of active chemicals in cannabis, can successfully kill leukemia cells. They also find that the combination of chemicals and the order in which they are given is important. The findings will, no doubt, open the door to more effective treatments.
June 7, 2017
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Carbon nanotube based microfluidic chip that captures rare, aggressive cancer cells
In work that could improve understanding of how cancer spreads, a team of engineers and medical researchers at the University of Michigan developed a new kind of microfluidic chip that can capture rare, aggressive cancer cells, grow them on the chip and release single cells on demand.
May 11, 2017
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Carcinoma in situ: What is it and how is it treated?
Carcinoma in situ is a cancer designation where a person has abnormal cells that have not spread beyond where they first formed. The words "in situ" translate to "in its original place."
September 26, 2017
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Case Western Reserve University professor awarded $150,000 for pediatric cancer research
In the United States, more children are lost to cancer than any other disease, and one in 285 children will be diagnosed before they turn 20. As one of the nation's leading pediatric cancer researchers, Alex Huang, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics with secondary appointments in pathology, biomedical engineering and general medical sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, focuses on strategies to activate the immune system to fight the disease.
July 27, 2017
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Cause of tumor resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors identified
The success of specialized drugs to inhibit blood supply to tumors -- so-called angiogenesis inhibitors -- is compromised by the fact that these drugs do not effectively penetrate the tumor tissue and so do not reach the smallest blood vessels in the tumor, a new study has shown for the first time.
January 24, 2017
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Cell adherence may predict metastasis potential of cancer cells
In metastasis, cancer cells break away from the primary site of the tumor and travel through the blood or lymphatic system to more distant parts of the body. However, only a small number of malignant cells have the ability to form secondary tumors. new research may have found a way to identify these cells.
March 1, 2017
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Cell cannibalism may have role to play in resisting cancer growth
Cell cannibalism in tumor samples has been observed for over a century, yet this unusual behavior is not well studied. New research led by scientists at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge reveals a new mechanism driving cell cannibalism that offers surprising insights into cancer biology.
July 11, 2017
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Cell signaling interaction may prevent key step in lung cancer progression, study shows
A novel cell signaling interaction that may prevent a key step in lung cancer progression, new findings reveals.
November 9, 2017
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Cell stress response sheds light on treating inflammation-related cancer, aging
Stress -- defined broadly -- can have a profoundly deleterious effect on the human body. Even individual cells have their own way of dealing with environmental strains such as ultraviolet radiation from the sun or germs. One response to stress -- called senescence -- can trigger cells to stop dividing in cases of cancer and aging. This may hold promise for treating inflammation-related disorders.
October 4, 2017
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Cells avoiding suicide may play role in spread of cancer
New studies probe mechanisms of death-defying anastasis
December 9, 2016
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Cells' mechanical memory could hold clues to cancer metastasis
In the body, cells move around to form organs during development; to heal wounds; and when they metastasize from cancerous tumors. A mechanical engineer found that cells remember the properties they had in their first environment for several days after they move to another in a process called mechanical memory.
October 25, 2017
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Cells that make blood vessels can also make tumors and enable their spread
While it's widely held that tumors can produce blood vessels to support their growth, scientists now have evidence that cells key to blood vessel formation can also produce tumors and enable their spread.
June 19, 2017
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Cellular aging and cancer development: New insight
Medical researchers have discovered the role of the protein ZBTB48 in regulating both telomeres and mitochondria, which are key players involved in cellular aging. The results of the study will contribute to a better understanding of the human aging process as well as cancer development.
June 14, 2017
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Chemists create microscopic environment to study cancer cell growth
According to the American Cancer Society, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases diagnosed and 600,920 cancer deaths in the U.S. in 2017. now a new study may offer new understanding about what turns good cells bad.
March 28, 2017
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Chemotherapy drug may increase vulnerability to depression
A chemotherapy drug used to treat brain cancer may increase vulnerability to depression by stopping new brain cells from growing, according to a new study.
April 25, 2017
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Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse
Standard chemotherapy is a blunt force instrument against cancer - and it's a rare cancer patient who escapes debilitating side effects from systemic treatments that mostly affect dividing cells, both malignant and healthy, throughout the body. Researchers at the Buck Institute and elsewhere now show that chemotherapy triggers a pro-inflammatory stress response termed cellular senescence, promoting the adverse effects of chemotherapy as well as cancer relapse and metastasis.
January 17, 2017
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Childhood Chemo May Have Lasting Effects on Memory
Study found timing of treatment seemed to play a role
June 19, 2017
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Childhood Cancer Radiation May Cause Gene Mutation
That flaw seems to increase risk of a type of brain tumor later in life, researchers report
August 4, 2017
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Childhood Cancer Survivors and Later Sexual Health
Study finds especially toxic treatments were tied to later issues, but most rated sex lives as positive
February 6, 2017
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Childhood cancer survivors experience financial burden due to high out-of-pocket health care costs
Adult survivors of childhood cancer face an increased likelihood of financial difficulties related to out-of-pocket costs for their health care, compared with adults not affected by childhood cancer. In their report published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center also report that survivors of childhood cancer who pay higher out-of-pocket costs were more than eight times more likely to have trouble paying their medical bills than were either survivors not facing higher out-of-pocket costs or adults without a history of childhood cancer.
August 22, 2017
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Childhood Cancer Survivors Living Longer
Decline parallels reduced use of radiation, at lower doses, researchers say
February 28, 2017
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Childhood Cancer Survivors Now Living Healthier Lives
Could be due to changes made years ago in treatments children receive, researchers say
June 2, 2017
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China is Racing Ahead of the US in the Quest to Cure Cancer with CRISPR
On Friday, a team of Chinese scientists used the cutting-edge gene-editing technique CRISPR-Cas9 on humans for the second time in history, injecting a cancer patient with modified human genes in hopes of vanquishing the disease.
April 28, 2017
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Cleaning chromium from drinking water
A novel approach to neutralize a cancer-causing chemical in drinking water has been uncovered by new research. the team has found a new way to convert the dangerous chromium-6 into common chromium-3 in drinking water, making it safer for human consumption.
December 20, 2016
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Clinical trial finds that vitamin D, calcium have no effect on cancer risk
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and a major public health burden. Previous studies have suggested that vitamin D may lower the risk of developing cancer, so a new randomized trial tests this hypothesis in healthy, older women.
March 28, 2017
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CNIO researchers optimize new system capable of generating cellular model of Ewing sarcoma
A team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has optimized a system capable of generating a cellular model of Ewing sarcoma. the technique, based on CRISPR and described in the pages of Stem Cell Reports, makes it possible to generate cellular models to analyze the mechanisms underlying the origin and progression of this and other diseases, as well as the search for new treatments.
May 10, 2017
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Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press releases new book on Targeting Cancer
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press (CSHLP) announced the release of Targeting Cancer, available on its website in hardcover, paperback, and ebook formats.
August 31, 2017
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Color change test to help cancer research advance
A simple color changing test to help scientists investigate potential cancer drugs has been developed
March 27, 2017
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Combination approach improves power of new cancer therapy
An international research team has found a way to improve the anti-cancer effect of a new medicine class called 'Smac mimetics.'
June 26, 2017
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Combination of anti-angiogenic and immune-stimulating therapies can lead to effective cancer treatments
Scientists from VIB and KU Leuven, together with colleagues from the University of California and the Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research have demonstrated that, anti-angiogenic therapy can improve immune boosting treatments. the successful combination of these two therapies results in the growth of specialized vessels that deliver cancer-fighting immune cells to the tumor, potentially leading to more effective treatments and longer survival periods.
April 13, 2017
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Combination of conventional and new drugs enhances tumor cell death
A group of researchers tested the therapeutic effect of a combination of conventional -- common anti-cancer agents -- and new drugs -- under clinical trials.
August 28, 2017
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Combination of traditional chemotherapy, new drug kills rare cancer cells in mice
An experimental drug combined with the traditional chemotherapy drug cisplatin, when used in mice, destroyed a rare form of salivary gland tumor and prevented a recurrence within 300 days, a study found.
August 16, 2017
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Combination Therapy for Cancer using Radiation and Nanoencapsulated Drugs
Scientists from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have discovered an astonishing new role for the immune cells known as macrophages--enhancing the efficaciousness of nanoparticle-delivered cancer treatments.
June 1, 2017
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Combining immunotherapies effective against mouse model of cancer
Recent study results suggest that combining virotherapy and PD-1 blockades may be more effective than either approach alone
June 19, 2017
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Combining intraoperative imaging with PET scans helps surgeons remove hidden cancer cells
Surgeons were able to identify and remove a greater number of cancerous nodules from lung cancer patients when combining intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) -- through the use of a contrast agent that makes tumor cells glow during surgery -- with preoperative positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The study from the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania (ACC) is the first to show how effective the combination of IMI with the tumor-glowing agent can be when combined with traditional PET imaging.
July 27, 2017
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Combining vitamin C with antibiotics destroys cancer stem cells
A combination of vitamin C and antibiotics could be key to killing cancer stem cells, a new study finds, paving the way for a strategy that could combat cancer recurrence and treatment resistance.
June 13, 2017
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Common class of chemicals cause cancer by breaking down DNA repair mechanisms
A common class of chemicals found everywhere from car exhausts, smoke, building materials and furniture to cosmetics and shampoos could increase cancer risk because of their ability to break down the repair mechanisms that prevent faults in our genes, according to a new study.
June 1, 2017
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Common heart drug repurposed to treat rare cancer in Europe
A drug that's commonly used to treat high blood pressure is being repurposed for a rare tissue cancer in Europe. the medication, named propranolol, was recently granted Orphan Drug Designation by the European Commission (EC).
January 17, 2017
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Comparison of outcomes for robotic-assisted versus laparoscopic surgical procedures
Two studies compare certain outcomes of robotic-assisted versus laparoscopic surgery for kidney removal or rectal cancer.
October 24, 2017
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Computational analysis of open-access data points to new ways of using drugs
A research team led by scientists at UC San Francisco has developed a computational method to systematically probe massive amounts of open-access data to discover new ways to use drugs, including some that have already been approved for other uses.
July 12, 2017
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Computational research details the activation mechanism of p38?
p38? is a protein involved in chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer, among other pathological conditions. a new study provides a deeper understanding of the structure of this protein, thereby paving the way for the development of more effective inhibitors. These findings are the result of combining fundamental biological data using computational techniques.
April 27, 2017
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Computer program developed to diagnose and locate cancer from a blood sample
Researchers in the United States have developed a computer program that can simultaneously detect cancer and identify where in the body the cancer is located, from a patient's blood sample.
March 24, 2017
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Comprehensive genomic analysis offers insights into causes of Wilms tumor development
Mutations involving a large number of genes converge on two pathways during early kidney development that lead to Wilms tumor, new research concludes.
August 21, 2017
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Comprehensive sequencing program shows promise of precision medicine for advanced cancer
DNA, RNA sequencing of 500 patients reveals potential treatment targets, deeper understanding of metastatic cancer
August 2, 2017
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Concurrent treatment with OX40- and PD1-targeted cancer immunotherapies may be detrimental
Concurrent administration of the T-cell stimulating anti-OX40 antibody and the immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-PD1 antibody attenuated the effect of anti-OX40 and resulted in poor treatment outcomes in mice.
August 28, 2017
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Connecting the dots between insulin resistance, unhealthy blood vessels and cancer
Animal studies examine risk factors that may overlap between colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease
May 1, 2017
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Connection between low oxygen levels, human gene discovered
Noncoding RNA implicated in several types of cancer
September 12, 2017
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Conquering One Big Cancer Side Effect: Fear
Three new therapy programs provide much-needed psychological support, researchers report
June 2, 2017
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Continued funding of Collaborative Research Center developing nanomaterials for cancer immunotherapy
The German Research Foundation (DFG) has agreed to fund the Mainz-based Collaborative Research Center (CRC) 1066 "Nanodimensional Polymer Therapeutics for Tumor Therapy" involved in the development of nanomaterials for cancer immunotherapy for another four years to the end of June 2021.
June 28, 2017
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'Cooling Caps' May Halt Chemo-Linked Hair Loss
One of two trials was stopped early because results were so strong
February 14, 2017
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Could a Common Blood Thinner Lower Cancer Risk?
A pill widely taken to prevent heart attack and stroke may also guard against cancer, new research suggests.
November 6, 2017
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Counterintuitive approach to treating a brain cancer
The loss of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN has been linked to tumor growth and chemotherapy resistance in the almost invariably lethal brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Now, researchers have shown that one way to override the growth-promoting effects of PTEN deletion is, surprisingly, to inhibit a separate tumor suppressor gene.
May 12, 2017
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CU Boulder study sheds new light on mechanism behind radiation-induced bystander effect
More than half of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy, in which high doses of radiation are aimed at diseased tissue to kill cancer cells. But due to a phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), in which irradiated cells leak chemical signals that can travel some distance to damage unexposed healthy cells, many suffer side-effects such as hair loss, fatigue, and skin problems. This bystander effect may also make targeted cells resistant to radiation treatment, research suggests.
July 19, 2017
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Custom cancer vaccines safely fight and kill tumors in early human trials
It's early and there are many hurdles, but data so far suggests safety, efficacy.
July 6, 2017
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Cutaneous horn: Appearance, causes, and treatment
Developing a growth on the skin, such as a cutaneous horn, can be a cause for concern.
August 15, 2017
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Cutting Carbs Won't Save You From Cancer
Half-eaten doughnuts hit the bottom of waste bins around the world this week, as news feeds spread word of a new dietary danger.
October 20, 2017
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Cutting down on cancer surgeries
New microscopy technique could reduce repeat surgeries for breast cancer patients
May 17, 2017
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CWRU researcher receives major NIH grants to develop microscopic drug-delivery systems
Nicole F. Steinmetz, PhD, George J. Picha Professor in Biomaterials, member of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Director of the Center for Bio-Nanotechnology at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, has received two major grants from the National Institutes of Health to develop microscopic drug-delivery systems for patients living with breast cancer, and patients at risk for serious blood clots.
June 29, 2017
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Misc. - D

Danish research may pave way for immunological treatment of cancer
Researchers from Aarhus University have found an important piece of the puzzle leading towards an understanding of how our innate immune system reacts against viral infections and recognises foreign DNA, for example from dying cancer cells. the discovery may prove to be of great importance for immunological treatment of cancer as well as autoimmune diseases in the future.
February 21, 2017
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Dartmouth study examines impact of health insurance status on cancer care
Millions of Americans acquire their health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, including individuals from disadvantaged communities (as defined by a summary measure comprised of U.S. Census measures of income, education, and employment). Patients with one of the four leading causes of cancer deaths have lower rates of cancer-specific survival based on where they live, specifically based on their social determinants of health.
January 27, 2017
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DCIS patients more likely to be alive ten years later than women in general population
Women over 50 who have been treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are more likely to be alive ten years later than women in the general population, according to new research presented at the European Cancer Congress 2017.
January 27, 2017
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Deadly nanoparcel for cancer cells
Most tumors contain regions of low oxygen concentration where cancer therapies based on the action of reactive oxygen species are ineffective. Now, American scientists have developed a hybrid nanomaterial that releases a free-radical-generating prodrug inside tumor cells upon thermal activation.
May 4, 2017
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Deadly nanoparcel for cancer cells
Free-radical-generating hybrid nanomaterial for the oxidative destruction of hypoxic cancer cells
May 4, 2017
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Deep Learning, AI Could One day Assist in Spotting Cancer
Deep learning and artificial intelligence are on their way to bringing about a sea change in how we use computers in medicine. Neural networks have the power to work toward solutions using approaches they devise on their own -- and it gives them incredible problem-solving capabilities.
May 12, 2017
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Deep Sequencing of Loose DNA in Blood for Early Detection of Many Cancers
A collaborative project between scientists in the U.S., Denmark, and The Netherlands has developed a way of spotting bits of DNA in blood that derive from tumors deep in the body. The technology may allow for early detection of cancers before any symptoms arise and earlier than any other existing approach.
August 21, 2017
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Deploying an ancient defense to kill cancer
What if your body's ancient defenses against invading bacteria could be hijacked to help kill cancer? In a small sarcoma trial, scientists have found signs of immune attack after injections of a bacteria-inspired drug.
April 3, 2017
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Designer Virus Tells the Immune System How to Fight Cancer
A virus can cause illness and even death if you become infected with the wrong one. However, a virus has no malicious intentions; it's simply a bundle of genetic code programmed to make copies of itself. Researchers have been exploring ways to hijack the functionality of a virus to deliver new beneficial genes to cells.
June 1, 2017
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Designer Viruses Help Fight Cancer
Scientists have created artificial viruses for use in eliminating cancer cells.
May 31, 2017
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Designer viruses stimulate the immune system to fight cancer
Swiss scientists have created artificial viruses that can be used to target cancer. These designer viruses alert the immune system and cause it to send killer cells to help fight the tumor. The results, published in the journal Nature Communications ("Replicating viral vector platform exploits alarmin signals for potent CD8+ T cell-mediated tumour immunotherapy"), provide a basis for innovative cancer treatments.
May 26, 2017
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Desmoid tumor: All you need to know
Desmoid tumors are rare, noncancerous growths that develop in connective tissue, such as muscle. Also known as aggressive fibromatoses, they can occur almost anywhere in the body.
September 12, 2017
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Detection system reads biomolecules in barcoded microgels
Single-stranded, noncoding micro-ribonucleic acids (microRNAs), consisting of 18-23 nucleotides, play a key role in regulating gene expression. Levels of microRNAs circulating within blood can be correlated to different states of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and cardiovascular conditions. Many microRNAs within the blood are encapsulated within exosomes, nanoscale vesicles released by the cells.
December 19, 2016
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Developing tailor-made nanoparticles to fight cancer
Electronic devices, coatings or biomedical therapeutics -- nanoparticles, smaller than a human hair, can have very different properties and thus broad application options. The respective function depends primarily on the size of the particles.
June 29, 2017
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DKFZ scientists reveal how cancer cells suppress immune system to spread and multiply
The degenerated cells cause an inflammatory reaction and influence other blood cells with it so much, that the immune system is suppressed. They send out messages via exosomes, little bubbles, which the cells transmit to their surroundings. The discovery by the DKFZ scientists paves the way for new therapy approaches.
July 28, 2017
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Diarrhea-causing Salmonella can be weaponized to flush out cancer
In mice, armed bacteria infiltrated human tumors and triggered destruction.
February 9, 2017
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Did Firm Fake Patients for Cancer Drug Sales?
Insys Therapeutics faked cancer patients in order to boost sales of its drug Subsys, a sprayable form of the opioid painkiller fentanyl, according to a federal indictment and ongoing congressional investigation by Sen. Claire McCaskill.
September 12, 2017
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Differences found in cancer occurrence within African and US born blacks
The cancer profile of African-born blacks differs from that of United States-born blacks and varies by region of birth, according to a new study. the study, appearing in CANCER, suggests differences in environmental, cultural, social, and genetic factors, and points to an opportunity to study the risk factors associated with the cancer burden in African-born blacks to help create targeted interventions.
April 14, 2017
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Dinosaur extinction metal can be used to kill cancer cells
Cancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research by an international collaboration between the University of Warwick and Sun Yat-Sen University in China.
November 2, 2017
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Discovery could impact understanding, treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases
Scientists from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) may have cracked the code to understanding the function of special cells called regulatory T Cells. Treg cells, as they are often known, control and regulate our immune system to prevent excessive reactions. The findings, published in Science Immunology, could have a major impact in our understanding and treatment of all autoimmune diseases and most chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, Crohn's disease as well as broader conditions such as asthma, allergies and cancer.
July 4, 2017
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DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as 'barcodes,' researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. the technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease.
February 7, 2017
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DNA mutations shed in blood predicts response to immunotherapy in patients with cancer
A blood sample, or liquid biopsy, can reveal which patients will respond to checkpoint inhibitor-based immunotherapies, a first-of-its-kind study reports.
October 2, 2017
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DNA patterns can unlock how glucose metabolism drives cancer, study finds
Less aggressive cancers are known to have an intact genome--the complete set of genes in a cell--while the genome of more aggressive cancers tends to have a great deal of abnormalities. Now, a new multi-year study of DNA patterns in tumor cells suggests that these aberrant genetic signatures are not random but reflect selective forces in tumor evolution.
February 15, 2017
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DNA sensor system developed for specific and sensitive measurement of cancer-relevant enzyme activity
The development of DNA sensor systems is of great importance for advances in medical science. Now another piece of the puzzle for the development of personalized medicine has been found with the results of a highly sensitive monitoring of cancer-related topoisomerase II enzymes.
August 23, 2017
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Do mobile phones cause cancer? Evidence still says 'no' despite what random people on an Italian jury think
Can we please stop having this debate?
April 21, 2017
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Doctors gain a greater understanding of skin cancer using tattoos
Researchers evaluate the effects on the medical students who took part in the study
September 26, 2017
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Does stronger initial response to cancer treatment predict longer overall survival?
It seems like such a simple question: Do patients whose tumors shrink more in response to targeted treatment go on to have better outcomes than patients whose tumors shrink less? But the implications of a recent study demonstrating this relationship are anything but simple and could influence both the design of future clinical trials and the goals of oncologists treating cancer.
August 15, 2017
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'Double decker' antibody technology fights cancer
Scientists have created a new class of antibody-drug conjugates for cancer therapy, outlines a new report.
October 25, 2017
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Drug may curb female infertility from cancer treatments
An existing drug may one day protect premenopausal women from life-altering infertility that commonly follows cancer treatments, according to a new study.
September 1, 2017
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Drug short-circuits cancer signaling
Drug zeroes in on mutated nuclear receptors found in cancer, leaves normal proteins alone
August 4, 2017
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Drug-like molecule appears to interfere with inflammatory response in variety of diseases
A drug-like molecule developed by Duke Health researchers appears to intercede in an inflammatory response that is at the center of a variety of diseases, including some cancers, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease.
August 17, 2017
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Dual loss of TET proteins prompts lethal upsurge in inflammatory T cells in a mouse model of lymphoid cancer
Members of the TET family of proteins help protect against cancer by regulating the chemical state of DNA --and thus turning growth-promoting genes on or off. These latest findings illustrate just how important TET proteins are in controlling cell proliferation and cell fate.
December 12, 2016
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Dual-action cancer nanomedicine therapy
A French-Australian research team has fabricated antibody-coated porous silicon nanoparticles that can actively target cells through binding to specific cell-surface receptors. They demonstrated that these nanoparticles can bind to and selectively deliver multiple therapeutics to human B cells in vitro.
June 6, 2017
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Dual-Cell Targeting Immunotherapy Nanoparticle Stimulates the Immune System to Hamper Tumor Growth
Cancer immunotherapy is considered to be one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment. However, this approach can lead to severe side effects and only works in a small percentage of patients.
June 22, 2017
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Dual-targeting nanoparticles lower cancer's defenses and attack tumors
Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment. But the approach only works in a fraction of patients and can cause nasty side effects.
June 7, 2017
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Misc. - E

Early cancer-detection startup Grail is reportedly trying to raise more money
Just months after Grail raised a $900 million Series B round, the startup that aims to detect cancer early on is looking for additional funding, CNBC reports. Prior to the $900 million round, Grail raised $100 million last year to develop initial studies of its blood test technology.
October 31, 2017
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Early death from pediatric cancer subtypes more likely to happen than previously reported
Treatments for childhood cancers have improved to the point that 5-year survival rates are over 80 percent. However, one group has failed to benefit from these improvements, namely children who die so soon after diagnosis that they are not able to receive treatment, or who receive treatment so late in the course of their disease that it is destined to fail.
March 8, 2017
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Early deaths from childhood cancer up to 4 times more common than previously reported
Treatments for childhood cancers have improved to the point that 5-year survival rates are over 80 percent. However, one group has failed to benefit from these improvements, namely children who die so soon after diagnosis that they are not able to receive treatment, or who receive treatment so late in the course of their disease that it is destined to fail.
March 8, 2017
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Editing preferences of enzymes may play role in infertility and cancer
To "turn off" particular regions of genes or protect them from damage, DNA strands can wrap around small proteins, called histones, keeping out all but the most specialized molecular machinery. Now, new research shows how an enzyme called KDM4B "reads" one and "erases" another so-called epigenetic mark on a single histone protein during the generation of sex cells in mice. the researchers say the finding may one day shed light on some cases of infertility and cancer.
November 28, 2016
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EFSA decision upholds years of research that shows safety of sucralose
The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) decision upholds years of research on sucralose - the sweetening ingredient in the original SPLENDA Sweeteners - that shows it to be safe and does not cause cancer. the decision was published as an open access Scientific Opinion in EFSA Journal, and rejects allegations made by a small Italian lab regarding a study in mice that they conducted. EFSA concluded that "the available data did not support the conclusions of the authors (Soffritti et al., 2016)."
May 8, 2017
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Electronic Barcoding of Microparticles to Help Bring Disease Biomarker Detection out of Lab
As research is progressing in understanding human diseases, it turns out that many conditions have related biomarkers that show up in the blood and other body fluids. Being able to continuously monitor for the presence of disease biomarkers outside a clinical setting may allow for early detection of cancer and other diseases.
June 19, 2017
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Encouraging results from combination therapy in Hodgkin lymphoma
Combination therapy with brentuximab vedotin and gemcitabine in patients is "highly active" regimen for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, the authors of a phase II clinical study report.
June 6, 2017
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Endometrial cancer: Potential new target for resistant tumors found
There are few treatment options for women with advanced endometrial cancer, which often relapses after developing resistance to chemotherapy. Now, however, new research suggests that targeting a protein that is most abundant on cancer stem cells in endometrioid tumors may offer a way forward.
August 25, 2017
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Enhanced CRISPR lets scientists explore all steps of health and disease in every cell type
Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge have created sOPTiKO, a more efficient and enhanced inducible CRISPR genome editing platform. In the journal Development, they describe how the freely available single-step system works in every cell in the body and at every stage of development. this new approach will aid researchers in developmental biology, tissue regeneration and cancer.
December 1, 2016
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Enhancing radiation therapy with nanotechnology
In an effort to devise novel and more effective anticancer regimes, a rapidly growing community of researchers is applying the unique properties of nanomaterials to combat the unmet challenges posed by classical radiation therapy (RT) -- which has become one of the most effective and frequently applied cancer therapies.
June 22, 2017
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Energy dense foods may increase cancer risk regardless of obesity status
Link between high dietary energy density in food and obesity-related cancer in normal weight individuals
August 17, 2017
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Enzyme's 'editing' preferences have implications for infertility, cancer
To "turn off" particular regions of genes or protect them from damage, DNA strands can wrap around small proteins, called histones, keeping out all but the most specialized molecular machinery. Now, new research shows how an enzyme called KDM4B "reads" one and "erases" another so-called epigenetic mark on a single histone protein during the generation of sex cells in mice. the researchers say the finding may one day shed light on some cases of infertility and cancer.
November 28, 2016
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Ependymoma: Symptoms and treatment
Ependymoma cancer is a rare tumor that occurs in the brain and spinal cord.
August 7, 2017
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Epigenetic change ties mitochondrial dysfunction to tumor progression
Scientists have identified a mechanism by which mitochondria can drive changes in nuclear gene expression that are associated with tumor progression.
December 21, 2016
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Equashield Pro Automated High-Throughput Compounding Robot for Chemo Drugs
Equashield, a Port Washington, NY firm, will be unveiling their first automated compounding robot. Technically called Closed System Transfer Devices (CSTD), such devices essentially reproduce a needle and a syringe action to compound drugs, particularly chemo agents for IV administration. Because such drugs can be toxic to clinical staff, the Equashield Pro has a number of proprietary safety systems and design elements that prevent exposure and cross-contamination.
November 28, 2016
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Errors made by 'DNA spellchecker' revealed as important cause of cancer
Sunlight, alcohol consumption increase the rate at which this happens, resulting in more mutations in the most important parts of our genomes
July 27, 2017
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ESMO announces takeover of Targeted Anticancer Therapies Congress series
ESMO, the leading European organisation for medical oncology, has announced it will take over the organisation of the Targeted Anticancer Therapies (TAT) Congress series, with the aim of expanding its educational offer and ensure that professionals are kept up to date with the latest drug developments to improve outcomes for cancer patients.
March 7, 2017
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Essential genes for cancer immunotherapy identified
A new study identifies genes that are necessary in cancer cells for immunotherapy to work, addressing the problem of why some tumors don't respond to immunotherapy or respond initially but then stop as tumor cells develop resistance to immunotherapy.
August 7, 2017
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Examining cost-effectiveness of initial diagnostic exams for microscopic hematuria
Routine urinalysis for screening of genitourinary cancer isn't recommended by any major health group but patients who undergo urinalysis for a variety of other reasons are often found to have microscopic hematuria, which prompts further evaluation. a new article explores the cost-effectiveness of four initial diagnostic protocols for these patients.
April 17, 2017
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Exercise Helps Counter Cancer-Linked Fatigue
Psychological treatment and education can be useful, too, more so than drugs, study finds
March 2, 2017
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Expanding the reach of therapeutic antibodies
A group of researchers has developed an approach to efficiently produce antibodies that can bind to two different target molecules simultaneously, a long-desired innovation in the field of cancer immunotherapy.
August 29, 2017
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Experimental cancer drug shows promise
New study suggests GGTI-2418 can block one specific protein from binding to and degrading another protein known for killing cancer cells.
June 14, 2017
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Experts call for expansion of molecular imaging in precision cancer care
The noninvasive approach needs more research but carries added benefits to biopsies, they say
December 29, 2016
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Experts indicate new way via which tumor cells can respond to chemotherapy
This finding could be the basis for future tools as well as the prognosis of therapeutic interventions
October 10, 2017
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Explainer: what is nanomedicine and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment?
A recent US study of people treated for cancer as children from the 1970s to 1999 showed that although survival rates have improved over the years, the quality of life for survivors is low. It also showed this was worse for those who were treated in the 1990s.
May 24, 2017
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Exploiting acidic tumor microenvironment for the development of novel cancer nano-theranostics
Cancer is one of leading causes of human mortality around the world. The current mainstream cancer treatment modalities (e.g. surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) only show limited treatment outcomes, partly owing to the complexities and heterogeneity of tumor biology. In the recent several decades, with the rapid advance of nanotechnology, nanomedicine has attracted more and more attentions and been exploited as a promising candidate for personalized medicine to enable more efficient and reliable cancer diagnosis and treatment.
June 29, 2017
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Exposure to carcinogenic compounds can come with inhalation of vaporized cannabis oil, study shows
New research shows that the agents commonly mixed with cannabis oil for vaping can also produce cancer-causing compounds when heated. The effect is similar to the potential health risks linked to cigarette smoke and agents used in e-cigarettes. The new study demonstrates that exposure to harmful levels of formaldehyde can come with a single inhalation of vaporized cannabis oil.
June 12, 2017
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Exposure to medical imaging radiation does not increase child's cancer risk
In an article published in the June 2017 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers assert that exposure to medical imaging radiation not only doesn't increase an adult person's risk of getting cancer, it doesn't increase a child's risk. According to the authors, the long-held belief that even low doses of radiation, such as those received in diagnostic imaging, increase cancer risk is based on an inaccurate, 70-year-old hypothesis and leads to unnecessary fear and misdiagnoses.
June 7, 2017
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Extensive use of fluorinated chemicals in fast food wrappers: Chemicals can leach into food
Previous studies have linked the chemicals to kidney and testicular cancers, thyroid disease, low birth weight and immunotoxicity in children, among other health issues.
February 1, 2017
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Extreme short and long telomeres linked to increased cancer risk
The length of the telomere "caps" of DNA that protect the tips of chromosomes may predict cancer risk and be a potential target for future therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute scientists will report today at the AACR Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.
April 3, 2017
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Misc. - F

