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2,061 Health - General Information Resources

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS)

Anaesthetic known for surgical procedures may be quick remedy for depression
Vienna and MedUni Vienna are currently the hotspot for brain health: this coming Thursday, the very first "Brain Day" will be held for a lay audience in the Van Swieten Hall of the Medical University of Vienna. the following day will see the start of the largest European specialist congress for neuropsychopharmacology, the ECNP, in which a significant number of MedUni Vienna experts are taking part. One topic on the agenda is the use of ketamine in the treatment of depression.
September 12, 2016
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Bacterial by-product helps correct gut microbiome imbalance in mouse model of ALS
A bacterial by-product known to be important in maintaining gut health may slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS - a progressive, neurodegenerative disease.
January 27, 2017
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Beta-blockers can help treat bone loss caused by antidepressants in mice
The antidepressant fluoxetine causes bone loss by instructing the brain to send out signals that increase bone breakdown, but a beta-blocker can intercept the signals, a new study in mice has found.
September 7, 2016
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Brain Scans Let ALS Patients Communicate
Correct responses were provided to more than 70 percent of yes-or-no questions, researchers say
January 31, 2017
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Brain's immune cells play direct role in development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Cedars-Sinai research scientists have found that immune cells in the brain play a direct role in the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, offering hope for new therapies to target the neurodegenerative disease that gradually leads to paralysis and death.
March 18, 2016
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Children of patients with C9orf72 mutations are at a greater risk of frontotemporal dementia or ALS at a younger age
The most common genetic cause of the brain diseases frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a mutation in the C9orf72 gene. Researchers have demonstrated that if an affected parent passes on this mutation, the children will be affected at a younger age (than the parent). There are no indications that the disease progresses more quickly.
February 14, 2017
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Chip Mimics Nerve-Muscle Junctions to Study Neuromuscular Disorders
MIT scientists have developed a microfluidic chip that mimics the neuromuscular connections that exist at the junction between neurons and the muscles. These junctions are often involved in various debilitating neuromuscular conditions such as myasthenia gravies and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
August 08, 2016
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CRF overexpression increases anxiety in primates
Overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a stress-related gene, increases anxious temperament in monkeys, new research indicates. the findings provide a direct link in primates between alterations in stress-related systems in the brain and the development of anxiety disorders. Anxiety disorders often begin early in life and anxious temperament during childhood is considered a risk for later development of anxiety and depression.
September 6, 2016
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FDA Approves 1st new Drug for ALS in Decades
Radicava, given intravenously, slows decline in patients with deadly neurological disease
May 8, 2017
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Gene silencing shows promise for treating two fatal neurological disorders
NIH-funded preclinical studies suggest designer drug may treat ALS and spinocerebellar ataxia 2.
April 12, 2017
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'Ice Bucket Challenge' Funds Boon to ALS Research
Money raised during the online campaign helped scientists spot gene linked to deadly nerve disease
July 27, 2016
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Insilico Medicine launches personalized drug discovery platform to develop new treatments for ALS
Today, Insilico Medicine, Inc., a company applying the latest advances in deep learning to biomarker development, drug discovery and aging research, launched ALS.AI, a personalized drug discovery and biomarker development platform utilizing the latest advances in deep learning. ALS.AI is intended to advance the discovery of new drugs and repurpose existing ones for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and personalized treatment for ALS patients.
June 1, 2017
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Locked-In ALS Patient Types via Wireless Brain Implant
Researchers at University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands managed to enable a severely paralyzed ALS patient with locked-in syndrome to type words on a computer screen by thinking what letters her hand wants to touch. Previously, such advanced brain-computer interface systems required wires to power the implants and to read and amplify the signals they're gathering.
November 15, 2016
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Locked-In ALS Patients Speak Thanks to Transcranial Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
At the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering in Geneva, Switzerland, four completely paralyzed people suffering from advanced ALS were able to communicate thanks to a cap that measures changes in the oxygenation within the brain. These folks are effectively locked-in, not even having the ability to move their arms and relying on a ventilator for breathing. It has been a controversial matter whether patients in such a state are even able to think coherently, but this study seems to indicate that they continue to think and make decisions just fine.
February 1, 2017
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MS versus ALS: Differences, causes, and treatment
Multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are both progressive diseases that affect the central nervous system.
May 19, 2017
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New apps designed to reduce depression, anxiety as easily as checking your phone
Speedy mini-apps are designed to address depression and anxiety
January 5, 2017
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New areas of the brain identified where ALS gene is active
Scientists identify 2 regions of mouse brains where C9orf72 is expressed
August 1, 2016
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New experimental and theoretical approaches 'dive into the pool' of membranes organelles
Engineers have developed a new way to dive into the cell's tiniest and most important components. What they found inside membraneless organelles surprised them, and could lead to better understanding of fatal diseases including cancer, Huntington's and ALS.
June 26, 2017
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New toxic pathway identified for protein aggregates in neurodegenerative disease
Scientists have identified new processes that form protein "clumps" that are characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD).
March 17, 2017
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Occupational exposure to magnetic fields increases risk of ALS
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a rare neurodegenerative disease of unknown origin that is currently untreatable. new research suggests that workplace exposure to magnetic fields may be responsible for the disease.
March 30, 2017
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Scientists discover urinary biomarker that may help track ALS
NIH-funded study suggests opportunity to find insights to neurological disease.
March 22, 2017
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Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS
In the quest to understand the driving forces behind neurodegenerative diseases, researchers in recent years have zeroed in on clumps of malfunctioning proteins thought to kill neurons in the brain and spinal cord by jamming their cellular machinery.
September 22, 2016
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Scientists keep a molecule from moving inside nerve cells to prevent cell death
Findings may have implications for Lou Gehrig's, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases
August 03, 2016
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Stem cell treatment helps improve motor functions, nervous system conditions in mice with ALS
Researchers at the University of South Florida show in a new study that bone marrow stem cell transplants helped improve motor functions and nervous system conditions in mice with the disease Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier.
May 15, 2017
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Depression - A

A new blue gene: NKPD1 variant increases depression risk
A study of people from an isolated village in the Netherlands reveals a link between rare variants in the gene NKPD1 and depressive symptoms. the study helps researchers understand the molecular pathology of the disease, which could eventually improve how depression is diagnosed and treated.
April 4, 2017
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy reduces depression, anxiety among chronic pain patients
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR) 2017 has shown that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that focuses on psychological flexibility and behavior change, provided a significant reduction in self-reported depression and anxiety among patients participating in a pain rehabilitation program.
June 15, 2017
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ACMSD enzyme could become key target for new drugs aimed at preventing suicide
An enzyme called ACMSD–part of a chain of biochemical reactions called the kynurenine pathway, activated by inflammation–could become an important target for new drugs aimed at preventing suicide.
October 3, 2016
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Acupuncture boosts effectiveness of standard medical care for chronic pain, depression
Acupuncture treatment can boost the effectiveness of standard medical care, lessening the severity of chronic pain and depression, health specialists have found.
January 30, 2017
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After heart attack, people with depression twice as likely to die
Researchers have known for a while that heart disease and depression influence each other. However, a new study investigates the impact of depression on heart disease over a long period of time, and finds the psychological disorder to increase mortality risk.
March 9, 2017
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After natural disasters, elderly survivors show cognitive decline
Loss of home, resulting depression, less contact with neighbors tied to dementia.
October 30, 2016
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Adolescent depression in girls offset by presence of 'boomerang father'
A study of the impact of 'boomerang fathers' -- those who cycle in and out of their children's lives -- found they provided a type of stability in a daughter's life that staved off her depressive symptoms compared to those adolescent girls whose fathers were completely absent.
August 02, 2016
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Alcohol produces same neural and molecular changes as rapid antidepressant drugs
Can having a few drinks help people with clinical depression feel better?
September 28, 2016
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Aligning depression treatment to patient need leads to efficient care
Not all depressed patients need intensive therapy, according to new research. Instead, prognosis can drive treatment.
March 19, 2017
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Alkaloid in ayahuasca beverage triggers neurogenesis in human neural cells
Ayahuasca is a beverage that has been used for centuries by Native South-Americans. Studies suggest that it exhibits anxiolytic and antidepressant effects in humans. One of the main substances present in the beverage is harmine, a beta-carboline which potential therapeutic effects for depression has been recently described in mice.
December 6, 2016
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Antidepressant use increases hip fracture risk among elderly
Antidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. the increased risk was highest at the beginning of antidepressant use and remained elevated even 4 years later.
January 11, 2017
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Antidepressants Induce Resilience and Reverse Susceptibility
When they work, antidepressant medications may take weeks or months to alleviate symptoms of depression. Progress in developing new and more effective antidepressant treatments has been limited, though a new study offers new insights into how antidepressants work.
February 2, 2017
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Are some BP Meds Linked to Depression, Bipolar?
Researchers add the effect was small, and study did not prove cause and effect
October 11, 2016
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Arthritis drug increases effectiveness of antidepressants in bipolar patients
Giving severely depressed patients the arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex®) dramatically boosted the effectiveness of their antidepressant medication, a Loyola study has found.
November 10, 2016
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Depression - B

Bouldering may help to treat depression
More than 15 million adults in the United States are affected by depression, making it one of the most common mental health disorders in the country. But a new study suggests that there may be a surprising way to help combat this debilitating condition: bouldering.
May 29, 2017
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Brain architecture alters to compensate for depression
Structural differences in the cerebral cortex have been found in patients with depression. These differences normalize with appropriate medication, report researchers.
March 7, 2017
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Brain science startup NeuroQore hopes its magnets will cure depression
NeuroQore wants to shoot magnetic pulses into your brain to try to treat mental disorders such as anxiety and depression.
February 9, 2017
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Brain Stimulation Doesn't Beat Meds For Depression
Novel treatment may need to be tailored to each patient, mental health expert says
June 28, 2017
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Depression - C

Can a Smart Headband Cure Depression?
As of 2015, South Korea had the fourth-highest suicide rate globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).
June 19, 2017
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Can Depression Up Odds for Psoriatic Arthritis?
Mood disorder may increase inflammation throughout the body, researcher says
February 24, 2017
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Caregivers should be screened early, often to prevent depression, anxiety
Currently, more than 34 million people in the U.S. care for terminally ill love ones, but few resources are available to help them navigate the challenges they encounter. a study has found that nearly one-quarter of caregivers were moderately or severely depressed and nearly one-third had moderate or severe anxiety. the researchers recommend that health providers remember to treat the whole family, providing ongoing screening to family caregivers to identify early signs of depression and anxiety.
February 10, 2017
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Changeover from daylight savings to standard time increases number of depression diagnoses
"The year has 16 months: November, December, January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, November, November, November," writes the Danish poet Henrik Nordbrandt in a disheartening comment on the month we are about to enter.
October 27, 2016
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Clinical interviews effective in predicting postpartum depression
Questions regarding work activities especially revealing
March 21, 2017
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Clinical trial evaluating potential treatment for postpartum depression
Researchers have announced the publication of results from a multi-site phase 2 clinical trial with brexanolone, an investigational medication, in the treatment of severe postpartum depression (PPD).
June 13, 2017
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Cognitive behavior therapy significantly reduced depression and anxiety in chronic pain patients
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is a helpful CBT intervention that improves outcomes in patients attending a rheumatology pain rehabilitation program
June 16, 2017
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Collaborative care helps improve symptoms in older adults with subthreshold depression
Depression is the second leading cause of disability worldwide, and one in seven older people meet criteria for depression. Effective therapeutic strategies are needed in older people with depressive symptoms. Simon Gilbody, Ph.D., of the University of York, England, and colleagues randomly assigned 705 adults age 65 years or older with subthreshold depression to collaborative care or usual primary care.
February 21, 2017
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Collaborative care provides improvement for older adults with mild depression
Among older adults with subthreshold depression (insufficient levels of depressive symptoms to meet diagnostic criteria), collaborative care compared with usual care resulted in an improvement in depressive symptoms after four months, although it is of uncertain clinical importance, according to a study.
February 21, 2017
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Common sets of genes disrupted in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression
Studying brain tissue from deceased donors, scientists have found common groups of genes disrupted among people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. the commonly affected genes sets, identified with RNA sequencing methods, engage in making proteins, controlling brain cell communications and mounting an immune system response, the researchers sapan class="DA1">October 26, 2016
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Computer Vision Applications in Mental Health: An Interview with Dr. LP Morency
The National of Mental Health estimates that more than 40 million adults in the US experienced some form of mental illness in 2015, 16 million (or almost 7% of the US population) of which experienced at least one major depressive episode. Over their lifetime, almost 30% of US adults will develop an anxiety disorder.
June 29, 2017
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Consumer genetics company helps spot genes associated with depression
17 new genes associated with a disorder we don't know enough about.
August 09, 2016
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Consuming violent and sexual media before sleep may highly influence dreams at night
The violent and sexual media you consume during the day may infiltrate your dreams at night, new research suggests.
November 15, 2016
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Could eating yogurt help treat depression?
A new study suggests that there may be an effective alternative to medication for the treatment of depression: probiotic bacteria found in yogurt.
March 9, 2017
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Crowdsourced genetics study ferrets out the hereditary roots of depression
Glib catch phrases like "better off together" tend to ring hollow when politicians say them. But in at least one arena, we really are better off together, and that's when it comes to crowdsourced genetics studies. In testimony to this, a new research effort carried out by the drug titan Pfizer was able to successfully locate 15 genetic mutations linked to depression, thanks to the 450,000 individuals who gave the consumer genetics company 23andMe permission to use their genetic data for such research.
August 11, 2016
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Depression - D

Deep brain stimulation could be effective treatment option for patients with severe depressions
Treatment with deep brain stimulation can provide lasting relief to patients suffering from previously non-treatable, severe forms of depression several years into the therapy or even eliminate symptoms entirely. this is the finding of the first long-term study on this form of therapy, conducted by scientists at the Medical Center - University of Freiburg. Seven of the eight patients receiving continuous stimulation in the study showed lasting improvements in their symptoms up to the last observation point four years into treatment.
March 19, 2017
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Deep brain stimulation provides long-term relief from severe depressions
Doctors have produced the first evidence of deep brain stimulation's lasting effectiveness in a four-year study. the method could serve in the future as an optional therapy for critically ill patients, suggests a new report.
March 19, 2017
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Depression after surgery: What you need to know
Experiencing depression after surgery is common. Having less than perfect health, the cost of surgery, plus other worries, may trigger feelings of hopelessness or despair.
May 25, 2017
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Depression can Strike new Dads, Too
Men who are stressed or in poor health seem to be at special risk, study shows
February 16, 2017
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Depression doubles long-term risk of death after heart disease diagnosis, new study finds new study
Depression is the strongest predictor of death in the first decade following a diagnosis of coronary heart disease, according to a new study.
March 13, 2017
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Depression during pregnancy is associated with abnormal brain structure in children
Depressive symptoms in women during and after pregnancy are associated with reduced thickness of the cortex -- the outer layer of the brain responsible for complex thought and behavior -- in preschool-age kids, according to a new study. the findings suggest that a mother's mood may affect her child's brain development at critical stages in life.
November 15, 2016
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Depression in early pregnancy linked to gestational diabetes
A two-way link between depression and gestational Diabetes has been uncovered by researchers. Women who reported feeling depressed during the first two trimesters of pregnancy were nearly twice as likely to develop gestational diabetes, according to an analysis of pregnancy records.
September 19, 2016
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Depression in pregnancy increases risk of mental health problems in children
Depression in pregnancy increases the risk of behavioral and emotional problems in children, says a new review.
September 28, 2016
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Depression linked to e-cigarette use among college students
The emergence of e-cigarettes as a nicotine product has left scientists with many questions about their impact on health, including how the product interacts with depression. a new study has found a connection between depression and initiation of e-cigarette use among college students.
February 13, 2017
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Depression May Hasten Death After Heart Diagnosis
Mental health screening recommended over the long term, study suggests
March 8, 2017
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Depression rates growing among adolescents, particularly girls
The rate of adolescents reporting a recent bout of clinical depression grew by 37 percent over the decade ending in 2014, with one in six girls reporting an episode in the past year, new research suggests.
November 15, 2016
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Depression Rising Among Teens, Especially Girls
Report authors point to cyberbullying, social media use as possible causes, but say that hasn't been proven
November 14, 2016
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Depression screening tools may lead to misdiagnosis in children and adolescents
In Canada and the U.S., doctors are increasingly being encouraged to try to identify depression in children and adolescents - even if they do not have obvious indications of the disease. In order to do so, the physicians often use short questionnaires that ask about symptoms of depression.
August 02, 2016
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Depression screening tools not accurate for children and adolescents
Researchers advise against routine screening in this age group
August 02, 2016
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Depression symptoms among men when their partners are pregnant
Men who were stressed or in poor health had elevated depression symptoms when their partners were pregnant and nine months after the birth of their child, according to the results of a study of expectant and new fathers in new Zealand.
February 15, 2017
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Depression: Finger-prick blood test predicts likely effectiveness of medication
For the first time, researchers show that a finger-prick blood test could help doctors to choose which medication is most likely to succeed in treating depression. In the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, they describe how levels of C-reactive protein in the blood predict which antidepressant treatments are most likely to lead to successful outcomes in patients with depression.
March 30, 2017
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Depression's physical source discovered
Research suggests potential for new treatments
October 18, 2016
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Depression, alcohol, and marijuana linked to later use of synthetic marijuana among teens
In the first prospective study of synthetic cannabinoids or SCs -- the group of chemicals that mimic the effects of marijuana -- researchers have found that symptoms of depression, drinking alcohol, or using marijuana was linked to an increased risk of SC use one year later.
March 13, 2017
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Depression - E