Fake Breast Cancer Charity Must Shut Down, Pay $350K To Real Charities
A purported charity called The Breast Cancer Survivors Foundation existed for six years, raising money through direct mailers and soliciting donors over the phone. It took in about $3 million per year, spinning heartwarming tales in its mailings of helping patients. This turned out to not actually be true, and those millions went to the professional fundraiser who ran the operation.
June 16, 2017
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Fast capture of cancer markers will aid in diagnosis, treatment
A nanoscale product of human cells that was once considered junk is now known to play an important role in intercellular communication and in many disease processes, including cancer metastasis. Researchers have developed nanoprobes to rapidly isolate these rare markers, called extracellular vesicles (EVs), for potential development of precision cancer diagnoses and personalized anticancer treatments.
April 10, 2017
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Faster biosensor for healthcare now developed
A new technology has been designed that is 20 times faster than the existing biosensors using micromagnetic pattern of spider web. the technology can be used for early diagnosis and recurrence diagnosis of diseases such as cancer.
April 21, 2017
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Fat cells may inactivate chemotherapeutic drug
Adipocytes metabolize daunorubicin, reducing its ability to kill cancer cells
November 8, 2017
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FDA Approves Drug for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
A new drug to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
February 10, 2017
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FDA approves first cell-based gene therapy for use in the United States
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a historic action today making the first gene therapy available in the United States, ushering in a new approach to the treatment of cancer and other serious and life-threatening diseases.
August 30, 2017
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FDA Approves First-of-Its-Kind Cancer Treatment
The FDA has for the first time approved a treatment that uses a patient's own genetically modified cells to attack a type of leukemia, opening the door to what the agency calls "a new frontier" in medicine.
August 30, 2017
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FDA approves gene therapy to treat a rare cancer
On August 30, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a novel gene therapy for patients with a rare type of leukemia. This is the first time the agency has greenlighted a gene therapy approach for use in the United States.
August 30, 2017
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FDA approves Revolutionary Cancer Drug
The Food and Drug Administration -- the American agency in charge of ensuring the safety of most of the things we ingest -- has approved a radical new therapy for fighting cancer called Yescarta.
October 20, 2017
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FDA issues warning letters to companies illegally selling products that claim to cure cancer
As part of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's ongoing efforts to protect consumers from health fraud, the agency today issued warning letters to four companies illegally selling products online that claim to prevent, diagnose, treat, or cure cancer without evidence to support these outcomes.
November 2, 2017
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FDA OKs First Cancer Drug by Genetic Type, Not Organ of Origin
Keytruda is targeted to specific cancers with specific DNA that can arise in multiple sites
May 24, 2017
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FDG PET-CT imaging helps assess anatomical structure and metabolic activity in patients with GLILD
A new proof of concept study has shown that an imaging technique more commonly used to assess cancer patients may also be of help in assessing disease and treatment effects in patients with inflammatory diseases.
November 30, 2016
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Feds seize smallpox vaccine from clinic injecting it into cancer patients
Their technique doesn't work, and it's dangerous
August 28, 2017
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Fetal genomic sequencing could enhance detection rate of genetic findings, study shows
In a study to be presented Thursday, Jan. 26, in the oral plenary session at 8 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, the Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers with the Columbia University Medical Center in New York found that, in preliminary data, fetal genomic (whole exome) sequencing (WES) as a diagnostic test for women with pregnancies complicated by major fetal congenital anomalies increased the detection rate of genetic findings by between 10 to 30 percent.
January 23, 2017
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Fighting cancer with immunotherapy: Signaling molecule causes regression of blood vessels
Immunotherapy with T-cells offers great hope to people suffering from cancer. some initial successes have already been made in treating blood cancer, but treating solid tumors remains a major challenge. the signaling molecule interferon gamma, which is produced by T-cells, plays a key role in the therapy. It cuts off the blood supply to tumors, as a new study reveals.
April 26, 2017
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First drug to prevent the onset of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy tested
Peripheral neuropathy is a very common side-effect of chemotherapy and may eventually lead to early discontinuation of treatment. New research has led to the identification and successful testing of a new molecule capable of preventing this neurological complication. This molecule could potentially become the first existing treatment to prevent this frequent adverse effect and improve the quality of life of cancer patients.
October 24, 2017
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First dual-targeting nanoparticles lower cancer's defenses and attack tumors
Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment. But the approach only works in a fraction of patients and can cause nasty side effects. Now scientists report the development of the first dual-cell targeting immunotherapy nanoparticle that slows tumor growth in mice with different cancers. In their study, up to half the mice in one cancer group went into full remission after the treatment.
June 7, 2017
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First lab-made cancer-hunting blood cells approved by the FDA
Analysts say it could cost as much as $700,000
August 30, 2017
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First 'nanotherapeutics' delivered to a tumor
Technique targets disease, spares nearby tissues
May 15, 2017
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First use of graphene to detect cancer cells
By interfacing brain cells onto graphene, researchers have shown they can differentiate a single hyperactive cancerous cell from a normal cell, pointing the way to developing a simple, noninvasive tool for early cancer diagnosis.
December 19, 2016
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First use of graphene to detect cancer cells
By interfacing brain cells onto graphene, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have shown they can differentiate a single hyperactive cancerous cell from a normal cell, pointing the way to developing a simple, noninvasive tool for early cancer diagnosis.
December 19, 2016
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First-ever treatment for Merkel cell carcinoma receives approval in Japan
Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, and Pfizer Inc. today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) has approved BAVENCIO® (avelumab, genetically recombinant Injection 200mg/mL for intravenous use) as the first and only treatment indicated for curatively unresectable Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare and aggressive cancer, in Japan.
September 27, 2017
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Five Major Cancer Studies Are Proving Difficult to Reproduce
Humanity would understand very little about cancer, and be hard-pressed to find cures, without scientific research. But what if, when teams recreated each other's research, they didn't arrive at the same result?
January 19, 2017
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Flipping the switch to stop tumor development
Researchers show how a protein prevents the uncontrolled expansion of immune cells, and have outlined their findings in a new report.
June 22, 2017
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Food withdrawal results in stabilization of important tumor suppressor
Tumor suppressors stop healthy cells from becoming cancerous. Researchers have found that p53, one of the most important tumor suppressors, accumulates in liver after food withdrawal.
December 21, 2016
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For 1 in 10 cancer patients, surgery means opioid dependence
More than 10 percent of people who had never taken opioids prior to curative-intent surgery for cancer continued to take the drugs three to six months later. The risk is even greater for those who are treated with chemotherapy after surgery.
November 1, 2017
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From cancer evolution to personalized therapies
Being able to predict the resistance or sensitivity of a tumor cell to a drug is a key success-factor of cancer precision therapy. But such a prediction is made difficult by the fact that genetic alterations in tumors change dynamically over time and are often interdependent, following a pattern that is poorly understood.
August 14, 2017
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From thousands of suspects, researchers ferret out cancer-causing genes
A team of researchers has identified specific gene combinations that can cause deadly brain cancer glioblastoma, using new technology that can also pinpoint triggers of other types cancers.
August 14, 2017
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Functional brain training alleviates chemotherapy-induced peripheral nerve damage in cancer survivor
Neurofeedback also results in measureable changes in targeted brain activity
March 3, 2017
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Misc. - G

Gastrointestinal cancer: Physical exercise helps during chemo
Walking or jogging helps patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer to cope better with the side effects of chemotherapy, shows new research.
March 10, 2017
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Gene circuit can be used to switch on inside cancer cells and stimulate immune attack, study suggests
A new study, conducted by researchers at MIT, suggests that a recently developed synthetic gene circuit can stimulate the immune system to kill cancer cells when it identifies indications of the cancer. The gene circuit will only stimulate a therapeutic response when it identifies two particular cancer markers.
October 20, 2017
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Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack
Advance may open new pathways for cancer immunotherapy
October 19, 2017
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Gene editing technique helps find cancer's weak spots
Genetic mutations that cause cancer also weaken cancer cells, allowing researchers to develop drugs that will selectively kill them. this is called "synthetic lethality" because the drug is only lethal to mutated (synthetic) cells. Researchers have developed a method to search for synthetic-lethal gene combinations. the technique uncovered 120 new opportunities for cancer drug development.
March 19, 2017
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Genetic analysis better explains how uterine cancers resist treatment
Researchers have charted the complex molecular biology of uterine carcinosarcoma, a rare and aggressive gynecologic cancer, according to a new study.
March 13, 2017
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Genetic biomarker IDs patients with increased risk for heart damage by anthracycline chemo
Among women with breast cancer who received a type of chemotherapy called an anthracycline, those who had a certain genetic biomarker had a significantly increased risk for having anthracycline-induced congestive heart failure.
December 19, 2016
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Genetic control of immune cell proliferation
Germinal centers are transient structures in the lymph nodes where antibody-producing B cells proliferate and differentiate at extraordinary rates. Germinal centers can be visually divided into a dark zone and light zone. for the proliferation and differentiation to occur, B cells must cycle between the two zones. Investigators have discovered how specific genes regulate this cycling. the findings provide new insights on how certain types of lymphomas form.
April 19, 2017
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Genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissues could offer clues to tumor behavior
Two recently discovered genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissue cells -- an altered gene and a snippet of noncoding genetic material -- could offer clues to tumor behavior and potential new targets for therapy, Johns Hopkins scientists report.
December 2, 2016
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Genetic engineering tool generates antioxidant-rich purple rice
Researchers in China have developed a genetic engineering approach capable of delivering many genes at once and used it to make rice endosperm -- seed tissue that provides nutrients to the developing plant embryo -- produce high levels of antioxidant-boosting pigments called anthocyanins. The resulting purple endosperm rice holds potential for decreasing the risk of certain cancers, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other chronic disorders.
June 27, 2017
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Generic Gleevec will Likely Save Millions in Costs
Over 5 years, researchers estimate more than $9 million in insurance savings
March 18, 2016
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Genetic profiling of blood cells can predict response to stem cell transplant for patients with MDS
A single blood test and basic information about a patient's medical status can indicate which patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are likely to benefit from a stem cell transplant, and the intensity of pre-transplant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy that is likely to produce the best results, according to new research by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital.
February 9, 2017
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Genetic risk of getting second cancer tallied for pediatric survivors
Faulty genes, not just treatment side effects, to blame for double whammy
April 7, 2017
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Genetic screening and counseling likely to benefit childhood cancer survivors, study suggests
Twelve percent of childhood cancer survivors carry germline mutations that put them or their children at increased risk of developing cancer, according to a landmark study presented today at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research. the findings from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital are expected to have an immediate and potentially life-saving impact on the growing population of childhood cancer survivors.
April 4, 2017
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Genetic sequencing could influence treatment for nearly three-quarters of advanced cancer patients
More biomarker-based clinical trials will increase opportunities
June 2, 2017
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Genome sequencing approach opens door to therapy options for rare, neglected cancers
An international team of scientists led by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and UConn School of Medicine have reported the results of a genome sequencing study for an extremely rare form of cancer. Their findings demonstrate the utility of this approach to open the door for therapy options for rare diseases that are neglected due to scarcity of patients or lack of resources.
March 23, 2017
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Genome sequencing method can detect clinically relevant mutations using 5 CTCs
Whole genome sequencing using long fragment read (LFR), a technology that can analyze the entire genomic content of small numbers of cells, detected potentially targetable mutations using only five circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a patient with metastatic breast cancer.
August 15, 2017
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Genome-wide cancer 'dependency map' now revealed
Initial results reveal more than 760 genetic dependencies across multiple cancers, suggesting opportunities for developing new treatments
July 27, 2017
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Georgia Tech Researchers May Have Developed Technology to Prevent Cancer Metastasis
Cancer cells rely on their cytoskeletons to move away from where they are born, resulting in metastasis of the cancer. This process has been a challenge to prevent, but doing so can go a long way toward successfully killing cancers before they're allowed to spread.
June 27, 2017
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Ginseng nanoparticles for cancer treatment
A recent editorial in Nanomedicine by scientists in Korea states that use of ginsenoside nanoconjugates could be a promising candidate against cancer and various other diseases, such as inflammation, osteoporosis and obesity in the future.
May 19, 2017
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Globe-trotting pollutants raise some cancer risks four times higher than predicted
A new way of looking at how pollutants ride through the atmosphere has quadrupled the estimate of global lung cancer risk from a pollutant caused by combustion, to a level that is now double the allowable limit recommended by the World Health Organization.
January 26, 2017
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Glowing Tumor Dye to Identifies Cancerous Lymph Nodes
Surgeons are using a fluorescent dye that makes cancerous cells glow in hopes of identifying suspicious lymph nodes during head and neck cancer procedures. The study is among the first in the world to look at the effectiveness of intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) of lymph nodes in patients with head and neck cancer.
October 10, 2017
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Glowing tumor technology helps surgeons remove hidden cancer cells
Combining intraoperative imaging with PET scans helps surgeons identify malignant nodules
July 27, 2017
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Glycans as biomarkers for cancer?
Bioorthogonal labeling of human prostate cancer tissue slice cultures to identify marker glycoproteins
June 26, 2017
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Gold Nanoshells Ferry Chemo Drugs Into Cancer Cells to Spare Rest of Body
Researchers at Rice and Northwestern universities engineered a way of encapsulating toxic chemo agents inside of gold nanoshells that deliver and deposit their contents only inside neoplastic cells. Reported on in the latest Early Edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study involved getting docetaxel and lapatinib chemo drugs inside of gold nanoshells which can be opened up with a near-infrared laser.
November 9, 2017
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Gold Nanostars and Immunotherapy Combined for a Cancer Vaccine
Researchers at Duke University have combined an FDA approved immunotherapy and a gold nanostar/laser treatment to completely eradicate tumors and vaccinate against the cancer.
August 18, 2017
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Gold nanostars and immunotherapy vaccinate mice against cancer
New treatment cures, vaccinates mouse in small proof-of-concept study
August 17, 2017
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Gold nanostars and immunotherapy vaccinate mice against cancer
By combining an FDA-approved cancer immunotherapy with an emerging tumor-roasting nanotechnology, Duke University researchers improved the efficacy of both therapies in a proof-of-concept study using mice.
August 17, 2017
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Gold specks raise hopes for better cancer treatments
A tiny medical device containing gold specks could boost the effects of cancer medication and reduce its harm, research suggests.
August 7, 2017
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Gold specks raise hopes for better cancer treatments
A tiny medical device containing gold specks could boost the effects of cancer medication and reduce its harm, research suggests.
August 7, 2017
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Good news for cyclists: you might live longer
A recent study published in the BMJ finds that cycling or walking to work reduces the risk of death from all causes, when compared with non-active commuting. the biggest effect was seen in cyclists, so it might be time to get your bike back out of the garage.
April 24, 2017
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Grail is raising at least $1 billion to fund its early cancer screening test
The early cancer screening startup Grail plans to raise more than $1 billion in Series B financing, possibly up to $1.8 billion.
January 5, 2017
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Graft-versus-host disease successfully prevented
Regimen may stop common side effect of stem cell transplants for hematologic cancer patients, report suggests
April 18, 2017
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Griffith scientists discover new and improved tool to detect cancer
Studying the food poisoning bacteria E. coli may have led scientists to discover a new and improved tool to detect cancer.
June 8, 2017
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Groundbreaking discovery has potential to improve therapies for cancer and other diseases
Study changes understanding of the Retinoblastoma protein and its role as a tumor suppressor
December 14, 2016
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Groups of Nanoparticles Powered by a Magnet Team Up to Kill Cancer Cells
Number of ways have been developed that allow nanoparticles to kill cancer cells. Some of these include delivering chemo agents, converting electromagnetic energy beamed into heat, and manipulating with the signaling processes of tumor cells.
June 14, 2017
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Gum Disease Linked to Cancer Risk in Older Women?
Esophageal, breast and lung cancer, among others, seen in postmenopausal women in large study
August 1, 2017
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Gut bacteria could protect cancer patients and pregnant women from Listeria
Researchers have discovered that bacteria living in the gut provide a first line of defense against severe Listeria infections. The study suggests that providing these bacteria in the form of probiotics could protect individuals who are particularly susceptible to Listeria, including pregnant women and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.
June 6, 2017
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Gut bacterium can stop chemotherapy from causing cancer cell death
Fusobacterium nucleatum promotes resistance to chemotherapy in colon cancer patients by turning off the push button for cancer cell suicide
July 27, 2017
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Gut microbiome may make chemo drug toxic to patients
The composition of people's gut bacteria may explain why some of them suffer life-threatening reactions after taking a key drug for treating metastatic colorectal cancer, new research has discovered. The findings could help predict which patients will suffer side effects and prevent complications in susceptible patients.
November 1, 2017
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Guy's Cancer Centre adds new positioning equipment to enhance patient comfort during radiotherapy treatment
A range of breast, head and neck boards aid a comfortable and welcoming patient experience at one of the UK's leading cancer centres
February 1, 2017
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Misc. - H

Hand-Held Probe Can Detect Cancer Cells in Real-Time During Surgery
Scientists in Montreal, Canada have perfected a hand-held Raman spectroscopy probe that surgeons can use to distinguish between cancer cells and normal tissue.
June 29, 2017
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Having an extra chromosome has a surprising effect on cancer
Smaller tumors, less cancer-driving proteins seen with trisomic cells
December 6, 2016
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Hemopurifier Filters Ebola, Hep C, Metastatic Melanoma: Interview with James A. Joyce, CEO of Aethlon Medical
Filtering infectious pathogens and cancer cells directly from whole blood has been an almost fantastic proposition, but the Hemopurifier from Aethlon Medical does just that. We've been covering it for over 10 years on Medgadget as it proves itself in clinical trials and new applications for it are discovered. It has already been studied as a treatment option for hepatitis C, metastatic melanoma, and the Ebola virus. Recently at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego, virus capture data was presented from a study of the Hemopurifier involving health-compromised patients infected with a virus.
July 18, 2017
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HCI researchers uncover how epithelial cells naturally turn over to maintain constant numbers
Epithelial cells comprise the skin and skin-like linings that coat internal organs, giving organs a protective barrier so they can function properly. Cells turn over very quickly in epithelia. to maintain healthy cell densities, an equal number of cells must divide and die. If that balance gets thrown off, inflammatory diseases or cancers can arise.
February 15, 2017
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High Doses of Vitamin D Fail to Cut Cancer Risk
Taking triple the daily recommendation didn't lower risk in older women, but larger trials are underway
March 28, 2017
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High-dose vitamin C makes cancer treatment more effective, trial shows
Common treatment options for cancer, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, can be expensive and sometimes ineffective. However, a new clinical trial tests the effect of high-dose vitamin C in combination with standard treatment on health outcomes for patients with cancer.
March 31, 2017
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Higher Odds for Certain Cancers for Couch Potatoes
Researchers say get moving, and point to national exercise guidelines
June 15, 2017
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Higher opioid use among cancer survivors
A new study found that opioid prescription use is more common in cancer survivors than in individuals without a history of cancer.
August 7, 2017
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Higher vitamin D levels linked to lower cancer risk, study suggests
Increasing vitamin D levels may lower risk for developing cancer, according to a study conducted by Creighton University with cooperation from the University of California San Diego. the results of the study were released today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. the study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, is a randomized clinical trial of the effects of vitamin D supplementation on all types of cancer combined.
March 28, 2017
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History of gum disease increases cancer risk in older women
Periodontal disease linked to gallbladder cancer risk in women
August 1, 2017
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HHMI scientists expand access to new resource for studying pediatric cancers
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists have created an extensive resource for studying pediatric cancers, which they are sharing widely to help accelerate research.
August 30, 2017
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Hope for 1st Drug Against Lymphedema
Mouse study offers clues to ease the painful, swollen limb condition
May 10, 2017
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Hormone receptor could be potential biomarker for gastric cancer, research shows
Scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Miami, and Shantou University Medical College in China, have shown that the hormone receptor GHRH-R could be a potential biomarker for gastric cancer, enabling earlier diagnoses and better staging.
December 21, 2016
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Hormone replacement therapy linked to lower risk of atherosclerosis and death in women
Hormone replacement therapy has long been controversial as studies have associated it with health benefits and risks. While some studies suggest that it lowers the risk of osteoporosis and improves some aspects of heart health, others link it to higher risk of cancer and stroke.
March 9, 2017
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How a cancer gene protects genome organization
Crucial function of yeast enzyme Set2 whose well-conserved human counterpart is often mutated in cancers uncovered
June 13, 2017
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How a non-coding RNA encourages cancer growth and metastasis
A pro-tumor environment in the cell can encourage a gene to produce an alternative form of RNA that enables cancer to spread, report researchers.
August 21, 2017
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How a nutrient, glutamine, can control gene programs in cells
Researchers have discovered the mechanism of this control, with implications for developmental biology, the immune response and cancer dysregulation
August 15, 2017
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How best to treat infections and tumors: Containment versus aggressive treatment
A new mathematical analysis identifies the factors that determine whether aggressive treatments or containment strategies will perform best in treating infections and tumors, providing physicians and patients with new information to help them make difficult treatment decisions.
February 9, 2017
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How body may detect early signs of cancer
Fresh insights into how cells detect damage to their DNA -- a hallmark of cancer -- could help explain how the body keeps disease in check. Scientists have discovered how damage to the cell's genetic material can trigger inflammation, setting in motion processes to remove damaged cells and keep tissues healthy.
July 26, 2017
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How can you cope with a cancer diagnosis?
Despite cancer being one of the most prevalent diseases in the world, receiving a diganosis still comes as a shock. In this article, we offer advice from both healthcare specialists and those who went through cancer on how to cope with this diagnosis.
October 13, 2017
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How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapy
Targeting pathway could increase potency of some current drugs
November 8, 2017
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How DNA damage turns immune cells against cancer
Findings suggest modifying the cell replication cycle could make combo therapies more successful
July 31, 2017
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How immature cells grow up to be red blood cells
Researchers have identified the mechanism behind red blood cell specialization and revealed that it is controlled by an enzyme called UBE2O. This finding could spark the development of new treatments for blood disorders and cancers.
August 18, 2017
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How killer cells take out tumors
The use of immunotherapy to treat cancer is celebrating its first successes -- but there are still many knowledge gaps in the underlying mechanisms of action. In a study of mice with soft tissue tumors, researchers have now shown how endogenous killer cells track down the tumors with the help of dormant viruses.
June 6, 2017
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How Many Mutant Genes Drive Cancer?
Study finds there's no precise number of DNA changes needed to spur a tumor
October 20, 2017
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How obesity promotes breast cancer
Obesity leads to the release of cytokines into the bloodstream which impact the metabolism of breast cancer cells, making them more aggressive as a result. The research team has already been able to halt this mechanism with an antibody treatment.
October 20, 2017
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How 'sleeper cells' in cancerous tumors can be destroyed
In many metastasized types of cancer, disseminated tumors grow back despite successful chemotherapy. As a research team has now discovered, this is because of isolated cancer cells that survive the chemotherapy due to a phase of dormancy. If these "sleeper cells" possess specific defects, however, they can be destroyed. This could increase the efficacy of chemotherapy for certain patients.
October 26, 2017
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How some chickens got striped feathers
Birds show an amazing diversity in plumage color and patterning. But what are the genetic mechanisms creating such patterns? Researchers now report that two independent mutations are required to explain the development of the sex-linked barring pattern in chicken. Both mutations affect the function of CDKN2A, a tumor suppressor gene associated with melanoma in humans.
April 7, 2017
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How to shield therapeutic nanoparticles from the immune system
In the lab, doctors can attach chemotherapy to nanoparticles that target tumors, and can use nanoparticles to enhance imaging with MRI, PET and CT scans. Unfortunately, nanoparticles look a lot like pathogens - introducing nanoparticles to the human body can lead to immune system activation in which, at best, nanoparticles are cleared before accomplishing their purpose, and at worst, the onset of dangerous allergic reaction.
December 19, 2016
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HPV and cancer: Key mechanism may suggest treatment
New research from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., investigates how the human papillomavirus promotes cancer. The findings might point to a potential new and improved strategy for targeted treatment.
October 2, 2017
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Hydrogel cubes show highly efficient delivery of a potent anti-cancer drug
Many potent anti-cancer drugs have major drawbacks -- they fail to mix with water, which means they will have a limited solubility in blood, and they lack selectivity to cancer cells.
June 28, 2017
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Misc. - I

I beat cancer twice, but women on Facebook helped me heal
The sisterhood of the purple ribbon
March 8, 2017
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IBM's Watson proves useful at fighting cancer–except in Texas
Despite early success, MD Anderson ignored IT, broke protocols, spent millions.
February 21, 2017
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Illuminating cancer: Researchers invent a pH threshold sensor to improve cancer surgery
Researchers have invented a transistor-like threshold sensor that can illuminate cancer tissue, helping surgeons more accurately distinguish cancerous from normal tissue.
December 20, 2016
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Increased endometrial cancer rates found in women with high levels of cadmium
Researcher recommends women limit cadmium intake
August 9, 2017
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Immune cell therapy shows promising results for lymphoma patients
Physician investigators are working to bring immune cellular therapies to refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Promising results from the phase 1 portion of the ZUMA-1 study, which uses chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells to treat b-cell lymphoma patients, have now been published.
January 5, 2017
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Immune therapy scientists discover distinct cells that block cancer-fighting immune cells
Scientists have discovered a distinct cell population in tumors that inhibits the body's immune response to fight cancer.
February 6, 2017
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'Immunoswitch' particles may be key to more-effective cancer immunotherapy
New strategy tested in animals could improve cancer immunotherapies
June 7, 2017
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'Immunoswitch' particles may be key to more-effective cancer immunotherapy
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells' defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice. Experiments with the tiny, double-duty "immunoswitch' found it able to dramatically slow the growth of mouse melanoma and colon cancer and even eradicate tumors in test animals, the researchers report.
June 7, 2017
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Immunotherapy that uses existing cancer drugs in a new way delivers promising results
Immunotherapy is an emerging field in the global fight against cancer, even though scientists and clinicians have been working for decades to find ways to help the body's immune system detect and attack cancerous cells. Doug Mahoney's lab at the University of Calgary recently discovered an immunotherapy that uses existing cancer drugs in a whole new way.
August 29, 2017
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Important mechanism of epigenetic gene regulation identified
How can defective gene activity, which can ultimately lead to cancer, be avoided? Researchers now identified a mechanism how cells pass on the regulation of genetic information through epigenetic modifications. These insights open the door to new approaches for future cancer treatments.
October 30, 2017
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Implanted scaffold with T cells rapidly shrinks tumors
A biopolymer structure enriched with nutrients shows how immunotherapy could be adapted for solid tumors, according to study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
April 24, 2017
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In a sample of blood, researchers probe for cancer clues
One day, patients may be able to monitor their body's response to cancer therapy just by having their blood drawn. a new study has taken an important step in that direction by measuring a panel of cancer proteins in rare, individual tumor cells that float in the blood.
March 24, 2017
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In battle for real estate, a disordered protein wins out
New study points to potential strategy to kill cancer cells
March 8, 2017
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In-depth tumor sequencing reveals key molecular drivers of metastatic cancers
Five hundred cancer patients are getting an in-depth look at their genomes as part of a new clinical study that is revealing some of the key molecular drivers of metastatic cancers. Some of the patients, who were diagnosed with more than 20 different types of cancer among them, are now working with their physicians to use their genomic information to guide treatment options.
August 3, 2017
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Increased genomic risk can make small tumors aggressive, study says
A study conducted on patients with early stage breast cancer suggested that even small tumors that are thought to be less serious can be aggressive.
September 4, 2017
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Indian Researchers Create Nanoparticle-Based Contrast Agent for Dual Modal Imaging of Cancer
A team of Researchers from PSG College of Technology, India have created nano-contrast agents for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging of cancer cells. Their research findings will be published in the forthcoming issue of the journal NANO.
June 21, 2017
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Infervision's Artificial Intelligence Software Detects Suspected Tumors on Standard Imaging Scans
Infervision, a Chinese company, has been integrating deep learning artificial intelligence to the practice of radiology in order to improve the detection rates of early stage tumors. the technology relies on analyzing tens of thousands of X-rays and CT scans that have been used to perform a diagnosis and to use that base of knowledge to evaluate future scans.
May 16, 2017
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Injectable plant-based nanoparticles delay tumor progression
New research suggests co-administration with chemotherapy drugs most effective strategy
June 28, 2017
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Injectable plant-based nanoparticles delay tumor progression
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in collaboration with researchers from Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine and RWTH Aachen University (Germany) have adapted virus particles--that normally infect potatoes--to serve as cancer drug delivery devices for mice.
June 28, 2017
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Injectable Plant-Based Nanoparticles Halt Development of Tumor
A team of Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in partnership with Researchers from Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine and RWTH Aachen University (Germany) have adapted virus particles--that typically infect potatoes--to act as cancer drug delivery devices for mice.
June 29, 2017
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Injecting plant-based nanoparticles and chemotherapy drug helps halt tumor progression in mice
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in collaboration with researchers from Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine and RWTH Aachen University (Germany) have adapted virus particles- that normally infect potatoes- to serve as cancer drug delivery devices for mice. But in a recent article published in Nano Letters, the team showed injecting the virus particles alongside chemotherapy drugs, instead of packing the drugs inside, may provide an even more potent benefit.
June 28, 2017
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Innovative Testing Platform for Assessing Nanotherapeutics for Different Cancers
An innovative testing platform for the real-time assessment of effectiveness of nanomaterials in gene expression regulation has been developed by researchers at Northwestern Medicine. the outcomes of the research have been reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and can assist in preclinical investigations and can optimize nanotherapeutics for cancers even before the clinical trial stage.
April 12, 2017
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Insights on Tumor Growth Lead to new Treatments
Recent discoveries that shed light on how tumors grow are giving doctors new tools to fight cancer. it's just the beginning and there's a long way to go, experts say, but they're hopeful about the future of cancer treatment.
February 22, 2017
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Instead of starving a cancer, researchers go after its defenses
Oxygen deprivation can propel tumor growth and spread
February 22, 2017
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Interfacing System can Help Differentiate Single Cancerous Cell from Normal Cell Using Graphene
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have shown that they can distinguish a single hyperactive cancerous cell from a normal cell by interfacing brain cells onto graphene. this could lead to the development of a simple, noninvasive tool for early diagnosis of cancer.
December 20, 2016
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'Intelligent' nanoparticles could help treat cancer patients
Scientists from the University of Surrey have developed 'intelligent' nanoparticles which heat up to a temperature high enough to kill cancerous cells - but which then self-regulate and lose heat before they get hot enough to harm healthy tissue.
October 24, 2017
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Interview with Harshal Shah, Head of Oncology Drug Delivery at Cambridge Consultants
Thanks to the ongoing advancements in standards of care and gradual improvements in more targeted therapeutics, some argue that cancer is slowly turning into a chronic disease, and with it bringing about a host of new challenges for oncology care. These challenges are also opening up a variety of new opportunities for technical innovations that would mediate the load on already heavily burdened healthcare systems.
May 22, 2017
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Investigating new cancer therapy candidates with live-cell imaging
Please give an overview of your research into cancer and the mechanisms that you and your research team are looking to target with novel therapy candidates.
October 16, 2017
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Investigation evaluates new drug in microgravity to activate immune system, help combat cancer
On Earth, research into antibody-drug conjugates to treat cancer has been around a while. The research presents a problem, though, because Earth-based laboratories aren't able to mimic the shape of the cancer cell within the body, which can sometimes produce incorrect findings. The International Space Station's unique microgravity environment allows scientists to approach the research from a new, 3-D angle.
June 15, 2017
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Investigators pinpoint cause, possible treatment for rare form of sarcoma
Researchers have discovered a potential cause and a promising new treatment for inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, a rare soft tissue cancer that does not respond to radiation or chemotherapy.
November 22, 2016
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Is a new Sepsis Treatment on the Horizon?
The possibility of curing sepsis with a common vitamin has put one of history's greatest killers back in the spotlight.
April 4, 2017
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Is anticoagulant warfarin associated with lower risk of cancer incidence?
The use of the blood thinner warfarin was associated with a lower risk of new cancers in people over 50.
November 6, 2017
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ISPOR issue panel focuses on addressing barriers to mHealth in cancer care
ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR), held an issue panel this afternoon that focused on mHealth in cancer care at its 20th Annual European Congress in Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
November 9, 2017
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IU study shows how fruit fly growth shares biochemical similarities with cancer cells
Scientists who study a molecule known to play a role in certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative disorders have a powerful new tool to study this compound due to research conducted at Indiana University.
January 25, 2017
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Misc. - J

Jets of plasma used in arc welding may help kill cancer cells and heal wounds
JETS of plasma traditionally used in arc welding could soon be used to kill cancer cells and heal wounds.
December 9, 2016
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Misc. - K

Kefir may be great way for cancer survivors to enjoy post-exercise dairy drink, researchers say
Regular exercise plays an important role in improving cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, and feelings of fatigue in cancer survivors during and after treatment. However, many people with cancer experience digestive upset due to treatment and may be wary of incorporating dairy products into their diet to help support their recovery.
July 12, 2017
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Key factor identified in gene silencing
A fertilized human egg develops into multiple tissues, organs and about 200 distinct cell types. Each cell type has the same genes, but they are expressed differently during development and in mature cells.
August 31, 2017
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Killing cancer with vitamin C: Hype or hope?
There are few cancer treatments that give patients long-term hope of survival. Could vitamin C be the missing link?
September 6, 2017
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Koch Institute's Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine Brings Together Renowned Faculty to Combat Cancer
The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT will soon be reaching the first anniversary of the launch of the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, founded through a generous gift from Kathy and Curt Marble '63.
July 10, 2017
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KU researcher reveals possible therapeutic intervention for 'chemobrain' in cancer patients
Findings offered by a University of Kansas researcher, identified as one of 20 'Must see Presenters' at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in early April, suggest a possible therapeutic intervention for "chemobrain," the cognitive impairment plaguing up to a third of cancer patients following chemotherapy.
April 12, 2017
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Misc. - L

Lab-on-a-Chip breakthrough aims to help physicians detect cancer and diseases at the nanoscale
IBM scientists have developed a new lab-on-a-chip technology that can, for the first time, separate biological particles at the nanoscale and could help enable physicians to detect diseases such as cancer before symptoms appear.
August 1, 2016
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Laboratory-on-a-chip technique simplifies detection of cancer DNA biomarkers
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S., making early, reliable diagnosis and treatment a priority. Miniaturized lab-on-chip approaches are prime candidates for developing viable diagnostic tests and instruments because they are small, need only limited test volumes, and can be cost-effective. Researchers have developed just such an approach capable of processing biomolecular samples from blood.
December 13, 2016
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Laboratory-on-a-chip technique simplifies detection of cancer DNA biomarkers
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S., making early, reliable diagnosis and treatment a priority for researchers. Genomic biomarkers offer great potential for diagnostics and new forms of treatment, such as immunotherapy. Miniaturized lab-on-chip approaches are prime candidates for developing viable diagnostic tests and instruments because they are small, need only limited test volumes, and can be cost-effective.
December 13, 2016
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Large pre-ACA Medicaid expansion did not level health disparities in cancer surgery
An analysis of the New York State's Medicaid expansion, which predated the 2010 Affordable Care Act, finds substantial decrease in uninsured rate but little change in racial disparities when it comes to access to cancer surgery -- a proxy for complex cancer care.
January 24, 2017
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Ligand-baited nanosprings capture tumor-derived exosomes from a prostate cancer cell line
In a new paper in Springer's Journal of Materials Science ("Silica nanostructured platform for affinity capture of tumor-derived exosomes"), researchers at Washington State University report a new approach for the effective capture of tumor-derived exosomes from a prostate cancer cell line. Exosomes are small secreted vesicles that play a key role in intercellular communication and cancer progression.
February 21, 2017
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Light-Sheet Microscopy Images Tumor Margins Intraoperatively to Guarantee Full Tumor Removal
Surgical tumor removal, particularly within the breasts, suffers from imprecision related to identifying the margins of where the tumor is. That's because tumors are often indistinguishable from healthy tissue until they're visualized and analyzed by pathologists using laboratory microscopes.
June 27, 2017
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Limited evidence that styrene causes cancer
In 2011, the styrene, a high volume plastics chemical and animal carcinogen, was the focal point in a 'poison scandal' in the Danish media. now a registry study of more than 72,000 employees from more than 400 companies that have been exposed to styrene during production of glassfibre reinforced plastics, has not found an increased incidence of a wide range of cancer types.
February 14, 2017
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Liquid biopsies that enable screening, early detection of cancer attract attention of investors
Interest is high in the development of blood-based tests that can be used to screen individuals for cancer. that isn't new, liquid biopsy industry has attracted attention and investment for the past few years. what is changing is that investors are more interested in screening and early detection - not just monitoring. Healthcare research firm Kalorama Information made the finding in a recent report. Kalorama Information's World Market for Molecular Diagnostics report provides markets for CTC (circulating tumor cell) testing, a type of testing related to liquid biopsy. Cell-free DNA is another type of market and Kalorama has also covered that market in detail.
March 28, 2017
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'Liquid biopsy' chip uses carbon nanotubes to detect metastatic cancer cells in a drop of blood
A chip developed by mechanical engineers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) can trap and identify metastatic cancer cells in a small amount of blood drawn from a cancer patient the breakthrough technology uses a simple mechanical method that has been shown to be more effective in trapping cancer cells than the microfluidic approach employed in many existing devices.
December 14, 2016
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Liquid biopsy spots aggressive pediatric brainstem cancer earlier without surgery
Sensitive, specific analysis counts individual tumor DNA molecules left in blood and fluids
November 6, 2017
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Localized chemotherapy may be effective way to keep immune system intact, animal study suggests
In experiments on mice with a form of aggressive brain cancer, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that localized chemotherapy delivered directly to the brain rather than given systemically may be the best way to keep the immune system intact and strong when immunotherapy is also part of the treatment.
December 22, 2016
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Long-term anti-inflammatory drug use may increase cancer-related deaths for certain patients
Other factors remain the top risk-reduction strategies both for developing cancer, premature cancer-related deaths
December 19, 2016
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Low-dose chemotherapy regimens could prevent tumor recurrence in types of breast cancer, pancreatic cancer
Conventional, high-dose chemotherapy treatments can cause the fibroblast cells surrounding tumors to secrete proteins that promote the tumors' recurrence in more aggressive forms, researchers have discovered. Frequent, low-dose chemotherapy regimens avoid this effect and may therefore be more effective at treating certain types of breast and pancreatic cancer, according to a new study.
November 23, 2016
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Luminescence switchable carbon nanodots follow intracellular trafficking and drug delivery
Tiny carbon dots have, for the first time, been applied to intracellular imaging and tracking of drug delivery involving various optical and vibrational spectroscopic-based techniques such as fluorescence, Raman, and hyperspectral imaging. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated, for the first time, that photo luminescent carbon nanoparticles can exhibit reversible switching of their optical properties in cancer cells.
February 13, 2017
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Misc. - M

Machine learning identifies breast lesions likely to become cancer
A machine learning tool can help identify which high-risk breast lesions are likely to become cancerous, according to a new study. Researchers said the technology has the potential to reduce unnecessary surgeries.
October 18, 2017
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Machine learning lets scientists reverse-engineer cellular control networks
Stampede supercomputer helps researchers create tadpoles with pigmentation never before seen in nature
March 22, 2017
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Magic Mushrooms Are Weirdly Effective at Making Cancer Less Miserable
The active ingredient in magic mushrooms, psilocybin, is remarkably effective at reducing feelings of anxiety, depression, and other forms of mental anguish in cancer patients, according to a pair of new studies.
December 1, 2016
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'Magic Mushroom' Chemical Eases Cancer Despair
Hallucinogenic drug psilocybin relieved depression, anxiety quickly and lasted for months, studies found.
December 1, 2016
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Magic Mushrooms Help Cancer Patients Deal with Depression
The Hallucinogen Helped Patients Accept Death and Embrace Life
December 1, 2016
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Making (sound) waves in the fight against cancer
Ultrasound innovation could replace invasive biopsies
December 14, 2016
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Many Cancer Patients Skip Treatments Due to Cost
More than one-quarter make choices that could undermine their health, report says
October 24, 2017
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Many U.S. Women Unaware of Fibroid Treatments
Hysterectomy isn't the only choice, radiology experts say
August 29, 2017
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Many young cancer patients do not receive adequate fertility information and support
All cancer patients of reproductive age should be provided with fertility information and referrals for fertility preservation, researchers urge.
August 21, 2017
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Many young cancer patients do not receive oncofertilty related services, new analysis finds
All cancer patients of reproductive age should be provided with fertility information and referrals for fertility preservation. A new Psycho-Oncology analysis of the published literature indicates that many cancer patients are not receiving such support, however.
August 21, 2017
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Master detox molecule boosts immune defenses
Scientists discover an unknown immune mechanism
April 18, 2017
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Mathematical modeling can identify ways to limit aggressive tumor cell growth
Mathematical models can be used to predict how different tumor cell populations interact with each other and respond to a changing environment, research suggests.
May 24, 2017
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Mayo Clinic creates genetic test to help guide diagnosis, treatment of lymphoma patients
Mayo Clinic has created a genetic test to help guide diagnosis and treatment of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. the Lymph2Cx test helps determine where the lymphoma started, assigning "cell-of-origin" groups using a 20-gene expression-based assay.
December 16, 2016
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Mayo Clinic researchers discover potential cause and new treatment for rare soft tissue cancer
Researchers at Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have discovered a potential cause and a promising new treatment for inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, a rare soft tissue cancer that does not respond to radiation or chemotherapy.
November 22, 2016
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Measuring patients' muscles to predict chemotherapy side effects
Measuring patients' muscle mass and quality could potentially help doctors better identify patients at high risk for toxic side effects that could require hospitalizations, researchers report.
February 22, 2017
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Medical Marijuana's Benefit to Kids Still Limited
Helped with chemo-linked nausea, epilepsy, but no evidence for other conditions
October 23, 2017
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Medication that treats parasite infection also has anti-cancer effect
Scientists report a new gene target, KPNB1, for treatment against epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). EOC is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women and has a particularly grim outlook upon diagnosis. They also find that ivermectin exerts an anti-tumor effect on EOC cells by interacting with the KPNB1 gene.
September 28, 2017
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MEMOIR: a Novel Method for Understanding the Life History of Cells
A recent study in the journal Nature has provided proof of principle for a novel method which enables the encoding of a cell's history in its genome and the subsequent readout of the information. Called MEMOIR (Memory by Engineered Mutagenesis with Optical In situ Readout), the new technique provides insight into cellular patterns of communication, relationships between cells, and various other events of influence, reaching beyond the static view of cells that is typically obtained.
November 22, 2016
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Men with learning difficulties four times more likely to die of testicular cancer
People with learning difficulties are 4 times more likely to die of testicular cancer than the general population. this is the first work relating cancer deaths to learning difficulties, with researchers now testing if this finding applies to all cancers.
March 27, 2017
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Metabolism drives growth, division of cancer cells
The metabolic state of tumor cells contributes to signals that control the proliferation of tumor cells. In the 1920s, scientists observed that tumor cells radically change their metabolism. this process was termed "Warburg Effect", however neglected until recently by cancer research, but the latest results show it is indeed of fundamental importance for the development of aggressive tumors.
February 20, 2017
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Metabolite that promotes cancer cell transformation and colorectal cancer spread identified
The metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial--mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread. this finding highlights the value of targeting D-2HG to establish new therapeutic approaches against colorectal cancer.
December 1, 2016
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Metal-free MRI contrast agent could be safer for some patients
To enhance the visibility of organs as they are scanned with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), patients are usually injected with a compound known as a contrast agent before going into the scanner. The most commonly used MRI contrast agents are based on the metal gadolinium; however, these metal compounds can be harmful for young children or people with kidney problems.
July 12, 2017
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Metal-free nanoparticle could expand MRI use, tumor detection
What might sound like the set-up to a joke actually has a clinical answer: Both groups can face health risks when injected with metal-containing agents sometimes needed to enhance the color contrast ' and diagnostic value ' of MRIs.
August 3, 2017
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Methylation status of ten positions in genome correlates with all-cause mortality
Various chemical modifications in the genome determine whether genes are read or deactivated. Methyl labels in the DNA play a key role in this "epigenetic" regulation of gene activity. Life style and environmental factors influence the methylation in the genome. Scientists have already well documented links between the methylation status of specific positions in the genome and cancer as well as other diseases.
March 19, 2017
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MIA transport protein no longer missing in action
Breakthrough in understanding how plant makes anti-cancer compound
January 13, 2017
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Microchip for Sorting and Identifying Large Numbers of Circulating Tumor Cells
Detection and classification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may soon become a common method for screening for multiple types of cancer. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is popular one technique for spotting CTCs, but it's limited because the number of available dye colors is small and because for CTCs of certain cancers there aren't any markers at all. Since few markers exist, the signal is often vague because multiple cell types end up being collected into the same container.
June 5, 2017
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Microfluidic Device for Onco Chemo Testing
Chemotherapy can be very difficult on patients, but finding out that the cancer didn't respond to the chemo is even more disturbing. Soon there may be a way to try different chemo agents on a patient's own tumor cells taken during a biopsy. Researchers at Purdue University have developed a microfluidic system inside which tumor cells can be exposed to therapeutic agents.
November 6, 2017
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Microscope can scan tumors during surgery and examine cancer biopsies in 3-D
A new microscope could provide accurate real-time results during cancer-removal surgeries, potentially eliminating the 20 to 40 percent of women who have to undergo multiple lumpectomy surgeries because cancerous breast tissue is missed the first time around.
June 26, 2017
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Milking it: A new robot to extract scorpion venom
A new scorpion-milking robot designed to extract venom could replace the traditional manual method. Scorpion venom is used in medical applications such as immunosuppressants, anti-malarial drugs and cancer research, but the extraction process can be potentially life-threatening.
July 3, 2017
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Mini particle accelerators make cancer treatment safer for everyone
The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana--the third largest hospital in Africa--houses two radiation machines for treating cancer patients. Both are relatively new, purchased by Ghana's Ministry of Health in the last few years. Both produce powerful X-rays that can penetrate your skin to kill tumor cells in your body. People from all over Ghana, even outside the country, come to the hospital to use the machines for cancer therapy.
June 12, 2017
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MIPT scientist proposes unique model to predict cancer development
A scientist from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) has proposed a model that can predict the number of key carcinogenic events for each cancer type based on the relationship between morbidity and age.
September 26, 2017
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MIT Tethers Nanoparticles to Make Cancer Cells More Vulnerable to Treatment
Researchers at MIT have developed an approach to make tumor cells more susceptible to particular types of cancer treatment by coating nanoparticles on the cells prior to delivering drugs.
March 21, 2017
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MIT researchers develop new machine to rapidly produce customized peptides
Manufacturing small proteins known as peptides is usually very time-consuming, which has slowed development of new peptide drugs for diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and bacterial infections.
February 27, 2017
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Mitochondria targeting anti-tumor compound
The compound folic acid-conjugated methyl-BETA-cyclodextrin (FA-M-BETA-CyD) has significant antitumor effects on folate receptor-ALPHA-expressing (FR-ALPHA (+)) cancer cells, researchers have found. The compound significantly reduced ATP production while simultaneously increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Side effects in animal models were minimal but further testing is still required to determine its safety.
June 26, 2017
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Molecular biologists discover an active role of membrane lipids in health and disease
Cells produce insulin, for example, or generate antibodies. To perform these functions, cells need to produce large quantities of proteins. For this purpose, these cells activate a program, the unfolded protein response (UPR). Errors in the UPR are thought to play a decisive role in the development of diseases such as diabetes or cancer. A research team has now discovered a previously unknown mechanism that controls activation of the UPR.
August 4, 2017
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More cancers diagnosed at early stage following increase in health insurance coverage
Cancer is most curable when it's detected at its earliest stages. An analysis of nearly 273,000 patients showed that between 2013 and 2014 there was a 1% increase in the percentage of breast, lung, and colorectal cancers diagnosed at the earliest, most treatable stage.
May 18, 2017
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Most cancer mutations are due to random DNA copying 'mistakes'
Scientists report data from a new study providing evidence that random, unpredictable DNA copying 'mistakes' account for nearly two-thirds of the mutations that cause cancer. Their research is grounded on a novel mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world.
March 23, 2017
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Most cancer mutations result from DNA copying errors
Two thirds of the mutations that cause cancer may be due to random, unpredictable DNA copying "mistakes," according to scientists from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, MD. These errors are reported to occur regardless of lifestyle and environmental factors.
March 24, 2017
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Most new, high-priced cancer drugs don't even extend life for 10 weeks
Patient advocates are urging FDA and drug companies to set the bar higher.
February 10, 2017
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Motorized molecules drill through cells
Nanomachines constructed to deliver drugs, destroy diseased cells
August 30, 2017
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Motorized molecules drill through cells
Nanomachines constructed to deliver drugs, destroy diseased cells
August 30, 2017
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Mouth cancer rates soar over 20 years
A new analysis reveals that rates of mouth (oral) cancer have jumped by 68 per cent in the UK over the last 20 years. the figures reveal the cancer is on the rise for men and women, young and old, climbing from eight to 13 cases per 100,000 people over the last two decades.
November 24, 2016
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MR-HIFU and ThermoDox to Treat Recurrent Childhood Tumors: Interview with AeRang Kim, Principal Investigator
Children's National Health System and the Celsion Corporation (Lawrenceville, NJ) have recently announced a Phase I clinical trial in the US to determine a safe and tolerable dose of ThermoDox in conjunction with non-invasive magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound. the trial is aimed on young adults and children with recurring solid tumors.
December 6, 2016
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Muscle growth finding may assist with cancer treatment
Researchers have developed a therapeutic approach that dramatically promotes the growth of muscle mass, which could potentially prevent muscle wasting in diseases including muscular dystrophy and cancer.
June 14, 2017
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Misc. - N