Early predictors of anxiety and depression may be evident in the brain at birth, study suggests
Analyzing brain scans of newborns, the researchers found that the strength and pattern of connections between the amygdala and certain brain regions predicted the likelihood of the babies developing greater internalizing symptoms like sadness, excessive shyness, nervousness, or separation anxiety by age two.
February 1, 2017
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Early signs of anxiety, depression may be evident in the brains of newborns
Brain scans at birth predict later symptoms
February 1, 2017
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Easier to let go: can depression help people deal with life?
Patients with depression find it easier to abandon unattainable goals, a psychological study has concluded.
February 2, 2017
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Effectiveness of yoga in treating major depression evaluated
New research indicates that the benefits of hatha yoga in treating depression are less pronounced in early treatment, but may accumulate over time.
May 8, 2017
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Excess Sweating May Affect your Mental Health
People with hyperhidrosis seem to have higher rates of anxiety and depression, study finds
December 6, 2016
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Depression - F

FDA Fast-Tracks Ketamine for Depression Treatment
The experimental drug esketamine (also known as ketamine) has been placed on the fast track for U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for treating major depression, according to Janssen Pharmaceutical.
August 18, 2016
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Financial difficulties increase risk of mental health conditions among university students
Experiencing financial difficulties and worrying about debt at university increases the risk of mental health conditions such as depression and alcohol dependency, according to new research from the University of Southampton and Solent NHS Trust.
August 09, 2016
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Depression - G

Gender differences in depression appear at age 12
A new analysis has broken new ground by finding gender differences in both symptoms and diagnoses of depression appearing at age 12.
April 27, 2017
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Groundbreaking fMRI study finds 4 distinct neurological subtypes of depression
New research from Weill Cornell has isolated four distinct neurotypes of depression. But its knock-on effects are much wider in scope. the work establishes biomarkers for depression, and it sheds new light on the physical underpinnings of psychological disease.
December 20, 2016
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Depression - H

Half of adults with anxiety or depression report chronic pain
In a survey of adults with anxiety or a mood disorder like depression or bipolar disorder, about half reported experiencing chronic pain, according to researchers.
May 31, 2017
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Head injuries can alter hundreds of genes and lead to serious brain diseases
Head injuries can adversely affect hundreds of genes in the brain that put people at high risk for diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, post-traumatic stress disorder, stroke, ADHD, autism, depression and schizophrenia, life scientists report. the researchers have identified for the first time potential master genes which they believe control hundreds of other genes that are linked to many neurological and psychiatric disorders.
March 6, 2017
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High occupational levels may be risk factor for poor response to depression treatment
An international study has found that having a high status job means that you are less likely to respond to standard treatment with medications for depression. These results, which may have implications for clinicians and their patients, employers and public policy, are presented at the ECNP Congress in Vienna.
September 20, 2016
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How depression can muddle thinking
Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation. But people with depression can also have trouble processing information and solving problems. now scientists studying a rat model for depression are identifying on a molecular level how the condition could affect thinking. the findings could lead to the development of new depression treatments that would address associated cognitive problems.
February 15, 2017
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How do antidepressants trigger fear and anxiety?
Researchers map the anxiety circuit in the brain and use a compound to limit fearful behavior -- an acute side effect of commonly prescribed SSRI antidepressants
August 24, 2016
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How listening to music in a group influences depression
New research takes a closer look at how music influences the mood in people suffering from depression, and examines what factors might affect whether listening to sad music in group settings provides social benefits for listeners, or if it rather reinforces depressive tendencies.
May 24, 2017
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How VR Could Change the Way we Treat Depression
Virtual reality meets mental health.
September 29, 2016
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Depression - I

Infections during pregnancy have a negative impact upon maternal care, can trigger depression in child
A viral infection in a pregnant woman not only affects her subsequent ability to provide maternal care but can also trigger depression in her offspring, which can then even extend into the next generation as a result of changes to genetic mechanisms in the brain.
December 14, 2016
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Depression - K

Keep your Lows from Keeping you Down
When she was 19, Laura Riordan was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, a condition characterized by extreme mood swings -- periods of highs (called mania) and lows of depression.
October 28, 2016
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Ketamine And Depression: FAQ
Major depression affects more than 16 million American adults each year, nearly a third of whom don't find relief from antidepressants and other traditional treatments. When depression isn't treated, it increases the chance of alcohol and drug dependence, as well as suicide.
July 6, 2017
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Depression - L

Learning to reduce rumination can help patients with depressive symptoms, research shows
A thought is a thought. It does not reflect reality. new research shows that learning how to ruminate less on thoughts and feelings has a positive effect for individuals with depression.
March 13, 2017
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Less Labor Pain, Lower Postpartum Depression Risk?
Reduced inflammation one possible reason for the association, researcher says
October 26, 2016
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Low gene expression may raise susceptibility to depression
Researchers have taken an in-depth look at the function of a gene that may be linked to the development of major depression. Their findings show that its activity levels might determine our susceptibility to stress and negative stimuli.
July 10, 2017
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Low levels of 'anti-anxiety' hormone linked to postpartum depression
Effect measured in women already diagnosed with mood disorders
March 14, 2017
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Depression - M

Many adults who screen positive for depression don't receive treatment
A new study suggests gaps exist in the treatment of depression with many individuals who screen positive for the mental health disorder not receiving treatment, according to a new article.
August 29, 2016
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Many Depressed Adults not Getting Treatment: Study
Reasons range from dismissal of symptoms to shame or stigma
August 29, 2016
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Maternal depression across the first years of life impacts children's neural basis of empathy
Exposure to early and chronic maternal depression markedly increases a child's susceptibility to psychopathology and social-emotional problems, including social withdrawal, poor emotion regulation, and reduced empathy to others. Since 15-18% of women in industrial societies and up to 30% in developing countries suffer from maternal depression, it is of clinical and public health concern to understand the effects of maternal depression on children's development.
January 3, 2017
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Mice study explains why antidepressants don't work in some patients
SSRI antidepressants (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, the best known being Prozactm) are amongst the most commonly taken medicines. However, there seems to be no way of knowing in advance whether or not SSRIs will work effectively. now a group of European researchers has developed a new theory of SSRI action, and tested it in stressed mice.
September 20, 2016
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Mindfulness training helps alleviate depressive symptoms in disadvantaged African-American women
African-American women with lower socio-economic status have an increased risk of depressive disorders, yet they rarely seek out antidepressants or psychotherapy because of negative attitudes and stigma associated with conventional mental health treatments.
August 16, 2016
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More evidence why depressed dads should seek help
A father's depression has a direct effect on both internalized and externalized behavioral problems in adolescents, according to a recent study.
May 3, 2017
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More Than 1 in 10 Pilots Suffer from Depression
Report highlights need for accurate screening
December 14, 2016
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More Than 330M Worldwide Have Depression: WHO
Depression affects more than 300 million people worldwide and is the leading cause of poor health and disability, according to the World Health Organization.
March 31, 2017
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Mouse study identifies new method for treating depression
Inhibiting brain enzyme alleviates depression, and does it much faster than conventional antidepressants
March 21, 2017
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Mouse study paves way for more effective antidepressant
Depression affects the well-being of a significant number of adults in the United States. Although medication is available for treating clinical depression, some of these drugs take a long time to work or may pose health risks because of their side effects. However, a new mouse study paves the way for a more effective treatment of depression in humans.
March 21, 2017
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MRI brain scans may help clinicians decide between CBT and drug treatment for depression
Researchers from Emory University have found that specific patterns of activity on brain scans may help clinicians identify whether psychotherapy or antidepressant medication is more likely to help individual patients recover from depression.
March 24, 2017
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Music therapy reduces depression in children, adolescents, research finds
Music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioral and emotional problems, researchers have discovered.="DA1">November 3, 2016
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Depression - N

Nearly half of adults with mood disorders experience chronic pain, survey finds
In a survey of adults with anxiety or a mood disorder like depression or bipolar disorder, about half reported experiencing chronic pain, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The findings are published online in the Journal of Affective Disorders.
May 31, 2017
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Negative experiences on Facebook linked to increased depression risk in young adults
Negative experiences on Facebook may increase the risk of depressive symptoms, suggesting that online social interactions have important consequences for mental health, a unique new study of young adults finds.
September 8, 2016
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Nerve cell miswiring linked to depression
Mouse study identifies gene needed for proper assembly of serotonin circuitry
April 28, 2017
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New approach uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs
A team of engineering and medical researchers has found a way to use ultrasound to monitor fluid levels in the lung, offering a noninvasive way to track progress in treating pulmonary edema -- fluid in the lungs -- which often occurs in patients with congestive heart failure. the approach, which has been demonstrated in rats, also holds promise for diagnosing scarring, or fibrosis, in the lung.
March 21, 2017
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New erectile dysfunction treatment uses high-frequency acoustical waves
Statistically speaking, 50% of all men, have experienced erectile dysfunction (ED) at some time or another, and the chance of developing ED increases as you age. the medical management of ED has evolved greatly over the past several decades.
December 16, 2016
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New research could lead to improved treatment for depression
SCIENTISTS at the University of Huddersfield led by Dr Patrick McHugh have embarked on a project that could lead to a more effective treatment for depression.
August 10, 2016
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New study aims to identify ways of helping patients withdraw from long-term antidepressant treatment
One in 10 adults are being given antidepressants each year, but up to 50 per cent of patients could be given an alternative treatment, a University Professor suggests.
July 25, 2016
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New study to look at impact of common antidepressants on pregnant women
Northwestern Medicine Prentice Women's Hospital and the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry is home to a landmark study that will, for the first time, take a close look at the impact of certain common antidepressants on pregnant women.
September 13, 2016
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New therapy proves effective in reducing symptoms of treatment-resistant depression
In the largest study ever conducted with patients experiencing chronic and severe depression, researchers led by Dr. Scott Aaronson, Director of Clinical Research at Sheppard Pratt Health System have found that an implantable vagus nerve stimulation device (VNS Therapy) paired with antidepressant treatment (which could include medications, psychotherapy, or electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)) proves effective in reducing symptoms among patients with treatment-resistant depression.
March 31, 2017
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Depression - O

Off-Label Antidepressants Common; Evidence Lacking
One-third are prescribed for conditions like pain or migraine with little scientific backup, study says
February 22, 2017
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Oral contraceptive pills have negative impact on women's quality of life, study shows
One of the most common combined oral contraceptive pills has a negative impact on women's quality of life but does not increase depressive symptoms. this is shown by a major randomised, placebo-controlled study conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden in collaboration with the Stockholm School of Economics.
April 18, 2017
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Depression - P

Patients are experimenting with ketamine to treat depression
sean spencer was ready to give up. For two years, since suffering a major panic attack, the entrepreneur had been living under a cloud of depression. Nothing seemed to make it better. He took traditional antidepressants, but they made him "want to die." Meditation gave him a fleeting sense of relief, but it wasn't enough to get him through the day. Out of desperation, he finally traveled to a clinic to try a controversial new therapy: ketamine IV infusions.
June 21, 2017
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Patients with depression symptoms due to chronic sinus disease are less productive
Depression is the driving factor for missed days of work or school in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis
March 10, 2017
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Pediatrician advises parents to identify depression and suicidal tendencies among teens
The teen years can be a time of stress, confusion and uncertainty. There is pressure to fit in, to stand out and to succeed. So you can hardly blame adolescents for sometimes being moody, down, or wanting to be left alone.
September 22, 2016
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Peer victimization in fifth grade has lasting effects on health and later substance use, study finds
A new study led by the University of Delaware found that kids who are bullied in fifth grade often suffer from depression and begin using alcohol and other substances a few years after the incidents.
May 8, 2017
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Personalized psychiatry matches therapy to specific patients with depression
Selecting the antidepressant that will be most effective for a specific patient suffering from depression can be a 'try and try again' process. Examining new personalized and precision psychiatry approaches, a new study shows that body mass index, sex of the patient, and symptom profile can be used to determine a personalized treatment that guides antidepressant choice and significantly improves patient outcome.
May 1, 2017
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PET imaging of adult neurogenesis may contribute to better diagnosis of depression, evaluation of drug therapy effectiveness
A new non-invasive PET scanning technique has been used by researchers to obtain images of neuron proliferation in the subventricular zone and subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is known to be particularly affected by depression.
August 03, 2016
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Physically active children are less depressed
Children, like adults, reap physical and mental benefits from being active
January 31, 2017
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Piece of mind: Engineers can take pictures of the brain with surgical needle and laser light
With just an inexpensive micro-thin surgical needle and laser light, engineers have discovered a minimally invasive, inexpensive way to take high-resolution pictures of an animal brain, a process that also could lead to a much less invasive method for humans. the team has now proven the process works on mice for the benefit of medical researchers studying neurological disorders such as depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and aggression.
March 19, 2017
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Playing to beat the blues: Video games viable treatment for depression
People play more often when they receive reminders, study finds
March 27, 2017
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Poor sleep in anxiety, depression may make it harder to see positive
The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex may have to work harder to modify negative emotional responses in people with poor sleep who have depression or anxiety, new research suggests.
April 18, 2017
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Postpartum Depression May Mean Fewer Children
They're unlikely to have more than two kids, researchers say
March 18, 2016
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Prenatal BPA exposure could lead to development of anxiety and depression in boys
Boys exposed prenatally to a common chemical used in plastics may be more likely to develop symptoms of anxiety and depression at age 10-12. the new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) within the Mailman School of Public Health examined early life exposure to the chemical Bisphenol a (BPA).
August 16, 2016
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Depression - Q

Queen's and AWARE announce new online support service for adults with depression
Queen's University Belfast and AWARE, the national depression charity for Northern Ireland, announce a new online support service for adults with depression to mark World Health day (Friday 7 April).
April 7, 2017
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Depression - R

Research evaluates risk factors for postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants
Postpartum depression is the most common complication of pregnancy and childbirth, affecting up to 15 percent of all women within the first three months following delivery. Research has shown that mothers of infants born prematurely have almost double the rates of postpartum depression, particularly during their time in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
September 13, 2016
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Research findings underscore striking heterogeneity of depression
Depression is generally considered to be a specific and consistent disorder characterised by a fixed set of symptoms and often treated with a combination of psychotherapy and medication. However, the standard rating scales used by healthcare professionals and researchers to diagnose this disease often differ in the symptoms they list, perhaps explaining why a one-size-fits-all treatment has to date been so ineffective. this is the finding of research conducted by psychologist Eiko Fried from the University of Amsterdam (UvA). His results are published in the latest edition of the Journal of Affective Disorders.
October 22, 2016
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Researchers examine morbidity linked to depressive disorders
Ross Baldessarini and an international group of investigators have analyzed the morbidity associated with depressive disorders in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.
April 27, 2017
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Researchers explore kidney biomarkers to track lupus progression
Lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease, can wreak havoc on an affected individual's body through inflammation, pain and even damage of the skin, joints and organs.
December 16, 2016
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Researchers locate physical roots of depression
Understanding of the physical root of depression has been advanced, thanks to research by the University of Warwick, UK, and Fudan University, China.
October 18, 2016
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Researchers provide new data and prospects for links between gut microbiota and depression
An international group of researchers headed by Andre Carvalho has published in Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic a paper that provides new data and prospects for the links between the intestinal flora and several disorders, notably depression.
February 16, 2017
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Researchers reassess supposed link between depression and all-cause mortality
Over three decades of research suggest that depression increases the odds of death. However, a new research paper throws doubt on this presumed link after finding no evidence of a direct association between depression and all-cause mortality.
May 16, 2017
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Researchers uncover prevalence of anxiety and depression in young people with chronic liver diseases
Researchers have found that many teens and young adults with chronic liver conditions suffer from depression and anxiety, which can have considerable impacts on their emotional and physical health. the findings, which are published in Liver Transplantation, indicate that greater attention should be directed to the mental health of these young patients.
October 27, 2016
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Review highlights importance of population-based alcohol policies in suicide prevention
Suicide was the tenth leading cause of death in the United States in 2013. There is clear evidence that intoxication and chronic, heavy drinking are often associated with suicide. While alcohol policies are known to be effective in reducing excessive drinking, this review undertakes a critical look at the literature on the relationship between alcohol policies and suicide.
September 13, 2016
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Depression - S