'Nanocarriers' Loaded to Transport Cancer Drugs and Imaging Particles to Tumor Site
A conundrum of cancer is the ability of a tumor to use the human body as a human shield to deflect treatment. Tumors develop around normal organs and tissues, which gives doctors few options, but to damage, remove, or poison healthy parts of the body trying to fight back the cancer with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy.
November 30, 2016
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Nanodiscs deliver personalized cancer therapy to immune system
Researchers at the University of Michigan have had initial success in mice using nanodiscs to deliver a customized therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of colon and melanoma cancer tumors (Nature Materials, "Designer vaccine nanodiscs for personalized cancer immunotherapy").
December 27, 2016
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Nanodiscs Train Immune System to Attack and Kill Tumors
Immunotherapy has great great potential for fighting cancer, but controlling it is difficult. at University of Michigan investigators have developed an approach that uses specially designed nanodiscs to train the immune system to attack tumors. the nanodiscs, made of synthetic high density lipoproteins, contain neoantigens, particles which trigger an immune response, of a specific tumor. These are delivered into the body to train immune system T-cells to attack that type of cancer and prevent its recurrence.
January 11, 2017
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Nanohyperthermia softens tumors to improve treatment
The mechanical resistance of tumors and collateral damage of standard treatments often hinder efforts to defeat cancers. However, a team of researchers has successfully softened malignant tumors by heating them. this method, called nanohyperthermia, makes the tumors more vulnerable to therapeutic agents. First, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are directly injected into the tumors. Then, laser irradiation activates the nanotubes, while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact.
January 1, 2017
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Nanohyperthermia softens tumors to improve treatment
The mechanical resistance of tumors and collateral damage of standard treatments often hinder efforts to defeat cancers. However, a team of researchers from the CNRS, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Paris Descartes University, and Paris Diderot University has successfully softened malignant tumors by heating them.
January 1, 2017
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Nanohyperthermia may prove effective as adjuvant cancer treatment with chemotherapy
The mechanical resistance of tumors and collateral damage of standard treatments often hinder efforts to defeat cancers. However, a team of researchers from the CNRS, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Paris Descartes University, and Paris Diderot University has successfully softened malignant tumors by heating them. this method, called nanohyperthermia, makes the tumors more vulnerable to therapeutic agents. First, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are directly injected into the tumors.
January 1, 2017
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Nanolaser can detect, kill circulating tumor cells to prevent cancer metastases
A nanolaser known as the spaser can serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of finding metastasized cancer cells in the blood stream and then killing these cells, according to a new research study.
August 22, 2017
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Nanolaser can detect, kill circulating tumor cells to prevent cancer metastases, study finds
A nanolaser known as the spaser can serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of finding metastasized cancer cells in the blood stream and then killing these cells, according to a new research study.
August 21, 2017
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Nanolaser can Identify, Kill Metastasized Cancer Cells in Blood Stream
According to a new research work, a nanolaser called the spaser is capable of acting as a water-soluble, super-bright, biocompatible probe that has the potential to find metastasized cancer cells in the blood stream and then kills these cells.
August 22, 2017
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Nanolock Could Help Physicians Diagnose Cancers Earlier and Provide Individualized Therapies
The moment when healthy cells transform into cancer cells is a significant point. Several cancers can be stopped in their tracks if they are identified quite early. In ACS Sensors, one group has reported that they have developed a sensitive and accurate method capable of recognizing a specific mutation in the genetic code that has been involved in the disease.
July 6, 2017
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'Nanolock' detects cancer mutation; could lead to early diagnoses, personalized therapies
The moment when healthy cells turn into cancer cells is a critical point. And if caught early enough, many cancers can be stopped in their tracks.
July 4, 2017
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Nanomachines to Drill Through Cell Membranes
An international team of scientists has developed tiny motorized molecules that can drill holes in cells membranes when stimulated by light. The nanomachines could be useful for drug delivery or directly killing cancer cells.
August 31, 2017
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Nanomedical anti-tumor strategy
Biocompatible nanocapsules, loaded with an amino acid and equipped with an enzyme now combine two anti-tumor strategies into a synergistic treatment concept. Researchers hope this increases effectiveness and decreases side effects. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the scientists explain the concept: tumor cells are deprived of their nutrient glucose as this is converted to toxic nitrogen monoxide and hydrogen peroxide.
December 12, 2016
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Nanoparcel to Destroy Hypoxic Cancer Cells
A majority of cancer tumors contain regions of low oxygen concentration where cancer treatments based on the action of reactive oxygen species are unproductive. Recently, American researchers have created a hybrid nanomaterial that discharges a free-radical-generating prodrug within tumor cells upon thermal activation.
May 5, 2017
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Nanoparticle aggregates for destruction of cancer cells
An international team has shown that it is possible to mechanically destroy cancer cells by rotating magnetic nanoparticles attached to them in elongated aggregates.
June 13, 2017
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Nanoparticle based contrast agent developed for dual modal imaging of cancer
Dual modal imaging which shares the advantages of two imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging, has the ability to produce images with higher spatial resolution and higher sensitivity. Contrast agents having both magnetic and optical properties identifies the cancer cells efficiently. Europium doped gadolinium oxide nanorods were synthesized and subsequently coated with silica to improve the biocompatibility.
June 19, 2017
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Nanoparticle imaging agents developed to better monitor growth of tumours
UAlberta researchers have created two new imaging agents that could help physicians visualize the formation of tumour-associated blood vessels, keep track of tumour growth and possibly generate new therapies (Nanoscale, "Viral nanoparticles decorated with novel EGFL7 ligands enable intravital imaging of tumor neovasculature").
October 4, 2017
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Nanoparticle vaccine shows potential as immunotherapy to fight multiple cancer types
Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine immunotherapy that targets several different cancer types.
April 24, 2017
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Nanoparticle vaccine shows potential as immunotherapy to fight multiple cancer types
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine immunotherapy has been developed that targets several different cancer types, outlines a new report.
April 24, 2017
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Nanoparticles Feature Two Mechanisms to Boost Effectiveness of Immunotherapy to Fight Cancer
Immunotherapy techniques for fighting cancer generally fall into two categories: preventing tumor cells from evading the immune system's T cells and summoning T cells to attack the tumors. Now scientists at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed nanoparticles that perform both tasks at the same time, significantly improving the effectiveness of immunotherapy in a study on laboratory mice.
June 12, 2017
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Nanoparticles loaded with curcumin kill cancer cells
Attaching curcumin, a component of the common spice turmeric, to nanoparticles can be used to target and destroy treatment-resistant neuroblastoma tumor cells, according to a new study published in Nanoscale.
July 25, 2017
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Nanoparticles reprogram immune cells to fight cancer
Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed biodegradable nanoparticles that can be used to genetically program immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells -- while the immune cells are still inside the body.
April 17, 2017
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Nanoparticles Reprogram Immune Cells to Fight Cancer
Dr. Matthias Stephan visualizes a future where patients with leukemia could be treated as early as the day they are diagnosed with cellular immunotherapy that is accessible even at their neighborhood clinic and is as simple to administer as present day chemotherapy, but without the severe side effects.
April 18, 2017
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Nanoparticulate Delivery Systems Allow Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells
Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. It is a leading cause of death and the burden is expected to grow worldwide due to the growth and aging of the population, mainly in less developed countries, in which about 82% of the world's population resides.
March 8, 2016
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Nanopores could map small changes in DNA that signal big shifts in cancer
Detecting cancer early, just as changes are beginning in DNA, could enhance diagnosis and treatment as well as further our understanding of the disease. a new study by University of Illinois researchers describes a method to detect, count and map tiny additions to DNA called methylations, which can be a warning sign of cancer, with unprecedented resolution.
April 13, 2017
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Nanoscale ultrasound technique is first to image inside live cells
Researchers at the University of Nottingham have developed a break-through technique that uses sound rather than light to see inside live cells, with potential application in stem-cell transplants and cancer diagnosis.
December 21, 2016
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Nanoshells could deliver more chemo with fewer side effects
Researchers investigating ways to deliver high doses of cancer-killing drugs inside tumors have shown they can use a laser and light-activated gold nanoparticles to remotely trigger the release of approved cancer drugs inside cancer cells in laboratory cultures.
November 8, 2017
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Nanoshells could deliver more chemo with fewer side effects
In vitro study verifies method for remotely triggering release of cancer drugs
November 8, 2017
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Nanosubmarine with self-destroying activity
Self-destroyed redox-sensitive stomatocyte nanomotor delivers and releases drugs for cells
May 30, 2017
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Nanotechnology Combined with Ultrasound Advances Chemotherapy Treatment in Recent Lab Experiments
Many people diagnosed with cancer have been treated with chemotherapy, have gone on to live healthy lives. However, chemotherapy does impact the body, the treatment attacks all the cells in the body, not just cancer cells.
August 28, 2017
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Nanotechnology delivers medicine to cancer cells while protecting healthy cells
Cancer treatments, including chemotherapy, have helped many of those who have been diagnosed with the disease to go on to live healthy lives.
August 25, 2017
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Nanotechnology Expert Sadik Esener Roped in to Direct OHSU's Center for Early Detection Research
A scientific innovator, whose achievements range from developing diagnostic biochips to creating nanoscale cancer-fighting "smart bullets" that deliver treatments to tumor cells, has been recruited to the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute to lead the first large-scale early cancer detection program of its kind.
March 8, 2016
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Nanovaccine shows potential as immunotherapy for cancer
For the first time, researchers have shown that using a nanovaccine to deliver cancer immunotherapy can slow tumor growth and prolong survival in mouse models of several types of cancer.
April 25, 2017
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Natural kill cell technology to stop cancer gets licensed
Our bodies contain Natural Killer (NK) cells - an army that stops cancers and viruses before they can make us sick. a researcher from the University of Central Florida's College of Medicine has created a nanoparticle that increases the number of these killers 10,000-fold in the lab and her new technology has generated a licensing agreement that is expected to accelerate the therapy's path to clinical trials.
December 14, 2016
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Naturally occurring symptoms may be mistaken for tamoxifen side-effects
Women taking tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer were less likely to continue taking the drug if they suffered nausea and vomiting, according to new data.
December 9, 2016
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NCI launches study of African-American cancer survivors
The largest study to date of African-American cancer survivors in the United States is underway. the Detroit Research on Cancer Survivors (ROCS) study, which will include 5,560 cancer survivors, will support a broad research agenda looking at the major factors affecting cancer progression, recurrence, mortality, and quality of life among African-American cancer survivors. the effort is funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.
February 27, 2017
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NCI study identifies essential genes for cancer immunotherapy
A new study identifies genes that are necessary in cancer cells for immunotherapy to work, addressing the problem of why some tumors don't respond to immunotherapy or respond initially but then stop as tumor cells develop resistance to immunotherapy.
August 7, 2017
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NCI study shows feasibility of cancer screening protocol for patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome
In a new study from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, researchers found a higher than expected prevalence of cancer at baseline screening in individuals with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), a rare inherited disorder that leads to a higher risk of developing certain cancers. The research demonstrates the feasibility of a new, comprehensive cancer screening protocol for this high-risk population.
August 3, 2017
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Neurofeedback shows promise in reducing symptoms of CIPN in cancer survivors
A type of functional brain training known as neurofeedback shows promise in reducing symptoms of chemotherapy-induced nerve damage, or neuropathy, in cancer survivors, according to a study by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. the pilot study, published in the journal Cancer, is the largest, to date, to determine the benefits of neurofeedback in cancer survivors.
March 3, 2017
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Neurons support cancer growth throughout the body
Cancer cells rely on the healthy cells that surround them for sustenance. Tumors reroute blood vessels to nourish themselves, secrete chemicals that scramble immune responses, and, according to recent studies, even recruit and manipulate neurons for their own gain. this pattern holds true not just for brain cancers, but also for prostate cancer, skin cancer, pancreatic cancer, and stomach cancer.
February 13, 2017
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New algorithms may revolutionize drug discoveries, and our understanding of life
A new set of machine learning algorithms that can generate 3-D structures of tiny protein molecules may revolutionize the development of drug therapies for a range of diseases, from Alzheimer's to cancer.
February 7, 2017
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New approach could potentially prevent muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy and cancer
Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) researchers have collaboratively developed a therapeutic approach that dramatically promotes the growth of muscle mass, which could potentially prevent muscle wasting in diseases including muscular dystrophy and cancer.
June 14, 2017
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New approach in T-cell therapy to treat cancer
Scientists have armed immune cells with a new surface molecule. This causes the cells to respond particularly aggressively when they encounter a protein that tumors actually use to camouflage themselves from the immune system.
June 8, 2017
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New approaches to treat aggressive NUT midline carcinoma
Precision medicine, which custom-tailors therapies to the needs of individual patients, is becoming more and more important in cancer therapy. Today, molecular-biological diagnostics can precisely identify alterations in tumor cells. A major aim of modern cancer therapy is to develop drugs that individually target these altered tumor cells, but do not impact the surrounding healthy cells.
September 26, 2017
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New article explores cost-effectiveness of initial diagnostic protocols for microscopic hematuria
Detecting red blood cells in the urine of asymptomatic patients who don't see blood when they urinate (asymptomatic microscopic hematuria) is common but it can signal cancer in the genitourinary system.
April 17, 2017
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New autoimmune disease triggered by thymomas
A newly-identified autoimmune endocrine disease that leads to hypopituitarism is caused by thymomas (a type of tumor originating from the thymic gland), a research group has discovered. These underlying mechanisms could help to understand and develop a treatment for similar autoimmune diseases.
March 2, 2017
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New cancer-causing syndrome uncovered
Certain genetic mutations thought to be associated with a rare bone marrow disease may instead predispose individuals to early-onset cancer, two new studies suggest.
September 25, 2017
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New category of immunotherapy appears safe to use in patients with both cancer and HIV
A new category of immunotherapies called checkpoint inhibitors that has been highly effective against many different cancers appears safe to use in patients with both advanced malignancies and HIV, a population excluded from earlier trials of such therapies, according to an early-phase trial.
November 7, 2017
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New cellular imaging paves way for cancer treatment
Researchers have pioneered a technique which uses florescent imaging to track the actions of key enzymes in cancer, genetic disorders and kidney disease.
June 8, 2017
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New cellular target may put the brakes on cancer's ability to spread
Promising way to curb signals that trigger metastasis
May 26, 2017
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New class of materials could revolutionize biomedical, alternative energy industries
Polyhedral boranes, or clusters of boron atoms bound to hydrogen atoms, are transforming the biomedical industry. These humanmade materials have become the basis for the creation of cancer therapies, enhanced drug delivery and new contrast agents needed for radioimaging and diagnosis. Now, a researcher has discovered an entirely new class of materials based on boranes that might have widespread potential applications, including improved diagnostic tools for cancer and other diseases as well as low-cost solar energy cells.
January 25, 2017
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New color-coding tool sheds light on blood disorders, cancers by tracking clonal stem cells
A new color-coding tool is enabling scientists to better track live blood stem cells over time, a key part of understanding how blood disorders and cancers like leukemia arise, report researchers in Boston Children's Hospital's Stem Cell Research Program.
November 22, 2016
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New compound kills cancer without harming healthy cells
Scientists have developed a small molecule that directly triggers suicide in cancer cells without harming healthy cells.
October 9, 2017
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New Contrast Agent Points to Tumors, Helps Identify How Aggressive They Are
Differentiating between tumor types can be very important when choosing the right tools to fight a given cancer, but contrast agents that make tumors pop on MRI scans don't provide much info other than where the target is. That may soon be changing, as researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed a new MRI contrast agent that spots breast cancer tumors and also points to whether they are timid or more aggressive.
September 26, 2017
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New device could revolutionize drug delivery to treat cancer and other diseases, study shows
A new study by Lyle Hood, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes a new device that could revolutionize the delivery of medicine to treat cancer as well as a host of other diseases and ailments. Hood developed the device in partnership with Alessandro Grattoni, chair of the Department of Nanomedicine at Houston Methodist Research Institute.
December 1, 2016
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New discovery could have major impact on therapies to prevent spread of cancer
A research study led by University of Minnesota engineers gives new insight into how cancer cells move based on their ability to sense their environment. The discovery could have a major impact on therapies to prevent the spread of cancer.
June 6, 2017
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New discovery opens new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of cancer and tissue fibrosis
Researchers from the Turku Centre for Biotechnology (BTK) in Finland have discovered that a cellular fuel sensor, known to control energy processes in the cells, is involved in the regulation of the contact of cells with their surrounding environment. this unexpected link could help scientists better understand life-threatening diseases, such as cancer and tissue fibrosis.
March 29, 2017
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New Drug Formulary will Help Expedite Use of Agents in Clinical Trials
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) today launched a new drug formulary (the "NCI Formulary") that will enable investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers to have quicker access to approved and investigational agents for use in preclinical studies and cancer clinical trials. the NCI Formulary could ultimately translate into speeding the availability of more-effective treatment options to patients with cancer.
January 11, 2017
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New drugs that target neighbour proteins may help halt cancer progression
Cancer is caused by an accumulation of genetic changes in a cell, that overcome the normal checks and balances leading to uncontrolled growth. a complex, interacting network of proteins controls all of a cell's processes, from metabolism to growth and division.
January 24, 2017
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New Eczema Drug Promising in Early Trial
Nemolizumab significantly reduced the itch and improved appearance of skin
March 2, 2017
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New Environmentally Friendly Method to Make Nanoclusters of Zinc Peroxide
Anticancer nanomaterials have been created by a team of researchers at Aalto University, Finland by simulating the volcano-induced dynamic chemistry of the deep ocean.
May 15, 2017
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New experimental and theoretical approaches 'dive into the pool' of membranes organelles
Engineers have developed a new way to dive into the cell's tiniest and most important components. What they found inside membraneless organelles surprised them, and could lead to better understanding of fatal diseases including cancer, Huntington's and ALS.
June 26, 2017
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New fiber optic probe brings endoscopic diagnosis of cancer closer to the clinic
Compact handheld probe can be used for microscopic analysis of tissue without any special stains or preparation
April 27, 2017
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New florescent imaging technique tracks actions of key enzymes in cancer, kidney disease
Researchers at the Universities of York and Leiden have pioneered a technique which uses florescent imaging to track the actions of key enzymes in cancer, genetic disorders and kidney disease.
June 8, 2017
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New gene fusions, mutations linked to gastrointestinal stromal tumors
In recent years, researchers have identified specific gene mutations linked to gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which primarily occur in the stomach or small intestine, but 10 to 15 percent of adult GIST cases and most pediatric cases lack the tell-tale mutations, making identification and treatment difficult. Researchers have identified new gene fusions and mutations associated with this subset of GIST patients.
December 14, 2016
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New genes identified that regulate the spread of cancers
Study reveals Spns2 gene as a new drug target
January 11, 2017
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New genomic sequencing approach could be first step toward blood tests for early cancer detection
"We continue to see promising reports about possible uses of circulating tumor DNA analysis. While this approach has a ways to go before it becomes a proven technology for early cancer detection, this research is an important step in that direction," said ASCO Expert John Heymach, MD, PhD.
June 5, 2017
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New Guidelines on Post-Treatment Cancer Pain
Specialists urge doctors to offer alternative therapies for this widespread problem
July 29, 2016
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New hope for multiple cancers with pembrolizumab combination therapies
The combination of pembrolizumab and the checkpoint inhibitor known as epacadostat is leading to promising responses and is generally well tolerated in patients with triple-negative breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, and several other cancers, according to researchers.
May 30, 2017
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New HPV vaccine could prevent most infections and millions of cancers
Cervical cancer affects more than half a million women and causes more than a quarter of a million deaths each year globally. Almost all cervical cancers result from a human papillomavirus, or HPV, infection. HPV infections cause cancers in other parts of the body, too. But the latest HPV vaccine could prevent most infections -; and millions of cancers -; worldwide, according to an article by Cosette Wheeler, PhD, and her collaborators.
June 13, 2017
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New imaging project for new applications in cancer diagnostics
The project, funded by the EU Horizon 2020 scheme, brings a consortium of 20 companies, including technology giants Phillips and Siemens to take developments in engineering and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)and develop Magnetic Resonance Force (MRF) Imaging for new applications in cancer diagnostics.
March 27, 2017
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New Implantable Capsule for Killing Tumors, Managing Chronic Diseases
Researchers from University of Texas at San Antonio and Houston Methodist Research Institute have developed a new injectable drug delivery capsule that can administer medication locally for extended periods of time. the device, reported on in Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, has approximately 5,000 microscopic channels through which a drug is pumped and a special membrane that regulates how fast the medication is delivered.
December 9, 2016
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New insight into how cancer spreads
Discovery could also benefit regenerative medicine therapies
June 6, 2017
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New Intelligent Nanoparticles Capable of Killing Cancerous Cells
University of Surrey scientists have developed 'intelligent' nanoparticles capable of heating up to a temperature that is high enough to kill cancerous cells -- but which can self-regulate and lose heat before they get hot enough to harm healthy tissue.
October 24, 2017
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New key regulator of acquisition of immune tolerance to tumor cells in cancer patients
Researchers have identified a distinctive epigenetic event in immune cells that differentiate in the tumoral microenvironment and make them tolerant to cancer cells.
October 3, 2017
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New mechanism for genome regulation discovered
Implications for improving gene therapy
June 21, 2017
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New mechanobiology technique to stop cancer cell migration
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University have developed a novel technique that stops cervical cancer cell migration. the research, published in Chem could open up new avenues in cancer treatment.
February 10, 2017
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New method heats up ultrasonic approach to treating tumors
Researchers apply new modeling tools to improve acoustic simulations and design a new focusing method for potential clinical treatments
March 28, 2017
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New method reduces adverse effects of rectal cancer treatment
Short-course preoperative radiotherapy combined with delayed surgery reduces the adverse side-effects of rectal cancer surgery without compromising its efficacy, report scientists.
February 10, 2017
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New methodology enables real-time tracking of proton induced radiation chemistry in water
Proton therapy is a promising form of radiation treatment used to kill cancerous cells and effectively halt their rapid reproduction. While this treatment can also be delivered in different modalities (i.e. electrons and X-rays), proton therapy limits damage to healthy tissue by depositing energy in a highly localized dose volume.
March 28, 2017
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New Microfluidic Chip Detects Circulating Tumor Cells in Real Time
At the Rovira i Virgili University in Catalan, Spain, researchers have developed and patented a microfluidic device for detecting circulating tumor cells within whole blood that originate from breast cancer tumors and which are responsible for metastasis.
July 17, 2017
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New milestone in development of Kinase Chemogenomic Set
Potent group of inhibitors critical to understanding human disease and new therapy development
August 25, 2017
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New minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses
Medicine diffusion capsule could locally treat multiple ailments and diseases over several weeks
December 2, 2016
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New molecule could become first treatment against chemotherapy-induced neuropathy
IDIBELL Researchers of the Neuro-Oncology Unit of Bellvitge University Hospital - Catalan Institute of Oncology, led by Dr. Jordi Bruna, have successfully tested a new molecule capable of preventing the development of peripheral neuropathy induced by chemotherapy in cancer patients, especially in colon cancer cases, the third most common neoplasm in the world. The molecule, which has a completely novel mechanism of action, would be the first treatment against this neurological complication, for which no effective treatment has yet been approved.
October 24, 2017
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New MRI Technique Images Glucose in Body to Spot Tumors
Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center have developed a highly sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that can image tumors in the body, without the need for conventional contrast agents or radioactivity.
June 28, 2017
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New nanostructured drug delivery system shows promise for fighting solid tumors
A new cancer-drug delivery system shows the ability to exploit the oxygen-poor areas of solid tumors that make the growths resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation treatment.
April 4, 2017
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New Pathology Atlas maps genes in cancer to accelerate progress in personalized medicine
A new Pathology Atlas is launched today with an analysis of all human genes in all major cancers showing the consequence of their corresponding protein levels for overall patient survival. The difference in expression patterns of individual cancers observed in the study strongly reinforces the need for personalized cancer treatment based on precision medicine.
August 17, 2017
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New pharmacon allows testicular tumors to shrink
Positive effects in mice
December 28, 2016
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New plasmonic sensor improves early cancer detection
A new plasmonic sensor will serve as a reliable early detection of biomarkers for many forms of cancer and eventually other diseases.
May 30, 2017
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New plasmonic sensor improves early cancer detection
A new plasmonic sensor developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will serve as a reliable early detection of biomarkers for many forms of cancer and eventually other diseases.
May 30, 2017
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New possible target for cancer treatment
Scientists report that cancer cells and normal cells use different 'gene switches' in order to regulate the expression of genes that control growth. In mice, the removal of a large regulatory region linked to different types of cancer caused a dramatic resistance to tumor formation, but did not affect normal cell growth. The findings highlight the possibility of developing highly specific cancer drugs with fewer side effects.
June 6, 2017
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New potential treatment for cancer metastasis identified
Breast cancer metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads, may be prevented through the new use of a class of drugs already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, say investigators.
January 9, 2017
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New prognostic tool accurately predicts recurrence of parathyroid cancer
A newly-created prognostic tool reliably predicts the recurrence of parathyroid cancer, enabling physicians to identify patients at the highest risk. Consequently, the tool also helps to determine the optimum postoperative strategy, including aggressive surveillance and additional treatments, according to study results published online as an "article in press" on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website ahead of print publication.
April 28, 2017
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New protein discovered in aging, cancer
A protein has been found to have a previously unknown role in the ageing of cells, according to an early study. the researchers hope that the findings could one day lead to new treatments for aging and early cancer.
March 7, 2017
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New report reveals 25% drop in overall cancer death rate in the U.S.
A steady decline over more than two decades has resulted in a 25% drop in the overall cancer death rate in the United States. the drop equates to 2.1 million fewer cancer deaths between 1991 and 2014.
January 5, 2017
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New research provides insights into role of key cancer gene
New research represents a promising step towards better understanding of a key cancer gene. A long-running collaboration between researchers at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, and the AstraZeneca IMED Biotech Unit reveals new insights into how the PTEN gene may control cell growth and behavior and how its loss contributes to the development and advancement of certain cancers.
October 19, 2017
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New research shows that nuts can inhibit growth of cancer cells
Roasted and salted, ground as a baking ingredient or fresh from the shell - for all those who enjoy eating nuts, there is good news from nutritionists at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). Their latest research shows that nuts can inhibit the growth of cancer cells.
February 6, 2017
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New research uncovers how blood cancer 'steals' parts of bone marrow cells to thrive
New research published today uncovers how the blood cancer 'steals' parts of surrounding healthy bone marrow cells to thrive, in work that could help form new approaches to cancer treatment in the future.
October 5, 2017
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New self-regulating nanoparticles could treat cancer
Scientists have developed 'intelligent' nanoparticles which heat up to a temperature high enough to kill cancerous cells -- but which then self-regulate and lose heat before they get hot enough to harm healthy tissue.
October 24, 2017
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New sensors could enable more affordable detection of pollution, diseases
When it comes to testing for cancer, environmental pollution and food contaminants, traditional sensors can help. The challenges are that they often are bulky, expensive, non-intuitive and complicated. Now, one team reports that portable pressure-based detectors coupled with smartphone software could provide a simpler, more affordable alternative while still maintaining sensitivity.
June 21, 2017
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New study aims to better understand major factors affecting African American cancer survivors
The Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University School of Medicine will launch the nation's largest study of African American cancer survivors to better understand disproportionately high incidence and mortality from cancer and its impact on this specific patient population.
February 27, 2017
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New study discloses role of specific proteins in killing fast-duplicating cancer cells
Many cancer patients struggle with the adverse effects of chemotherapy, still the most prescribed cancer treatment. for patients with pancreatic cancer and other aggressive cancers, the forecast is more grim: there is no known effective therapy.
March 27, 2017
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New study illuminates dark side of p53 gene in cancer
The gene p53 is the most commonly mutated gene in cancer - it is p53's job to monitor cells for DNA damage and to mark damaged cells for destruction and so cancer cells with mutated DNA must disable p53 before it disables them. However, there is a second, darker side to p53. While intact or "wild type" p53 is a tumor suppressor, mutated p53 can itself become an oncogene, driving the progression of the disease.
April 3, 2017
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New study links 'mastermind' gene to rare cancer-causing tumor
Scientists have discovered a new "mastermind fusion gene" may be associated with a rare cancer-causing tumor -- pheochromocytomas ("pheo") and paragangliomas -- according to a study. this breakthrough discovery could lead to more precise treatment as well as a better understanding of cancer itself.
February 13, 2017
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New study shows how cells can be led down non-cancer path
As cells with a propensity for cancer break down food for energy, they reach a fork in the road: they can either continue energy production as healthy cells, or shift to the energy production profile of cancer cells. In a new study, researchers map out the molecular events that direct cells' energy metabolism down the cancerous path. Their findings could lead to ways to interrupt the process.
October 23, 2017
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New study shows how social interaction impacts treatment response in cancer patients
How well cancer patients fared after chemotherapy was affected by their social interaction with other patients during treatment, according to a new study by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Cancer patients were a little more likely to survive for five years or more after chemotherapy if they interacted during chemotherapy with other patients who also survived for five years or more.
July 19, 2017
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New Sugar Molecule Sticks to Tumors, Delivers Drugs
At the University of Würzburg in Germany scientists have developed a new sugar molecule that sticks to tumors and that may end up being used for early cancer detection and for killing of tumors. The molecule was created to target and bind with galectin-1, a protein that exists on all our healthy cells, but that is overproduced by tumor cells. Galectin-1 is important not only because its high concentration can be a marker for a tumor, but also because it helps tumors disguise themselves from the immune system.
August 22, 2017
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New technique can effectively identify cancer-causing substances in urine or blood
A team of researchers, led by Professor Yoon-Kyoung Cho of Life Science at UNIST has recently developed a new technique that effectively identifies cancer-causing substances in the urine or blood.
March 7, 2017
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New technique efficiently separates circulating tumor cells in bloodstream
A new research, affiliated with UNIST has been highlighted on the front cover of the January 2017 issue of the prestigious journal Analytical Chemistry. the key finding of this study is the development of a new technique that seperates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood at a liquid-liquid interface.
February 7, 2017
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New technique for imaging cells, tissues under the skin
A team of scientists has developed the first technique for viewing cells and tissues in three dimensions under the skin. the work could improve diagnosis and treatment for some forms of cancer and blindness.
March 18, 2016
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New technique to study genetic changes could enhance cancer diagnosis
Large-scale changes to the structure of the genome are often seen in cancer cells. Scientists at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, UK, have found a way to detect these changes, which could enhance cancer diagnosis and aid the use of targeted treatments.
July 4, 2017
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New technique uses nanoparticle-carrying immune cells to deliver anti-cancer drugs
Some researchers are working to discover new, safer ways to deliver cancer-fighting drugs to tumors without damaging healthy cells. Others are finding ways to boost the body's own immune system to attack cancer cells. Researchers at Penn State have combined the two approaches by taking biodegradable polymer nanoparticles encapsulated with cancer-fighting drugs and incorporating them into immune cells to create a smart, targeted system to attack cancers of specific types.
January 4, 2017
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New techniques give blood biopsies greater promise
Improved methods validate the use of blood samples for studying patients' cancer genomes
November 6, 2017
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New technologies show brain tumor firmness, adhesion before surgery
It's not often that a fall saves someone's life. Helen Powell, 74, says that was the case for her. a computerized tomography scan that followed her fall revealed a cancerous brain tumor that led her to surgery using first-in-the-world technology.
May 3, 2017
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New Tests and Treatments for Childhood Cancer
When doctors found a mass on the kidney of Heather Garnett's son, they wasted no time starting his care. "His tumor had ruptured, so they wanted to get it out quickly. they found it on a Tuesday and had the surgery right away on Thursday," says Garnett, an account manager and 39-year-old mother of three in Minneapolis.
February 2, 2017
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New therapeutic antibody for dog cancers
Scientists have developed a new chimeric antibody that suppresses malignant cancers in dogs, showing promise for safe and effective treatment of intractable cancers.
August 25, 2017
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New toolkit reveals novel cancer genes
A new statistical model has enabled researchers to pinpoint 27 novel genes thought to prevent cancer from forming, in an analysis of over 2,000 tumors across 12 human cancer types. The findings could help create new cancer treatments that target these genes, and open up other avenues of cancer research.
October 31, 2017
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New tumor target strategy halts human cancer in up to 90% of mice
Using a similar treatment in humans may be effective at fighting cancer.
December 14, 2016
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New tumor-shrinking nanoparticle to fight cancer, prevent recurrence
A new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle has been created by researchers, aimed at shrinking breast cancer tumors, while also preventing recurrence of the disease.
May 1, 2017
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New type of immunological treatment of cancer?
Researchers have found an important piece of the puzzle leading towards an understanding of how our innate immune system reacts against viral infections and recognises foreign DNA, for example from dying cancer cells. the discovery may prove to be of great importance for immunological treatment of cancer as well as autoimmune diseases in the future.
February 21, 2017
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New ultrasound technique is first to image inside live cells
Researchers have developed a breakthrough technique that uses sound rather than light to see inside live cells, with potential application in stem-cell transplants and cancer diagnosis.
December 21, 2016
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New way to predict tumor growth described by research study
Researcher's algorithm can aid doctors in judging the best treatment options
April 18, 2017
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New way to produce protein antigen may lead to preventative vaccine for schistosomiasis
Cornell and Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research scientists have developed a way to produce a protein antigen that may be useful as vaccine for schistosomiasis -- a parasitic disease that infects millions of people, mostly in tropical and subtropical climates -- according to new research in the journal Protein Expression and Purification, June 2017.
June 12, 2017
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New way to shut down cancer cells' ability to consume glucose
Many cancers depend on glucose consumption for energy, but good pharmacological targets to stop cancers' ability to uptake and metabolize glucose are missing. A new study finally identifies a way to restrict the ability of cancer to use glucose for energy.
November 7, 2017
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New way to speed search for cancer cures dramatically
New technique will help doctors customize treatments to benefit patients
April 25, 2017
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New way to tackle cancer cells
Scientists have introduced, for the first time, the organelle-localized self-assembly of a peptide amphiphile as a powerful strategy for controlling cellular fate.
July 3, 2017
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Newfound effect of cancer drug may expand its use
A drug first designed to prevent cancer cells from multiplying has a second effect: it switches immune cells that turn down the body's attack on tumors back into the kind that amplify it.
February 10, 2017
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Newly developed nomograms provide accurate predictions for patients with oropharyngeal cancer
Nomograms provide accurate prediction of overall survival and progression-free survival for patients with oropharyngeal cancer
August 21, 2017
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Newly Developed Nanoparticle Vaccine Immunotherapy Targets Multiple Cancer Types
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine immunotherapy targeting several cancer varieties has been developed by researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center.
April 25, 2017
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Newly identified pathway in mitochondria fuels tumor progression across cancer types
Scientists have identified a novel protein pathway across several types of cancer that controls how tumor cells acquire the energy necessary for movement, invasion and metastasis. this protein pathway was previously only observed in neurons and represents a potential therapeutic target for several types of cancer.
December 19, 2016
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Newly revealed autism-related genes include genes involved in cancer
Using a computational technique that accounts for how genes interact, scientists revealed genes that may be related to autism spectrum disorder
September 25, 2017
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NIH awards to test ways to store, access, share, and compute on biomedical data in the cloud
NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase to seek best practices for developing and managing a data commons.
November 6, 2017
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NIH partners with 11 leading biopharmaceutical companies to accelerate the development of new cancer immunotherapy strategies for more patients
Supports Cancer Moonshot goal to bring immunotherapy success to more patients in half the time.
October 12, 2017
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No magic wand required: Scientists propose way to turn any cell into any other cell type
By harnessing massive amounts of data on activity within and between snippets of DNA, researchers say it could be possible to reprogram both healthy and diseased cells
October 24, 2017
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Non-Destructive Mass Spectrometry Helps Identify Tumor Margins Inside OR
Determining where a tumor margins are is one of the greatest challenges for surgeons treating cancer. Tumors have nearly all the same characteristics as healthy tissue, and so it's standard practice to send biopsy samples of tissue to the pathology lab for margin inspection. This takes time, and often too long for the patient under anesthesia and surgical team to wait for the results to come in, which means there are revision surgeries.
July 27, 2017
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Non-labeling multiphoton microscopy provides highly reliable prediction of cancer malignancy
A new study by Osaka University scientists shows that non-labeling multiphoton microscopy (NL-MPM) can be used for quantitative imaging of cancer that is safe and requires no resection, fixation or staining of tissues.
October 3, 2017
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Norman Sharpless sworn in as director of the National Cancer Institute
Norman E. "Ned" Sharpless, M.D., took the oath of office late Tuesday, October 17, 2017, to become the 15th director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. He succeeds Harold E. Varmus, M.D., who stepped down as director in March 2015. Douglas R. Lowy, M.D., has been NCI's acting director since April 2015.
October 18, 2017
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Not such a 'simple' sugar: Glucose may be important in the fight against cancer
Scientists have just discovered that glucose, the most important fuel used in our bodies, also plays a vital role in the immune response. Targeting glucose-controlled systems in the body thus offers an exciting new option for regulating this response.
May 30, 2017
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Novartis partners with UC Berkeley to pursue 'undruggable' disease targets
Novartis has joined forces with researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, to develop new technologies for the discovery of next-generation therapeutics, pursuing the vast number of disease targets in cancer and other illnesses that have eluded traditional small-molecule compounds and are considered "undruggable."
September 28, 2017
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Novel approach could help predict how well patients respond to cancer treatment
A novel approach developed by researchers from the University of Leicester and the MRC Toxicology Unit could help to predict how well patients respond to drugs designed to fight various forms of cancer.
November 8, 2017
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Novel gene editing approach to cancer treatment shows promise in mice
New CRISPR-based gene therapy effectively targets cancer-causing 'fusion genes' and improves survival in mouse models of aggressive cancers, researchers report.
May 1, 2017
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Novel microscopy technique can more accurately diagnose cancer than current methods
A novel microscopy technique to examine tumor tissue in three dimensions can more accurately diagnose cancer than current two-dimensional methods, according to a study conducted at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden.
October 3, 2017
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Novel platform for investigating quiescence in dormancy-capable cancer cells
A team of researchers has reported a novel encapsulation approach to identify dormant cancer cells and maintain them in a quiescent state.
October 3, 2017
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Novel Smartphone App for Bilirubin, Pancreatic Cancer Screening
Pancreatic cancer patients have one of the lowest five-year survival rates, due in large part to the disease going undiagnosed in its early and intermediate stages. There are no overt symptoms during the critical early period, and non-invasive screening tools for identifying early pancreatic tumors before they metastasize have yet to be developed and translated into clinical use.
August 31, 2017
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Novel treatment causes cancer to self-destruct without affecting healthy cells
Scientists have discovered the first compound that directly makes cancer cells commit suicide while sparing healthy cells. The new treatment approach, described in today's issue of Cancer Cell, was directed against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells but may also have potential for attacking other types of cancers.
October 9, 2017
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Nurse-led intervention helps carers with medication management for people with terminal cancer
A study funded by Marie Curie and Dimbleby Cancer Care published today shows the potential benefits of a new nurse-led intervention in supporting carers to manage pain medication in people with terminal cancer.
July 7, 2017
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Misc. - O

Obesity Linked to 13 Types of Cancer
Losing weight might lower the risk, researchers say
October 3, 2017
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On the other hand, the immune system can also cause cancer
A new study describes how immune response designed to scramble viral DNA can scramble human DNA as well, sometimes in ways that cause cancer.
August 23, 2017
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Oncologists Offer Ideas To Ease Cancer's Costs
New drugs routinely priced at $100,000 a year, ASCO says
July 19, 2017
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Oncologist outlines lack of cancer and psychiatric care in rural America
Jennifer Lycette, M.D., understands the importance of treating patients with cancer at home in their in rural communities. It allows them to spend more time with their families and to focus on their treatment and recovery, not traveling.
December 9, 2016
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One Dose of Radiation May Help Spine Pain in Cancer
Study suggests it works as well as a full week of treatments
June 2, 2017
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One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find
The results show the number of mutations driving cancer varies considerably across different cancer types
October 19, 2017
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One-fourth of cancer patients use cannabis, study reveals
New research conducted in a cancer center in a state that had legalized the use of recreational and medicinal cannabis shown that about one-fourth of surveyed cancer patients used cannabis in the previous year, mostly for psychological and physical symptoms. The study also indicated that legalization increased the likelihood of a rise of cannabis use among cancer patients.
September 25, 2017
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Online database aims to collect, organize research on cancer mutations
Goal is to help clinicians treat patients based on tumor genetics
January 30, 2017
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Ontario, Canada Poised to Lead Global Biotech Innovation: Interview with Minister Reza Moridi
Canada's province of Ontario has been rapidly developing its infrastructure for world class biomedical research. In a place that birthed the discovery and isolation of insulin in 1921, the first external cardiac pacemaker in 1950, and the discovery of stem cells in 1961, Ontario has historically been ripe with biomedical innovation.
June 27, 2017
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Optoacoustics May Allow Surgeons See Tumor Margins for Accurate Excisions
While doctors have gotten pretty good at finding and excising tumors, identifying whether they have been removed in their entirety remains a challenge. Histology slides are today's standard, but processing the tissue, freezing, slicing it, staining, imaging, and analysis take much too long. Patients are often sent home, only to find out later that a part of the tumor remains in their body.
May 19, 2017
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Oral Sex Plus Smoking a Cancer Danger for Men
Risk of head and neck tumors tied to HPV infection jumps to 15 percent for this group, study finds
October 20, 2017
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Organo-metal compound seen killing cancer cells from inside
Researchers have witnessed - for the first time - cancer cells being targeted and destroyed from the inside, by an organo-metal compound discovered by the University of Warwick.
February 13, 2017
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'Origami organs' can potentially regenerate tissues
Bioactive tissue paper made from organs is pliable enough to fold into origami structures
August 7, 2017
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OSU scientists find way to fight solid tumors using new cancer-drug delivery system
A new cancer-drug delivery system shows the ability to exploit the oxygen-poor areas of solid tumors that make the growths resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation treatment.
April 4, 2017
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Overexpression of nerve growth factor drives gastric tumorigenesis in mice
Gastric tumors are started by specialized cells in the stomach that signal nerves to make more acetylcholine, according to a study in mice. the multinational team of researchers who conducted the study also identified a substance called nerve growth factor that stimulates nerve development and, when blocked, inhibits stomach cancer development.
December 16, 2016
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Misc. - P

Parity laws may not fully address affordability for patients needing cancer drugs
State laws designed to ensure that the pill form of cancer drugs is not more costly than treatments given through an infusion in a clinic or hospital have had a mixed impact on patients' pocketbooks, according to University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers.
November 9, 2017
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Partners of cancer patients greatly appreciate web-based self-help intervention
Twenty to thirty percent of the partners of cancer patients suffer from psychological problems. this percentage is even higher if the patients in question are terminally ill. with this in mind, scientists from the University of Twente's Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies and VU University Medical Center have developed a web-based self-help intervention for people in this situation.
December 21, 2016
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Pathway to 'rejuvenating' immune cells to fight cancers and infections
A new discovery of the mechanism of T cell exhaustion will lead to treatments to enhance immunotherapies against cancers and such viruses as HIV.
June 27, 2017
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Pathway's power to boost, halt tumors may be promising cancer therapy target
A protein, called inositol-requiring enzyme 1 -- IRE1 -- may serve as a key driver in a series of molecular interactions that can both promote and, paradoxically, inhibit tumors in certain types of cancers, such as non-melanoma skin cancers, according to a team of molecular biologists. They add that this pathway's dual power may make it a tempting target for future research on the design of new types of anti-cancer therapeutics.
August 29, 2017
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Penectomy: Surgery, risks, and outlook
A penectomy is the removal of the penis to treat penile cancer.
August 3, 2017
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Penn analysis finds genetic factors that could help identify men at increased risk for testicular cancer
An analysis of data from five major studies of testicular cancer has identified new genetic locations that could be susceptible to inherited testicular germ cell tumors. The findings, which researchers call a success story for genome mapping, could help doctors understand which men are at the highest risk of developing the disease and signal them to screen those patients.
June 12, 2017
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Penn researchers attempting to harness power of big data to help cancer patients avoid ER visits
What if doctors could look into a crystal ball and predict which of their patients might be at risk of getting sick enough to go to the emergency room? what if they could use that prediction to help patients get treatment more quickly, with less fear and uncertainty, and with a greater chance of returning home rather than being admitted to the hospital? for at least one group of patients, that's exactly what researchers at Penn Medicine are trying to do. But instead of peering into a crystal ball, they're attempting to harness the power of big data.
January 30, 2017
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Penn State researchers develop nanoprobes to rapidly isolate rare cancer markers
A nanoscale product of human cells that was once considered junk is now known to play an important role in intercellular communication and in many disease processes, including cancer metastasis. Researchers at Penn State have developed nanoprobes to rapidly isolate these rare markers, called extracellular vesicles (EVs), for potential development of precision cancer diagnoses and personalized anticancer treatments.
April 10, 2017
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Personalized vaccines could help the immune system fight cancer
But there's still a long way to go.
July 7, 2017
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Pharmacist identifies protein linked to tumor growth in gallbladder cancer
Patients with gallbladder cancer often show few or no symptoms for long periods of time. As a result, the tumors are only detected at a late stage of the disease when treatment is often no longer possible. Working in collaboration with pathologists at the University of Magdeburg, Sonja M. Kessler, a research pharmacist in the group led by Professor Alexandra K. Kiemer at Saarland University, has identified a new pathway that may allow improved prognosis and treatment of the disease.
October 25, 2017
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Phase-contrast X-ray imaging could identify tumors earlier
What is phase-contrast X-ray imaging and how does it differ from conventional X-rays?
March 29, 2017
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Photoacoustic imaging and photothermal cancer therapy using bilirubin nanoparticles
Sangyong Jon, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at KAIST, and his team developed combined photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy for cancer by using Bilirubin nanoparticles.
September 26, 2017
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Photoacoustic technique uses lasers to create detailed ultrasound images in live animals
Researchers have developed a photoacoustic imaging technique that uses lasers to create detailed ultrasound images in live animals. The method allows for complete internal body scans with enough spatiotemporal resolution to see active organs, circulating cancer cells, and brain function.
August 30, 2017
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Photoacoustics Measures Oxygenation of Tumors to Help Choose Treatment
Different tumors respond differently to radiation and chemotherapy. There's a lot of evidence that solid tumors that are poorly oxygenated don't respond well to these therapies. So having a way to assess tumors for tissue oxygenation can help mitigate and avoid therapies that are dangerous to the rest of the body.
August 29, 2017
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Physicians more likely to support smoking cessation in heart disease patients than people with cancer
Although a cancer diagnosis can motivate people to try to quit smoking, a study of British general practitioners finds that physicians are more likely to support smoking cessation in primary care patients with coronary heart disease than those with cancer, and patients with cancer are less likely to stop smoking.
September 12, 2017
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Physicists Develop Diagnostic Method to Understand Life's Nanoscale Machinery
A diagnostic method capable of detecting very small molecules that indicate the presence of cancer could soon become a reality.
June 28, 2017
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Physicists make quantum leap in understanding life's nanoscale machinery
The possibility of an entirely new capability for detecting cancer at its earliest stages arises from University of Queensland physicists applying quantum physics to single molecule sensing for the first time.
June 27, 2017
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Pioneering cancer gene therapy gets green light -- and $475,000 price tag
The country's first approved gene therapy -- approved Wednesday to fight leukemia that resists standard therapies -- will cost $475,000 for a one-time treatment, its manufacturer announced.
August 30, 2017
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Plant substance inhibits cancer stem cells
Lab experiments show that the chemical compound damsin found in the plant Ambrosia arborescens inhibits the growth and spread of cancer stem cells. The similar but synthetically produced ambrosin has the same positive effect.
September 27, 2017
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Plant substance shows inhibitory effects on cancer stem cells
The plant Ambrosia arborescens grows at a high elevation in large parts of South America, and is traditionally used as a medicinal plant. The researchers have isolated the sesquiterpene lactone damsin from the plant and studied its effect on cancer stem cells in three different breast cancer cell lines. They have also performed similar studies using what is known as an analog called ambrosin - a substance similar to damsin, but produced synthetically. The results show that they both have an effect on cancer stem cells.
September 27, 2017
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Plant virus-based system can be used to deliver anti-cancer drugs
An article published in Experimental Biology and Medicine (Volume 242, Issue 14, August 2017) reports that a plant virus-based system can be used to deliver anti-cancer drugs. The study, led by Dr. Nicole Steinmetz in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Case Western Reserve University Schools of Engineering and Medicine in Cleveland, OH demonstrates that a complex consisting of tobacco mosaic virus and vcMMAE, a first-line chemotherapy agent for the treatment of lymphoma, can kill cancer cells.
August 21, 2017
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Plant-made virus shells could deliver drugs directly to cancer cells
Viruses are extremely efficient at targeting and delivering cargo to cells. Researchers report they have harnessed this well-honed ability -- minus the part that makes us sick -- to develop virus-like nanoparticles to deliver drugs straight to affected cells. In lab tests, they show that one such particle can be produced in plants and it ferries small molecules to cancer cells.
February 15, 2017
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Plasmonic Lasers Find, Destroy Circulating Tumor Cells to Prevent Metastasis
Though reasonably good techniques for ridding the body of primary tumors have been developed over the decades, preventing metastasis is still a major challenge. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) break off from established tumors and wonder off to start new mets in other parts of the body.
August 23, 2017
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Plastic nanoparticles inspired by nature could improve cancer drug delivery
Scientists have developed a way to control the shape of polymer molecules so they self-assemble into non-spherical nanoparticles -- an advance that could improve the delivery of toxic drugs to tumors. Very little in nature is perfectly spherical, but it has proved very difficult for scientists to synthesize particles that are not round until now.
November 1, 2017
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Plastic nanoparticles inspired by nature could improve cancer drug delivery
UNSW Sydney scientists have developed a way to control the shape of polymer molecules so they self-assemble into non-spherical nanoparticles - an advance that could improve the delivery of toxic drugs to tumours.
November 1, 2017
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Poor overall environmental quality linked to elevated cancer rates
Nationwide, counties with the poorest quality across five domains -- air, water, land, the built environment and sociodemographic -- had the highest incidence of cancer, according to a new study.
May 8, 2017
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Popular immunotherapy target turns out to have a surprising buddy
The majority of current cancer immunotherapies focus on PD-L1. This well-studied protein turns out to be controlled by a partner, CMTM6, a previously unexplored molecule that is now suddenly also a potential therapeutic target.
August 16, 2017
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Possible treatment targets found for pre-malignant bone marrow disorders
Nature Immunology study uncovers key driver of MDS in blood stem cells
December 29, 2016
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Potential new cancer treatment activates cancer-engulfing cells
Macrophages are a type of white blood cell that can engulf and destroy cancer cells. a research group has discovered that by using an antibody for a particular protein found on macrophages, the macrophage is activated, and cancer cells are effectively eliminated. this discovery could lead to the development of new cancer treatments.
February 6, 2017
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Potential new drug class hits multiple cancer cell targets, boosting efficacy and safety
A potential new class of anti-cancer drugs inhibits two or more molecular targets at once, maximizing therapeutic efficiency and safety, report scientists.
February 1, 2017
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Potential therapy to prevent 'chemobrain' in cancer patients
A compound called 'KU-32' prevents cognitive decline in rats caused by chemotherapy treatment, research shows. KU-32 works by inducing the heat shock response, which protects cells and may counteract the damaging effects of hydrogen peroxide.
April 12, 2017
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Potential new treatment found for 'chemo brain'
Chemotherapy is the most commonly available form of cancer treatment, but its serious side effects are well-known. new research investigates the mechanism behind the cognitive impairment often associated with chemotherapy and offers new options for treating these adverse effects on the brain.
April 17, 2017
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Powerful resource to advance treatment of pediatric solid tumors
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is offering the global scientific community no-cost access to an unprecedented collection of pediatric solid tumor samples and data to fuel research and move treatment forward.
August 30, 2017
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Powerful toolkit uncovers rare tumor suppressor genes
A new statistical model has enabled researchers to pinpoint 27 novel genes thought to prevent cancer from forming, in an analysis of over 2000 tumors across 12 human cancer types. The findings could help create new cancer treatments that target these genes, and open up other avenues of cancer research.
October 31, 2017
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Pro-growth cancer signaling pathway could light up new avenues of treatments for solid tumors
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and Carbone Cancer Center have better defined a pro-growth signaling pathway common to many cancers that, when blocked, kills cancer cells but leaves healthy cells comparatively unharmed.
November 23, 2016
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Problems with DNA replication can cause epigenetic changes that may be inherited for several generations
Scientists reveal that a fault in the process that copies DNA during cell division can cause epigenetic changes that may be inherited for up-to five generations. They also identified the cause of these epigenetic changes, which is related to the loss of a molecular mechanism in charge of silencing genes. Their results will change the way we think about the impact of replication stress in cancer and during embryonic development, as well as its inter-generational inheritance.
August 16, 2017
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Processed foods linked with cancer risk in slim older women
A new study suggests that foods with higher dietary energy density - usually processed foods - may increase the risk of obesity-related cancers in women who are postmenopausal, even if they are actually physically fit.
August 17, 2017
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Prolonged exposure to work-related stress linked to increased risk of cancers
For men, prolonged exposure to work-related stress has been linked to an increased likelihood of lung, colon, rectal, and stomach cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. the findings are among the results obtained by researchers at INRS and Universite de Montreal who conducted the first study to assess the link between cancer and work-related stress perceived by men throughout their working life.
January 17, 2017
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Prolonged exposure to work-related stress thought to be related to certain cancers
First study on the link between cancer and work-related stress perceived by men throughout their working lifetime
January 17, 2017
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Prolonged hospitalization of advanced cancer patients linked to physical, psychological symptom burden
New research indicates that hospitalized patients with advanced cancer experience many physical and psychological symptoms, and that patients dealing with a higher burden of these symptoms have longer hospital stays and a greater risk for unplanned hospital readmissions. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings highlight the critical need to develop and test interventions to lessen these patients' symptoms.
October 23, 2017
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Prolonged use of cancer inhibitors can lead to severe cardiovascular problems
Plk1 inhibitors have recently been acknowledged as an "Innovative Therapy for leukemia" by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, a study published in Nature Medicine by researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) suggests that prolonged use of these inhibitors can not only lead to hypertension issues but also to the rupturing of blood vessels and severe cardiovascular problems.
July 10, 2017
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Promising approach for prognosis, treatment in mastocytosis
Systemic mastocytosis is a rare, incurable disease that affects approximately one in every 10,000 people. It is a haematological tumor disease, similar to leukemia, in which the bone marrow and other organs, such as the bowel, liver or spleen, are infiltrated by mast cells. In the animal model, researchers have now discovered a new prognostic and therapeutic approach that could at least help to prevent rapid progression of the disease.
December 13, 2016
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Protein critical to toxoplasmosis regulation: CD4 T-Cell and Blimp-1
Researchers are finding a way to regulate chronic toxoplasmosis, one of the most common parasitic diseases worldwide. this research also has important implications for cancer.
August 1, 2016
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Protein data takes significant step forward in medicine
The Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is part of a nationwide effort to learn more about the role of proteins in cancer biology and to use that information to benefit cancer patients.
June 28, 2017
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Protein that inhibits the development of autoimmune diseases discovered
The immune system protects humans from threats such as, for example, disease-causing bacteria, and cancer as well. Yet if the system malfunctions, it can attack the body it is supposed to defend and cause autoimmune diseases such as type one diabetes mellitus or multiple sclerosis. Scientists have now demonstrated that the membrane protein Caveolin-1 plays a key role in immune responses that trigger this type of disease.
August 15, 2017
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Protein that promotes 'cell-suicide' could revolutionize eye cancer treatment
New research has identified the role of a specific protein in the human body that can help prevent the survival and spread of eye cancer, by initiating cancer 'cell-suicide.'
December 6, 2016
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Proton Partners acquires Blue Phantom2 data acquisition system to support innovative cancer treatment
The Blue Phantom2 measures data with certified accuracy for commissioning and routine quality assurance ensuring accurate delivery of radiotherapy treatment
December 9, 2016
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Psychological intervention lowers survivors' fear of cancer recurrence
About 50 percent of all cancer survivors and 70 percent of young breast cancer survivors report moderate to high fear of recurrence. The fear can be so distressing that it negatively affects medical follow-up behavior, mood, relationships, work, goal setting, and quality of life. Yet, interventions to alleviate this fear are lacking.
June 5, 2017
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Psychological intervention reduces fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors
About 50% of all cancer survivors and 70% of young breast cancer survivors report moderate to high fear of recurrence. The fear can be so distressing that it negatively affects medical follow-up behavior, mood, relationships, work, goal setting, and quality of life. Yet, interventions to alleviate this fear are lacking.
June 5, 2017
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Misc. - Q

Quantum Dots Light Up Tumors Brighter Than Ever Before
Scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) in San Diego, California have devised a way to optically image tumors with unprecedented clarity using quantum dots. These nano structures are tiny particles, only a few nanometers wide, that generate light of a specific wavelength when they're themselves stimulated by a light beam.
September 12, 2017
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'Quora for cancer' startup theMednet raises $1.3 million in seed funding
TheMednet launched out of Y Combinator earlier this year to bring physicians a sophisticated platform for finding the best in treatment research, starting with cancer. It has now raised $1.3 million in seed funding to help it reach even more of those physicians.
July 14, 2017
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Misc. - R

Raised blood platelet levels 'strong predictor' of cancer
Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study.
May 23, 2017
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Rapid capture of cancer markers with lipid nanoprobes will aid in diagnosis and treatment
A nanoscale product of human cells that was once considered junk is now known to play an important role in intercellular communication and in many disease processes, including cancer metastasis. Researchers at Penn State have developed nanoprobes to rapidly isolate these rare markers, called extracellular vesicles (EVs), for potential development of precision cancer diagnoses and personalized anticancer treatments.
April 10, 2017
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Rapid Hepatocellular Carcinoma Test Can be Administered Anywhere
Researchers at the University of Utah have developed a rapid and highly portable liver cancer screening test, that can be administered anywhere.
August 25, 2017
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Random DNA copying 'mistakes' account for most cancer mutations, study finds
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report data from a new study providing evidence that random, unpredictable DNA copying "mistakes" account for nearly two-thirds of the mutations that cause cancer. Their research is grounded on a novel mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world.
March 24, 2017
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Random mutations play large role in cancer, study finds
Analysis suggests that cell division produces more malignancy-linked errors than environment, inheritance
March 23, 2017
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Rare Tumor May Point the Way to Diabetes Treatment
Insulinomas provide genetic maps for making insulin, researchers say
October 5, 2017
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Readers concerned about cancer's sugary disguise
A new wave of potential immune therapies aims to target the network of complex sugars that coat cancer cells, Esther Landhuis reported in "Cancer's sweet cloak'. some of these sugars, called sialic acids, help tumors hide from the immune system.
May 3, 2017
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Red onions pack a cancer-fighting punch, study reveals
Researchers are the first to discover Ontario-grown red onions have the strongest cancer-fighting power
June 7, 2017
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Reducing the radioresistance of cancer
Some cancer cells are protected from radiation therapy through an interaction of interleukin-6 with the Nrf2-antioxidant pathway, researchers have found. the discovery is believed to improve methods of increasing cancer's radiosensitivity.
January 13, 2017
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Refined method offers new piece in the cancer puzzle
A special spectrometry method that is normally used in analyses of computer chips, lacquers and metals has been further developed at the University of Gothenburg so that it can help researchers better detect harmful cells in the body.
February 8, 2017
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Refined method offers new piece in the cancer puzzle
A special spectrometry method that is normally used in analyses of computer chips, lacquers and metals has been further developed so that it can help researchers better detect harmful cells in the body.
February 8, 2017
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Refuting the idea that mutations cause cancer
Medical researchers offer evidence that it is forces of evolution driven by natural selection acting in the ecosystem of the body that, in the presence of tissue damage, allow cells with dangerous mutations to thrive.
July 31, 2017
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Reprogrammed blood vessels promote cancer spread
Tumor cells use the bloodstream to spread in the body. to reach the blood, they first have to pass the wall of the vessel. Scientists have now identified a trick that the cancer cells use: they activate a cellular signal in the vessel lining cells. this makes the passage easier and promotes metastasis. In experiments with mice, the researchers were able to block this process using antibodies.
March 3, 2017
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Research aids discovery of genetic immune disorder
Immune molecule deficiency increases patients' risk of Epstein-Barr virus and EBV-related cancer
December 23, 2016
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Research explains why mTOR inhibitors show limited ability to kill cancer
Anti-cancer drugs called mTOR inhibitors slow the growth of cancer cells but show limited ability to cause cancer cell death. New studies explain why.
October 6, 2017
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Research findings may provide new treatment for prevention of cancer metastasis
Breast cancer metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads, may be prevented through the new use of a class of drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Mayo Clinic researchers have identified that a key drug target, CDK4/6, regulates a cancer metastasis protein, SNAIL, and drugs that inhibit CDK 4/6 could prevent the spread of triple-negative breast cancer.
January 9, 2017
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Research findings show effective way to harness anti-tumor potential of macrophages in cancer therapy
for all the success of a new generation of immunotherapies for cancer, they often leave an entire branch of the immune system's disease-fighting forces untapped. Such therapies act on the adaptive immune system, the ranks of specialized cells that mount precision attacks on foreign and diseased cells. the other arm of the immune system, known as innate immunity, may not be merely idle during this battle, but may actually abet tumor growth.
March 9, 2017
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Research finds differences in cell migration between normal and malignant tumor cells
What makes cancer so deadly is its ability to move . the better that doctors can keep tumors contained and protect unaffected organs in the body, the less lethal a cancer will be.
December 21, 2016
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Research finds higher rates of cancer in world's 'better' countries
The world's "better" countries, with greater access to healthcare, experience much higher rates of cancer incidence than the world's "worse off" countries, according to new research from the University of Adelaide.
October 11, 2017
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Research identifies new gene fusions and mutations linked to GIST tumors
Researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, with colleagues from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Fox Chase Cancer Center, have determined that a specific region of the small bowel, called the duodenal-jejunal flexure or DJF, shows a high frequency of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with mutations of the NF1 gene.
August 18, 2017
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Research sheds new light on key drivers of cancer metastasis
Latest research from new Zealand's University of Otago is shedding new light on why and how cancer cells spread from primary tumours to other parts of the body. this phenomenon - known as metastasis - causes about 90 per cent of all cancer deaths.
December 21, 2016
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Research uncovers new target for therapy, diagnosis, and prognosis of colon cancer
Genetic research conducted at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine and Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center demonstrated for the first time that a novel protein can cause normal cells in the lining of the colon to become malignant, grow and spread, as well as take on the characteristics of stem cells.
September 12, 2017
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Research will shift how cancer diversity and resistance are understood, studied
Circular DNA, once thought to be rare in tumor cells, is actually very common and seems to play a fundamental role in tumor evolution, say researchers.
February 8, 2017
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Researcher to examine if music intervention can alleviate distress in young cancer patients and parents
An Indiana University School of Nursing researcher has been awarded $1.4 million to determine if a music therapy intervention can be used to manage acute distress in young cancer patients ages 3 to 8 and their parents.
November 22, 2016
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Researchers advance tumor-imaging nanosystem for enhanced diagnostic imaging
Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have developed a proof-of-concept nanosystem that dramatically improves the visualization of tumors. Published today in Nature Communications ("In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging"), the platform achieves a five-fold increase over existing tumor-specific optical imaging methods. The novel approach generates bright tumor signals by delivering quantum dots to cancer cells without any toxic effects.
August 23, 2017
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Researchers build liquid biopsy chip that detects metastatic cancer cells in blood
More effective than existing microfluidic devices, the breakthrough technology
December 14, 2016
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Researchers chart global genetic interaction networks in human cancer cells
Genetic networks have been identified in human cells, say researchers, noting that the study has also found potential targets for cancer therapy.
February 2, 2017
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Researchers create anticancer nanomaterials by simulating underwater volcanic conditions
Researchers at Aalto University, Finland, have developed anticancer nanomaterials by simulating the volcano-induced dynamic chemistry of the deep ocean. the novel method enables making nanoclusters of zinc peroxide in an environmentally friendly manner, without the use of additional chemicals. the as-synthesised zinc peroxide nanoparticles can be used as a tool for cancer therapy and against other complicated diseases.
May 12, 2017
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Researchers deliver first nanotherapeutics to tumor
For the first time, WSU researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. the innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy tissues.
May 15, 2017
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Researchers develop and validate new assay that detects gene fusions in solid tumors
An assay that identifies a peculiar but important abnormality in cancer cells has been developed and validated by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James).
August 14, 2017
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Researchers develop ceramic skull implant to deliver ultrasound treatments through thick skulls
Ultrasound brain surgery has enormous potential for the treatment of neurological diseases and cancers, but getting sound waves through the skull and into the brain is no easy task. To address this problem, a team of researchers from the University of California, Riverside has developed a ceramic skull implant through which doctors can deliver ultrasound treatments on demand and on a recurring basis.
August 2, 2017
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Researchers develop hybrid nanomaterial for destruction of cancer cells
Most tumors contain regions of low oxygen concentration where cancer therapies based on the action of reactive oxygen species are ineffective. Now, American scientists have developed a hybrid nanomaterial that releases a free-radical-generating prodrug inside tumor cells upon thermal activation. as they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the free radicals destroy the cell components even in oxygen-depleted conditions, causing apoptosis. Delivery, release, and action of the hybrid material can be precisely controlled.
May 4, 2017
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Researchers develop innovative nanobiodevice that enables rapid detection of cancer biomarker
Like DNA, ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a type of polymeric biomolecule essential for life, playing important roles in gene processing. Short lengths of RNA called microRNA are more stable than longer RNA chains, and are found in common bodily fluids. the level of microRNA in bodily fluids is strongly correlated with the presence and advance of cancer.
March 8, 2017
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Researchers develop new method to visualize whole-body cancer metastasis at single-cell level
Researchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center (QBic) and the University of Tokyo (UTokyo) have developed a method to visualize cancer metastasis in whole organs at the single-cell level. Published in Cell Reports, the study describes a new method that combines the generation of transparent mice with statistical analysis to create 3-D maps of cancer cells throughout the body and organs.
July 6, 2017
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Researchers develop new tumor-shrinking nanoparticle to fight cancer, prevent recurrence
A Mayo Clinic research team has developed a new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle aimed at shrinking breast cancer tumors, while also preventing recurrence of the disease. In the study, published today in Nature Nanotechnology ("Multivalent bi-specific nanobioconjugate engager for targeted cancer immunotherapy"), mice that received an injection with the nanoparticle showed a 70 to 80 percent reduction in tumor size. Most significantly, mice treated with these nanoparticles showed resistance to future tumor recurrence, even when exposed to cancer cells a month later.
May 1, 2017
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Researchers develop simple, flexible technique for early cancer diagnosis
Earlier discovery of cancer and greater precision in the treatment process are the objectives of a new method developed by researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy and Boston University. Investments are now being made to roll out this innovation across healthcare and broaden the scope of the research in this field.
May 22, 2017
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Researchers develop tumor-targeting MRI contrast based On human protein
A team led by Gang Han, PhD, has designed a human protein-based, tumor-targeting Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast that can be easily cleared by the body. The discovery holds promise for clinical application, including early stage tumor detection because of the enhanced MRI contrast, according to Dr. Han, associate professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology at University of Massachusetts Medical School.
July 7, 2017
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Researchers discover how primary tumors can program cancer cells that spread to become dormant, resist cancer treatment
In a first of its kind study, researchers have discovered the conditions by which specific signals in primary tumors of head and neck and breast cancers, pre-program cancer cells to become dormant and evade chemotherapy after spreading. Their findings could lead to new drug development, treatment options and transform the way doctors care for cancer patients to treat metastatic disease.
January 26, 2017
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Researchers discover how traffic jam in intracellular sorting can cause tumor development
For tissues to cooperate and perform normal functions, cells need to know which way is up. When cells lose track of their orientation, they can start to grow out of control, and develop into cancer. Now, a team of researchers has identified a new regulator for cell orientation, offering a future target for precision medicine in cancer treatment.
November 6, 2017
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Researchers discover intestinal quiescent stem cells that are resistant to chemotherapy
The intestine has a high rate of cellular regeneration due to the wear and tear originated by its function degrading and absorbing nutrients and eliminating waste. the entire cell wall is renewed once a week approximately. this explains why the intestine holds a large number of stem cells in constant division, thereby producing new cell populations of the various types present in this organ.
March 10, 2017
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Researchers discover mutation that amplifies capabilities of tumor-suppressor protein
Cancer researchers have long hailed p53, a tumor-suppressor protein, for its ability to keep unruly cells from forming tumors. But for such a highly studied protein, p53 has hidden its tactics well.
October 9, 2017
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Researchers discover new class of fusion genes that affect development of cancer
Cancer researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a new class of fusion genes with properties that affect and may drive the development of cancer.
October 5, 2017
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Researchers discover potential novel strategy for improving immunotherapy against cancer
Researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered a potential novel strategy for improving drugs that unleash the immune system against cancer -- by binding two compounds to a nanoparticle.
April 3, 2017
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Researchers discover unexpected link between brain development and tumor invasion
Researchers from Turku Centre for Biotechnology have observed that a protein called SHANK prevents the spread of breast cancer cells to the surrounding tissue. the SHANK protein has been previously studied only in the central nervous system, and it is known that its absence or gene mutations are related to autism.
March 9, 2017
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Researchers explore potential of traditional Chinese ink for cancer treatment
For hundreds of years, Chinese calligraphers have used a plant-based ink to create beautiful messages and art. Now, one group reports in ACS Omega that this ink could noninvasively and effectively treat cancer cells that spread, or metastasize, to lymph nodes.
September 27, 2017
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Researchers find another immune system link science said didn't exist
Unexpected connection likely sabotaging vaccines designed to treat cancer
March 23, 2017
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Researchers find racial and gender disparities in survival of patients with anal cancer
Over the past 30 years, squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA) is one of the few cancers with steadily rising incidence in the United States, with the most rapid increase seen in black men. To further investigate this trend, researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center looked at more than 7,800 cases of SCCA in the United States and found that the complex chemistry of social, economic, biologic, and cultural factors led not only to disparities in incidence, but also survival.
August 9, 2017
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Researchers find new way to restrict ability of cancer to use glucose for energy
Cancer cells consume exorbitant amounts of glucose, a key source of energy, and shutting down this glucose consumption has long been considered a logical therapeutic strategy. However, good pharmacological targets to stop cancers' ability to uptake and metabolize glucose are missing.
November 7, 2017
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Researchers find new way to tackle cancer cells
In-situ assembly of amphiphilic peptides with accompanying cellular functions inside a living cell (i.e., intracellular assembly) and their interaction with cellular components have been emerging as a versatile strategy in controlling cellular fate.
July 3, 2017
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Researchers find unforeseen increase in smoking-related mortality risk among East German women
The researchers found that East German women are running the risk of an unforeseen increase in deaths through smoking. According to the calculations, rates for deaths from lung cancer, which is a very strong indicator for the effect of smoking, will rise continuously for East German women aged 50 and older.
May 10, 2017
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Researchers identify promising prospect for new medications to fight against H. pylori
There is a strong suspicion that Helicobacter pylori is linked to the development of stomach cancer. now an international team of researchers led by Prof. Donald R. Ronning (University of Toledo, USA) has used neutrons to unlock the secret to the functionality of an important enzyme in the bacterium's metabolism.
December 21, 2016
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Researchers map molecular events that direct cells' energy metabolism down the cancerous path
As cells with a propensity for cancer break down food for energy, they reach a fork in the road: They can either continue energy production as healthy cells, or shift to the energy production profile of cancer cells. In a new study published Monday (Oct. 23, 2017) in the journal Nature Cell Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers map out the molecular events that direct cells' energy metabolism down the cancerous path.
October 24, 2017
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Researchers pinpoint genetic drivers of diffuse large B cell lymphoma
Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer, but the diagnosis belies a wildly diverse and little understood genetic foundation for the disease that hampers successful treatment.
October 5, 2017
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Researchers produce 3D map of molecular 'scaffold' known to play key role in cancers
Researchers have produced the first three-dimensional (3D) map of a molecular 'scaffold' called SgK223, known to play a critical role in the development and spread of aggressive breast, colon, and pancreatic cancers.
October 30, 2017
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Researchers provide evidence of increase in cancer decades after arsenic exposure ends
A new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that arsenic in drinking water may have one of the longest dormancy periods of any carcinogen. By tracking the mortality rates of people exposed to arsenic-contaminated drinking water in a region in Chile, the researchers provide evidence of increases in lung, bladder, and kidney cancer even 40 years after high arsenic exposures ended.
October 24, 2017
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Researchers reveal how cancer cells cope with genetic chaos
Scientists have uncovered how tumors are able to grow despite significant damage to the structure and number of their chromosomes, the storage units of DNA.
January 9, 2017
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Researchers reveal potential of radiomics to improve precision medicine
Precision medicine has become the leading innovation of cancer treatment. Patients are routinely treated with drugs that are designed to target specific tumors and molecules. Despite the progress that has been made in targeted cancer therapies, the path has been slow and scientists have a long road ahead. In a collaborative project, researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigated the emerging field of radiomics has the potential to improve precision medicine by non-invasively assessing the molecular and clinical characteristics of lung tumors.
August 3, 2017
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Researchers show how cancer spreads in mice
New research brings us closer to fully understanding the process of metastasis in cancer, by using a groundbreaking imaging method that can track and trace individual cancer cells with more clarity.
July 6, 2017
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Researchers study patients' genetic and susceptibility risk factors for lymphedema
Genetic variations may be one of the important factors that influence breast cancer survivors' responses to the inflammatory processes and vulnerability to lymphedema.
February 8, 2017
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Researchers take important step forward in disabling cancer cells' defences
Recent study out of the University of Ottawa opens door for new disease therapies in cancer, ALS, Fragile X Syndrome and others.
March 10, 2017
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Researchers uncover global regulator that 'switches on' silent biosynthetic gene clusters
Bacteria have supplied some of today's most indispensable anti-cancer and anti-bacterial drugs. Yet these compounds comprise only a fraction of their possible offerings. Now, researchers have found a way to unleash their full potential as natural product dispensers.
April 13, 2017
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Researchers uncover enzyme behind immune cell response
Monash University researchers have revealed the role played by an enzyme that is pivotal to the process of clearing infection in the body. Moreover, they suggest that the enzyme may be a potential target for drug development to block the types of inappropriate or excessive cell behavior that occur in cancer and autoimmunity.
October 12, 2017
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Researchers uncover protein-based 'cancer signature'
A research team has investigated the expression of ribosomal proteins in a wide range of human tissues including tumors and discovered a cancer type specific signature. this "cancer signature" could potentially be used to predict the progression of the disease.
December 5, 2016
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Researchers uncover new mechanism that promotes growth of blood vessels in tumors
Cancer cells have an enormous need for oxygen and nutrients. Therefore, growing tumors rely on the simultaneous growth of capillaries, the fine branching blood vessels that form a supply network for them. The formation of new blood vessels, called angiogenesis, is therefore a possible target for cancer therapy. Physicians use special inhibitors called angiogenesis inhibitors to "starve" tumors.
July 18, 2017
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Researchers uncover protein-based 'cancer signature'
A research team at the University of Basel's Biozentrum has investigated the expression of ribosomal proteins in a wide range of human tissues including tumors and discovered a cancer type specific signature. as the researchers report in Genome Biology ("Patterns of ribosomal protein expression specify normal and malignant human cells") this "cancer signature" could potentially be used to predict the progression of the disease.
December 5, 2016
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Researchers unveil new role of thymic dendritic cells in controlling T lymphocyte egress into the blood
A team of scientists led by Julie Saba, MD, PhD at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, has unveiled a novel role of thymic dendritic cells, which could result in new strategies to treat conditions such as autoimmune diseases, immune deficiencies, prematurity, infections, cancer, and the loss of immunity after bone marrow transplantation.
December 6, 2016
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Resistance to targeted therapy in mantle cell lymphoma
A team of cancer researchers have published research looking at the underlying mechanisms of resistance to the drug, Ibrutinib, which is used to treat patients with mantle cell lymphoma.
June 14, 2017
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Review finds no increased cancer risk for people taking oral diabetes medication
People taking a new oral medication for Type 2 diabetes can breathe a sigh of relief concerning suspicions they might be at an increased risk for many types of cancer, according to Indiana University researchers.
September 26, 2017
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Risk of skin cancer doesn't deter most college students who tan indoors, study shows
White female college students in Indiana who tan indoors know they are placing themselves at risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging, but most continue to tan indoors anyway, according to a study.
January 10, 2017
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Roadmap to more personalized cancer treatment
People with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and the KRAS-variant inherited genetic mutation have significantly improved survival when given a short course of the drug cetuximab in combination with standard chemotherapy and radiation, research has found.
December 22, 2016
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Role of a DNA repair mechanism
The molecular mechanisms described in this project may prevent the formation of some types of cancer
October 31, 2017
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Rotating Magnetic Nanoparticles Could Mechanically Destroy Cancer Cells
An international team in which a UPM researcher is involved has shown that it is possible to mechanically destroy cancer cells by rotating magnetic nanoparticles attached to them in elongated aggregates.
June 14, 2017
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Misc. - S