Scientists use new non-invasive PET scanning method to monitor hippocampal neurogenesis
Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technology (CLST) in Japan have used a new non-invasive PET scanning technique to obtain images of neuron proliferation in the subventricular zone and subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is known to be particularly affected by depression.
August 03, 2016
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Simple, inexpensive psychotherapy treatment as effective as CBT for treating depression in adults
Behavioural activation treatment could offer cost savings of over 20%
July 25, 2016
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Significant number of airline pilots suffer depression, suicidal thoughts
In an anonymous pilot survey, about 12% were depressed, 4% had suicidal thoughts.
December 14, 2016
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SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health
Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them.
September 23, 2016
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Study data does not support benefits of testosterone supplementation in men with 'low T'
The prescription of testosterone supplementation for cardiovascular health, sexual function, physical function, mood, or cognitive function in men with "low T" is not supported by clinical trials data, conclude researchers who describe a review of more than 200 clinical trials published Sept. 21 in PLOS One.
September 22, 2016
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Study evaluates effectiveness of psychotherapy in SAD patients who fail to respond to antidepressants
A randomized controlled study has evaluated the role of psychotherapy in patients whose social anxiety did not respond to drug treatment. Although antidepressants are still a commonly used treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD), a significant proportion of patients fail to remit following antidepressants.
July 27, 2016
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Study finds depression to be strongest predictor of death following heart disease diagnosis
Depression is the strongest predictor of death in the first decade following a diagnosis of coronary heart disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.
March 13, 2017
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Study Finds Genes Linked to Depression
One Study, Over a Dozen Genes that can Affect Risk
August 1, 2016
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Study finds moderate or severe signs of depression and anxiety among hospice caregivers
Currently, more than 34 million people in the U.S. care for terminally ill love ones, but few resources are available to help them navigate the challenges they encounter. a study at the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that nearly one-quarter of caregivers were moderately or severely depressed and nearly one-third had moderate or severe anxiety. the researchers recommend that health providers remember to treat the whole family, providing ongoing screening to family caregivers to identify early signs of depression and anxiety.
February 8, 2017
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Study finds negligible link between excessive screen time and depression, delinquency among teenagers
Chances are that your children will turn out OK even though they spend hours playing video games or watching TV. this is according to Christopher Ferguson of Stetson University in the US, who led a study in Springer's journal Psychiatric Quarterly which found that there is only a negligibly small association between excessive screen time and higher levels of depression and delinquency among teenagers. Ferguson therefore believes the strict attention to limited screen time by policy makers and advocacy groups is uncalled for.
February 7, 2017
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Study finds prior history of suicide attempt could be more lethal than previously thought
While a prior history of suicide attempt is one of the strongest predictors of completed suicide, a Mayo Clinic study finds it is more lethal than previously known.
September 13, 2016
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Study looks at positive link between high-volume transplant centers and improved patient outcomes
How many heart transplant programs do we really need?
September 20, 2016
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Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design
Previous studies have shown a correlation between the design of cities and growing epidemics of injuries and non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, Diabetes and cancer. a three-part series published in the Lancet and released in conjunction with the United Nations quantifies health gains achieved if cities were designed so that shops, facilities, work and public transportation were within walking distance of most residents.
September 23, 2016
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Study reports presence of structural changes in the brain during medication treatment for depression
"Our findings suggest that thickening of the cerebral cortex is a compensatory, neuroplastic response that helps to reduce the severity of depressive symptoms," said Peterson, director of the Institute of the Developing Mind at CHLA and professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California.
March 7, 2017
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Study reveals link between rare NKPD1 gene and depressive symptoms
A study of people from an isolated village in the Netherlands reveals a link between rare variants in the gene NKPD1 and depressive symptoms. the findings are published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry. the study, led by co-first authors Najaf Amin, PhD, of Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands and Nadezhda Belonogova of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Novosibirsk, Russia, helps researchers understand the molecular pathology of the disease, which could eventually improve how depression is diagnosed and treated.
April 4, 2017
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Study reverses thinking on genetic links to stress, depression
For years, scientists have been trying to determine what effect a gene linked to the brain chemical serotonin may have on depression in people exposed to stress. But now, analyzing information from more than 40,000 people who have been studied over more than a decade, researchers have found no evidence that the gene alters the impact stress has on depression.
April 4, 2017
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Study shows adequate sleep may accelerate antident response
Medication is an important part of treatment for many patients with major depressive disorder, but the transition to antidepressants isn't always smooth.
September 7, 2016
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Study shows drugs for hypertension may help treat mood disorders
In the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, the relationship of drugs that are generally used for treating hypertension (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors) are examined in their effects as to depression.
July 26, 2016
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Study shows work productivity key in evaluating recovery of depressed patients
While medications can quickly reduce depressive symptoms, monitoring work productivity can provide unique insight into whether a patient will require additional treatments to achieve long-term remission, a new study through the Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute finds.
August 17, 2016
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Study: No Link Between Antidepressants, Autism
After accounting for other factors that raise chances of the disorder, the increased risk disappeared
April 18, 2017
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Depression - T

Tackling depression by changing the way you think
Teaching patients not to ruminate offers important coping skill for depression
March 13, 2017
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Tai chi significantly reduces depression symptoms in Chinese-Americans
A new study finds that a 12-week program of instruction and practice of the Chinese martial art tai chi led to significantly reduced symptoms of depression in Chinese-Americans not receiving any other treatments.
May 25, 2017
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This is your brain on (legal) cannabis: Researchers seek answers
For those suffering depression or anxiety, using cannabis for relief may not be the long-term answer
December 16, 2016
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Tiny Babies May Face Mental Health Problems Later
Review found greater likelihood of ADHD, anxiety and depression
February 13, 2017
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TMS therapy offers hope for senior adults with depression
Late-life depression (LLD) is a frequent complication of the aging process, occurring in up to 5% of senior adults and in a higher proportion of subjects with coexistent medical illnesses.
June 1, 2017
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Traumatic brain injuries may be helped with drug used to treat bipolar disorder
Rutgers research indicates lithium may prevent brain cell damage
May 8, 2017
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Treating depression with software
A treatment for depression using Emotional Faces Memory Task resulted in a significantly greater reduction of major depressive disorder symptoms compared to a control group, according to initial clinical results.
June 5, 2017
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Treating persistent depression in older adults
A $13.9 million grant has been awarded to evaluate treatment strategies for older adults with depression who have not responded to medications.
October 5, 2016
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Depression - U

UAlberta EMPATHY program reduces depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts in youth
A University of Alberta pilot program designed to promote mental health skills in youth significantly lessened cases of depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts.
June 19, 2017
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UNC researchers evaluate investigational medication for treatment of postpartum depression
Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine announced the publication of results from a multi-site phase 2 clinical trial with brexanolone, an investigational medication, in the treatment of severe postpartum depression (PPD).
June 13, 2017
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UNC researchers map anxiety circuit in the brain that may explain side effects of antidepressants
More than 100 million people worldwide take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac and Zoloft, to treat depression, anxiety and related conditions, but these drugs have a common and mysterious side effect: they can worsen anxiety in the first few weeks of use, which leads many patients to stop treatment.
August 25, 2016
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Depression - W

Weighted blankets for anxiety: Uses and benefits
Some people who experience anxiety may not find relief through medication alone, or they might be hesitant to try medication. other methods of managing anxiety, such as the use of a weighted blanket, can help.
April 21, 2017
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What Effect Does Prenatal and Postpartum Maternal Depression Have on Children?
The results of a large study do not support the notion that prenatal and postpartum maternal depression is particularly detrimental to children's psychological development. Instead, the most robust effects were found for maternal depression occurring during children's preschool years.
February 24, 2017
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What Keeps some Youths from Sexual Health Services
Survey reveals reluctance of teens, young adults to talk to their doctor because parents might find out
December 16, 2016
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What People with Depression Wish you Knew
Depression is common: Almost 16 million Americans deal with it every year. But for those who have it, explaining their feelings can be hard.
January 6, 2017
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Why do antidepressants take so long to work?
An episode of major depression can be crippling, impairing the ability to sleep, work, or eat. But the drugs available to treat depression can take weeks or even months to start working. Researchers have discovered one reason the drugs take so long to work, and their finding could help scientists develop faster-acting drugs in the future.
July 28, 2016
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Work productivity is key factor in assessing recovery of depressed patients
While medications can quickly reduce depressive symptoms, monitoring work productivity can provide unique insight into whether a patient will require additional treatments to achieve long-term remission, a new study finds.
August 15, 2016
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Hearing