Safe Delivery of Therapeutic Genes by DNA Barcoding
Researchers used small snippets of DNA as barcodes to develop a new technique for rapidly screening the capability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to particular organs of the body. this new technique succeeded in accelerating the development and use of gene therapies for Parkinson™ disease, cancer and heart disease.
February 8, 2017
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Salford scientists may have found simple way for designing new antibiotics
CANCER researchers in the UK may have stumbled across a solution to reverse antibiotic drug resistance and stop infections like MRSA.
July 12, 2017
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Salk professor receives inaugural Sjg Prize for groundbreaking cancer research
Salk Professor Tony Hunter, who holds an American Cancer Society Professorship, has been awarded $500,000 as part of the $1 million Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences' inaugural Sjg Prize for Cancer Research for "groundbreaking studies of cellular processes that have led to the development of new and effective cancer drugs."
February 14, 2017
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Scalp Cooling to Prevent Hair Loss from Chemo Cleared in US for Solid Tumor Patients
Thanks to a new FDA clearance, cancer patients with solid tumors undergoing chemotherapy will now have the ability to have their scalp cooled by the DigniCap system to help prevent hair loss. Previously only indicated for breast cancer patients, the DigniCap Cooling System moves cool liquid through a cap worn by a patient during chemo sessions.
July 6, 2017
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Screening the dark genome for disease
Researchers have developed a method to swiftly screen the non-coding DNA of the human genome for links to diseases that are driven by changes in gene regulation. the technique could revolutionize modern medicine's understanding of the genetically inherited risks of developing heart disease, diabetes, cancer, neurological disorders and others, and lead to new treatments.
April 3, 2017
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Scientists are using gene editing to try to slow cancer growth
With more research, CRISPR could give us a new cancer treatment.
May 25, 2017
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Scientists create 'immunoswitch' particles that slow cancer growth in test animals
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells' defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice. Experiments with the tiny, double-duty "immunoswitch" found it able to dramatically slow the growth of mouse melanoma and colon cancer and even eradicate tumors in test animals, the researchers report.
June 8, 2017
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Scientists develop novel chemical 'dye' to improve liver cancer imaging
A new nanodiamond-based dual-mode contrast agent provides clearer and more accurate images of liver tumors at lower dosages, report researchers.
May 2, 2017
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Scientists develop portable device for detecting circulating tumor cells
Researchers at the URV's Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, led by the ICREA researcher, Ramon Alverez Puebla, and the professor of Applied Physics, Francesc Díaz, and the Department of Clinical Oncology of the HM Torrelodones University Hospital, have patented a portable device that can detect tumor cells in blood.
July 17, 2017
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Scientists developing magnetic stem cells to fight cancer
Scientists from the Tomsk Polytechnic University's Laboratory of Novel Dosage are developing a technology to control mesenchymal stem cells of patients. the technology will allow treating cancer more effective. to fight cancer cells the scientists suggest using the patient's own magnet controlled cells. Native body cells won't be rejected by its immune system and can deliver medication directly into the center of the disease.
December 29, 2016
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Scientists discover 27 genes that could halt cancer
From an analysis of more than 2,000 tumors spanning 12 types of human cancer, scientists have identified 27 new genes that could stop the disease in its tracks.
November 1, 2017
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Scientists discover a molecular motor has a 'gear' for directional switching
A study published today offers a new understanding of the complex cellular machinery that animal and fungi cells use to ensure normal cell division, and scientists say it could one day lead to new treatment approaches for certain types of cancers.
January 4, 2017
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Scientists discover a molecular motor has a 'gear' for directional switching
A new study offers a new understanding of the complex cellular machinery that animal and fungi cells use to ensure normal cell division, and scientists say it could one day lead to new treatment approaches for certain types of cancers.
January 4, 2017
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Scientists discover mechanism that causes cancer cells to self-destruct
Modifying specific proteins during cancer cell division unleashes a natural killing mechanism
March 27, 2017
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Scientists discover new natural source of potent anti-cancer drugs
An efficient process to rapidly discover new "enediyne natural products" from soil microbes has now been developed that could be further developed into extremely potent anticancer drugs, researchers report.
December 20, 2016
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Scientists discover protein that helps provide better vaccination response
Researchers have discovered a protein they believe would help make vaccinations more effective and provide protection from other diseases such as cancer.
April 7, 2017
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Scientists discover that foot callouses can be linked to oesophageal cancer
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have discovered that foot callouses/keratoderma (thickened skin) can be linked to cancer of the oesophagus (gullet), a disease which affects more than 8000 people in the UK each year.
February 1, 2017
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Scientists discover way of improving immune system's memory to recognise and fight cancers
Scientists from the University of Southampton have discovered an important way that the immune system can learn to recognise and fight cancers.
February 1, 2017
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Scientists establish process for identifying biomarkers for cancer diagnosis
Scientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have established a process for identifying biomarkers for the diagnosis of different types of cancer. with the aid of a specific type of infrared (IR) spectroscopy, the researchers applied an automated and label-free approach to detect tumour tissue in a biopsy or tissue sample.
April 3, 2017
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Scientists explain concept of combining NO gas therapy with starvation of tumor cells for nanomedical treatment
Biocompatible nanocapsules, loaded with an amino acid and equipped with an enzyme now combine two anti-tumor strategies into a synergistic treatment concept. Researchers hope this increases effectiveness and decreases side effects.
December 14, 2016
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Scientists find key cues to regulate bone-building cells
The prospect of regenerating bone lost to cancer or trauma is a step closer to the clinic as scientists have identified two proteins found in bone marrow as key regulators of the master cells responsible for making new bone.
February 2, 2017
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Scientists find novel way for earlier detection of deadly Merkel cell carcinoma
Scientists have found a way to detect earlier if a deadly cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), is recurring in patients, according to a paper to be published 11 a.m. Eastern time, Dec. 7, in the journal Cancer.
December 6, 2016
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Scientists gain new insights into protein network that regulates programmed cell death
Researchers use a simplified model of a protein network to explain how apoptosis is regulated, whose malfunction is linked to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.
July 14, 2017
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Scientists identify RIOK1 enzyme as new target for cancer therapy
Dr. Florian Weinberg, from Prof. Dr. Tilman Brummer's research group at the Institute of Molecular Medicine and Cell Research (IMMZ) of the University of Freiburg, joined forces with scientists from the Departments of Clinical Pathology and Medicine I of the University Medical Centre Freiburg and the Kinghorn Cancer Centre/Garvan Insitute in Australia in an international team that has identified a new target for cancer therapy.
May 5, 2017
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Scientists investigate cancer radiotherapy to make improvements
When tumors are treated with radiotherapy, the benefits can be hijacked by the treatment's counteraction to trigger inflammation and dampen the body's immune response, new research shows.
December 14, 2016
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Scientists may have found a way to stop cancer from metastasizing
Metastasis is the main cause of death in cancer, and current treatments against it are ineffective. But new research may have found a way to slow down, and perhaps even halt, the spread of cancer cells.
June 27, 2017
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Scientists probe link between stroke and cancer
A new study supports the idea that stroke survivors are more likely to have underlying cancer than the general population. While the findings are yet to be confirmed by further studies, the researchers suggest that stroke survivors should be screened and monitored for cancer.
September 6, 2017
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Scientists produce world's first CT images of biological tissue using protons
An international team of scientists has produced the world's first computerized tomography (CT) images of biological tissue using protons - a momentous step towards improving the quality and feasibility of Proton Therapy for cancer sufferers around the world.
May 11, 2017
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Scientists propose therapeutic strategy to suppress formation of hereditary bony tumors
Patients with multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE)--a rare disease that causes the growth of multiple benign bone tumors -- have limited treatment options. The genetic disorder affects roughly 1 in 50,000 people and can be very painful, debilitating and poses the risk of malignant transformation to deadly sarcoma. Surgery, physical therapy and pain management are currently the only options available to MHE patients.
August 3, 2017
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Scientists reveal potential way of boosting immune system's memory to fight cancer
Scientists have discovered an important way that the immune system can learn to recognize and fight cancers, outlines a new report.
February 1, 2017
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Scientists reveal the relationship between sugar, cancer
A nine-year joint research project has led to a crucial breakthrough in cancer research. Scientists have clarified how the Warburg effect, a phenomenon in which cancer cells rapidly break down sugars, stimulates tumor growth. This discovery provides evidence for a positive correlation between sugar and cancer, which may have far-reaching impacts on tailor-made diets for cancer patients.
October 13, 2017
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Scientists synthesize and evaluate mono/di-halogenated coumarins for anticancer activity
Throughout the world, many medicinal compounds are being discovered. Scientists have learnt to modify the chemical structures of active compounds so that they can improved therapeutic activity and reduced the toxicity. In view of the established low toxicity, relative cheapness, presence in the diet, and occurrence in various herbal remedies of coumarins, it appears prudent to evaluate their properties and applications further.
January 30, 2017
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Scientists uncover how tumor cells can switch disguises to spread easily around the body
Scientists have uncovered how tumor cells in aggressive uterine cancer can switch disguises and spread so quickly to other parts of the body. In a study published in Neoplasia, researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine created a map showing which genes were switched on and off in different parts of the tumor, providing a "signature" of these switches throughout the genome.
March 30, 2017
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Scientists uncover mechanism that keeps cells in the right places
Scientists have uncovered how cells are kept in the right place as the body develops, which may shed light on what causes invasive cancer cells to migrate.
July 26, 2017
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Scientists uncover mutations needed for cancer to emerge
Between one and 10 driver mutations are required for cancer to develop, according to a team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. The researchers studied more than 7,500 tumors across 29 different cancers.
October 23, 2017
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Scientists unravel mechanism fueling growth of aggressive Rhabdoid tumors
Rhabdoid tumors are among the most recalcitrant childhood cancers, and scientists have long sought ways to understand what drives their resilience and makes them impervious to treatment. now researchers have uncovered a molecular chain of events that interferes with a key mechanism that regulates cell behavior and controls tumor formation.
December 13, 2016
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Scientists use molecular bait strategy to capture and isolate cancer-prone protein
IBS researchers modified an anti-cancer drug to capture and purify a cancer-prone protein
March 2, 2017
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Scientists use tumor-derived dendritic cells to slow tumor growth
In the human body, so-called dendritic cells are responsible for activating our immune system. While researchers previously believed that tumors could repress these dendritic cells -- blocking an adequate natural cancer defense mechanism -- a new study has painted a more positive picture.
January 25, 2017
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Scientists want to borrow power from your phone to cure cancer
A team in Japan has used the processing power of citizens' phones and computers to find a cure for neuroblastoma. Now, it's focusing on childhood cancer.
March 9, 2017
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Sean Parker's cancer institute may have found a blood test to see if patients will respond to treatment
Scientists in collaboration with tech billionaire Sean Parker's Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy may have found a way to predict whether melanoma patients will respond to treatments that target the PD-1 (programmed cell death protein) pathway in tumors through a simple blood test, according to a paper in the scientific journal Nature.
April 10, 2017
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Second cancers are far deadlier in younger people than older adults
Second cancers in children and adolescents and young adults (AYA) are far deadlier than they are in older adults and may partially account for the relatively poor outcomes of cancer patients ages 15-39 overall, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found.
April 20, 2017
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Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adult cancer survivors has declined
Exposure was higher among those who had a smoking-related cancer and those who were socioeconomically disadvantaged
June 22, 2017
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Seed versus soil, with some fungus thrown in
A tree's genetics picks its fungus, which grants drought tolerance (or not).
September 29, 2017
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'Self-regulating nanoparticles' can be made just hot enough to kill cancer
Researchers have developed a new type of nanoparticle that allows itself to be heated up to a temperature that kills cancer cells, but not so high as to harm healthy tissue.
October 25, 2017
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"Self-regulating" nanoparticles can burn cancer without harming healthy cells
Researchers at the University of Surrey and Dalian University of Technology in China have created a form of nanoparticle that can heat up and kill cancerous cells and then self-regulate to avoid burning healthy cells. The particles can raise their temperature between 42°C to 45°C, hot enough to kill cancer cells. Once they reach a set temperature they back off, ensuring that healthy cells are spared.
October 30, 2017
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Short-term fasting during chemotherapy may counteract side effects of common cancer drugs
A short-term fast appears to counteract increases in blood sugar caused by common cancer drugs and protect healthy cells in mice from becoming too vulnerable to chemotherapy, according to new research from the University of Southern California.
April 4, 2017
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Sight unseen: Gene expression reveals 'hidden' variability in cancer cells' response to drugs
A new study reveals "hidden" variability in how tumor cells are affected by anticancer drugs, offering new insights on why patients with the same form of cancer can have different responses to a drug. The results highlight strategies to better evaluate drug effectiveness and inform the development of synergistic drug combinations to overcome the ability of tumors to evade treatment.
October 30, 2017
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Single cells lined up like ducks in a row
The higher the concentration of tumor cells in the bloodstream, the greater the risk of metastasis. The number of circulating tumor cells indicates how well a patient is responding to therapy. Researchers have developed a new microhole chip that enables cells to be identified and characterized reliably within minutes.
June 7, 2017
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Silicon Nanoparticle Heater and Thermometer United to Fight Cancer
A Team of Russian Physicists from ITMO University have discovered that spherical silicon nanoparticles can be effectively heated up and concurrently produce light based on their temperature. According to the Researchers, these properties united with a good biocompatibility will facilitate usage of the semiconductor nanoparticles in nanosurgery and photothermal therapy.
June 2, 2017
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Simple colour changing test can help speed up research for cancer drugs
A simple colour changing test to help scientists investigate potential cancer drugs has been developed by University of Bath scientists, allowing research to progress at a much greater speed than has been possible until now.
March 27, 2017
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Simple new Device for Capturing Circulating Tumor Cells Needs No Microfluidics
Scientists at Worcester Polytechnic Institute are reporting in journal Nanotechnology on a new way of trapping circulating tumor cells that doesn't rely on microfluidic techniques common in previously developed devices. Because it is arguably a simpler approach that relies more on simple mechanics, the device is cheap and works impressively well.
January 6, 2017
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Single-dose radiotherapy effectively reduces spinal cord compression symptoms
A common complication in people with metastatic cancer, spinal cord compression is a major detriment to quality of life. Radiation treatment is widely used to relieve pain and other symptoms, but there is no standard recommended schedule, and approaches currently vary. Findings from a phase III clinical trial show that a single radiation treatment is as effective as a full week of radiation.
June 5, 2017
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Skewing the aim of targeted cancer therapies
The widespread practice of using high RNA levels to pick cancer drug targets could be inaccurate two-thirds of the time
August 15, 2017
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Social interaction affects cancer patients' response to treatment
Biological basis is unknown but may be related to stress response, NIH researchers say.
July 19, 2017
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Software Models Liver's Movement to Guide Surgeons to Target Tumors
Squishy viscera, such as the liver, can change their shape significantly from the time a CT scan is taken that spots a tumor to when it's excised during surgery. Various tags have been developed that can be tacked onto tissue in order to use as a point to calibrate against, but this approach still doesn't quite achieve the desired precision.
July 18, 2017
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Some terminal cancer patients show unwillingness to face poor prognosis, study finds
In a recent study, published in The Oncologist, just under 10% of patients diagnosed with terminal cancer did not know their prognosis and had no interest in finding out. This unwillingness to face a poor prognosis can lead to unnecessary treatments and prevent patients from making appropriate end of life (EOL) plans, causing their remaining time to be more stressful and traumatic that it need be.
July 6, 2017
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Some thyroid cancer patients can safely delay surgery
Most people diagnosed with cancer want to start treatment as soon as possible, for fear that delaying care will allow their tumor to grow out of control.
August 31, 2017
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Some types of cancers are heavily dependent on sugar, study shows
In a new study, scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas have found that some types of cancers have more of a sweet tooth than others.
May 26, 2017
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Southern Research aims to develop new radiosensitizers that may greatly benefit cancer patients
Two out of three cancer patients are treated with radiation, but the therapy often fails to wipe out the tumor or slow its growth. Southern Research is working to develop a new class of drugs that will help the radiation deliver a more powerful punch to the disease.
June 9, 2017
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SPECT/CT combined with fluorescence imaging detects micrometastases
Dual-modality imaging could guide cancer surgery
May 8, 2017
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Sperm May One day Cure some Cancers
Sperm is creepy. it's wiggly, and there's usually millions of them and unless they're... y'know, going after an egg, sperm are useless. that was until some German scientists came up with a system to deliver medication using the tiny swimmers.
April 13, 2017
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Spondyloarthritis: Symptoms, treatments, and causes
Spondyloarthritis is the term for several inflammatory diseases that cause different types of arthritis. Also known as spondyloarthropathy, it is a condition that affects the joints and the entheses, the areas where ligaments and tendons attach to bone.
August 25, 2017
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Spousal cancer diagnosis can lead to decline in household income
Caring for a husband or wife with cancer significantly diminishes family income, according to researchers from the University of Georgia Terry College of Business, who tracked changes in employment and income among working-age couples in Canada.
April 24, 2017
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Squeezing Cancer Cells Through Tiny Holes for Diagnostic Uses
The stiffness of a cell is often an indicator of whether it is healthy or cancerous, and the so-called mechanotype, a phenotype based on cell mechanics when squeezed, is indicative of other properties of cells
October 6, 2017
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Statins may hold keys to future cancer treatment, reseachers find
High doses of drugs commonly used to fight high cholesterol can destroy a rogue protein produced by a damaged gene that is associated with nearly half of all human cancers, researchers have found.
January 24, 2017
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Stem cell-based method selectively targets cancerous tissue while preventing toxic side effects
A stem cell-based method created by University of California, Irvine scientists can selectively target and kill cancerous tissue while preventing some of the toxic side effects of chemotherapy by treating the disease in a more localized way.
July 27, 2017
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Stem-cell transplants show limited benefit for double-hit lymphoma patients in remission
Penn study finds therapy does not make relapse less likely
May 15, 2017
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Stimuli-responsive 'cluster bombs' for tumor therapy
Researchers have designed a a pH-responsive size-changeable "Cluster Bomb" based on mesoporous silica nanoparticle and peptide tLyP-1-modified tungsten disulfide quantum dots (WS2-HP) programmed tumor therapy.
July 18, 2017
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Structural knowledge of the DNA repair complex
New research provides mechanistic insight into how DNA is monitored and repaired if damage occurs. the results may eventually help to improve the treatment of certain types of cancer, as the DNA repair complex provides a mechanism for cancer cells to resist chemotherapy.
March 21, 2017
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Studies advance methods to avert toxicity that can accompany immunotherapy
New understanding of cytokine release syndrome and neurologic toxicities could help to reduce side effects from CAR T-cell treatments
October 12, 2017
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Study clarifies role of KLF12 in CRC tumor growth
Results of preclinical studies by MUSC investigators reported in the July 2016 issue of PLOS One, demonstrate for the first time that the transcription factor KLF12 promotes CRC cell growth, in part, by activating EGR1. Furthermore, data demonstrate that KLF12 and EGR1 levels synergistically correlate with poor CRC prognoses.
July 29, 2016
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Study describes algorithm that can predict growth of cancerous tumors
A new study by Yusheng Feng, professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes an algorithm that can predict the growth of cancerous tumors, which could help medical professionals judge the best treatment options for patients.
April 18, 2017
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Study estimates number of cancer deaths in China attributable to potentially modifiable risk factors
A new report finds more than half of all cancer deaths in men in 2013 in China and more than a third of those in women were attributable to a group of potentially modifiable risk factors: smoking, alcohol, nutrition, weight, physical activity, and infections.
July 6, 2017
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Study examines link between RCT efficacy and real-world effectiveness of cancer therapies
Value in Health, the official journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR), announced today the publication of new research examining the relationship between the efficacy of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and real-world effectiveness for oncology treatments.
July 27, 2017
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Study explains how genetic mutations linked to telomere capping complex contribute to cancers
Telomeres are the protective structures at the end of chromosomes and are essential for the faithful replication and protection of our genome. Defects in telomere function can lead to genomic instability in cancer, while the gradual shortening of telomeres is associated with the aging of human cells. a key component of the telomere protecting mechanism is a multi-protein complex called shelterin.
April 10, 2017
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Study finds fly growth mimics cancer cells, creating new tool in fight against disease
Scientists who study a molecule known to play a role in certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative disorders have a powerful new tool to study this compound due to new research.
January 24, 2017
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Study finds limited evidence that styrene causes cancer in humans
Limited evidence that styrene, a high volume plastics chemical and animal carcinogen, causes cancer in humans
February 14, 2017
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Study finds link between fertility treatments and pediatric tumors
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have found that babies born from mothers who underwent fertility treatments are at increased risk of developing many types of pediatric cancers and tumors (neoplasms).
April 25, 2017
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Study finds underlying causes of racial, ethnic disparities in cancer survival
Large study finds stage at diagnosis, neighborhood socioeconomic status, and marital status have the greatest impact on racial/ethnic cancer survival disparities
October 19, 2017
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Study finds wide racial gap in access to cancer surgery after NY State Medicaid expansion
The 2001 New York State Medicaid expansion--what is considered a precursor to the Affordable Care (ACA)--widened the racial disparity gap when it came to access to high-quality hospitals for cancer surgery, according to a new study from Georgetown University.
October 5, 2017
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Study highlights importance of long-term research in bringing new cancer therapies to market
New drugs to treat cancer that are now emerging are the end products of research begun in the 1970s and '80s, a new study by Bentley University has found, demonstrating the importance of long-term research in bringing new therapies to market. the research, published in the journal PLOS One, appears as Congress considers deep cuts to the National Institutes of Health, whose budget funds research into cancer and other diseases.
March 28, 2017
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Study identifies genetic alterations with potential to promote aggressiveness of astrocytomas
Among the various types of cancerous brain tumors, 70% are astrocytomas. Fatal in as many as 90% of cases, astrocytomas originate in the largest and most numerous cells in the central nervous system, called astrocytes because of their star shape.
September 6, 2017
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Study links mutations in notch gene to role in B cell cancers
In B cell tumors, mutated overactive versions of the Notch protein directly drive the expression of the Myc gene and many other genes that participate in B cell signaling pathways, researchers have found. Myc is a critical gene in governing cell proliferation and survival.
October 23, 2017
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Study may lead to new therapy options for treatment resistant, relapsed endometrial cancer
A team of Cleveland Clinic researchers have discovered a key pathway that leads to recurrence and treatment resistance in endometrial cancer, providing the potential for much needed new therapies for women with limited options.
August 23, 2017
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Study offers new insights into mechanisms underlying action of motor proteins
A study published today offers a new understanding of the complex cellular machinery that animal and fungi cells use to ensure normal cell division, and scientists say it could one day lead to new treatment approaches for certain types of cancers.
January 4, 2017
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Study potentially explains vulnerability of young cancer patients to treatment toxicities
Scientists have discovered a potential explanation for why brain and heart tissues in very young children are more sensitive to collateral damage from cancer treatment than older individuals.
December 22, 2016
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Study provides fresh insights into how the body detects early signs of cancer
Fresh insights into how cells detect damage to their DNA - a hallmark of cancer - could help explain how the body keeps disease in check.
July 26, 2017
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Study provides insights into how cancer cells can evade FGFR inhibitors
A new study by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) has identified a mechanism by which cancer cells develop resistance to a class of drugs called fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors.
March 2, 2017
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Study questions whether mistaken antibodies led cancer research down a 20-year dead end
For nearly two decades researchers have sought a way to target an estrogen receptor in the hope they could improve breast cancer survival, but a new article contends that the effort may never pan out. The reason? The target receptor does not actually appear to be where they believe it to be.
June 15, 2017
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Study reveals cancer-fighting power of onions
The next time you walk down the produce aisle of your grocery store, you may want to reach for red onions if you are looking to fight off cancer.
June 7, 2017
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Study reveals how abdominal fat could increase cancer risk
It's been well established that obesity is a contributor to cancer risk, but how it actually causes cancer is still a question that hasn't been fully explained.
August 23, 2017
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Study reveals intriguing crosstalk between metabolism and epigenetics in cancer development
A study published in Briefings in Functional Genomics investigated how epigenetics can modulate human's genetic program -- it can emphasize or silence genes. the new research shows that if epigenetics is disrupted, it might switch on oncogenes (genes that in certain circumstances transform cells into tumor cells) or shut down tumor suppressors. Both events will transform cells into tumor cells and cause cancer.
March 24, 2017
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Study reveals link between coffee and low mortality
According to the study, coffee consumption was related to low mortality risk of African-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Latinos, and whites, due to the association of coffee with diseases like cancer, stroke, diabetes, and, other heart, respiratory and kidney diseases.
July 11, 2017
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Study reveals ways in which cells feel their surroundings
Cells push out tiny feelers to probe their physical surroundings, but how much can these tiny sensors really discover? A new study led by Princeton University researchers and colleagues finds that the typical cell's environment is highly varied in the stiffness or flexibility of the surrounding tissue, and that to gain a meaningful amount of information about its surroundings, the cell must move around and change shape.
July 18, 2017
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Study sheds light on determining surgical margins for feline tumors
Researchers are paving the way for more precision in determining surgical margins for an aggressive tumor common in cats by analyzing tissue contraction at various stages of the post-operative examination process.
June 13, 2017
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Study shows how an opportunistic microbe kills cancer cells
Study identifies specialized vesicles responsible for cell reproduction
June 19, 2017
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Study shows involvement of lipid metabolism in tumour metastasis
A study headed by Salvador Aznar Benitah, ICREA researcher at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), and published today in Nature identifies metastasis-initiating cells through a specific marker, namely the protein CD36. this protein, which is found in the membranes of tumour cells, is responsible for taking up fatty acids. CD36 activity and dependence on lipid (fat) metabolism distinguish metastasis-initiating cells from other tumour cells.
December 6, 2016
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Study shows link between symptom burden and use of health care services in advanced cancer patients
Hospitalized patients with advanced cancer who report more intense and numerous physical and psychological symptoms appear to be at risk for longer hospital stays and unplanned hospital readmissions.
October 23, 2017
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Study shows potential of whole genome sequencing and AI to help clinicians scale precision oncology
In a study published today in the July 11, 2017 issue of Neurology Genetics, an official journal of the American Academy of Neurology, researchers at the New York Genome Center (NYGC), The Rockefeller University and other NYGC member institutions, and IBM have illustrated the potential of IBM Watson for Genomics to analyze complex genomic data from state-of-the-art DNA sequencing of whole genomes. The study compared multiple techniques - or assays - used to analyze genomic data from a glioblastoma patient's tumor cells and normal healthy cells.
July 11, 2017
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Study shows promising clinical activity, safety results of KTE-C19 in aggressive B-cell non-hodgkin lymphoma
Immune cellular therapy is a promising new area of cancer treatment. Anti-cancer therapeutics, such as chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells, can be engineered to target tumor-associated antigens to attack and kill cancer cells. this allows for an improved precision medicine approach to treating cancer.
December 5, 2016
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Study shows strong long-term survival rates for patients with GIST
Nearly one in four patients with incurable gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) treated with Gleevec will survive 10 years, a new report outlines.
February 20, 2017
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Study shows that HPV vaccine also prevents recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in children
The vaccine that protects against cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV) also prevents an uncommon but incurable childhood respiratory disease, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. The findings suggest that the chronic and difficult-to-treat condition, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, is disappearing in Australian children as a result of the nation's highly successful HPV vaccination program.
November 9, 2017
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Study suggests revolutionary way to make cancer cells more susceptible to existing chemotherapies
The same signal that drives aggressive growth in a deadly cancer cell type also triggers coping mechanisms that make it "notoriously" hard to kill, according to a study published online December 15 in Cell. When stressed, this cell type - far more than most cancer cells - encases its genetic messages in protein globs called "stress granules" that lessen the effect of chemotherapies.
December 16, 2016
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Study tests therapeutic effect of conventional and new cancer drug combinations
Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide affecting 8.2 million of people per year, and in the US, the number of new cases will achieve 1.6 million in 2017. The global impact of this disease costs a trillion of dollars, which makes critical the development of new drugs and treatment against it.
August 28, 2017
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Study to determine lowest dose of chemotherapy needed for babies with SCID
Michael Pulsipher, MD, of the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, along with co-principal investigator, Sung-Yun Pai, MD, of Boston Children's Hospital, has been awarded nearly $9 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the NIH to study a new treatment approach for babies born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) which prevents the immune system from functioning normally. In a multi-site study, investigators plan to determine the lowest dose of chemotherapy needed for babies with SCID undergoing bone marrow transplant -- the standard treatment for SCID. The goal is to restore the immune system safely and effectively with less toxicity than the higher dose regimens currently in use.
October 6, 2017
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Study uncovers new genetic markers linked to testicular germ cell tumors
Testicular cancer is relatively rare with only 8,850 cases expected this year in the United States. A majority of testicular cancer, 95 percent of all cases, begins in testicular germ cells, which are the cells responsible for producing sperm. Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most common cancer in men aged 20 to 39 years in the U.S. and Europe. Peter Kanetsky, Ph.D., M.P.H., chair of the Cancer Epidemiology Department at Moffitt Cancer Center, and colleagues from the International TEsticular CAncer Consortium (TECAC), launched a large analysis of five major testicular cancer studies to investigate genetic risk factors linked to TGCT.
June 13, 2017
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Study unveils new way to starve tumors to death
Blocking cancer cells' metabolism may make treatments more effective, less toxic
January 24, 2017
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Study: Cancer cells grow faster when transplanted into fatty, obese tissue
It's not just what's inside breast cancer cells that matters. it's also the environment surrounding cancer cells that drives the disease, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. In an abstract that will be presented April 3 at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2017, researchers will report their preliminary findings that cancer cells grew faster when they were transplanted into fatty, obese tissue.
March 31, 2017
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Study: Cancer patients who used symptom-reporting Internet tool lived longer
Cancer patients who reported their symptoms to their cancer care providers using a web-based survey lived longer than those patients who did not, according to a study led by a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher.
June 5, 2017
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Studying the nanomechanical properties of aging and cancerous cells using AFM
Can you please explain how you use AFM to study the nanomechanical properties of cells related to aging processes and cancer?
October 31, 2017
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Subset of carbon nanotubes poses cancer risk similar to asbestos in mice
Researchers have shown for the first time in mice that long and thin nanomaterials called carbon nanotubes may have the same carcinogenic effect as asbestos: they can induce the formation of mesothelioma. The findings were observed in 10 percent -- 25 percent of the 32 animals included in the study, which has not yet been replicated in humans.
November 6, 2017
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Sulforaphane, a phytochemical in broccoli sprouts, ameliorates obesity
Sulforaphane, a phytochemical in broccoli sprouts, is known to exert effects of cancer prevention by detoxicating chemical compounds taken into the body and by enhancing anti-oxidation ability. In the present study, experiments with mice demonstrate that sulforaphane ameliorates obesity, the conclusion based on the two functions of sulforaphane newly uncovered; amelioration of obesity through enhancing energy consumption by browning of adipocytes, and reduction of metabolic endotoxemia through improving gut bacterial flora.
March 7, 2017
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Supercomputers assist in search for new, better cancer drugs
Researchers use advanced computers to virtually discover and experimentally test new chemotherapy drugs and targets
May 1, 2017
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Supercomputers reveal how cell membranes keep cancer-causing proteins turned off
Two biophysicists have used supercomputers to show how cell membranes control the shape, and consequently the function, of a major cancer-causing protein.
April 4, 2017
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Supramolecular protein fishing with molecular baits
IBS researchers modified an anti-cancer drug to capture, purify a cancer-prone protein
March 2, 2017
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Surgical Pen Can Identify Cancer in Real-Time
Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have developed a hand-held surgical "pen" that can analyze tissue samples and tell a surgeon if they are cancerous in just a few seconds.
September 12, 2017
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SurgVision Displays Tumors During Surgery
At RSNA 2016 in Chicago, SurgVision, a Dutch firm, was showing off its intra-surgical molecular probe fluorescence imaging system designed for excising hard to spot tumors. the system relies on novel dyes attached to tumor-seeking antibodies and a multi-spectral fluorescence imaging camera to spot the dye within tissue.
December 13, 2016
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Surprise advance in the treatment of adult cancers
An epigenetic modification that might be the cause of 15% of adult cancers of the throat linked to alcohol and tobacco use was identified. this discovery was unexpected since it seemed highly improbable that this kind of alterations of the epigenome found in children could also target an epithelial tumor like throat cancer that occurs only in adults.
January 11, 2017
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Survival Continues to Improve for Most Cancers
Still, more progress is needed and racial disparities remain, U.S. report finds
March 31, 2017
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Surviving cancer may increase risk of birth complications
A recent study, published in JAMA Oncology, finds a link between surviving cancer and health risks for the survivors' future newborns. the study provides new information about this little-studied interaction.
March 23, 2017
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'Sweet spot' where tissue stiffness drives cancer's spread
Researchers have now found that physical forces exerted between cancer cells and the ECM are enough to drive a shape change necessary for metastasis. Those forces converge on an optimal stiffness that allows cancer cells to spread.
February 21, 2017
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Sweetening connection between cancer and sugar
Scientists have found that some types of cancers have more of a sweet tooth than others.
May 26, 2017
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Symptom burden may increase hospital length of stay, readmission risk in advanced cancer
Greater physical and psychological symptoms associated with higher utilization of health care resources in hospitalized patients with advanced cancer
October 23, 2017
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'Synthetic gene circuit' may improve effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy
Synthetic gene circuits that only trigger powerful, tumor-specific immune responses when they detect certain disease markers may help immunotherapies to fight cancer more effectively, according to a new study.
October 19, 2017
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Synthesizing Hexagonal Silver Nanoplates Using Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
An innovative technique that combines tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep was successful in synthesizing hexagonal silver nanoplates, indicating an effective approach for regulating the nanostructure of inorganic materials.
May 4, 2017
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Misc. - T