1 in 10 Americans Has Had Ringing in the Ears
Study also found association between prolonged exposure to loud noises and tinnitus
July 21, 2016
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A Cheaper Alternative to Hearing Aids?
Devices performed almost as well and are much cheaper, but they aren't regulated, researchers note
July 4, 2017
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ACCLARENT AERA Treats Eustachian Tube Dysfunction by Gentle Dilation
Acclarent out of Irvine, California is releasing in the U.S. its ACCLARENT AERA eustachian tube balloon dilation system, the first such product for treatment of eustachian tube dysfunction. Eustachian tubes, which link the pharynx to the middle ear and are used to regulate pressure when we yawn, sneeze, and swallow food, can get blocked and result in poor hearing, discomfort, and pain.
October 4, 2016
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Action on Hearing Loss supports launch of Accessible Information Standard for people with hearing deficits
Charity Action on Hearing Loss is welcoming the launch of the Accessible Information Standard, which comes into full force today (August 1).
August 02, 2016
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Adding higher frequencies to standard protocol improves detection of hearing loss in adolescents
Adding higher frequencies to the American Academy of Pediatrics hearing test protocol helps detect adolescent hearing loss, according to a team of pediatricians and audiologists.
November 21, 2016
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An Easier Gel Ear Infection Treatment Someday?
One-time application was highly effective in animal trials, but more study needed, researchers say
September 14, 2016
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Bose gets into the hearing aid headphone business
When you've got a punny name as good as "Hearphones" (no Google, I did not mean "headphones") in the chamber, you owe it to the world to deliver product. for Bose, the emerging space of hearing-assisting headphones was the perfect place for that fun bit of word play.
December 12, 2016
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Cauliflower ear: Causes, symptoms, and treatments
Cauliflower ear, also known as perichondrial hematoma, is a swelling of the ear caused by a blood clot. this blood clot causes tissue damage that leads to a lumpy appearance that is said to resemble a cauliflower.
March 7, 2017
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Doppler Labs is working with Senator Elizabeth Warren to deregulate the hearing aid industry
"Hearing is a right for everybody," Doppler Labs" Noah Kraft told me over the phone last week. it's why his new chief science officer Jim Pitkow is working with a team of U.S. senators and members of Congress to make certain types of hearing aids available over the counter.
March 28, 2017
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Earwax There to Protect your Hearing, Doctors Say
If it builds up, seek medical attention, otherwise leave it alone, guidelines advise
January 3, 2017
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Fewer Americans Under 70 Have Hearing Loss
It's still common, but noise-safety rules and changing smoking patterns may have helped, researcher says
December 14, 2016
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First-ever clinical study shows that older adults benefit from hearing aid use
Led by researchers at Indiana University with funding support (Grant No. R01 DC011771) from the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the study sought to compare patient outcomes when hearing aids are delivered via an audiology "best practices" model compared with an "over-the-counter" (OTC) model.
February 23, 2017
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For Millions, Everyday Life Takes Toll on Hearing
Contrary to popular opinion, work-related noise not the main culprit, CDC reports
February 7, 2017
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Fujitsu's Ontenna could be a big deal for the deaf
The prototype device translates audio waves to vibrations
October 3, 2016
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Fujitsu's Ontenna could be a big deal for the deaf
The prototype device translates audio waves to vibration
October 4, 2016
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Gene associated with age-related hearing loss
A large screening program has identified several genes associated with age-related conditions including hearing loss, retinal degeneration and osteoarthritis. the animal study may lead to studies of the equivalent human gene and help develop screening programs to identify the risk of developing an age-related condition many years before symptoms appear.
August 18, 2016
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Groundbreaking research finds concussion biomarker in auditory system
The secret to reliably diagnosing concussions lies in the brain's ability to process sound, according to a new study by researchers from Northwestern University's Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory.
December 22, 2016
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Hearing Loss May Double in United States by 2060
Those over 70 will be hardest hit, study finds
February 23, 2017
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Hearing loss prevalence declining in U.S. adults aged 20 to 69 years
Hearing loss among U.S. adults aged 20 to 69 has declined over the last decade, even as the number of older Americans continues to grow. These findings, published today in JAMA Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery, also confirm that hearing loss is strongly associated with age and other demographic factors such as sex, race/ethnicity, and education. Noise exposure, which is potentially preventable, was also significant but less strongly associated after adjustment for other factors.
December 14, 2016
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Hormone replacement therapy may increase risk of hearing loss
Hearing loss affects tens of millions of people in the United States. new research examines the link between menopausal age, the use of oral hormonal therapy, and hearing loss in the first large-scale study of its kind.
May 10, 2017
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Hormone Replacement Therapy Tied to Hearing Loss
Older age at menopause also appeared to increase the risk, study found
May 12, 2017
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Human inner ear organs grown: Could lead to new therapies for hearing, balance impairments
Researchers have successfully developed a method to grow inner ear tissue from human stem cells, a finding that could lead to new platforms to model disease and new therapies for the treatment of hearing and balance disorders.
May 2, 2017
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Innovative program shows promise in helping deaf, hard-of-hearing children gain literacy skills
Those can be some of the most powerful words in the development of any child's ability to read and write. for children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and living in bilingual homes, the "come read with me" invitation becomes even more crucial to their literacy development.
July 27, 2016
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Kanso Off-The-Ear Sound Processor for Cochlear Implants Coming to America
Cochlear, an Australian firm, won FDA regulatory approval to bring to the U.S. its Kanso Sound Processor. the Kanso is the hearing part for interfacing with cochlear implants, capturing sounds using two microphones, converting them into a digital signal, and passing them to an implant under the skin. the implant delivers these signals to the cochlea where hearing nerve fibers absorb them and sends them to the brain.
September 8, 2016
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Knops are adjustable ear plugs that might save your hearing
Kind of pricey, though
April 19, 2017
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MED-EL SYNCHRONY EAS Electric and Acoustic Hearing System for Partial Deafness FDA Cleared
MED-EL, an Austrian firm, received FDA clearance for its SYNCHRONY EAS (Electric Acoustic Stimulation) Hearing Implant System. the product is the first hearing aid system that simultaneously works as both a cochlear implant and a more traditional audio amplifier. a central processor with a microphone splits the signal into high and low frequencies.
September 23, 2016
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MIT unveils Short-Wave Infrared Otoscope for new View of Middle Ear
While we have instruments that can peer deep inside the ear, they typically can't see much below the surface once inside. That's because visible light is absorbed and scattered by soft tissues, providing only a view of their surfaces.
August 26, 2016
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New program provides free hearing aids to low-income, uninsured adults
Low-income people dealing with hearing loss just got a little hope.
June 16, 2017
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New study seeks to understand how deaf infants with cochlear implants learn words
Research has proven the importance of early access to sound and spoken language among newborns and has led to significant advances in hearing screening and early intervention. Despite progress and improvements in educational and language outcomes of deaf children, children with hearing loss are still delayed, on average, when it comes to spoken language acquisition and still achieve lower reading levels and educational outcomes than children with normal hearing.
February 27, 2017
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Now drivers can hear ambulances no matter how loud their music is playing
if you've ever been startled by the sudden appearance of an ambulance while blasting music in your car, then you appreciate the value of a loud siren. Fortunately, your car is probably equipped already to receive warning signals on its audio system, thanks to a new solution developed by students in Sweden.
January 16, 2017
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Pain Relievers May be Tied to Hearing Loss in Some
But degree of impairment tied to acetaminophen and ibuprofen was modest, researchers say
December 19, 2016
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Post-Op Ear Drops and Kids' Eardrum Perforations
Rate of the injury rises with quinolones, but researchers say alternatives have their own hazards
March 30, 2017
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Research shows role played by brain reorganisation process in success or failure of cochlear implants
A cochlear implant is an electronic device capable of restoring hearing in a profoundly deaf person by directly stimulating the nerve endings in the inner ear. this technology enables people who have become deaf to be able to communicate orally again, even by telephone, and children born deaf to learn to speak and to benefit from normal schooling.
March 28, 2017
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Researchers discover gene linked to age-related hearing loss
A large screening programme has identified several genes associated with age-related conditions including hearing loss, retinal degeneration and osteoarthritis. the animal study, published in Nature Communications, may lead to studies of the equivalent human gene and help develop screening programmes to identify the risk of developing an age-related condition many years before symptoms appear.
August 18, 2016
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Researchers discover gene that may play role in restoring hearing after noise exposure
Researchers have discovered that a protein implicated in human longevity may also play a role in restoring hearing after noise exposure. the findings, where were published in the journal Scientific Reports, could one day provide researchers with new tools to prevent hearing loss.
April 24, 2017
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Researchers discover new biological mechanism involved in progressive hearing loss
New research with funding from UK charity Action on Hearing Loss has led to the discovery of a new biological mechanism involved in the progressive loss of hearing which could lead to new approaches to treating this common form of hearing loss.
August 17, 2016
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Researchers reveal hereditary nature of bilateral tinnitus
Researchers have been able to demonstrate the hereditary nature of certain forms of tinnitus. Bilateral tinnitus - that is, tinnitus in both ears - has been shown to depend on genetic factors, particularly in men. the twin study, whiin the journal Genetics in Medicine, was conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet together with colleagues from the European research network TINNET.
March 9, 2017
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Scientists Want to Grow your Music-Blasted Ears some new Parts
Hearing loss can be inevitable for some older folks, as well as for their music blasting, phone screen-staring grandchildren. Naturally, many of those who've lost their hearing are keen on getting it back, somehow, with things like hearing aids and cochlear implants.
May 2, 2017
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Shortened antimicrobial treatment inferior to standard regimen for middle ear infections, study finds
A five-day antimicrobial treatment regimen for middle ear infections in young children is inferior to the standard 10-day regimen, according to newly published research in the new England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). Middle ear infections (or "acute otitis media") are common childhood illnesses often caused by bacteria and usually treated with antibiotics.
December 22, 2016
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Study could help surgeons choose best approaches for hearing preservation in cochlear implant patients
Cochlear implants that have electrodes designed without wire perform better than those with wires for long-term hearing preservation, a Mount Sinai researcher has reported in a first-of-its-kind study. The research also determined that the best surgical approach for cochlear implant procedures did not involve drilling into the bone around the ear. The results, published in the June 23, 2017, online edition of The Laryngoscope, may transform how doctors approach cochlear implant procedures to give patients the best possible outcomes.
June 27, 2017
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Study Suggests Genetic Link to Middle Ear Infections
They're the No. 1 reason kids get antibiotics, and finding could point to better treatments, researchers say
October 7, 2016
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These iPhone-connected hearing aids let doctors make adjustments remotely
Connected hearing aids are nothing new, but today a company called ReSound introduced the iPhone-compatible LiNX 3D, which can be adjusted remotely. this means doctors can access their patients' hearing aids and make minor adjustments without the person having to revisit their office.
April 3, 2017
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This fly's incredible hearing is a curiosity to those developing better hearing aids
Ormia ochracea's sense of directional hearing is second to none in the animal kingdom.
May 15, 2017
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Why Certain Noises Really Irritate some People
'Misophonia' is a disorder that can make a person's brain go into overdrive, researchers report
February 3, 2017
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IBS Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Children suffering from IBD not meeting daily recommended intake of calcium and vitamin D
A new study highlights that children suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not meeting the daily recommended intake of calcium and vitamin D. The research, conducted at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, identified that only 26.6% and 21.3% of paediatric IBD patients were achieving the current recommended intake for calcium and vitamin D respectively.
May 29, 2017
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Common yeast may worsen IBD symptoms in Crohn's disease
During the past decade, the gut has experienced a renaissance as investigations focus on the role of the microbiome on human health. While most studies have focused on bacteria, the dominant microbial inhabitants in the gut, scientists used mouse studies to show the role of yeast in aggravating the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. Their work suggests that allopurinol, a generic drug already on the market, could offer some relief.
March 8, 2017
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Crohn's disease appears to have two distinct genetic subtypes, study finds
Crohn's disease, a common inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract, can have devastating consequences for a patient's quality of life and is notoriously hard to treat successfully, in part because its course and severity vary so much from one case to the next.
October 14, 2016
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Crohn's disease versus ulcerative colitis: What is the difference?
Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are both inflammatory bowel diseases with many similarities. Nevertheless, there are some key differences between the two conditions that affect how they are managed.
June 6, 2017
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Diet and antibiotic use can change gut microbiota contributing to IBS symptoms
A recent review of research suggests that changes to the microorganisms (microbiota) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may be a cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). the review article is published in the American Journal of Physiology–Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
January 27, 2017
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Dietary soy-protein may be effective adjunct therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases
A diet supplemented with soy protein may be an effective adjunct therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases, Penn State researchers reported after completing a study that included mice and cultured human colon cells.
April 26, 2017
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DNA changes in blood samples could pave way for simple tests to diagnose IBD
Scientists have identified chemical changes in the DNA of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases that could improve screening for the conditions.
November 28, 2016
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Gastrointestinal disorders involve both brain-to-gut and gut-to-brain pathways
New research indicates that in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or indigestion, there is a distinct brain-to-gut pathway, where psychological symptoms begin first, and separately a distinct gut-to-brain pathway, where gut symptoms start first. In the study, higher levels of anxiety and depression were significant predictors of developing IBS or indigestion within 1 year.
July 22, 2016
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Gene that protects against inflammatory bowel disease identified
Researchers have identified a gene that protects the gut from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). the mouse study found a mutation in the Gatm gene and used CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology to confirm this link. the Gatm gene is required for the rapid replenishment of the intestinal mucosal barrier that guards the intestinal wall against inflammation caused by bacteria in the digestive tract, researchers determined.
February 1, 2017
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Genetic Subtypes of Crohn's Disease Identified
Findings may help explain why the inflammatory bowel condition is so tough to treat, researchers say
October 14, 2016
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Get Relief from IBS
Follow these tips to ease your symptoms.
March 8, 2016
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'Good' bacteria is potential solution to unchecked inflammation seen in bowel diseases
In a new report, researchers describe how inflammation can go unchecked in the absence of a certain inhibitor called NLRP12, adding that beneficial bacteria may be the key to helping to reverse a cycle of gut inflammation seen in certain inflammatory bowel diseases.
March 13, 2017
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Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD
Hamilton researchers are conducting a ground-breaking new trial looking at fecal transplants to help treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children.
September 15, 2016
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IBD diagnosis in childhood does not affect educational achievements and lifestyle, study finds
Twenty-five percent of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are diagnosed as children or adolescents -- at the peak of their social and educational development. Parents of newly diagnosed patients often inquire about the long term consequences of IBD on their child's health and lifestyle.
October 19, 2016
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IBD patients with longer duration of disease have higher risk of developing NAFLD
Research led by a Houston Methodist gastroenterologist shows that patients who have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) for more than two decades have a higher risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
April 5, 2017
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IBS researchers devise nanochannels for iodide transport in cell membranes
Exchange of iodide (iodine ions) between bloodstream and cells is crucial for the health of several organs and its malfunctioning is linked to goiter, hypo- and hyperthyroidism, breast cancer, and gastric cancer. Researchers at the Center for Self-Assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have devised nanostructures that function as channels for iodide transport in cell membranes.
June 8, 2017
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IBS scientists control memory by modulating synchronized brain waves during deep sleep
Have you ever tried to recall something just before going to sleep and then wake up with the memory fresh in your mind? While we absorb so much information during the day consciously or unconsciously, it is during shut eye that a lot of facts are dispatched to be filed away or fall into oblivion. A good quality sleep is the best way to feel mentally refreshed and memorize new information, but how is the brain working while we sleep? Could we improve such process to remember more, or maybe even use it to forget unwanted memories?
July 6, 2017
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IBS scientists develop Nano MRI Lamp for smarter diagnosis of diseases
A research team led by CHEON Jinwoo at the Center for Nanomedicine, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), developed the Nano MRI Lamp: a new technology platform that tunes the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals "ON" only in the presence of the targeted disease. Published in Nature Materials, this study can overcome the limitations of existing MRI contrast agents.
February 6, 2017
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IBS scientists uncover biological pathway that contributes to thyroid disorder
A team led by KOH Gou Young, director of the Center for Vascular Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), in collaboration with Chungnam National University, clarified the molecular mechanism to explain how the thyroid and surrounding vascular system change in the most common form of hyperthyroidism.
May 18, 2017
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Identifying serious bowel conditions in under-50s
Why can it be difficult, particularly in young people, for GPs to distinguish between patients with non-serious conditions, such as IBS, and serious conditions, like bowel cancer and inflammatory bowel disease?
April 11, 2017
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Impact of IBS on patients
What did the recent IBS Global Impact Report reveal about the personal and economic impact of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)?
January 16, 2017
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Inflammatory bowel disease: Causes, symptoms, and treatments
Inflammatory bowel disease is an umbrella term for a number of long-term conditions that involve inflammation of the digestive tract, or the gut.
March 16, 2017
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Inflammatory bowel disease: Potential new treatment target identified
New research suggests that a small protein involved in inflammation could be an effective target for drugs to treat inflammatory bowel disease, with particular benefit for the millions of patients who do not respond to the current standard therapy.
April 10, 2017
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Key role for microRNA in inflammatory bowel disease
An international team of researchers has discovered that a microRNA produced by certain white blood cells can prevent excessive inflammation in the intestine. the study shows that synthetic versions of this microRNA can reduce intestinal inflammation in mice and suggests a new therapeutic approach to treating patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis.
May 9, 2017
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Many ulcerative colitis patients with anemia do not receive testing and treatment, study reports
Many patients with ulcerative colitis don't receive recommended testing and treatment for the common problem of iron deficiency anemia, reports a study in the October issue of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). the journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
October 22, 2016
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New project to develop a nanotherapy targeting the molecules involved in inflammatory bowel diseases
Leti, a technology research institute of CEA Tech, today announced a European Union project to develop a nanotherapy targeting the molecules involved in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
May 11, 2017
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New, low-cost biosimilar for IBD therapy shows efficacy and safety
Treatment of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has been greatly improved by the introduction of biologic therapies such as infliximab (which targets tumour necrosis factor alpha), but at considerable cost. a recent analysis of results from 11 published studies including 829 patients shows that a new and lower-cost biosimilar for infliximab-called CT-P13 (Remsima/Inflectra)-has excellent clinical efficacy and safety.
March 3, 2017
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Probiotics could help improve gut symptoms and psychological issues in IBS, study shows
Probiotics may relieve symptoms of depression, as well as help gastrointestinal upset, research from McMaster University has found.
May 23, 2017
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Researchers develop first sensor that can identify IBD and distinguish between two subtypes
Researchers have developed the first sensor capable of objectively identifying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and distinguishing between its two subtypes. the device represents a substantial achievement toward a more personalized approach to diagnosing and treating IBD, a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract affecting more than 1 million Americans.
January 4, 2017
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Researchers discover same kind of T-cell exhaustion in IBS-D patients
Australian researchers have for the first time discovered that a specific type of irritable bowel syndrome is associated with exhaustion of the immune system in patients.
June 21, 2017
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Scientists find genes that may cause inflammatory bowel disease
Using genetic "fine-mapping," researchers have zoomed in on just a few genetic variants that may trigger the autoimmune condition inflammatory bowel disease.
July 3, 2017
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Scientists identify gene linked to incurable bowel disorders
A key gene that helps to explain an underlying cause of incurable bowel disorders such as Crohn's disease has been identified by scientists.
May 17, 2017
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Spinning ginger into nanoparticles to heal inflammatory bowel disease
A recent study by researchers at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center took them to a not-so-likely destination: local farmers markets. they went in search of fresh ginger root.
August 17, 2016
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Study finds link between vitamin D levels and severity of malabsorption issues
Natural health experts BetterYou have welcomed a recommendation by leading gastroenterology expert Isobel Mason, to take a vitamin D supplement to reduce Crohn's flare-ups.
March 3, 2017
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Study shows safety, efficacy of endoscopic needle knife therapy for intestinal strictures in IBD patients
Cleveland Clinic doctors have published the first study illustrating the safety and efficacy of endoscopic needle knife therapy for intestinal strictures in patients with inflammatory bowel disorder (IBD).
April 28, 2017
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UC Riverside professor receives grant to explore therapeutic target for treating IBD patients
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestine that includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. a protective protein that plays a key role in this disease is "T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase" or TCPTP.
April 7, 2017
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Ulcerative colitis diet: Foods to choose and avoid
Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease that may be improved by dietary changes. But which foods should people choose and which should they avoid?
June 8, 2017
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Ulcerative colitis: Do probiotics help?
Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease, for which there is no known cure. Because of this, some people try to manage the condition by making dietary and lifestyle changes.
June 6, 2017
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Ulcerative colitis: Defining and treating pain
Ulcerative colitis is a chronic, inflammatory condition of the lower gastrointestinal tract. It is associated with periods where symptoms worsen causing diarrhea, bloating, discomfort, and pain. These periods are called flares.
June 9, 2017
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Women with IBS experience worse quality of life than men, new research shows
Double work and a high embarrassment factor can lead to the quality of life being affected more among women than men by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a very common gastrointestinal disease. Even with the same level of physical pain and other symptoms, women's perceived quality of life is worse than the mens, according to new research.
January 9, 2017
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Yoga may be valuable adjunct to conventional therapies for ulcerative colitis
Patients with ulcerative colitis, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, often relapse at times of stress. In a clinical trial of 77 ulcerative colitis patients who were in clinical remission but were experiencing reduced quality of life, those assigned to 12 supervised 90-minute weekly sessions of yoga had a greater increase in quality of life and reduced activity of their colitis compared with those who were given written self-care advice.
April 5, 2017
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Men and Women

A healthy sex life may boost job satisfaction
According to a 2016 survey, around 50 percent of employees in the United States feel unsatisfied with their jobs. However, a new study suggests a surprising way to boost satisfaction in the workplace: maintain a healthy sex life.
March 7, 2017
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A new Treatment for Premature Ejaculation?
Handy anesthetic 'wipes' may help some -- but not all -- guys with premature ejaculation, small study finds
May 15, 2017
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Acupuncture treatment lowers frequency of hotflashes for 50% of women, study finds
Hot flashes - the bane of existence for many women during menopause - can be reduced in frequency by almost half for about 50 percent of women over eight weeks of acupuncture treatment, according to scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.
September 28, 2016
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Adverse early life experiences and abuse may lead women to unnecessary, harmful surgeries
Mayo Clinic researchers report that women who suffered adverse childhood experiences or abuse as an adult are 62 percent more likely to have their oefore age 46. These removals are for reasons other than the presence of ovarian cancer or a high genetic risk of developing cancer, says the new study published today in BMJ Open.
June 7, 2017
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Anxiety linked to severe quality-of-life impairment in postmenopausal women
Whether anxiety increases common menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and sleep disruption or whether these symptoms cause increased anxiety remains an ongoing debate. Regardless of which comes first, multiple studies confirm that increased anxiety occurring during the menopause transition adversely affects a woman's quality of life.
January 25, 2017
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Binge drinking in teens may raise women's blood glucose in later life
Women who drink a lot of alcohol and engage in binge drinking starting in their mid-teens are more likely to have high blood sugar - a risk factor for type 2 diabetes - when they reach their early 40s.
June 9, 2017
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Botox Beats Implant for Urinary Incontinence in Women
But both have side effects that may affect your choice, researchers say
October 4, 2016
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Brain differences between men and women affect response to pain relief
Results from a new study may explain why female patients often require higher doses of morphine - one of the primary drugs for the treatment of chronic or severe pain - than male patients to achieve the same level of relief. It appears that a type of immune cell called microglia are more active in the pain-processing regions of the female brain.
March 6, 2017
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Cholesterol-lowering statins linked to increased risk of Diabetes in older women
Older Australian women taking cholesterol-lowering statins face a significantly increased risk of developing diabetes, according to a University of Queensland study.
March 15, 2017
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Choosing between Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra: what to consider
Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra are the three most popular drugs used to help treat the symptoms of erectile dysfunction.
March 14, 2017
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Combat exposure may jeopardize the behavioral health of women in the military
In a recent study, combat exposure among Army enlisted women was associated with an increased likelihood of developing behavioral health problems post-deployment, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and at-risk drinking.
August 02, 2016
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Concussive injury in female athletes elicits long-term changes in the corpus callosum
Female athletes who have suffered at least one concussion showed structural differences in the corpus callosum, the structure that connects the two hemispheres of the brain, compared to unconcussed female athletes and other women.
August 09, 2016
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Cranberry capsules do not help in reducing UTI among older women, study finds
Among older women residing in nursing homes, administration of cranberry capsules compared with placebo resulted in no significant difference in presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria (presence of bacteria and white blood cells in the urine, a sign of urinary tract infection [UTI]), or in the number of episodes of UTIs over l year, according to a study published online by JAMA. the study is being released to coincide with its presentation at IDWeek 2016.
October 27, 2016
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Cranberry Products May not Prevent UTIs: Study
In female nursing home residents, cranberry capsules didn't affect infection rate
October 27, 2016
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Defective immune cells may play role in hair loss
After studying their activity in mice, researchers have discovered that a type of immune cell normally associated with inflammation, or regulatory T cells, also promote hair growth by triggering stem cells in the skin. Mice without these particular immune cells cannot regenerate hair. The researchers suggest that defects in regulatory T cells could be a cause of alopecia areata and may also contribute to other forms of baldness.
May 25, 2017
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Do OTC treatments for erectile dysfunction work?
Erectile dysfunction is a male sexual dysfunction that is more common as men get older. Medications to treat this condition were previously available on prescription only, but options are now available over the counter.
April 24, 2017
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Drug approved for treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy shows no added benefit in post-menopausal women
Ospemifene (tradename: Senshio) is approved for the treatment of moderate to severe symptomatic vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) in post-menopausal women who are not candidates for local vaginal oestrogen therapy. the drug has been on the market in Germany since May 2016.
August 11, 2016
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Drug treatment used for other conditions can help women combat urinary incontinence
Urinary incontinence in women is common, with almost 50% of adult women experiencing leakage at least occasionally. Genetic or heritable factors are known to contribute to half of all cases, but until now studies had failed to identify the genetic variants associated with the condition.
May 29, 2017
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Early menopause: Eating vegetable protein tied to lower risk
Eating foods rich in vegetable protein - such as tofu, enriched pasta, nuts, and breakfast cereal - is linked to a lower risk of early menopause, compared with consuming protein that comes mainly from animal sources.
June 26, 2017
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Early menopause, never giving birth may raise heart failure risk
Contrary to popular belief, heart disease is not just a "male" problem; the condition is the leading cause of death among both men and women. new research examines the link between a woman's reproductive history and her risk of cardiovascular disease.
May 16, 2017
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Early Menopause? Broken Bone Risk May be Higher
And traditional preventive treatments don't erase added danger, new study suggests
November 11, 2016
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Eating fruits and vegetables may lower women's stress risk
New research provides yet another reason to include fruits and vegetables in the diet, after finding that eating up to seven servings per day can lower the risk of psychological stress for middle-aged women.
March 16, 2017
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Eight home remedies for a yeast infection
A yeast infection is a common type of fungal infection. One place it targets is the genital area, which leads to pain, itching, and discharge. But what ways can a yeast infection be treated at home?
June 15, 2017
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Epididymitis: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
In the back of the testicles, there is a coiled tube called the epididymis. This tube stores and carries sperm and is linked to the ejaculatory duct by another tube called the vas deferens.
June 29, 2017
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Erectile dysfunction: Causes and treatment in young men
Most men will experience problems getting or keeping an erection at some point during adulthood, but this is not always caused by a medical problem. However, some men do develop a medical condition called erectile dysfunction.
March 6, 2017
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Essential oils and menopause: Can they help?
Women going through menopause commonly experience a range of symptoms as their hormones shift and their fertility declines. Some medications, including hormone replacement therapy (HRT), can help.
June 14, 2017
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Exposure to licorice compound disrupts steroid sex hormone production in ovary
A study of mouse reproductive tissues finds that exposure to isoliquiritigenin, a compound found in licorice, disrupts steroid sex hormone production in the ovary, researchers report. this is the first study to examine the effects of this chemical on the ovary.
November 9, 2016
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Fat Near Heart a Hazard for Postmenopausal Women
Study ties 'paracardial' fat to raised risk of hardening of the arteries
January 31, 2017
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Females working in forensic science labs report high stress levels than male counterparts
Women may be at the forefront of the fast-growing forensic science field, but they're also more stressed than their male counterparts, indicates new research led by a Michigan State University criminologist.
August 18, 2016
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Fennel 'safe and effective' for easing menopause symptoms, study confirms
Although a normal phase of a woman's life, menopause can have a wide range of inconvenient symptoms. New research suggests fennel may help to relieve these symptoms, with little to no side effects.
May 17, 2017
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For Many Women, Sex Gets Better at Midlife
Doctors discuss how you and your partner can achieve greater satisfaction
October 5, 2016
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Frequent urination in women: Causes and treatment
Urination is the body's way of getting rid of excess water as well as wastes. While this is an important function for survival, urinating too frequently can interfere with a woman's quality of life.
March 30, 2017
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Gender Doesn't Dictate Perspiration Rate
Instead, your size and shape influence how the body releases heat and cools down, study finds
February 24, 2017
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Gene variants linked to hot flashes in menopausal women
Most women experience hot flashes and night sweats either before or during menopause, but a significant minority don't have these symptoms. Could our genes be a factor in determining which women get hot flashes?
October 19, 2016
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Hair loss treatments for men: best options
Many men are affected by hair loss. Although male pattern baldness or androgenetic alopecia causes the majority of incidences of male hair loss, there are many reasons a man can lose his hair.
April 21, 2017
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Haywire Immune Cells May Help Cause Baldness
Cells that fight inflammation also play role in hair growth, mice study finds
May 25, 2017
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High vitamin D intake could reduce the risk of an early menopause
A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has revealed that women can cut their risk of an early menopause, by having a high vitamin D intake.
May 11, 2017
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Higher BMI, abdominal obesity and body fat linked to greater risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women
The results of a population study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR) 2017 showed that, in women, being overweight or obese, as defined by body mass index (BMI ), abdominal obesity and a higher body fat percentage was associated with a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
June 14, 2017
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Heart palpitations and menopause: What you need to know
Women may worry about the menopause for different reasons.
May 30, 2017
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Hormone replacement therapy linked to lower risk of atherosclerosis and death in women
Hormone replacement therapy has long been controversial as studies have associated it with health benefits and risks. While some studies suggest that it lowers the risk of osteoporosis and improves some aspects of heart health, others link it to higher risk of cancer and stroke.
March 9, 2017
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Injected Drug May Help Fight Osteoporosis in Women
Abaloparatide appears to reduce fractures better than the current drug Forteo, researchers say.
August 16, 2016
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Is it menopause? Tests and diagnosis
Menopause is a stage in a woman's life at which point she has not menstruated for 12 months or more. Although going through menopause means that a woman should no longer need to worry about getting pregnant, it does signify changes to hormone levels that can affect a woman's overall well-being.
May 25, 2017
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Japanese scientists show how male pheromone enhances female sexual behavior in mice
A study by a group of Japanese scientists showed how a male pheromone in mice enhances sexual behaviors in females--and how it may enhance a different behavior, aggression, in males -- by identifying distinct neural circuits and neurons that generate a particular behavioral response to specific chemical signals. The findings point to a model for further investigating how sex-specific innate behaviors in living things are controlled.
June 22, 2017
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JMU scientists crystallize new inhibitory antibodies targeting sclerostin
Osteoporosis particularly affects elderly women: the bone's structure weakens and the risk of suffering fractures rises. as prophylaxis patients are advised to have a healthy diet and perform physical exercises; when the risk of bone fractures is high, medicine preventing further bone loss is prescribed in addition.
September 2, 2016
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Male Masturbation: 5 Things you Didn't Know
If there's one thing that almost every guy is an expert at, it's masturbation. After years of extensive, hands-on experience, you think you know everything there is to know. But according to the experts, maybe you don't. Here are some that may surprise you.
January 31, 2017
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Marriage, fatherhood may cause men to gain weight
There is a common belief that once people get married, they begin to pile on the pounds. A new study suggests that this notion may hold some truth, after finding that married men have a higher body mass index than unmarried men.
June 26, 2017
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Natural remedies for treating erectile dysfunction
Some treatments for erectile dysfunction can include natural herbs and remedies. However, when seeking a natural remedy, a man should be cautious and understand the possible risks associated with certain natural cures.
March 10, 2017
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Men with high 2D: 4D ratios tend to be better educated, say HSE researchers
According to HSE researchers, men with a high 2D:4D ratio (i.e. those whose index finger is longer than their ring finger) tend to be better educated. These findings are presented in the paper "2D: 4D and lifetime educational outcomes: Evidence from the Russian RLMS survey" in Personality and Individual Differences.
April 21, 2017
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Menopause and a Decline in Intimacy
Researchers identify timing, but it can vary by race and ethnicity
November 2, 2016
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Menstruation does not affect cognitive function, study finds
Abdominal cramps, mood swings, and sore breasts are just some of the bothersome symptoms that can accompany menstruation. However, contrary to popular belief, brain fog is one symptom that is unlikely to arise at that time of the month.
July 4, 2017
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Mindfulness class provides clear benefit for women, study finds
In a new study of a Brown University scholarly course on mindfulness that also included meditation labs, researchers found that the practice on average significantly helped women overcome "negative affect" -- a downcast mood -- but did not help men. the finding, the authors said, should call more attention to considering gender as a potential factor in assessing mindfulness efficacy.
April 20, 2017
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Mobile app helps reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence in women
Urinary leakage whilst coughing and jumping is common in women. Using a self-administered treatment via a mobile app called Tat® for three months reduced symptoms, led to fewer leakages and improved quality of life.
September 13, 2016
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Mood swings during menopause: Causes and treatments
Most women go through menopause without developing a significant mood disorder. Menopause is a time of change, however, and emotional reactions are part of that.
May 22, 2017
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More US Women Hospitalized for Opioid Abuse
U.S. cases rose 75 percent for females versus 55 percent for males over a decade, study finds
June 21, 2017
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NAMS publishes new position statement on use of hormone therapy to relieve menopause symptoms
A new position statement on the use of hormone therapy (HT) for menopausal and postmenopausal women from The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) has been published online today in the Society's journal, Menopause. "The use of hormone therapy continues to be one of the most controversial and debated topics," says Dr. JoAnn V. Pinkerton, NAMS executive director. "
June 19, 2017
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Natural remedies for hot flashes
Vasomotor symptoms, or hot flashes and night sweats, are the most common symptoms of perimenopause and menopause.
May 19, 2017
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Nearly Half of U.S. Men Infected with HPV
Although a vaccine is available, too few are getting it when young
January 19, 2017
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New Drug approved for Postmenopause Sexual Pain
A new drug to treat postmenopause-related pain during sexual intercourse has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
November 17, 2016
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New research reveals vanity could play crucial role in protecting young women from harmful UV light
New research published in Cogent Psychology, examines the way sun safe messages are conveyed to young women, and reveals their vanity could play a vital role in protecting them from harmful UV light.
August 18, 2016
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New review questions safety of estrogen replacement therapy
Although individuals often consume natural products because of their potential health benefits, a new review indicates that it is not clear whether the benefits of plant-derived compounds that mimic estrogen outweigh the possible health risks.
October 11, 2016
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New study finds lower levels of estrogen in women with stress urinary incontinence
Sex steroid levels change markedly during menopause, and estrogen deficiency after menopause causes changes within the urogenital tract. A new study found significantly lower levels of estrogen in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence compared with those without symptoms.
June 7, 2017
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New study finds structural differences iadolescent boys and girls with PTSD
Traumatic stress affects the brains of adolescent boys and girls differently, according to a new brain-scanning study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.
November 11, 2016
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New study shows female urologists perform more surgeries on women than male counterparts
Female urologists perform more surgeries on women than their male colleagues, according to a new study in the Journal of Urology®
August 17, 2016
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NIH-supported trials of testosterone therapy in older men report mixed results
Hormone treatment improved bone strength and hemoglobin levels; may increase cardiovascular risk; had no effect on cognition.
February 21, 2017
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Overactive bladder in men: what causes it and how is it treated?
Overactive bladder is a urinary disorder that affects both men and women, with a range of common symptoms. this article explores how overactive bladder is caused in men and the best ways to treat it.
April 18, 2017
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Overtaken by Opioids: A Growing Problem for Women
Sarah Wilson's father was a police officer, so she was too scared to try drugs and alcohol as a teenager.
June 7, 2017
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Poor sense of smell may hinder women's social lives
Having a poor sense of smell in later life may have negative implications for a woman's social life, a new study suggests.
March 22, 2017
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Porn-induced erectile dysfunction: how does it happen?
Men who have erectile dysfunction are unable to get or keep an erection long enough to engage in sexual intercourse.
April 25, 2017
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Postmenopausal bleeding: Is it normal?
Menopause occurs when a woman has not had her menstrual period for a year. This occurrence is the result of a natural decline in hormones that a woman will experience usually in her 40s or 50s.
May 26, 2017
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Predominance of testosterone in males may explain disparate ACL injury rate between men and women
In studies on rats, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report new evidence that the predominance of the hormone testosterone in males may explain why women are up to 10 times more likely than men to injure the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knees.
September 20, 2016
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Primary breadwinner status may affect psychological well-being and health of men
Gendered expectations in marriage are not just bad for women, they are also bad for men, according to a new study by University of Connecticut (UConn) sociologists.
August 19, 2016
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Prolonged exposure to male hormone blockers increases risk of persistent erectile dysfunction
Men with longer exposure to the drugs finasteride and dutasteride had a higher risk of getting persistent erectile dysfunction than men with less exposure, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. the persistent erectile dysfunction continued despite stopping these drugs, in some cases for months or years.
March 9, 2017
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PTSD May Affect Boys, Girls Differently
Changes in brain regions seemed to differ by gender, researchers say
November 11, 2016
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Researchers Identify Genes Linked to Hot Flashes
Mutations found in women of all races, ethnicities
October 19, 2016
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Researchers identify unique bleeding syndrome linked to cirrhosis and portal hypertension
A unique bleeding syndrome associated with cirrhosis and portal hypertension has been identified by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Wake Forest University Medical Center, and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in an article published online on April 21, 2017 by the Journal of Investigative Medicine. the syndrome is characterized by typical presentation with acute bleeding (hematemesis, melena, or hematochezia) and also the presence of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, documented as iron deficiency anemia
April 21, 2017
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Review provides new insights into diagnosis, treatment for PCOS
Polycystic ovary syndrome afflicts over 14 million women in the United States. the disorder increases the risk of endometrial cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, asthma, obesity, depression and anxiety, as well as infertility and a variety of reproductive disorders.
August 04, 2016
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Scientists identify differences in outcomes for women and men with AFF in emergency departments
Atrial fibrillation and flutter (also known as AFF) is associated with serious health problems and is a significant contributor to death rates. Investigators have identified differences in outcomes for male and female patients who presented with AFF to emergency departments in Alberta, Canada and were then discharged.
May 4, 2017
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Sex hormone-sensitive gene complex linked to premenstrual mood disorder
Dysregulated cellular response to estrogen and progesterone suspected.
January 3, 2017
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Sexual activity appears to be on the decline among Americans
Americans are having less sex than they did 25 years ago, with the sharpest decline being seen among married people, according to research published in Archives of Sexual Behavior.
March 9, 2017
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Sexual benefits of zinc: can it help treat erectile dysfunction?
Zinc is a trace mineral that plays a vital role in many aspects of human health. These processes include growth, immunity, and reproduction.
March 8, 2017
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Shift Work May Put Damper on a Man's Sex Life
Disrupted sleep patterns could explain the link, three studies suggest
May 15, 2017
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Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls
Across the globe, there is increased focus on developing interventions related to comprehensive sexual health education for adolescents, with the ultimate goal of combatting unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. the challenge has been how best to reach this audience in a way that is meaningful, relevant and easy to understand.
September 8, 2016
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Social media users more likely to feel isolated, study finds
Social isolation is a growing public health concern. In recent years, research has linked social isolation to an increased risk of mortality, and a new study investigates the impact of social media use on perceived social isolation.
March 6, 2017
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Social media worries young girls into vaginal surgery, say doctors
Girls as young as nine are undergoing surgery to have their labia reduced due to insecurities stemming from social media and pornography, according to leading doctors.
July 3, 2017
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Standard test may miss urinary infection in symptomatic women
New research from Belgium suggests that the standard culture test for bacteria may return a negative result even though the patient tested actually has a urinary tract infection. the study compared women with symptoms of urinary infection - such as pain during urination and feeling an urgent or frequent need to urinate - with non-symptomatic women. with the help of a more sensitive test, it found that nearly all the symptomatic women with a negative standard test result actually did have an infection.
April 28, 2017
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Statins linked to higher risk of Diabetes in older women
Statins are often prescribed for older women with high levels of blood cholesterol, yet the effects of the drug have not been as well-studied in this group as in others. Now, a new study from Australia finds that older women taking statins to lower cholesterol may have a significantly higher risk of developing diabetes.
March 16, 2017
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Staying Trim, Strong May Cut Incontinence Risk
But for women in study, these factors only helped with one type of incontinence
December 30, 2016
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Stress of major life events impacts women more than men, shows poll of 2,000 people
Modern life stressors affect heart, brain, and nervous system
March 15, 2017
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Study offers new insights into biological causes of premature baldness in men
Short men may have an increased risk of becoming bald prematurely. An international genetic study under the leadership of the University of Bonn at least points in this direction. During the study, the scientists investigated the genetic material of more than 20,000 men. Their data show that premature hair loss is linked to a range of various physical characteristics and illnesses.
March 8, 2017
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Study shows how pheromones drive sexual behavior
A new mouse study shows how different brain circuits for males and females turn chemical signals into either aggressive or sexual behavior, respectively.
June 26, 2017
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Study shows hysterectomy doubles chances of woman experiencing persistent hot flushes, night sweats
A University of Queensland School of Public Health study has found these hot flushes and sweats -- known as vasomotor symptoms -- can persist for more than a decade, seriously affecting quality of life.
August 03, 2016
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Study suggests link between concussion and increased risk of abnormal menstrual patterns
A study of nearly 130 girls and young women suggests concussion was associated with increased risk of having two or more abnormal menstrual bleeding patterns, according to an article published by JAMA Pediatrics.
July 3, 2017
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Surgical menopause: Effects, risks, and outlook
Menopause occurs when a woman has not had her period for 12 months or longer.
May 29, 2017
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T-sol can be safe and effective treatment for men with hypogonadism
For men with hypogonadism, a condition in which the body does not produce enough testosterone, low sex drive and fatigue are common symptoms. for these men treatment with a 2% testosterone solution (T-sol) can be effective therapy. In a six-month open-label study of patients receiving T-sol, published in the Journal of Urology®, researchers noted improvement of low sex drive and low energy symptoms, and did not identify new safety concerns.
August 17, 2016
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Top Sexual Health Symptoms for Women
You just never seem to be in the mood these days. Or the last few times you had sex, it hurt. Maybe you have some discharge that's different from the norm.
February 7, 2017
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Tracking bone changes in women during menopause may help prevent fractures
Bone fragility has long been a worrisome condition affecting women as they age.
January 27, 2017
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UA researcher's findings on estrogen may lead to promising treatment for hot flashes
Fifteen years ago, Dr. Naomi Rance was at work when she experienced her first hot flash. Rance, a physician and researcher at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson, took note.
June 29, 2017
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Vaginal itching: Common causes, symptoms, and treatments
Vaginal itching is an uncomfortable, yet common occurrence. There are a number of causes, and most require medical treatment.
March 27, 2017
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Vaginal pimples: Causes, treatment, and prevention
Pimples around the female genital area are a common condition caused by a variety of factors. These bumps may be uncomfortable and irritating, but they are not serious in most cases.
June 7, 2017
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Vasomotor symptoms of menopause: Treatment and management
Menopause occurs after a woman has not had her period for 12 months. After menopause, she no longer releases eggs for fertilization, and her ovaries do not produce estrogen and progesterone, as they once did.
June 6, 2017
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Was It Love at First Smell?
Sight isn't the only sense involved in attraction to others, new research says
May 18, 2017
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Weight-Loss Surgery Brings Bigger Heart Benefits to Women: Study
Researchers suggest their bodies may respond differently than men after procedure
November 4, 2016
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What does a yellow bruise on the breast mean?
The good news is that having a yellow bruise on the breast should not be cause for concern.
May 22, 2017
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What is the average height for men?
The average height for both men and women has substantially increased over the last century.
June 30, 2017
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White Wine May Do No Favors for a Woman's Skin
Study suggests the drink, as well as liquor, are both tied to a higher risk for rosacea
April 20, 2017
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White wine, liquor may raise women's risk of rosacea
As the weekend approaches, many of us will be looking forward to a drink or two with friends. According to a new study, however, women who are concerned about their skin health might want to steer clear of white wine and liquor.
April 21, 2017
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Women and Chlamydia
You might not be intimately familiar with the name, but chlamydia is actually the most commonly reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the U.S. Each year, about 1.2 million infections are reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But because chlamydia often has no symptoms, at least as many people could be living with the disease without even realizing it.
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Women aren't better at reading people's faces
Study found men were just as good at gauging others in social settings
May 19, 2017
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Women experience higher stress from major life events than men, study reveals
New research has highlighted the potential gender gap in stress, with women reporting higher stress from life events such as death of a loved one, illness, losing their smartphone and Brexit.
March 15, 2017
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Women find men with full beards more attractive when judging long-term relationships, study shows
New research suggests that women tend to find beardedness attractive when judging long-term relationships, perhaps as a signal of formidability among males and the potential to provide direct benefits, such as enhanced fertility and survival, to females.
September 12, 2016
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Women have statistically lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men, study reveals
The fact that men are overrepresented in psoriasis registers and consume more psoriasis care have long led researchers to believe that the common skin disease disproportionally affects men. a unique study with 5,438 Swedish psoriasis patients now reveals that women have a statistically significant lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men.
March 24, 2017
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Women More Sensitive to Metal Joint Implants
Researchers don't know if hormones or exposure to metals in makeup or jewelry may play a part
April 26, 2017
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'Yo-Yo Dieting' Hard on Older Women's Hearts
But at least one nutrition expert says it's too soon to draw conclusions
November 17, 2016
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Young adult women support stricter regulations, but against total ban of indoor tanning
Most young adult women who regularly visit indoor tanning salons support the introduction of policies to make it safer, but are against a total ban. this is according to a study led by Darren Mays of Georgetown University Medical Center in the US, in the journal Translational Behavioral Medicine: Practice, Policy, Research, published by Springer. the findings are good news for regulators who are finalizing stricter regulations aimed at highlighting the skin cancer risks associated with artificial tanning.
August 16, 2016
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Misc. - Numbers