T-cell signaling process central to immune response
Scientists obtain first glimpse of the molecular mechanism by which recognition of an antigen by the T cell receptor triggers the first steps leading to an immune response
May 16, 2017
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Targeting cancer stem cells improves treatment effectiveness, prevents metastasis
Targeting cancer stem cells may be a more effective way to overcome cancer resistance and prevent the spread of squamous cell carcinoma -- the most common head and neck cancer and the second-most common skin cancer, according to a new study. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a highly invasive form of cancer and frequently spreads to the cervical lymph nodes.
March 10, 2017
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Targeting immune cells that help tumors stay hidden could improve immunotherapy
Researchers have discovered a clue that could unlock the potential of immunotherapy drugs to successfully treat more cancers. The findings were made in mice and showed that targeting a sub-population of immune cells called regulatory T cells (T-regs) could make the drugs more effective.
June 15, 2017
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Targeting the biological clock could slow the progression of cancer
Does the biological clock in cancer cells influence tumor growth? Yes, according to a new study.
February 16, 2017
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Tattoos mark the spot for surgery, then disappear
Tattoos aren't just for body art. they can have medical applications, too. Doctors are using them on patients to mark an area for future treatment -- particularly for non-melanoma skin cancer such as basal cell carcinoma -- but the inks can cause problems. now scientists have developed a better solution. In a new article, they report a new ink that glows only under certain light conditions and can disappear altogether after a period of time.
December 21, 2016
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Technique for Blocking Capillaries to Starve and Suffocate Tumors
Researchers from Shanghai Institute of Ceramics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the East China Normal University have reported in journal Nature Nanotechnology on a new technique of blocking cappilaries that feed oxygen and nutrients to tumors, essentially suffocating and starving them at the same time.
January 25, 2017
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Technique to Produce Multi-Target Antibody Therapies
Researchers in The Netherlands and Switzerland have devised a new technique to reliably produce antibodies that can bind to two different target molecules at the same time, which could be very useful for cancer immunotherapy.
August 30, 2017
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Telomere length predicts cancer risk
The length of the 'caps' of DNA that protect the tips of chromosomes may predict cancer risk and be a potential target for future therapeutics. Longer-than-expected telomeres -- which are composed of repeated sequences of DNA and are shortened every time a cell divides -- are associated with an increased cancer risk.
April 3, 2017
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Testicular cancer survivors with low testosterone more likely to have chronic health problems
In a large study, 38% of 491 testicular cancer survivors had low testosterone levels, known as hypogonadism. Compared to survivors with normal testosterone levels, survivors with low testosterone were more likely to have a range of chronic health problems, including high blood pressure, diabetes, erectile dysfunction, and anxiety or depression.
June 5, 2017
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Testicular cancer: Genetic test steps closer
A new study brings closer the day when healthy men will be able to undergo a genetic test that shows them if they are at higher risk of testicular cancer.
June 12, 2017
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Tethered nanoparticles make tumor cells more vulnerable
MIT researchers have devised a way to make tumor cells more susceptible to certain types of cancer treatment by coating the cells with nanoparticles before delivering drugs.
March 19, 2017
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Tethered nanoparticles make tumor cells more vulnerable
New strategy could improve performance of some immune-based drugs
March 19, 2017
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Texas A&M researcher suggests ways to unlock intrinsic hope in cancer patients
Can cancer patients tap into a certain kind of hope that is often overlooked but incredibly therapeutic and healing? Research by University Distinguished Professor of Marketing Leonard Berry of Texas A&M University's Mays Business School suggests clinicians can help patients tap into this kind of hope.
June 9, 2017
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Texas hospital struggles to make IBM's Watson cure cancer
Audit committee questions procurement compliance
March 9, 2017
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Th1/17 hybrid T cells offer potent and durable anti-tumor response in preclinical model
Adoptive cell therapy for cancer involves harvesting T cells from a patient and expanding and sometimes modifying them in the laboratory before reinfusion. It has been challenging to create T cells that are both potent and durable. In a new study, researchers report the potent anti-tumor properties of hybrid Th1/Th17 cells that combine the cancer-fighting properties of Th1 cells and the ability of Th17 cells to self-renew and regenerate.
November 9, 2017
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The antibody that normalizes tumor vessels
Scientists have discovered that their antisepsis antibody also reduces glioma, lung and breast cancer progression in mice, outlines a new report.
December 12, 2016
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The best treatment for laryngeal cancer? this approach helps decide
Study finds 'exceptional' long-term survival when a single dose of chemotherapy selects patients for chemo-radiation or surgery
February 2, 2017
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The Chemicals In Burnt Toast and Crispy Fries Won't Kill You, But the Calories Might
We'Re Pretty Bad at Identifying Which Cancer Risks Make a Difference
January 27, 2017
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The FDA just approved a game-changing cancer treatment
CAR T-cell immunotherapy is a brand new way treat cancer.
August 30, 2017
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The life-saving treatment that's being thrown in the trash
Today, transplanted umbilical cord blood can treat or cure more than 80 conditions.
March 28, 2017
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The Mednet launches its 'Quora for cancer," an online medical knowledge base
A New York City startup called the Mednet today launched a platform that gives physicians a knowledge-sharing tool that's as easy to use as Quora, but provides them with expert answers about the latest research in their field. the site has focused, so far, strictly on cancer.
March 21, 2017
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The power of radiomics to improve precision medicine
Precision medicine has become the leading innovation of cancer treatment. Patients are routinely treated with drugs that are designed to target specific tumors and molecules. Despite the progress that has been made in targeted cancer therapies, the path has been slow and scientists have a long road ahead. In a collaborative project, investigated the emerging field of radiomics has the potential to improve precision medicine by non-invasively assessing the molecular and clinical characteristics of lung tumors.
August 3, 2017
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The role of a telomere capping complex in cancer revealed
Scientists have unveiled part of the protein complex that protects telomeres--the ends of our chromosomes. Telomeres are the protective structures at the end of chromosomes and are essential for the faithful replication and protection of our genome. Defects in telomere function can lead to genomic instability in cancer, while the gradual shortening of telomeres is associated with the aging of human cells.
April 10, 2017
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The tech industry and the search for a cancer cure
Nvidia, Intel, IBM and other Silicon Valley companies are making finding a cure a high priority.
November 28, 2016
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Therapy flags DNA typos to rev cancer-fighting T cells
Disabled spell-checker identifies patients who may benefit from immune therapy
June 9, 2017
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These tiny, light-activated nanomachines can kill cancer cells within minutes
50,000 of them are the width of a strand of human hair
August 31, 2017
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This "map" could change the way we treat cancer
Researchers plan to use it to develop new drugs.
July 27, 2017
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This Synthetic Bone Implant Could Replace Painful Marrow Transplants
Thanks to advances in medicine, bone marrow transplants are no longer the last resorts they once were. Every year, thousands of marrow transplants are performed, a common treatment for ailments from bone marrow disease to leukemia. But because they first require a patient undergo radiation to kill off any existing bone marrow stem cells, marrow transplants remain incredibly hard on a patient.
May 9, 2017
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Thousands of rare cancer-related gene mutations found
Innovative research, published in PLOS Computational Biology this week, explains how thousands of "previously ignored genetic mutations" may contribute to the growth of malignant tumors. Using a new statistical approach, scientists find new patterns in proteins.
April 21, 2017
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Thwarting metastasis by breaking cancer's legs with gold nanorods
"Your cancer has metastasized. I'm sorry," is something no one wants to hear a doctor say.
June 26, 2017
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Time to initiating cancer therapy is increasing, associated with worsening survival
Based on US analysis of common solid tumors in study population of 3.6 million
June 5, 2017
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Timing could matter to how responsive cancer cells are to treatment
The timing of when DNA damage occurs within these different checkpoints matters to a cell's fate, report scientists.
October 25, 2017
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Timing of chemo affects inflammation, mice study suggests
Finding 'sweet spot' for drug administration could help patients
January 24, 2017
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Tiny Embeddable Sensor Unveiled for Measuring pH, Chloride
Imec and Holst Centre, two sister research organizations based in Belgium and Holland, unveiled a tiny sensor for measuring a fluid's pH and chloride levels. Chloride is an electrolyte involved in a variety of cellular processes, including regulating the body's pH level. Being able to measure these parameters may make them popular metrics for assessing athletic performance and for personalized medicine.
December 20, 2016
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Tiny medical device containing gold specks could boost effects of cancer drugs
A tiny medical device containing gold specks could boost the effects of cancer medication and reduce its harm, research suggests.
August 7, 2017
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Toward glow-in-the-dark tumors: new fluorescent probe could light up cancer
A fluorescent probe lights up the enzyme beta-galactosidase in a cell culture. the glowing probe-enzyme combination could make tumors fluoresce, allowing surgeons to cut away cancer while leaving healthy tissue intact.
March 28, 2017
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Tracking cancer's signaling pathways
Malignant melanoma is one of the most common and dangerous types of cancer. Researchers have investigated how and why brown pigmented moles turn into malignant melanoma using innovative robot technology. The insights gained can simplify methods of diagnosis in the future; furthermore, they suggest that certain cosmetic products and creams should be avoided.
May 23, 2017
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Tracking the body's mini-shuttles
New method of tagging body's own transporters could lead to more effective treatments for life-threatening diseases
September 28, 2017
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Traditional Japanese art inspires a futuristic innovation: Brain 'organoids'
The ancient Japanese art of flower arranging was the inspiration for a groundbreaking technique to create tiny "artificial brains" that could be used to develop personalized cancer treatments.
December 5, 2016
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Trapping Cancer Helps to Study Dormant Cells and How to Kill Them
Cancers often come back following successful treatment, a process at least partially due to the fact that dormant cells, which are particularly resistant to common therapies like chemo, remain in the body. They're elusive and therefore difficult to study, so progress on targeting such cells has been limited.
October 16, 2017
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Treating cancer with drugs for Diabetes and hypertension
A combination of a Diabetes medication and an antihypertensive drug can effectively combat cancer cells. the team of researchers has also reported that specific cancer cells respond to this combination of drugs.
December 27, 2016
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Triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules for guided drug delivery
These microcarriers may offer an entirely different approach to treating solid human tumors of numerous pathologic subtypes by delivering their encapsulated drug cargo to a tumor and protecting against collateral tissue damage.
March 30, 2017
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Triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules for guided drug delivery
Chemists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have designed triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules that bring the promise of guided drug delivery closer to preclinical testing.
March 30, 2017
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TSRI researchers develop novel drug delivery method for treating cancers
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a new drug delivery method that produces strong results in treating cancers in animal models, including some hard-to-treat solid and liquid tumors.
March 16, 2017
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TUM researchers decipher binding mechanism of antibody to environmental toxin
Summertime is barbecue time. However, when fat reacts with glowing coal, a substance chemists call benzopyrene is created. It is a widespread environmental toxin that can cause cancer in humans. Since buildings were heated with coal and wood for decades, dispersed by chimney smoke, it is now also found in soil and groundwater. A team led by Prof. Arne Skerra from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has deciphered the binding mechanism of an antibody to benzopyrene -- a discovery that could pave the way for an easier method to identify and, hence, remove the toxin.
July 13, 2017
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Tumor analysis post-surgery provides breakthrough in how patients respond to treatment
Study monitors effectiveness of drugs on cancer patients
November 8, 2017
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Tumor cells get stiff before becoming invasive
Breast cancer cells undergo a stiffening state prior to acquiring malignant features and becoming invasive. the discovery identifies a new signal in tumor cells that can be further explored when designing cancer-targeting therapies.
May 16, 2017
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Tumor necrosis factor may help control blood pressure, study suggests
Investigators at the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research have discovered a surprising new role for tumor necrosis factor (TNF): namely, that it is a major regulator of small blood vessel function, the key determinant of blood pressure.
April 6, 2017
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Tumor-seeking salmonella treats brain tumors
New approach produces 20 percent survival rate in rat model where few typically live
January 11, 2017
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Tumor.com
For resources and information on Types of Tumors and Fibroid tumor.
Provides Information
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Tumorigenesis may be induced from neighboring tissues, study suggests
Current view is that cancer development is initiated from cells that acquire initial DNA mutations. These in turn provoke additional defects, and ultimately the affected cells begin to proliferate in an uncontrolled manner to develop primary tumors. These can later spread and create metastases, or secondary tumors, in other parts of the body.
June 2, 2017
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Two agents deliver knockout punches to Ewing sarcoma
When combined with an already FDA-approved chemotherapy, a novel agent appears to halt the ability of Ewing sarcoma to grow and progress.
October 3, 2017
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Two de-identification methods reduce risk of re-identification of patients
Bottom Line: Two de-identification methods, k-anonymization and adding a "fuzzy factor," significantly reduced the risk of re-identification of patients in a dataset of 5 million patient records from a large cervical cancer screening program in Norway.
July 28, 2017
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Two investigational antitumor agents work better together against MPNST and neuroblastoma
The synergistic effects of a kinase inhibitor and an oncolytic herpes virus show promise for difficult-to-treat neuroblastomas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors
February 9, 2017
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Two thirds of cancer mutations result from completely random DNA mistakes
An increased focus on early detection will be needed to effectively treat the disease
March 23, 2017
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Two-Thirds of all Cancer Mutations Are Unavoidable, Scientists Claim
In a study that's bound to attract considerable controversy, a pair of researchers are claiming that between 60 and 66 percent of all cancer-causing mutations are the result of random DNA copying errors, making them essentially unavoidable. the new research is offering important insights into how cancer emerges, and how it should be diagnosed and treated--but many questions remain.
March 23, 2017
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Misc. - U

U.S. Cancer Death Rates Continue to Fall: Report
Researchers credit declines in smoking, better detection and treatment
January 5, 2017
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U.S. Cancer Deaths Decline Over Three Decades
But clusters of high death rates remain in some pockets of the country, study finds
January 24, 2017
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U.S. News names Roswell Park as 2017--18 Best Hospital for cancer
Roswell Park Cancer Institute has been named a 2017--18 Best Hospital for cancer by U.S. News & World Report. The Buffalo, N.Y., comprehensive cancer center was ranked by the news outlet as 33rd among nearly 900 cancer hospitals reviewed nationwide, and was also recognized as high-performing within two other categories: urology and lung cancer surgery.
August 8, 2017
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Ubiquitous and influential
New insights into the intricate molecular underpinnings of ubiquitin signaling
February 13, 2017
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UC Davis professor wins NIH award to develop 'smart' immune cells for cancer therapies
Assistant Professor Sean Collins, Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics in the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences, has received a $1.5 million award from the National Institutes of Health to advance the development of "smart" immune cells for therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. The five-year NIH Director's New Innovator Award aims to provide new insight into how to engineer immune cells to control their recruitment and response to tumors.
October 6, 2017
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UC researchers find stem cell vaccine to enhance immune responses against tumors in animal models
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found that a cancer stem cell vaccine, engineered to express a pro-inflammatory protein called interleukin-15 (IL-15) and its receptor (IL-15Ralpha), caused T cell production in animal models and enhanced immune responses against tumors.
May 10, 2017
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UC Santa Cruz researchers fight pediatric cancer using big data
When you hear the words "Santa Cruz," you likely think of surf, sand and other beachside fun. It's easy to forget there is a world class research institution, University of California, Santa Cruz, nestled in the redwoods right above town.
August 18, 2017
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UCLA researchers develop new method to rapidly measure cell's stiffness and size
UCLA biophysicists have developed a new method to rapidly determine a single cell's stiffness and size -- which could ultimately lead to improved treatments for cancer and other diseases.
October 4, 2017
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UCLA scientists discover potential combination treatment for brain cancer in adults
UCLA scientists have discovered a potential combination treatment for glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer in adults. The three-year study led by Dr. David Nathanson, a member of UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, found that the drug combination tested in mice disrupts and exploits glucose intake, essentially cutting off the tumor's nutrients and energy supply. This treatment then stimulates cell death pathways-;which control the cancer cells' fate-;and prevents the glioblastoma from getting bigger.
October 9, 2017
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UCM scientists design biosensor capable of detecting cancer autoantibodies at early stages
Before a malignant tumor is developed, the immune system tries to fight against proteins that are altered during their formation, producing certain cancer antibodies. a biosensor developed by scientists from the Complutense University of Madrid has been able to detect these defensive units in serum samples of patients with colorectal and ovarian cancer. the developed method is faster and more accurate than traditional methods.
January 11, 2017
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UCSD researchers discover how mutant gene amplifies inflammation to fuel cancer
A human gene called p53, which is commonly known as the "guardian of the genome," is widely known to combat the formation and progression of tumors. Yet, mutant forms of p53 have been linked to more cases of human cancer than any other gene.
October 19, 2017
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UH gets $3.3 million funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas
The University of Houston has received $3.3 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.
August 18, 2017
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UI scientists reveal how high-dose vitamin C damages cancer cells
Vitamin C has a patchy history as a cancer therapy, but researchers at the University of Iowa believe that is because it has often been used in a way that guarantees failure.
January 9, 2017
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Ultrafast detection of a cancer biomarker enabled by innovative nanobiodevice
Like DNA, ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a type of polymeric biomolecule essential for life, playing important roles in gene processing. Short lengths of RNA called microRNA are more stable than longer RNA chains, and are found in common bodily fluids. the level of microRNA in bodily fluids is strongly correlated with the presence and advance of cancer. this means that microRNA can act as an easily accessible biomarker to diagnose cancer, which causes over 14% of deaths annually worldwide.
March 8, 2017
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Ultrafast detection of a cancer biomarker enabled by innovative nanobiodevice
Pioneering nanobiodevice can isolate cancer biomarkers quickly with high resolution
March 8, 2017
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Ultrasound Activates Nanoparticle Aggregates for Selective Drug Delivery
Researchers at the Harvard Wyss Institute have developed a nanoparticle aggregate system that releases a drug when it is dispersed using ultrasound. This means that it can be used to deliver toxic chemotherapy drugs directly to a tumor while reducing side-effects in healthy tissues.
June 19, 2017
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Ultrasound and Microbubbles for Targeted Chemotherapy Delivery
Researchers in Norway have developed a chemotherapy delivery system consisting of microbubbles containing drug-loaded nanoparticles. When the researchers apply ultrasound to the microbubbles in a tumor, the microbubbles burst, releasing the nanoparticles and the chemotherapeutic drug.
August 28, 2017
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UMass researchers develop new class of photodynamic molecules for treating deep-tissue tumors
UMass Medical School scientist Gang Han, PhD, and his team have designed a new class of molecules used in photodynamic therapy that are able to direct lamp light deep into tissue to kill cancer tumors.
December 5, 2016
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Understanding proteins and their impact on immune system
Researchers have made a breakthrough in the understanding of how our genetic make-up can impact on the activity of the immune system and our ability to fight cancer.
May 30, 2017
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Understanding randomization of clinical trials crucial to success
A research team analyzed linguistic approaches to help cancer patients better comprehend the concept of randomization, being assigned by chance to treatment or control groups, in clinical trials.
December 21, 2016
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Underused cancer test could improve treatment for thousands
A simple blood test could improve treatment for more than 1 in 6 stage 2 colon cancer patients, suggests new research. The researchers also discovered that many patients who could benefit from the test likely aren't receiving it.
June 21, 2017
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Unexpected findings uncover new understanding of gene expression
Scientists have discovered surprising findings about an enzyme central to gene expression and mutated in many cancers.
October 2, 2017
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Unexpected link between cancer and autism
Researchers have observed that a protein called SHANK prevents the spread of breast cancer cells to the surrounding tissue. the SHANK protein has been previously studied only in the central nervous system, and it is known that its absence or gene mutations are related to autism.
March 9, 2017
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Unexpected role for epigenetic enzymes in cancer
A new study focused on a family of enzymes – known as KDM5 – that have been shown in previous studies to be involved in cancer cell growth and spreading.
January 6, 2017
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Up to one-quarter of cancer patients use marijuana
A new study conducted in a cancer center in a state with legalized medicinal and recreational marijuana found that approximately one-quarter of surveyed patients used marijuana in the past year, mostly for physical and psychological symptoms.
September 25, 2017
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Urine-based biomarkers for early cancer screening test
A new study has introduced a new technique that validates urine-based biomarkers for early detection of cancer. the research team expects that this may be potentially useful in clinical settings to test urinary EV-based biomarkers for cancer diagnostics.
March 7, 2017
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US cancer drug costs increasing despite competition
After a follow-up period of 12 years, the mean cumulative cost increase was 37 percent, including all the injectable anticancer drugs. Annual changes in pricing did not appear to be affected by new supplemental FDA approvals, new off-label indications or new competition.
October 31, 2017
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Using 'fire to fight fire' to combat disease could make it worse, tests show
A treatment billed as a potential breakthrough in the fight against disease, including cancer, could back-fire and make the disease fitter and more damaging, new research has found. Ground-breaking research has found that introducing 'friendlier' less-potent strains into a population of disease-causing microbes can lead to increased disease severity.
December 30, 2016
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Using immune cells to deliver anti-cancer drugs
Biomedical engineers have created a smart, targeted drug delivery system using immune cells to attack cancers.
January 3, 2017
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Using Light to Activate Genes and Kill Cancer
Scientists at Kyoto University in Japan have developed a gene delivery system, involving gold nanorods and a near infrared laser, which can transport a gene into cells and activate it.
July 10, 2017
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Using 'sticky' nanoparticles, researchers develop strategy to boost body's cancer defenses
After radiation treatment, dying cancer cells spit out mutated proteins into the body. Scientists now know that the immune system can detect these proteins and kill cancer in other parts of the body using these protein markers as a guide -- a phenomenon that University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers are looking to harness to improve cancer treatment.
June 26, 2017
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Using thermal measurement to improve cancer therapy outcomes
Researchers at the Adolphe Merkle Institute at the University of Fribourg, along with colleagues from the Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, have developed a novel characterization method, NanoLockin, which can help optimize the design of nanoparticles used in a recent form of cancer therapy known as magnetic hyperthermia (Nanoscale, "A lock-in-based method to examine the thermal signatures of magnetic nanoparticles in the liquid, solid and aggregated states").
November 24, 2016
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Utilizing tumor suppressor proteins to shape nanomaterials
A new method combining tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep successfully created hexagonal silver nanoplates, suggesting an efficient strategy for controlling the nanostructure of inorganic materials.
May 3, 2017
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Utilizing tumor suppressor proteins to shape nanomaterials
A new method combining tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep successfully created hexagonal silver nanoplates, suggesting an efficient strategy for controlling the nanostructure of inorganic materials.
May 3, 2017
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UTSW researchers develop new nanoparticle vaccine immunotherapy that targets multiple tumor types
Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine immunotherapy that targets several different cancer types.
April 24, 2017
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Misc. - V

Vaginal estrogens do not increase cancer, cardiovascular disease risk in post-menopausal women
Women who have gone through menopause and who have been using a vaginal form of estrogen therapy do not have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer than women who have not been using any type of estrogen.
August 16, 2017
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VIB-KU Leuven scientists identify new mechanism that impacts cancer growth
Scientists at VIB-KU Leuven have identified a new mechanism that impacts tumor growth. the typical lack of oxygen in tumors doesn't only stimulate proliferation, but also offsets the important role of the protein PHD2 as 'cancer cell killer'. a possible solution lies in blocking the enzyme PP2A/B55, which restores the function of PHD2 and consequently slows down cancer growth.
February 14, 2017
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Visualizing whole-body cancer metastasis at the single-cell level
Researchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center (QBiC) and the University of Tokyo (UTokyo) have developed a method to visualize cancer metastasis in whole organs at the single-cell level. Published in Cell Reports ("Whole-Body Profiling of Cancer Metastasis with Single-Cell Resolution"), the study describes a new method that combines the generation of transparent mice with statistical analysis to create 3-D maps of cancer cells throughout the body and organs.
July 7, 2017
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Vitamin C and antibiotics: A new one-two 'punch' for knocking-out cancer stem cells.
Cancer stem cells, which fuel the growth of fatal tumors, can be knocked out by a one-two combination of antibiotics and Vitamin C, report investigators.
June 12, 2017
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Vitamin C can be used to target and kill cancer stem cells, research finds
Researchers measure the impact on cancer stem cell metabolism of 3 natural substances, 3 experimental pharmaceuticals and 1 clinical drug.
March 8, 2017
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Vitamin C effective in targeting cancer stem cells
Researchers have measured the impact on cancer stem cell metabolism of three natural substances, three experimental pharmaceuticals and one clinical drug.
March 8, 2017
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Vitamin D decreases risk of cancer, new study suggests
Low vitamin D status may increase the risk of cancer, suggests new research. the study is a randomized clinical trial of the effects of vitamin D supplementation on all types of cancer combined.
March 28, 2017
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Vitamin D guidelines may be changed following new study
A new study finds that, contrary to popular belief, vitamin D-2 and D-3 do not have equal nutritional value. With vitamin D deficiency on the rise, the authors call for a rethink of official guidelines.
July 6, 2017
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Vitamin D, calcium supplementation among older women does not significantly reduce risk of cancer
Among healthy postmenopausal women, supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium compared with placebo did not result in a significantly lower risk of cancer after four years, according to a study.
March 28, 2017
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Misc. - W