1 in 6 U.S. Adults Takes a Psychiatric Drug
Whether the medicines over-prescribed is up for debate, psychiatrists say
December 12, 2016
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1st U.S. Living-Donor Uterine Transplant Performed
Infertility procedure was tried in 4 women but has remained successful in only one, Texas team says
October 5, 2016
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2nd Global Iron Deficiency Day: Vifor Pharma supports global activities to raise awareness of iron deficiency
According to the World Health Organisation, iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases such as chronic kidney disease, congestive heart failure or inflammatory bowel disease.
November 24, 2016
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3 Questions About Eczema
An interview with expert Asriani M. Chiu, MD, on eczema symptoms, causes, and prevention.
August 15, 2016
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3D Organoids Mimic Real Lungs to Study Pulmonary Diseases
Lungs are very difficult to study because of their bubbly, fragile alveolar nature. They're challenging to sustain outside the body and difficult to study while inside. Researchers at the UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center have developed a technique for growing lung-like tissue that in many ways resembles real lungs.
September 16, 2016
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3D Printed Model Brains Being Studied for Neuro Surgeries
Stratasys, a manufacturing technology company based in Valencia, California, is touting the use of 3D printed brains it helped to create as a tool for planning neuro surgeries. Dr. Saleem Abdulrauf, chairman of the St. Louis University Department of Neurological Surgery and Neurosurgeon-in-Chief at the St. Louis University Hospital, and his team are currently assessing the usefulness of 3D printed models versus more standard tools and techniques for readying approaches to treat aneurysms in the brain.
November 15, 2016
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3D printing breakthrough heralds 'new era' for advanced skin models
Scientists in South Korea have come up with a new method for 3D printing human skin, which both shortens the process and reduces the cost.
June 12, 2017
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3D-printed 'bionic skin' could give robots the sense of touch
Engineering researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed a revolutionary process for 3D printing stretchable electronic sensory devices that could give robots the ability to feel their environment. the discovery is also a major step forward in printing electronics on real human skin.
May 10, 2017
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3D-printed 'bionic skin' could give robots the sense of touch
Engineering researchers have developed a revolutionary process for 3D printing stretchable electronic sensory devices that could give robots the ability to feel their environment. the discovery is also a major step forward in printing electronics on real human skin.
May 10, 2017
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6 Symptoms you Shouldn't Ignore
Most aches and pains aren't a sign of something serious, but certain symptoms should be checked out. see a doctor if you feel any of these things:
October 12, 2016
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6 Things People with Psoriasis Wish you Knew
Even if you don't know someone with psoriasis, you may have seen a person with signs of the disease. the red, scaly skin patches, small red dots, or pus-filled blisters can show up where it's hard to hide them -- the elbows, the hands, even the face. it's more than a cosmetic problem. People will stare, or snicker, or worse.
August 15, 2016
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10 Solutions for Sore Knees
If you slip on the sidewalk, wipe out while playing with your kids, or wrench your knee all of a sudden, you know you need rest, ice, and maybe a trip to your doctor. But what should you do about ongoing knee pain that just won't quit?
November 1, 2016
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Misc. - A

A Benefit of back Pain Surgery: Better Sex
Operation often leads to more comfortable lovemaking, study finds
November 22, 2016
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A faster, better way to detect salmonella in meat, chicken
Salmonella is the lauding cause of bacteria-associated foodborne illnesses in the United States, according to a study. Thus, early detection of the pathogen, by a rapid and sensitive test is important to prevent the illness.
September 14, 2016
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A Laser Modified by Blood to Look at Tissues from Inside
Infrared, ultraviolet, and visible light are commonly used to visualize tissues in a variety of ways, but the light is typically not coherent, poorly focused, and not very bright. Researchers at the University of Michigan have been working on a way of getting blood to act like a laser, revealing medically relevant information from within the body.
September 2, 2016
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A new strategic direction for behavioral and social sciences research at NIH
The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) at the National Institutes of Health has released a new strategic plan for 2017 through 2021. the plan focuses on scientific priorities, which reflect key research challenges that OBSSR is uniquely positioned to address. Developed with considerable input from internal and external NIH stakeholders, the plan ensures OBSSR continues to fulfill its mission.
November 23, 2016
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A new test can detect your blood type with color-changing paper
It could be crucial in emergency situations and remote areas
March 15, 2017
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A novel concept for a synthetic articular-cartilage-like material
Inspired by the structure of cancellous bone and the nutrition metabolism principles of articular cartilage, a research team in China has utilized friction-induced heat and pressure as a trigger to form and repair an analogue of articular cartilage.
May 11, 2017
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A quantitative study of brain activity using light sheet microscopy
LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, report on the latest work of Li Ye, a Post-Doc Research Associate in the Deisseroth Laboratory at Stanford University he applies light sheet microscopy in a program to quantitatively study brain activity in order to better understand the processing of information.
October 5, 2016
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A 'safe' space to shoot up: Worth a try in California?
Tawny Biggs' seemingly happy childhood in the northern Los Angeles County suburb of Santa Clarita, Calif., showed no outward sign that she would one day struggle with drug addiction.
June 19, 2017
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A skin graft for bad burns
To get a head start on healing burn wounds, biomedical engineers at Michigan Technological University turn to the body's natural network. they combine engineered stem cell sheets with split thickness skin grafts to do so.
October 28, 2016
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A spoonful of fat makes the medicine go down
For years scientists and dieticians have argued over the health benefits of dietary fat. Research published this week, however, shows that piggybacking onto natural fat absorption pathways can dramatically enhance the utility of some drugs.
August 10, 2016
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A star is born: Lesser-known brain cell takes center stage
A new method efficiently grows human astrocytes in a dish, advancing studies of stroke, Alzheimer's and depression.
June 6, 2017
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Abnormal increase in hippocampal activity impairs memory and attention
Neurons in the brain interact by sending each other chemical messages, so-called neurotransmitters. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most common inhibitory neurotransmitter, which is important to restrain neural activity, preventing neurons from getting too trigger-happy and from firing too much or responding to irrelevant stimuli.
August 23, 2016
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Acclarent's RELIEVA SCOUT Multi-Sinus Dilation System now Available in U.S.
Acclarent, a J&J firm, is releasing in the U.S. its RELIEVA SCOUT multi-sinus dilation system, a balloon sinuplasty device for widening the sinus openings in people with chronic sinusitis.
July 21, 2016
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Acetaminophen may be effective treatment option for acute mountain sickness
Trekking and mountain climbing are quickly growing in popularity, but.one of the challenges that climbers face is acute mountain sickness (AMS). Previous studies have shown that ibuprofen is an effective way to reduce the risk of AMS. Investigators wanted to find out if acetaminophen, a commonly used anti-pain medicine like ibuprofen, would have a comparable effect. They found almost no difference in the performance of both drugs, suggesting that acetaminophen may be another effective prophylactic treatment for AMS. Their results are published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine.
June 19, 2017
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Achilles' heel of malaria parasite could be exploited to treat deadly disease
Malaria researchers at the Australian National University have found one of the malaria parasite's best weapons against drug treatments turns out to be an Achilles' heel, which could be exploited to cure the deadly disease.
July 25, 2016
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Acne Gives Up Secret that Points to new Treatments
Bacteria on skin sometimes release fatty acids that trigger inflammation, researchers report
October 28, 2016
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Artificial Hand 'Sees' Objects
Camera allows amputees to reach automatically for objects, as a real hand would, study finds
May 4, 2017
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Added benefit not proven for orphan drug in treatment of adults with stomach cancer
Ramucirumab is a monoclonal antibody, which blocks a receptor, reducing the growth of blood vessels and so reducing blood supply to the tumours. this aims to slow the growth of the tumours. as a so-called orphan drug, i.e. a drug for the treatment of rare diseases, ramucirumab was initially exempt from proof of an added benefit. with several expansions of the therapeutic indication, it has lost this special status.
August 19, 2016
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Addiction silences synapses in reward circuits
In addiction, cues in the environment can form strong associations with the drug of abuse. a new study suggests that alterations in silent synapses, inactive connections between neurons, could be the neural mechanism underlying the formation of these drug-related memories. the alterations were found in the nucleus accumbens, a brain region involved in reward-related learning.
August 02, 2016
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Addicts Try to Avoid Fentanyl, But Many Fail
Potent synthetic opioid now responsible for more than half of overdose deaths, study suggests
June 16, 2017
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Addisonian crisis: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Addisonian crisis is also known as an adrenal crisis or acute adrenal insufficiency. It is a rare and potentially fatal condition where the adrenal glands stop working properly and there is not enough cortisol in the body.
June 22, 2017
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Adult-onset Still's disease: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory disorder that affects the body. Many experts consider it to be the same disease as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, but occurring in adults, often in their 30s.
June 19, 2017
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Advanced Instruments launches novel GloCyte System at 68th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting
Advanced Instruments, Inc., a leader in laboratory instrumentation, launches their GloCyte Automated Cell Counter System at the 68th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo in Philadelphia, PA July 31-August 4 2016.
July 29, 2016
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Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese
Jacopo Annese, President and CEO of the Institute for Brain and Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to democratizing neuroscience and making neuroscience tools and knowledge about the brain more available to the public, discusses his work on the Human Brain Library.
August 25, 2016
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Advances in imaging detect blunt cerebrovascular injury more frequently in trauma patients
Study underscores importance of trauma teams reevaluating how they care for patients with head injuries
January 19, 2017
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African ancestry linked to increased kidney disease risk among Hispanic/Latino adults
African ancestry contributes to the risk of chronic kidney disease among some Hispanic/Latino adults, according to a study co-authored by Loyola University Chicago researchers.
October 5, 2016
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After joint replacement surgery, smokers at increased risk of reoperation for infection
For patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement, smoking is associated with an increased risk of infectious (septic) complications requiring repeat surgery, reports a new study.
February 16, 2017
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Air pollution may directly affect biology of upper airways to cause chronic sinus problems
Although human population studies have linked air pollution to chronic inflammation of nasal and sinus tissues, direct biological and molecular evidence for cause and effect has been scant. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers report that experiments in mice continually exposed to dirty air have revealed that direct biological effect.
April 18, 2017
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Alarming levels of industrial pollution particles found in brains of city dwellers
A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science claims to have found alarmingly high levels of pollution-derived magnetic nanoparticles in the brains of urban study participants, leading to renewed worry about the effects of smog on billions of people around the world. the study is not the final word on the origin or effects of these particles, and its results probably need to be replicated at a larger scale, but they're serious enough to warrant major attention.
September 7, 2016
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Alcohol consumption at early age linked to increase of psychopathological symptoms
Alcohol consumption onset between eleven and thirteen years old is associated with an increased risk of psychological disorders in the future, according to a study conducted by the Complutense University of Madrid. the most common symptoms of more than 3.000 adolescents who participated in the research were bodily discomfort, hostility and aggression.
October 4, 2016
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Alcohol may change personality less than we think, say researchers
Alcohol consumption may have less effect on personality than people commonly believe, say researchers.
May 16, 2017
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Allergic to Peanuts? Tree Nuts Might Still be Safe
Careful testing can determine whether you need to avoid cashews, walnuts or others, study finds
March 27, 2017
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Allergy shots: Uses, effectiveness, and side effects
Experiencing allergies can be miserable, with watery eyes, a runny nose, rashes, and breathing problems. Some allergy sufferers try many treatments to keep their allergy symptoms at bay.
June 30, 2017
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Aluminum cookware made from scrap metal poses serious and unrecognized health risk
Aluminum cookware made from scrap metal in countries around the world poses a serious and previously unrecognized health risk to millions of people according to a new study. the highest levels were found in cookware from Vietnam including one pot that released 2,800 times more lead than California's Maximum Allowable Dose Level (MADL) of 0.5 micrograms per day.
January 23, 2017
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AMSBIO launch high throughput genotoxicity skin assay technology
AMSBIO announces the launch of DermaChip® - a new high throughput assay technology that allows scientists, for the first time, to reliably measure the genotoxic risk of a whole range of environmental agents (including cleaning agents, household products and industrial chemicals as well as cosmetics) to our skin.
June 30, 2017
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American Nutrition supplements vitamins and herbs
Vitamins herbs and supplements sports and body building
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American Pain Foundation, Inc.
a non-profit consumer information, education, and advocacy organization dedicated to helping people who suffer from pain.
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Americans Are Spending Billions on Plastic Surgery
New report details costs of most popular plastic surgery procedures
April 12, 2017
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Amputee feels texture in real-time with artificial fingertip
An amputee was able to feel smoothness and roughness in real-time with an artificial fingertip that was surgically connected to nerves in his upper arm. Moreover, the nerves of non-amputees can also be stimulated to feel roughness, without the need of surgery, meaning that prosthetic touch for amputees can now be developed and safely tested on intact individuals.
March 8, 2016
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AMSBIO add new range of human endothelial progenitor cells
AMSBIO has expanded its wide and varied catalogue of primary and progenitor cell types and media with a new range of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC).
October 28, 2016
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AMSBIO offers extensive products to study metabolic pathways in cells
AMSBIO offers an extensive range of proteins, antibodies, assays and kits covering every single target of major cellular metabolic pathways including folate metabolism, pyruvate metabolism (with and without oxygen), citrate metabolism, O2 consumption and toxicity, oxidative stress and fatty acid oxygen measurement.
January 3, 2017
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AMSBIO's immunotherapy range for IDO pathway research
AMSBIO offer a wide range of products for IDO pathway research, including cell lines, assay kits and active proteins to be used in IDO pathway research (IDO1, IDO2 and TDO genes).
May 16, 2017
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Analgesic effects of opioids can be mediated via immune cells
Opioids are the most powerful painkillers. Researchers at the Charite - Universit㳳medizin Berlin have now found that the analgesic effects of opioids are not exclusively mediated by opioid receptors in the brain, but can also be mediated via the activation of receptors in immune cells.
January 17, 2017
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Ancient enzyme protects lungs from common irritant produced by bugs and mold
Chitin-destroying enzymes reduce mortality from inflammatory lung disease in mice, study shows
April 20, 2017
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Animal models can't 'tune out' stimuli, mimicking sensory hypersensitivity in humans
Mice with fragile X syndrome had an inability to adapt to repeated whisker stimulation
June 12, 2017
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Animal-assisted therapy can help students combat homesickness, study shows
The expression dog is man's best friend might have more weight in the case of first-year university students suffering from homesickness, according to a new UBC study.
September 8, 2016
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Ankylosing spondylitis: Pictures, early signs, and progression
Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of arthritis that leads to chronic pain and discomfort, usually in the spine.
May 29, 2017
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Ankylosing spondylitis: Progression and outlook
Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic disorder that creates pain, stiffness, and inflammation in the body. As the disorder progresses, inflammation may get worse and new symptoms may show up.
May 22, 2017
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Ankylosing spondylitis: Symptoms and early signs
Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of arthritis that typically begins in the spine and the joints between the spine and the pelvis. It causes pain, stiffness, and may affect the shape of the spine and mobility.
May 23, 2017
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Ankylosing spondylitis: Tests, diagnosis, and treatment
Ankylosing spondylitis is a disorder that causes chronic pain in the joints, usually starting in the back and buttocks.
May 18, 2017
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Ankylosing spondylitis: X-ray and imaging techniques
X-rays and other imaging techniques for ankylosing spondylitis are an important part of getting an accurate diagnosis of this condition.
May 18, 2017
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Anti-gravity treadmill can help reduce fears, increase self-belief in patienrgery
Patients recovering from knee operations are being helped back to sport and exercise through expert rehabilitation at the University of Kent.
July 6, 2017
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Anti-heroin vaccine developed at TSRI proven effective in primate models
A vaccine developed at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) to block the "high" of heroin has proven effective in non-human primates. This is the first vaccine against an opioid to pass this stage of preclinical testing.
June 6, 2017
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Anti-nausea drug may be new treatment for obstructive sleep apnea
An old pharmaceutical product may be a new treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, according to new research presented today by University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University scientists at the SLEEP 2017 annual meeting in Boston.
June 6, 2017
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Antidepressant improves drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier, rat study shows
NIH rat study suggests amitriptyline temporarily inhibits the blood-brain barrier, allowing drugs to enter the brain.
April 27, 2017
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Antidepressant may enhance drug delivery to the brain
NIH rat study suggests amitriptyline temporarily inhibits the blood-brain barrier, allowing drugs to enter the brain
April 27, 2017
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Antiepileptic drugs for reducing seizures may induce psychotic disorders, study shows
Today Brain publishes a new study indicating that antiepileptic drugs designed to reduce seizures, may also induce psychotic disorders in some patients.
August 09, 2016
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Anxious? Distressed? You're not Alone
And about 1 in 10 Americans who need mental health care don't have the insurance coverage, study finds
April 17, 2017
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Aphasia may not solely be a language issue as traditionally believed, study shows
Aphasia, a language disorder commonly diagnosed in stroke patients, may not be solely a language issue as traditionally believed, according to a Penn State study.
March 30, 2017
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Apple acquires Beddit, a sleep tracking company, in health pursuit
In its pursuit to accommodate everything health, Apple has decided to acquire the sleep tracking hardware and software company, Beddit. Anyone who currently owns a Beddit product or uses its software needn't worry as the product and services support that are currently provided will be maintained for the foreseeable future.
May 10, 2017
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Apple acquires sleep monitoring company Beddit
Beddit, the company which makes sleep monitoring hardware and an accompanying app, was recently acquired by Apple. While Apple hasn't addressed this acquisition in any way, Beddit's privacy policy, last revised on May 8, 2017, says that Beddit has been acquired by Apple.
May 10, 2017
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Apple buys Beddit, a sleep-tracking company with existing Apple watch app
Could the Apple watch track your Zs soon?
May 10, 2017
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Ardelyx initiates two clinical trials to evaluate new treatment for hyperkalemia
Ardelyx, Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on enhancing the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal and cardiorenal diseases, today announced the initiation of a Phase 3 clinical trial and an onset-of-action clinical trial evaluating RDX7675 in patients with hyperkalemia, a potentially life-threatening condition common in patients with cardiorenal disease.
January 3, 2017
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Area of brain linked to bipolar disorder pinpointed
A volume decrease in specific parts of the brain's hippocampus -- long identified as a hub of mood and memory processing -- was linked to bipolar disorder in a new study.
January 24, 2017
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Armpit lumps: Causes, diagnosis, and treatment
Armpit lumps are very common and are normally caused by a swollen lymph node or gland under the armpit. However, there are many other causes for armpit lumps, some of which may require treatment.
April 21, 2017
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Armpit pain: Common causes and treatments
Many people experience underarm or armpit pain at some point in their lifetime. While armpit pain can be a sign of severe health complications, it is usually associated with minor infections and overexertion.
June 2, 2017
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Array of nanoscale sensors can sniff and diagnose several types of diseases
Before modern medical lab techniques became available, doctors diagnosed some diseases by smelling a patient's breath. Scientists have been working for years to develop analytical instruments that can mimic this sniff-and-diagnose ability. Now, researchers report in the journal ACS Nano that they have identified a unique "breathprint" for each disease. Using this information, they have designed a device that screens breath samples to classify and diagnose several types of diseases.
December 21, 2016
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Artificial Fingertip Allows Man to Regain Feeling In His Phantom Hand
A man missing an arm has been able to feel the sensation of touch in his phantom hand thanks to a newly developed artificial fingertip from Ecole polytechnique federale de Lausanne, Switzerland and Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Italy. the device interfaces with electrodes implanted into the remaining arm, not far above the stump.
March 8, 2016
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Artificial limbs are becoming more like wearable robots
The carbon fibre legs or "blades" used by lower limb amputee runners have arguably become one of the most iconic symbols of the Paralympic Games. Although different lower-limb sports prostheses are used for running, jumping and other activities, they share a single common aim: they are designed to help Paralympians run faster, jump higher or further than other competitors. Form follows function.
September 12, 2016
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Artificial touch with finger prosthesis reveals how neurons cooperate inside healthy brain
In a collaboration between Swedish and Italian researchers, the aim was to analyse how the brain interprets information from a virtual experience of touch, created by a finger prosthesis with artificial sensation. the result was - completely unexpectedly - a new method for measuring brain health.
April 5, 2017
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As Heroin Takes Hold, Some Librarians Learn How To Treat Overdoses
Public libraries aren't merely book repositories; they also provide access to information and resources for the entire community. And in some neighborhoods, librarians are training themselves to revive heroin users who have overdosed.
May 22, 2017
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ATA releases new guidelines for diagnosis, treatment of thyroid disease during pregnancy and postpartum
New evidence-based recommendations from the American Thyroid Association (ATA) provide guidance to clinicians in diagnosing and managing thyroid disease during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Pregnancy has a profound effect on thyroid gland function, and thyroid disease is common in pregnancy. the 97 recommendations presented in the new Guidelines help define current best practices for thyroid function testing, iodine nutrition, pregnancy complications, and treatment of thyroid disease during pregnancy and lactation.
January 6, 2017
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Athletes' anxiety over illness symptoms could increase injury risk
The anxiety experienced by elite athletes over illness symptoms is linked to the risk of being injured during competition and should be taken seriously, according to a study carried out at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2015. the way in which the symptoms progress and the nature of the sporting activity also influence the risk of injury.
March 1, 2017
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Australian survey reveals cannabis use in people with epilepsy to manage seizures
People with epilepsy resort to cannabis products when antiepileptic drug side-effects are intolerable and epilepsy uncontrolled.
March 9, 2017
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Automated rapid blood test provides accurate malaria diagnosis
Diagnosing malaria has been a very time-consuming and error-prone process up to now. Together with his Dutch colleague Jan van den Boogaart, Professor Oliver Hayden from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed an automated rapid blood test that provides an accurate diagnosis in almost 100 percent of cases.
June 16, 2017
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Avoiding spiritual struggles and existential questions is linked with poorer mental health
Fear of confronting the tensions and conflicts brought on by existential concerns–the "big questions" of life–is linked with poorer mental health, including higher levels of depression, anxiety and difficulty regulating emotions, according to a new study.
December 5, 2016
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AXT makes magnetic particle imaging technology available to researchers in Australia
AXT is proud to be able to bring another cutting-edge technology to Australia that will help our medical researchers accelerate the rate at which they bring new cures, remedies and therapies to clinical realities. In this case, AXT have partnered with Magnetic Insight to make
December 21, 2016
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Ayurvedic treatment for psoriasis: Options, remedies, and evidence
Ayurveda is an ancient medical practice that people sometimes use to try to help their psoriasis. It involves incorporating a special diet, herbal compounds, and additional supportive medical practices.
April 14, 2017
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Misc. - B

Baldness: How close are we to a cure?
Baldness is an accepted part of the aging process for some, and a source of distress for others. Hair loss affects millions of men and women, yet despite decades of research, a cure is still not available. Just how close are we to finding a magic bullet for baldness?
June 5, 2017
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Bare bones: Making bones transparent
Ten years ago, the bones currently in your body did not actually exist. Like skin, bone is constantly renewing itself, shedding old tissue and growing it anew from stem cells in the bone marrow. Now, a new technique developed at Caltech can render intact bones transparent, allowing researchers to observe these stem cells within their environment. the method is a breakthrough for testing new drugs to combat diseases like osteoporosis.
April 26, 2017
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Barium swallow: what to expect and side effects
A barium swallow is a type of test used to look inside the esophagus, or food pipe. a doctor might recommend this test if they need to look at the outline of any part of a person's digestive system.
April 27, 2017
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Battery you can swallow could enable future ingestible medical devices (w/video)
Non-toxic, edible batteries could one day power ingestible devices for diagnosing and treating disease. One team reports new progress toward that goal with their batteries made with melanin pigments, naturally found in the skin, hair and eyes.
August 23, 2016
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BBI Solutions launches new range of antibodies for Galectin-3 biomarker
BBI Solutions (BBI) has announced the launch of a range of antibodies for the biomarker Galectin-3. the antibodies complement BBI's Galectin-3 antigen, which was also launched earlier this year. Available to sample now, these antibodies are highly sensitive with low cross-reactivity.
October 5, 2016
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Behavioral activation as effective as CBT? An interview with Professor David Richards
What is behavioral activation (BA) treatment and how does it differ from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)?
October 10, 2016
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Best medications to treat overactive bladder
Overactive bladder is a condition that relates to storage of urine in the bladder. In this condition the muscle in the bladder wall may be unstable, which can cause urine leakage.
April 10, 2017
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Best treatments for an overactive bladder
Overactive bladder is a disorder that causes a group of symptoms. the most common symptoms include a sudden, uncontrollable urge to urinate, leaks, and having to go to the bathroom many times during both the day and the night.
April 11, 2017
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BET inhibitor treatment decreases lung inflammation in mice
Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic respiratory infections, primarily caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which lead to airway inflammation and damage.
July 21, 2016
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Better outcome measures needed for clinical trials for Fragile X Syndrome
Assessments not keeping up with clinical trial advances
June 12, 2017
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Better sleep can lead to better sex
Sleep disturbance is common for many women during menopause, creating an array of adverse health outcomes such as heart disease, hypertension, and depression. a new study shows that sleep problems can also interfere with a woman's level of sexual satisfaction.
February 1, 2017
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Better sleep can make us feel like a million bucks
Sleep deprivation and sleep disorders are dangerous, costly, and impact our health and overall well-being. new research puts forth sleep as a major public health concern, and shows that the effects of a good night's sleep are as beneficial for our happiness and well-being as winning the lottery might be.
March 19, 2017
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Better Sleep Could Mean Better Sex for Older Women
Study found links between too little shuteye and less sexual satisfaction, especially around menopause
February 1, 2017
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BetterYou magnesium flakes shown to ease restless legs syndrome
An Essex mum of three suffering from restless legs syndrome (RLS) can finally share a bed with her husband again thanks to a natural Magnesium Flake remedy, which featured on the 'Secrets of Sleep' (More4, 5 July).
July 10, 2017
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Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows
Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown.
September 21, 2016
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Binge drinking likely to contribute to development of compulsive alcohol consumption
Prior research suggests that binge drinking may increase people's risk of developing alcohol use disorders (AUDs), especially adolescents and young adults. It is unclear whether different drinking patterns -- for example, intermittent versus regular drinking --have a different impact on the compulsive drinking that characterizes people with AUDs. This study used rats to examine whether chronic intermittent alcohol access facilitates a transition to compulsive-like drinking.
July 6, 2017
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Bioengineered human livers mimic natural development
Study uncovers previously unknown genetic-molecular crosstalk
June 14, 2017
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Biofortuna achieves key milestones in development of new blood group genotyping product family
Biofortuna Ltd, a UK-based diagnostics company offering molecular diagnostic products and contract manufacturing services, has successfully achieved key milestones in the development of its new blood group genotyping product family -- ReadyPlex™. this breakthrough has released the second tranche of its 2015 funding -- totalling £1.5m -- which will be used for final development and commercialisation of this innovative product line.
October 5, 2016
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Bioinformatics Consulting
provides scientific consulting, software development, data processing and computing support services for molecular biologists and biotechnology companies.
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Biolegend chooses Chromatrap technology to power chromatin immunoprecipitation kits
Chromatrap® announces that BioLegend, a major US-based manufacturer and supplier of reagents and kits for biomedical research, has chosen their novel solid-state ChIP technology to power a new range of faster and more efficient chromatin immunoprecipitation kits.
June 30, 2017
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Biological basis of 'atypical' chronic fatigue syndrome revealed
Chronic fatigue syndrome is a debilitating disorder characterized by severe fatigue that lasts for more than 6 months. the condition is also accompanied by a range of symptoms, from muscle pain and headaches to cognitive dysfunction. the illness can sometimes be difficult to diagnose, and its cause is not yet known. However, new research finds the biological basis for two subgroups of chronic fatigue syndrome, which may in the future help clinicians to diagnose the disease and treat it more effectively.
April 4, 2017
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Biomarker in blood may help predict recovery time for sports concussions
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that the blood protein tau could be an important new clinical biomarker to better identify athletes who need more recovery time before safely returning to play after a sports-related concussion. the study, supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research with additional funding from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, published online in the Jan. 6, 2017 issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
January 6, 2017
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Biomedical scientist develops new way to create micro muscles for testing muscle efficiency
A biomedical research scientist is taking the lead in the creation of muscle cells and micro muscles to test muscle efficiency in the laboratory - and he is able to carry out this new and innovative work thanks to the support he has received to get him back into science after a career break.
November 30, 2016
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Biomimetic Artificial Skin Layer with Significant Temperature Sensitivity
Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology have developed a material that can sense changes in temperature with more sensitivity than human skin. the team discovered that flexible films made from pectin demonstrate an electrical response, caused by the release of calcium ions, following very small changes in temperature. Increased temperature causes the pectin molecules to "unzip", allowing the release and movement of calcium ions.
February 3, 2017
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Bipolar Diagnosis May Take Up to 6 Years
Researcher calls delay a 'lost opportunity' for treatment
July 25, 2016
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Bipolar disorder: new method predicts who will respond to lithium therapy
For roughly one-third of people diagnosed with bipolar disorder, lithium is a miracle drug, effectively treating both their mania and depression. now a new develop tool has been developed to gauge success of preferred treatment for bipolar disorder.
March 19, 2017
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Bipolar disorder: Signs, symptoms, and diagnosis
Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that is characterized by ods of extreme high and low mood. But what are the signs and symptoms of this mood disorder?
June 28, 2017
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Bladder infection: Causes, treatments, and remedies
A bladder infection is a bacterial infection of the bladder. It is also sometimes known as a urinary tract infection because the urinary tract includes the bladder, urethra, ureters, and kidneys.
March 9, 2017
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Bleeding ulcer: What causes it and is it serious?
The term ulcer means a sore that doesn't heal quickly. Ulcers can occur almost anywhere on the body, usually resulting from injuries, illnesses, or infections. They can be short-lived or ongoing.
July 10, 2017
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Blood Banks Face Shortages, new Screening Rules
Rare complication of transfusions has led to beefed-up testing requirements
December 23, 2016
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Blood flow to the brain increased by 600% during evolution, research reveals
In a new research collaboration between the University of Witwatersrand and the University of Adelaide, previously held views on the evolutionary development of the human brain are being challenged. the findings of their studies, published today in the Royal Society Open Science, unseats previous theories that the progression of human intelligence is simply related to the increase in size of the brain.
August 31, 2016
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Blood Pressure-Lowering Diet May Help Treat Gout
DASH eating plan brings blood pressure down, and seems to relieve inflammatory joint problem
August 15, 2016
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Blood Test May Someday Diagnose Concussion
Small study suggests markers in the blood might spot when brain injury has occurred
November 11, 2016
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Blood-brain barrier on a chip sheds new light on 'silent killer'
The blood-brain barrier is a network of specialized cells that surrounds the arteries and veins within the brain. It forms a unique gateway that both provides brain cells with the nutrients they require and protects them from potentially harmful compounds.
December 6, 2016
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Blood-Monitoring Disposable Smart Patch Delivers Blood Thinners On-Demand
Thrombosis, the occlusion of vasculature by blood clots, is a precursor to debilitating conditions including stroke, pulmonary embolism, and heart attack. Blood thinners such as heparin or Coumadin are used to treat thrombosis, but necessitate ongoing blood tests for precise drug dosing.
November 30, 2016
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Body Acceptance Rises for Women
But study finds men a bit concerned about their muscle size
August 05, 2016
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Body dysmorphic disorder may be 'under-diagnosed" by cosmetic professionals, study suggests
Plastic surgeons and other cosmetic professionals are familiar with the challenges posed by patients with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) seeking cosmetic procedures, reports a survey study in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
February 7, 2017
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Bold steps needed to protect global standing of UK science, says Lords report
Bold steps are needed to ensure UK science has a prominent place in the global economy after Brexit, says a Lords report out today.
December 21, 2016
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Bonding with a partner could have unexpected rewards--in your brain, that is
Cuddling rodents might be the key to understanding this social behavior.
June 6, 2017
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Botulinum toxins may cause remote effects by moving between neurons
The botulinum toxins are among the deadliest substances on Earth, and two specific toxins – including the popular drug Botox – have multiple uses for treating many neuromuscular conditions, including frown lines, disabling muscle spasms and migraine headaches.
August 05, 2016
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Brain Disease Uncovered in Former Soccer Players
Autopsies show evidence of CTE, the degenerative condition linked to repetitive head trauma
February 15, 2017
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Brain hemorrhage: Causes, symptoms, and treatments
A brain hemorrhage refers to bleeding in the brain. this medical condition is also known as a brain bleed or an intracranial hemorrhage.
April 24, 2017
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Brain plasticity after injury: an interview with Dr Swathi Kiran
What is brain plasticity and why is it important following a brain injury?
November 3, 2016
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Brain rehabilitation via a mobile app? An interview with Keith Cooper
How has brain rehabilitation traditionally been delivered and when did Constant Therapy first begin to develop a mobile app to deliver therapy?
October 5, 2016
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Brain "relay' also key to holding thoughts in the mind
Thalamus eyed as potential treatment target for schizophrenia's working memory deficits.
May 3, 2017
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Brain Relies on Two Timekeepers for Sleep
Study shows internal clock and hourglass may sometimes be at odds with each other
August 12, 2016
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Brain scans differentiate two types of empathy
Using brain scans, researchers have discovered that empathic care and empathic distress have distinct patterns of brain activity that remain remarkably consistent across individuals.
June 8, 2017
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Brain Scans May Shed Light on Bipolar Suicide Risk
Almost half of those with the disorder attempt suicide and up to 20 percent succeed
January 31, 2017
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Brain Scans Spot Where Fear and Anxiety Live
Unusually large 'striatum' is linked to inability to cope with uncertainty, research shows
May 18, 2017
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Brain sets a unique learning rate for everything we do, by self-adjusting to the environment
Study refutes theory that behavior under uncertainty is optimal
April 19, 2017
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Brain study confirms gene mutation link to psychiatric disorders
Brain scans have revealed how a genetic mutation linked to major psychiatric disorders affects the structure, function and chemistry of the brain. the study offers further clues about how the mutation increases the risk of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression.
August 15, 2016
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Brain tissue from a petri dish
Stem cell research
April 13, 2017
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Brain-stimulation method provides significant reductions in phantom limb pain
As many as 25,000 people a year worldwide lose limbs from land mine blasts, and a new study, published in the Journal of Pain, shows that transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) administered to the scalp can stimulate the brain and provide significant reductions in phantom limb pain.
August 10, 2016
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Brain-Training May Help Ease Ringing in the Ears
Study found computer-based program seemed to allow people to cope with tinnitus
January 19, 2017
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Brain's internal compass also navigates during imagination
When you try to find your way in a new place, your brain creates a spatial map that represents that environment. Neuroscientists now show that the brain's 'navigation system' is not only active during actual or virtual movement, but also when imagining view directions. this suggests that the brain's spatial navigation system might also be important for cognitive functions such as imagination and memory.
August 30, 2016
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Brain's 'GPS' plays broader role in memory and learning than previously thought
The part of the brain that creates mental maps of one's environment plays a much broader role in memory and learning than was previously thought, according to new research published this week in the journal Nature by researchers at Princeton University.
March 30, 2017
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Brains of bulimic people may react differently to food cues
By studying the brain scans of women with and without bulimia, researchers have discovered that their brains react differently to food cues. They found that, in women with bulimia, there is less blood flow in a part of the brain that is linked to self-thinking.
July 10, 2017
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Breakthrough study opens door to design of whitening compounds for removing skin discolorations
New breakthrough opens doors to treat melanin-linked skin conditions
July 4, 2017
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Brightlamp Smartphone App to Check for Concussions
Brightlamp, a startup out of Purdue University, is developing an app that uses machine learning and the smartphone camera to help diagnose a concussion in about five seconds. Concussions are a type of brain injury that can happen during a collision or impact, causing the affected person to feel dizzy or disoriented. In sports like American Football or boxing, concussions are a common type of injury. Unfortunately, concussions can increase the likelihood of depression and neurodegenerative disease in later life.
June 1, 2017
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BSACI to publish updated guidance on diagnosis, management of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis
The Standards of Care Committee of the British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology (BSACI) is to publish updated guidance on the diagnosis and management of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis is common and affects between 10-15% of children and 26% of adults in the UK.
July 10, 2017
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Building better brains: A bioengineered upgrade for organoids
A few years ago, Jürgen Knoblich and his team at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA) have pioneered brain organoid technology. They developed a method for cultivating three-dimensional brain-like structures, so called cerebral organoids, in a dish.
May 31, 2017
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Bumps on the skin: Pictures, causes, and treatments
There are many different causes of bumps that appear on the skin. While many of these underlying causes do not result in serious complications, some cancers are associated with bumps appearing on the skin.
March 27, 2017
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BUSM researcher highlights link between sleep conditions and cognitive impairment in older people
Daytime sleepiness is very common in the elderly with prevalence rates of up to 50 percent. Caused by sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), a disruption of normal breathing during sleep, these cause recurrent awakenings and subsequent excessive daytime sleepiness.
January 31, 2017
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BUSM researchers move one step closer to understanding brain changes linked to PTSD
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and the VA Boston Healthcare System are one step closer to understanding the specific nature of brain changes associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
January 23, 2017
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Buzzing the vagus nerve just right to fight inflammatory disease
Electrical vagus nerve stimulation can help fight inflammatory diseases like Crohn's or arthritis but can also contribute somewhat to inflammation. Engineers have tweaked the buzz to keep the good effects and minimize those less desirable. Their innovation could be adapted to existing medical devices with relative ease.
January 5, 2017
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Misc. - C