Warfarin may prevent cancer
Warfarin is a medication used to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. A new study, however, suggests that the drug may also help to reduce the risk of cancer, particularly for people aged 50 and older.
November 6, 2017
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Watch Awesome Games Done Quick's Latest Speedrun Event for Cancer Research
Awesome Games Done Quick's first event of 2017 is underway.
January 9, 2017
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Watching movies can replace general anesthesia for kids with cancer having radiotherapy
Children with cancer could be spared dozens of doses of general anesthesia by projecting a video directly on to the inside of a radiotherapy machine during treatment, according to new research.
May 8, 2017
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'Weekend warriors' have lower risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease
One or two exercise sessions per week may be enough to reduce health risks in men and women
January 9, 2017
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Weight loss surgery reduces cancer risk by 33 percent in women
A large retrospective study that focused mainly on women finds that cancer risk is reduced by almost a third after bariatric, or weight loss, surgery.
October 6, 2017
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What is a heliotrope rash?
A heliotrope rash is a reddish purple rash on or around the eyelids. The rash can look patchy and uneven and is often accompanied by a swollen eyelid.
November 6, 2017
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What is dance psychology? what types of question are you trying to answer?
Dance psychology is the study of dance and dancers from a scientific and psychological perspective. what we're trying to understand is what happens when people dance and why, we are looking at it from a healthcare perspective, which might suggest dancing is good for you.
March 8, 2017
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What makes pancreatic cancer so aggressive?
Key factor for aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer discovered
April 18, 2017
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What the hair of a fly tells us about cancer
Cells divide into two identical cells that then divide in turn, meaning that any tissue can grow exponentially. But the moment comes when some of them have to develop into specialized cells. On the back of a fly, for example, a cell must know that when it splits, it will give birth to two different cells: a hair and a neuron.
June 6, 2017
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What you don't Know About Cancer can Kill You
Too few Americans realize that obesity, alcohol and inactivity boost risk for disease, survey finds
February 1, 2017
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When wounds won't heal, therapies spread ' to the tune of $5 billion
Carol Emanuele beat cancer. But for the past two years, she has been fighting her toughest battle yet. She has an open wound on the bottom of her foot that leaves her unable to walk and prone to deadly infection.
August 3, 2017
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Where body fat is carried can predict cancer risk
Carrying fat around your middle could be as good an indicator of cancer risk as body mass index (BMI), according to new research.
May 24, 2017
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Where Legal, 25% of Cancer Patients Use Marijuana
But patients in Washington state say doctors provide little information about the drug
September 25, 2017
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Where you Live May play Role in Cancer Risk
Rural areas a bit safer than urban ones; environmental threats seem key, study says
May 8, 2017
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Whitehead Institute researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer drug-resistance
The use of proteasome inhibitors to treat cancer has been greatly limited by the ability of cancer cells to develop resistance to these drugs. But Whitehead Institute researchers have found a mechanism underlying this resistance–a mechanism that naturally occurs in many diverse cancer types and that may expose vulnerabilities to drugs that spur the natural cell-death process.
December 27, 2016
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Who botched Oz cancer registry rollout? Pretty much everybody
Another day, another botched government contract
June 29, 2017
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Whole-exome sequencing may routinely miss detecting some disease-causing genes, say researchers
Whole-exome DNA sequencing -- a technology that saves time and money by sequencing only protein-coding regions and not the entire genome -- may routinely miss detecting some genetic variations associated with disease, according to Penn State researchers who have developed new ways to identify such omissions.
April 24, 2017
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Why CAR T-cell immunotherapy is such a big deal for cancer treatment
The FDA will likely approve the gene-altering therapy.
July 13, 2017
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Why does chemotherapy cause hair loss?
Hair loss is a frequent side effect of cancer treatment, and for many patients, it becomes a real worry.
August 25, 2017
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Why high-dose vitamin C kills cancer cells
Low levels of catalase enzyme make cancer cells vulnerable to high-dose vitamin C
January 9, 2017
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Why thick skin develops on our palms and soles, and its links to cancer
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have discovered that foot callouses/keratoderma (thickened skin) can be linked to cancer of the esophagus (gullet), a disease which affects more than 8000 people in the UK each year.
February 1, 2017
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Women have diverse, multiple sexual health concerns after cancer diagnosis
A new review published in the European Journal of Cancer Care indicates that, in women diagnosed with cancer, concerns pertaining to sexual health are diverse, multiple, and pervade all types and stages of cancer.
August 11, 2017
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Women with gum disease may need to watch out for cancer
New research has confirmed that periodontal disease is tied to an elevated risk of several types of cancer, such as esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and gallbladder cancer, especially in mature women.
August 1, 2017
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World's 'better' countries have higher rates of cancer
The world's 'better' countries, with greater access to healthcare, experience much higher rates of cancer incidence than the world's 'worse off' countries, according to new research.
October 11, 2017
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Worm infection reveals cross-talk in the lymph nodes
By studying a worm infection, scientists have discovered how lymphatic vessels grow within lymph nodes, with major implications for cancer and inflammation.
August 28, 2017
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WSU Team Delivers "Nanotherapeutics" Directly to Tumor for First Time
A team of researchers from Washington State University (WSU) have shown a method to supply a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. the innovation would enable doctors to target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise destroy healthy tissues.
May 16, 2017
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Wyss Institute researchers develop new capture technology for cancer diagnostics
Cancerous tumors are formidable enemies, recruiting blood vessels to aid their voracious growth, damaging nearby tissues, and deploying numerous strategies to evade the body's defense systems. But even more malicious are the circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that tumors release, which travel stealthily through the bloodstream and take up residence in other parts of the body, a process known as metastasis.
June 28, 2017
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Misc. - Y

Yet another Cancer Drug Trial is on Hold Following Patient Deaths
As 2016 draws to a close, two of what started out as this year's most promising new cancer therapies have ground to a halt amidst patient deaths during the experimental treatments.
December 28, 2016
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Young cancer survivors have twice the risk of suicide
Survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 25 had a more than two-fold increased risk of suicide compared to their non-cancer peers, a new report suggests.
November 30, 2016
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Young survivors have social difficulties years after cancer diagnosis
Cancer affects tens of thousands of young people each year. Receiving a cancer diagnosis can be emotionally and socially challenging, particularly for adolescents or young adults, who are already experiencing a range of age-related changes. new research investigates the long-term impact of a cancer diagnosis on young adults.
March 19, 2017
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Misc. - Z

Zig-zagging device focuses high-energy radiation emissions
Physicists have found a way to better control high-energy particle emissions in an undulator device that could potentially be used as a source of radiation for cancer treatment or nuclear waste processing
June 12, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - C

Comprehensive program takes patient care to next level by improving lives of women with ovarian cancer
The Southeast's first comprehensive cancer treatment program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham takes patient care to the next level by improving the lives of women affected by or at risk for ovarian cancer.
August 31, 2017
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CT Perfusion Technology Monitors Blood Flow to Predict Ovarian Cancer Treatment Response
Patients with advanced ovarian cancer have a very high relapse rate following primary treatment, with 60 to 85% of patients relapsing. Treatment planning is an important factor in patient care, but few reliable options exist to help physicians accurately plan treatment and select patients who are appropriate candidates for a specific therapy.
June 30, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - G

Gene testing could help predict ovarian cancer patients' sensitivity to new class of drugs
Testing for a gene commonly mutated in ovarian cancers could pick out patients who will respond well to a promising new class of cancer drugs, a major new study reveals.
December 22, 2016
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Genomic roots of ovarian tumors may arise in fallopian tubes, study suggests
Some scientists have suspected that the most common form of ovarian cancer may originate in the fallopian tubes, the thin fibrous tunnels that connect the ovaries to the uterus. Now, results of a study of nine women suggest that the genomic roots of many ovarian tumors may indeed arise in the fallopian tubes, potentially providing insights into the origin of ovarian cancer and suggesting new ways for prevention and intervention of this disease.
October 24, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - H

Hypertension linked to better outcomes for subset of ovarian cancer patients
Hypertension, or high blood pressure, may come with a plus side, at least for a subset of women with ovarian cancer. new research from epidemiologists at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, published in the journal Cancer Causes & Control, provides evidence that hypertension and Diabetes and the use of medications to treat these common conditions may influence the survival of ovarian cancer patients -; sometimes in a detrimental way, but in the case of hypertension medications, perhaps as a benefit.
April 17, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - M

Miniature Brain and Skull Found Growing Inside Teen's Ovary
while performing a routine appendectomy on a 16-year-old girl, Japanese surgeons uncovered an ovarian tumor containing bits of hair, a thin plate of bone–and a miniature brain.
January 6, 2017
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MIT engineers develop more sensitive approach to reveal ovarian tumors
Most ovarian cancer is diagnosed at such late stages that patients' survival rates are poor. However, if the cancer is detected earlier, five-year survival rates can be greater than 90 percent.
April 10, 2017
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Mount Sinai experts offer tips on knowing risks and detecting symptoms of ovarian cancer
Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in American women and according to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 22,000 women will be diagnosed with the disease and 14,000 will die from it.
August 11, 2017
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Murine study finds potential boost for ovarian cancer drug Olaparib
Researchers have discovered that the metabolic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1) helps cancer cells repair their DNA and found that inhibiting PGAM1 sensitizes tumors to the cancer drug Olaparib (Lynparza). Their findings suggest that this FDA-approved ovarian cancer medicine has the potential to treat a wider range of cancer types than currently indicated.
January 25, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - N

New guidance for targeting residual ovarian tumors
Findings support new strategy of continuous drug delivery by implantable device
May 23, 2017
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New imaging test can show key enzyme in ovarian cancer to help guide treatment choices
A new imaging test may provide the ability to identify ovarian cancer patients who are candidates for an emerging treatment that targets a key enzyme cancer cells need to survive. Currently, epithelial ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations are considered candidates for the treatment, but there is no method to measure the enzyme levels to help guide treatment choices.
April 3, 2017
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New possibility in treating aggressive ovarian cancer, study shows
A recent discovery may lead to a new treatment strategy for an aggressive ovarian cancer subtype. Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer and it is the seventh most common cancer in women worldwide. Most women with ovarian cancer are diagnosed at the advanced stage, which is more difficult to treat.
November 30, 2016
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New technology can detect tiny ovarian tumors
'Synthetic biomarkers' could be used to diagnose ovarian cancer months earlier than now possible
April 10, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - O

Ovarian Cancer Drug Given Fast-Track Approval
The anti-cancer drug Rubraca (rucaparib) has been granted accelerated approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced ovarian cancer.
December 21, 2016
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Ovarian cancer researchers find biomarker linked to prognosis in aggressive disease type
Ovarian cancer researchers have identified a protein biomarker expressed on the surface of tumor cells in high-grade serous ovarian cancer, the most common and lethal subtype of the disease.
March 7, 2017
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Ovarian cancer target molecule may be key to blocking its spread
Blocking a protein found on the surface of ovarian cancer cells could prevent or reduce the spread of the disease to other organs, according to new research.
March 2, 2017
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Ovarian cancer: Effective immunotherapy steps closer with new T cell study
At a scientific meeting this week, researchers report some progress in developing an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. However, they also outline the considerable challenges that remain before the treatment can be made effective for this and other cancers that have solid tumors.
April 5, 2017
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Ovarian cancer: Statins might be effective with diet control
Laboratory tests have shown that statins, which are drugs used to control cholesterol, can kill ovarian cancer cells. But tests on human patients have yielded mixed results. Could choosing the right statin at the right dose, and excluding dietary sources of a compound that blocks the statin, be effective?
July 17, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - P

Pathologists identify new potential target in ovarian serous cancer
HER4 expression may be linked to chemotherapy resistance, lower survival rate
March 18, 2016
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Ovarian Cancer - S

Sanford study explores protein's role in improving survival of ovarian cancer patients
A Sanford Research lab is studying a protein's role in improving survival in ovarian cancer patients. Findings published in Oncogenesis indicate a higher level of a specific protein correlates with an increased survival rate and decrease in the spreading of cancer cells.
December 21, 2016
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Scientists track ovarian cancers to site of origin: Fallopian tubes
Small study offers proof of concept, support for wider research
October 23, 2017
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Studies question use of readmission rate as metric in surgeries for ovarian cancer patients
To reduce costs and improve quality of care, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) has made reducing readmission rates a priority, yet research studies presented today at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology's 2017 Annual Meeting for Women's Cancer question the use of the metric in surgeries performed in patients with ovarian cancer. the presentations find that readmission rate as a metric of quality of care in ovarian cancer surgeries focuses on short-term outcomes but is not an ideal measure of patient survival in the long run.
March 13, 2017
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Study finds 12 genetic variants that raise the risk of ovarian cancer
Ovarian cancer is a common form of cancer and a leading cause of cancer death among women. the genes we inherit affect our chances of developing ovarian cancer, and a new genomic study identifies 12 genetic variants associated with the risk.
March 27, 2017
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Study sheds light on how ovarian cancer spreads
Long-term goal is to develop treatments that prevent cancer cells from attaching to new sites during metastasis
June 27, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - V

Vitamin C can target and kill cancer stem cells, study shows
Cancer is currently one of the top killers worldwide, and the number of cancer cases is only expected to rise. Although there are a number of therapies available, most of them are toxic and cause serious side effects. new research examines the impact of the natural vitamin C on cancer cell growth.
March 13, 2017
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Ovarian Cancer - W

Women with a medical history of breast or ovarian cancer often fail to test for inherited genetic changes
A new study conducted by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, states that among nearly 4 million women in the United States who possess a medical history of ovarian cancer or breast cancer, 1.5 million have an increased risk of bearing some kinds of genetic mutations, which might increase the probability of causing additional cancers in the future.
August 21, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - B

Blood Test for Pancreatic Cancer Shows Promise
Scientists aim for earlier detection, when tumors are treatable
May 24, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - C

Combined DNA and protein 'liquid biopsy' more accurate in identifying early-stage pancreatic cancer
Johns Hopkins scientists say they have developed a blood test that spots tumor-specific DNA and protein biomarkers for early-stage pancreatic cancer. The combined "liquid biopsy" identified the markers in the blood of 221 patients with the early-stage disease. Their results, published online the week of Sept. 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that detection of markers from both DNA and protein products of DNA was twice as accurate at identifying the disease as detection of DNA alone.
September 4, 2017
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Combined molecular biology test is the first to distinguish benign pancreatic lesions
With near perfect screening accuracy, this new test may spare patients unnecessary pancreatic cancer operations
June 23, 2017
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Could a turmeric extract help to treat pancreatic cancer?
A common obstacle in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is drug resistance. However, new research has shown that curcumin - a compound that can be found in turmeric - can help to overcome the resistance to chemotherapy.
August 1, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - F

First mathematical model that predicts immunotherapy success
Researchers also helped craft similar model to predict why some pancreatic cancer patients survive longer than others
November 8, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - G

Gene-regulatory factors shown to improve pancreatic cancer response to chemotherapy
Researchers revealed that, in pancreatic cancer, the microRNAs miR-509-5p and miR-1243 can promote E-cadherin expression and thereby reduce the likelihood of cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition, or indeed reverse this transition. This ability to stop cells from adopting a phenotype linked to high migration and invasiveness was also shown to synergistically increase the cancer cell-killing efficacy of gemcitabine, which is promising for developing more effective combinatorial treatments for pancreatic cancer.
August 1, 2017
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Genetic test successfully detects some asymptomatic pancreatic cancers
PancreaSeq® analyzed mutations known to be associated with precursors to pancreatic cancers, report investigators at the conclusion of a study.
October 2, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - H

High rate of tumor shrinkage among pancreatic cancer patients
Adding cisplatin to standard gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel drug treatment provided a very high rate of tumor shrinkage for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, according to the results of a pilot clinical trial. These statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in overall response and survival rates resulted from a phase Ib/II clinical study.
April 25, 2017
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How pancreatic tumors could help to fight diabetes
A new study analyzes rare tumors in which insulin-producing beta cells are produced in excess in order to find a "genetic recipe" for regenerating these cells. And the findings might change the current therapeutic practices for treating diabetes.
October 4, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - I

Innovative therapy strategy for pancreatic cancer uses engineered exosomes targeting mutated KRAS gene
Study demonstrates that 'iExosomes' shut down growth of pancreatic tumors in mice
June 7, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - K

Key molecular link in major cell growth pathway
Findings point to new potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer
October 19, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - L

Light scattering spectroscopy helps doctors identify early pancreatic cancer
New optical tool predicts malignant potential of cysts with 95 percent accuracy, compared to 58 percent accuracy with current test
March 13, 2017
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Long-sought mechanism of metastasis is discovered in pancreatic cancer
An epigenetic factor reprograms gene enhancers, enabling cancer cells to 'remember' an earlier developmental state
July 27, 2017
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Low-Dose Aspirin May Cut Pancreatic Cancer Risk
Chinese-based study, analysis of previous research point to everyday use decreasing the odds
December 20, 2016
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Pancreatic Cancer - N

New app uses smartphone selfies to screen for pancreatic cancer
A new app could lead to earlier detection of pancreatic cancer simply by snapping a smartphone selfie. The disease kills 90 percent of patients within five years, in part because there are no telltale symptoms or non-invasive screening tools to catch a tumor before it spreads.
August 28, 2017
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New test may improve pancreatic cancer diagnoses
Method relies on five proteins from bits of tumor circulating in blood
May 24, 2017
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Newly identified biomarker panel could pave way to earlier detection of pancreatic cancer
A newly identified biomarker panel could pave the way to earlier detection and better treatment for pancreatic cancer, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania. Currently, over 53,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer -- the fourth leading cause of cancer death -- every year.
July 12, 2017
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Newfound signal helps pancreatic cancer cells hide from immune system
Researchers have uncovered another pathway by which pancreatic cancer cells turn off the system charged with attacking them.
April 10, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - P

Pancreatic cancer could be treated with a Parkinson's drug
A new study shows that a common drug for Parkinson's disease has anti-cancer effects in mice and human pancreatic cells.
September 29, 2017
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Pancreatic cancer patients may live longer by traveling to academic hospital for operation
New study findings link traveling to an academic medical center for surgical removal of pancreatic or thyroid cancer with higher quality surgical care for both cancers. Although the study shows better care at high-volume surgical centers for patients with pancreatic or thyroid cancer, few patients travel for their cancer operations, it concludes.
May 1, 2017
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Pancreatic cancer survival linked to four genes
Alterations in four main genes are responsible for how long patients survive with pancreatic cancer, according to a new study.
November 2, 2017
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Pancreatic cancer: 'Softening' tumors before chemotherapy may extend survival
New research finds that using a drug to "soften" tumors before chemotherapy doubles survival and reduces cancer spread in mouse models of pancreatic cancer - a disease with a low survival rate and few treatments for inoperable tumors.
April 6, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - R

Regular aspirin use lowers pancreatic cancer risk by 50%, new study finds
Researchers studied patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer at 37 Shanghai hospitals from December 2006 to January 2011. the 761 patients were interviewed in person about their use of aspirin per day or week and their ages when the use started and stopped. they were matched with control patients identified from the Shanghai Residents Registry.
January 6, 2017
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Regular aspirin use may reduce risk for pancreatic cancer
Regular use of aspirin by people living in Shanghai, China, was associated with decreased risk for developing pancreatic cancer, according to data published.
December 20, 2016
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Researchers find novel way to induce pancreatic cancer cell death
Pancreatic cancer, most frequently pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, is the most lethal and aggressive of all cancers. Unfortunately, there are not many effective therapies available other than surgery, and that is not an option for many patients. In an effort to better understand pancreatic cancer at a molecular level, scientists conducted a study to try to identify molecules that could become the next generation of therapeutics for this type of cancer.
April 10, 2017
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Researchers uncover critical pathway that helps pancreatic cancer cells turn off immune system
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Perlmutter Cancer Center have uncovered a critical pathway by which pancreatic cancer cells turn off the immune system charged with attacking them.
April 7, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - S

Scientists identify aggressive pancreatic cancer cells and their vulnerability
Preclinical findings show how tumors exploit cellular plasticity to change into resistant type
February 9, 2017
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Scientists identify cell-surface receptor for progranulin
Progranulin is produced and secreted by most cells in the body. from skin to immune cells, brain to bone marrow cells, progranulin plays a key role in maintaining normal cellular function. In cancer, too much progranulin makes tumors (particularly prostate carcinomas) more aggressive and metastatic, whereas in neurodegenerative diseases, too little is associated with disease onset and progression
November 30, 2016
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Sentinels in the blood: a new diagnostic for pancreatic cancer
A crafty method to identify pancreatic cancer early in its development has been devised by researchers. Their technique relies on the sensitive detection of extracellular vesicles (EVs) -- tiny bubbles of material emitted from most living cells.
February 6, 2017
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Small molecule may offer new way to fight pancreatic cancer
In a search for much needed new treatments for pancreatic cancer - a deadly and aggressive disease with a poor survival rate - scientists are looking for clues at the molecular level. Now, a new study finds that a small molecule called MIR506 appears to play an important role in the fate of pancreatic cancer cells, and may offer a way to stop their growth and ability to spread.
April 11, 2017
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Snap a Selfie to Detect Pancreatic Cancer
A 3D-printed box helps control lighting conditions to detect signs of jaundice in a person's eye (via Dennis Wise/University of Washington)
August 30, 2017
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'Super tumor suppressor' found to prevent pancreatic cancer
A new study affirms that not all gene mutations are bad, after uncovering a mutation that appears to give a known tumor suppressor gene a boost against pancreatic cancer.
October 10, 2017
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Pancreatic Cancer - T

Tumor DNA in blood may serve as prognostic marker of pancreatic cancer
The presence of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) isolated from blood samples of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma was associated with poor outcomes, report investigators.
December 19, 2016
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Pancreatic Cancer - U

Unraveling mysteries of pancreatic cancer's resistance to standard therapies
Blocking inflammation after radiation therapy led to improved survival in mouse model
January 24, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - Numbers

4 in 10 men may not be receiving adequate prostate cancer treatment in England
Almost 4 in 10 men with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer (prostate cancer that is likely to or that has already spread beyond the prostate) may be "undertreated" by the failure to use radiotherapy or in some circumstances surgery, according to new results. the most common form of under-treatment is the use of hormonal treatments alone without additional radiotherapy or surgery. this means that some of the men diagnosed with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer may not be receiving the best treatment.
March 27, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - A

A potential cure for metastatic prostate cancer? Treatment combination shows early promise
Pilot study suggests that a new paradigm including drug therapy, surgery, and radiation may cure previously incurable cancer
April 18, 2017
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Advanced prostate cancer treatment failure due to cell reprogramming
Response to anti-androgen therapy decreased in mice that were missing tumor suppressor genes
May 4, 2017
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Aggressive prostate cancer secrets revealed in landmark study
A landmark study has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer.
January 10, 2017
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All you need to know about the PCA3 test
Prostate cancer is an abnormal growth of the cells in the prostate. Even though many prostate cancers grow slowly and are not aggressive, others are aggressive and can spread quickly.
October 12, 2017
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ANGLE's Parsortix system could help predict metastasis in prostate cancer
ANGLE plc, the specialist medtech company, is delighted to announce that researchers from the Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, have presented new results at the World CDx Europe 2017 conference in London of their work with ANGLE's Parsortix system in prostate cancer. the new findings suggest a broader range of potential applications for Parsortix in prostate cancer from early to late disease prognosis.
March 31, 2017
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Are there any alternatives to a prostate biopsy?
A prostate biopsy can be painful and stressful and will not catch all cases of prostate cancer. Even so, more than a million men undergo prostate biopsies each year. Most do not have prostate cancer.
November 9, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - B

Blood test uses nanotechnology to predict aggressive prostate cancer accurately
A new diagnostic developed by Alberta scientists will allow men to bypass painful biopsies to test for aggressive prostate cancer. The test incorporates a unique nanotechnology platform to make the diagnostic using only a single drop of blood, and is significantly more accurate than current screening methods.
June 9, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - C

Can prostate cancer metastasis be stopped before it starts?
Research team identifies role for particular microRNA
January 24, 2017
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Clinical study examines impact of yoga on side-effects caused by prostate cancer treatment
Men who attended a structured yoga class twice a week during prostate cancer radiation treatment reported less fatigue and better sexual and urinary function than those who didn't, according to a clinical trial led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
April 6, 2017
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Clinical trial shows benefit of yoga for side effects of prostate cancer treatment
Twice-weekly yoga led to better physical, sexual, emotional, and social health, study finds
April 6, 2017
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Combined treatment regimen shows early promise in eliminating metastatic prostate cancer
Pilot study suggests that a new paradigm including drug therapy, surgery, and radiation may cure previously incurable cancer, according to a new study in Urology®
April 18, 2017
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Controlling zinc transporter levels could be effective plan to combat pancreatic cancer, other diseases
When trace elements rise to toxic levels, bad things happen.
September 6, 2017
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Could antidepressants stop prostate cancer from spreading?
In almost all cases where prostate cancer spreads to other areas of the body, the disease spreads to the bone first. In a new study, researchers reveal the discovery of an enzyme that helps prostate cancer cells to invade bone. Furthermore, certain antidepressant medications may have the potential to block this enzyme.
March 13, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - D

Despite concerns, vasectomy and prostate cancer not linked
The three-decade-long debate on the link between vasectomy and cancer may finally be over: a meta-analysis that looked at more than 3 million participants finds no relationship.
October 11, 2017
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Differential RNA splicing may play role in prostate cancer disparities in African-American men
"We wanted to understand the genetic basis of prostate cancer disparities. Why is it that the African American population has a higher incidence of prostate cancer and a worse prognosis compared to those of European American decent?" asked Norman Lee, PhD, principle investigator and professor of pharmacology and physiology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences. "In trying to understand the genetic basis, we found that part of it may have to do with differential RNA splicing."
June 30, 2017
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Discovery of genetic markers could guide individualized treatments for advanced prostate cancer
Researchers at Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have uncovered genetic clues to why tumors resist a specific therapy used for treating advanced prostate cancer. This discovery can guide health care providers to individualized treatments for castration-resistant prostate cancer, a deadly disease that does not respond to standard hormone therapy.
November 2, 2017
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Discovery of new prostate cancer biomarkers could improve precision therapy
A new cause of treatment resistance in prostate cancer has been uncovered by investigators. Their discovery also suggests ways to improve prostate cancer therapy.
August 14, 2017
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Drug could activate innate anti-tumor immunity to eradicate aggressive prostate cancer in mice
Cabozantinib, a drug already used to treat patients with certain types of thyroid or kidney cancer, was able to eradicate invasive prostate cancers in mice by causing tumor cells to secrete factors that entice neutrophils - the first-responders of the immune system - to infiltrate the tumor, where they triggered an immune response that led to tumor clearance.
March 9, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - E

Early MRI may lower costs for prostate cancer treatment
Study finds MRI and MRI-guided biopsy cheaper long-term than standard ultrasound
May 17, 2017
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Everything you need to know about prostate nodules
A prostate nodule is a firm, knuckle-like area on the prostate. It may not have any symptoms or may cause bladder infections and chronic pelvic pain. There are several causes of prostate nodules, including prostatitis and prostate cancer.
October 12, 2017
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Expert calls for shorter radiation use in prostate cancer treatment
Men with prostate cancer can receive shorter courses of radiation therapy than what is currently considered standard, according to scientists.
February 21, 2017
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Experts walk back on prostate screening; men 55-69 should consider it
New data tipped the scales just a bit, showing some benefit to screening.
April 11, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - F

First human application of novel PET tracer for prostate cancer
New tracer holds promise of monitoring targeted treatment of various cancers
August 7, 2017
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'First in human' trial defines safe dosage for small molecule drug ONC201 for solid cancer tumors
A 'first in human' clinical trial examining the small molecule drug ONC201 in cancer patients with advanced solid tumors shows that this investigational drug is well tolerated at the recommended phase II dose. That's according to investigators whose research also showed early signs of clinical benefit in patients with advanced prostate and endometrial cancers.
March 22, 2017
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For men with prostate cancer, emotional distress may lead to more aggressive treatment
The anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers report.
January 11, 2017
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Force Fields Become a Weapon in the Fight Against Prostate Cancer
Scientists from the UK have figured out how to use a force field to separate cells, and it's about to change prostate cancer research. It's done with an "electric sieve" that began its life as a bit of aluminum foil with some epoxy smeared on it. This new, sci-fi approach is based on another research technique called "dielectrophoresis."
June 19, 2017
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Frequent ejaculation and prostate cancer: What's the link?
The prostate is a small, walnut-shaped gland that plays an important role in ejaculation. It produces the fluid in semen and helps push this fluid out when a man ejaculates.
September 26, 2017
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Fundamental research enhances understanding of major cancer gene
Study of signalling in cells reveals new aspect to PTEN gene in prostate cancers
October 19, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - G

Genetic pathways to individualized treatment for advanced prostate cancer
Researchers have uncovered genetic clues to why tumors resist a specific therapy used for treating advanced prostate cancer.
November 1, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - H

Higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer in taller and heavier men
New research demonstrates that taller men and those who are obese have a higher risk of more aggressive types of prostate cancer. The findings could help to provide fresh insight into how the disease works.
July 13, 2017
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Hope for metastatic prostate cancer patients: Targeted alpha therapy shows impressive results
Nearly three years of research have brought about remarkable results for the majority of 80 patients subjected to targeted alpha therapy of metastatic prostate cancer. the first assessments describes a full response in two patients in critical clinical condition with extensive metastases.
December 21, 2016
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Hormone therapy for prostate cancer increases cardiac risk
Androgen-deprivation therapy, which is a common treatment for prostate cancer, has been tentatively linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study solidifies these concerns.
October 18, 2017
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How Biosensors Are Being Used To Treat Prostate Cancer
Like most geeks, our perceptions of futuristic medical technology were heavily shaped by Star Trek. The image of Bones waving his tricorder in front of some poor redshirt afflicted with an alien plague gave us the fantasy of a non-invasive form of treatment without all those icky fluids and needles.
June 15, 2017
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How nerves fuel prostate cancer growth
Certain nerves support the growth of prostate cancer via a tumor vessel proliferating "switch," according to a study by researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. This finding could potentially lead to a new strategy for treating prostate cancer.
October 20, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - I

Immunotherapy for prostate cancer: What you need to know
Prostate cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in American men.
June 21, 2017
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Italian-style coffee could halve the risk of prostate cancer
New research brings some good news for men who like a caffeine kick. Drinking more than three cups of Italian-style coffee daily could more than halve the risk of developing prostate cancer.
April 27, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - M

Men with low testosterone less likely to have prostate cancer
New research suggests that men with abnormally low levels of testosterone are less likely to develop prostate cancer in their lifetime.
November 6, 2017
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Merit Medical's Embosphere Microspheres for Minimally Invasive Treatment of Enlarged Prostate
Merit Medical has announced winning de novo clearance for its Embosphere Microspheres to be used for prostatic artery embolization procedures as a treatment option for symptomatic enlarged prostate. The de novo classification means that this is the first product that can be used to embolize the prostatic artery without resorting to surgery.
June 26, 2017
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Moffitt researchers develop novel drug that may help combat castration-resistant prostate cancer
Prostate cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in men in the United States. It is estimated that 161,360 men will be diagnosed and more than 26,700 men will die from the disease in this year. The majority of these deaths are caused by prostate cancer that becomes resistant to initial therapy and spreads to other sites, called metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. In a study published today in Cancer Cell, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report that a newly discovered epigenetic mechanism can lead to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer.
June 12, 2017
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Prostate Cancer - N

New analysis shows correlation between testosterone-lowering therapy for prostate cancer and dementia
A new analysis of patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer shows a connection between androgen deprivation therapy - a testosterone-lowering therapy and a common treatment for the disease - and dementia, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
March 30, 2017
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New diagnostic test uses machine learning to accurately detect aggressive prostate cancer
A new diagnostic developed by Alberta scientists will allow men to bypass painful biopsies to test for aggressive prostate cancer. The test incorporates a unique nanotechnology platform to make the diagnostic using only a single drop of blood, and is significantly more accurate than current screening methods.
June 9, 2017
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New Nanotechnology-Based Blood Test for Predicting Prostate Cancer Helps Avoid Painful Biopsies
Alberta Scientists have developed a new diagnostic that will allow men to avoid painful biopsies to check for aggressive prostate cancer. The test includes a unique nanotechnology system to make the diagnostic using just a single drop of blood, and is considerably more accurate than existing screening techniques.
June 12, 2017
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New Prostate Screening Guidelines Stress Choice
Men aged 55 to 69 should discuss PSA blood screen with their doctor, expert panel recommends
April 11, 2017
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New Research Finds Value in PSA Testing
Analysis of 2 major trials on the prostate cancer screen shows it cuts men's risk of dying from the disease
September 5, 2017
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New targeted alpha therapy protocol for advanced prostate cancer
Therapy options are limited for men with advanced-stage, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, but a new treatment protocol offers hope. Researchers report on their novel dosing regimen for actinium-225-labeled targeted alpha therapy of patients with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive tumors. The protocol balances treatment response with toxicity concerns to provide the most effective therapy with the least side effects.
October 3, 2017
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New technology may provide non-invasive approach to diagnose and monitor prostate cancer
Technology being developed at Washington State University provides a non-invasive approach for diagnosing prostate cancer and tracking the disease's progression.
March 22, 2017
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New three-in-one blood test opens door to precision medicine for prostate cancer
Test picks out men for treatment, detects early signs of resistance and monitors cancer's evolution over time
June 19, 2017
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New type of PET imaging identifies primary and metastatic prostate cancer
Researchers document the first-in-human application of a new imaging agent to help find prostate cancer in both early and advanced stages and plan treatment. the study indicates that the new agent -- a PET radiotracer -- is both safe and effective.
February 1, 2017
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New unexpected key player in melanoma development identified
Identification and functional validation of proteins involved in tumorigenesis are essential steps toward advancing cancer precision medicine. Scientists now report the important