C elegans could be powerful model for understanding how nervous systems produce behaviors
The human brain, the most complex object in the universe, has 86 billion neurons with trillions of yet-unmapped connections. Understanding how it generates behavior is a problem that has beguiled humankind for millennia, and is critical for developing effective therapies for the psychiatric disorders that incur heavy costs on individuals and on society.
December 27, 2016
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Calcium triggers virulence switch from acute to chronic lung infections
The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening pathogen in hospitals. About ten percent of all nosocomial infections, in particular pneumonia, are caused by this pathogen. Researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland, have now discovered that calcium induces the switch from acute to chronic infection. In Nature Microbiology the researchers have also reported why antibiotics are less effective in fighting the pathogen in its chronic state.
October 22, 2016
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Caliber I.D. launches new class of modular confocal microscope that can scan large areas at lightning fast speeds
Caliber I.D. launches the RS-G4, a new class of modular confocal microscope that delivers confocal's expected high resolution and clean contrast while overcoming its limited scan areas.
October 5, 2016
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Calming Virtual Reality Scenarios Prove More Effective at Reducing Pain
Virtual reality technology has been used in the past to help reduce the pain experienced during difficult to endure procedures, such as the SnowWorld game designed to help assist with bandage changes on burn victims. The actual mechanism how virtual reality actually numbs the pain was not properly studied, the assumption seems to have been that distraction is really what virtual reality does for pain.
June 19, 2017
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Caltech researchers discover brain region that judges intensity, ambiguity of facial expressions
Have you ever thought someone was angry at you, but it turned out you were just misreading their facial expression? Caltech researchers have now discovered that one specific region of the brain, called the amygdala, is involved in making these (sometimes inaccurate) judgments about ambiguous or intense emotions. Identifying the amygdala's role in social cognition suggests insights into the neurological mechanisms behind autism and anxiety.
April 25, 2017
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Can dealing with emotional exhaustion enhance happiness?
The process of dealing with emotional exhaustion can sometimes increase happiness. a new study examined when and how dealing with emotional exhaustion can enhance happiness in a work environment. the research was focused on the role of perceived supervisor support -- the workers' view of their manager's level of supportiveness, caring and appreciation for their efforts -- in stimulating ways to cope with exhaustion.
April 12, 2017
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Can essential oils help treat fibromyalgia?
Essential oils are concentrated aromatic liquids that are distilled from plants. they are believed to provide a number of health benefits and ease the symptoms of several medical conditions, including fibromyalgia.
May 8, 2017
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Can I get a tattoo if I have psoriasis?
Psoriasis is a medical condition that causes a person's skin cells to grow rapidly. this results in the buildup of excess skin cells known as "plaques" on the skin.
April 27, 2017
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Can People 'Sniff' Out Illness in Others?
Study suggests humans use vision and smell to detect infection more than thought
May 30, 2017
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Can Social Media Leave you Socially Isolated?
More time using apps and sites like Twitter, Instagram, Facebook linked to greater sense of isolation, study suggests
March 6, 2017
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Can Surgery Trigger Rare Muscle Disorder?
Still, the likelihood of developing postoperative Guillain-Barre syndrome remains slight, researchers say
November 23, 2016
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Can technology transform chronic disease management?
Implementing best practice care for patients with chronic diseases is one of the greatest challenges currently facing primary care providers. Although digital health technology is hailed for all its potential, could it improve the ability of primary care and internal medicine specialists to help these patients?
April 24, 2017
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Can type 2 Diabetes be reversed? Strategies, goals, and evidence
Type 2 Diabetes often arises with increased weight and obesity. Because of this, it is possible to reverse type 2 diabetes' effects through weight loss and lifestyle changes.
April 24, 2017
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Can you drink distilled water safely?
Staying hydrated is crucial for maintaining good health. But is drinking distilled water, rather than other types of water, a healthful option?
May 30, 2017
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'Cannibal drug' consumption in adolescence can increase vulnerability to cocaine use during adulthood
Consumption of the synthetic drug MDPV -a powerful psychostimulant known as 'cannibal drug'- in adolescence, can increase vulnerability of cocaine addiction during adulthood, according to a study carried out with laboratory animals and led by the researchers Elena Escubedo, from the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences and the Institute of Biomedicine of the UB (IBUB) and Olga Valverde, head of the Neurobiology of Behaviour Research Group (GreNeC) of Pompeu Fabra University (UPF).
March 22, 2017
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Canadian researchers use gene therapy to treat patient with Fabry disease
A team of Canadian physicians and researchers is believed to be the first in the world to have used gene therapy to treat a patient with Fabry disease, a rare inherited enzyme deficiency that can damage major organs and shorten lifespan.
February 16, 2017
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Cancer therapy shows promise for psoriasis treatment
HDAC inhibitors, already widely used to treat cancer, may be an effective therapy for psoriasis as well, scientists report.
May 31, 2017
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Careful counselling from clinicians may help alleviate anxiety in wAMD patients
Highly effective current treatments for vision loss need to be allied with careful counselling to ensure patients maintain good psychological health as well as good vision, new research recommends.
April 11, 2017
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Cast Made of Hollow Tubes Hardens to Make Perfect Fit
Three students from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are working on a new way to stabilize broken arms so as to avoid the downsides of traditional casts. Plaster and fiberglass casts that are used now don't let air in and out, making the skin below itchy and smelly, and sometimes causing serious infections. the solution that the students are working on involves wrapping the arm in a braid made of hollow silicone tubes, and then pumping s epoxy into the braided structure to solidify it into a hard cast.
October 14, 2016
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Causal connection between deep sleep and learning efficiency
For the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain. They have developed a new, non-invasive method for modulating deep sleep in humans in a targeted region of the brain.
May 22, 2017
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CATCH program identified as excellent example of evidence-based physical activity intervention
In a paper published today in a special physical activity series of the Lancet, the Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) program developed by researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) was identified as an excellent example of an evidence-based physical activity intervention that has been successfully scaled up to affect population health.
July 28, 2016
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Causes of baldness, gray hair identified
A study of a rare genetic disease may have yielded a cure for hair graying and baldness, after researchers unintentionally discovered the mechanisms that give rise to the conditions.
May 9, 2017
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Cell biology: a molecular rivet for long-range force transmission
Researchers have described, for the first time, how plastin, an actin-bundling protein, acts as a molecular rivet, providing global connectivity to the cortex underlying the plasma membrane of embryonic cells to facilitate polarization and cell division.
May 9, 2017
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Cell biology: new molecular details about protein sorting in the cell
The targeted incorporation of proteins into the membrane is a vital process for cell maintenance; these membrane proteins ensure the proper functioning of the cell's metabolism, communication with its environment, and energy supply. Protein-sorting mechanisms ensure that membrane proteins are specifically recognized among thousands of different proteins -- and are sent to the membrane, where they're needed.
January 31, 2017
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Cell migration occurs by intermittent bursts of activity, researchers find
Cell migration is a central process in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Researchers of Aalto University and their research partners have now discovered that this motion occurs by intermittent bursts of activity. It can be described by universal scaling laws similar to the ones observed in other driven systems outside of biology.
September 29, 2016
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Cells may need some reactive forms of oxygen to maintain health
Within our bodies, high levels of reactive forms of oxygen can damage proteins and contribute to diabetic complications and many other diseases. But some studies are showing that these reactive oxygen species (ROS) molecules sometimes can aid in maintaining health--findings now boosted by a surprising discovery from Joslin Diabetes Center researchers.
August 19, 2016
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CFS possesses objectively identifiable chemical signature in men and women, study reveals
Dauer is the German word for persistence or long-lived. It is a type of stasis in the development in some invertebrates that is prompted by harsh environmental conditions. the findings are published online in the August 29 issue of PNAS.
August 29, 2016
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Chagas disease confirmed as 'silent killer' in first large-scale US survey
A study of almost 5,000 Latin American-born residents of Los Angeles County found that 1.24% tested positive for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that can cause life-threatening heart damage if not treated early. Chagas disease is one of the leading causes of heart failure in Latin America.
April 14, 2017
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Chan Zuckerberg Initiative invests $3B to cure all diseases
The charity led by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, throws its weight behind efforts to diagnose, prevent and cure disease.
September 21, 2016
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Checking Patient's Drug History May Help Curb Opioid Abuse
Sharpest declines seen in states like New York with strict rules for doctors
May 23, 2017
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Checklist program reduced large-scale post-surgery deaths
A voluntary checklist-based program significantly reduced deaths following inpatient surgery in a collaborative group of 14 hospitals in South Carolina. a study shows that 3 years after implementing the program, there was a 22 percent drop in post-surgery deaths, while other hospitals in the state that did not participate in the program showed no reduction.
April 18, 2017
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Chemists develop one-step solution to make precursors for synthesis of drugs
A one-step solution to make nitrogen-laden molecular precursors for the preparation of drugs and other bioactive molecules has been discovered by researchers at Rice University, the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSWMC) and Brigham Young University.
September 13, 2016
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Chiari malformations: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Chiari malformations (CM) occur when brain tissue extends into the upper spinal canal.
July 4, 2017
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consumer information site from Merck.
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Children and adults show differences in judgments about moral conflict, research finds
Is it better to struggle with moral conflict and ultimately choose to do the right thing or to do the right thing without feeling any turmoil in the first place? new research suggests that your answer may depend on how old you are.
October 5, 2016
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Children with mild eczema unlikely to benefit from antibiotics, study shows
Estimates suggest that 40 percent of eczema flares are treated with topical antibiotics, but findings from a study led by Cardiff University suggest there is no meaningful benefit from the use of either oral or topical antibiotics for milder clinically infected eczema in children.
March 14, 2017
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Chip captures individual cells in minuscule gels
Researchers have developed a chip that can capture and hold individual cells in the exact center of a minuscule hydrogel droplet. Their novel method keeps cells alive for multiple weeks, which makes it easier to study them. This makes it possible to, for example, test the action of new drugs and improve stem cell therapies with unparalleled control.
June 12, 2017
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Cholera incidence in Africa increases during El Niño, study reveals
Cholera cases in East Africa increase by roughly 50,000 during El Niño, the cyclical weather occurrence that profoundly changes global weather patterns, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
April 11, 2017
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CHOP researchers exploit gene discovery in severe epilepsy to identify precision treatment
An international team of researchers who discovered a new gene disorder that causes severe childhood epilepsy leveraged that finding to reduce seizures in two children. the collaborators' case report reflects the potential of precision medicine--applying basic science knowledge to individualize treatment to a patient's unique genetic profile.
September 20, 2016
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Chromatrap reports benefits of using ChIP-seq kit for histone methylation applications
Chromatrap® reports on the advantages of using its Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing (ChIP-seq) assay kits for histone methylation applications.
September 16, 2016
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Chronic cough different than cough from cold, says allergist
There's been a lot of talk about politicians and coughs lately. and we've all seen public figures struggle with it. Sometimes the cough gets so bad the person can't speak. Sometimes it's a symptom of a bigger problem, such as an infection. These public figures no doubt have excellent medical care and the best medical advice, but they continue to have uncontrolled coughing episodes.
September 13, 2016
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Chronic exposure to childhood bullying may have lifelong health effects
Being bullied during childhood might have lifelong health effects related to chronic stress exposure--including an increased risk for heart disease and Diabetes in adulthood, according to a research review in the March/April issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry.
March 10, 2017
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Chronic nerve pain: Sensory neurons switch roles to transmit pain signals
Breaking research, published in the journal Science, demonstrates that touch-sensitive nerves switch teams and generate pain in chronic pain conditions. The findings may open the door to better treatments.
June 2, 2017
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Chronic pain patients can reduce emotional response to pain through spinal cord stimulation
Researchers at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have shown that patients who have chronic pain can reduce their emotional response to the pain through spinal cord stimulation.
March 18, 2016
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Chronic short sleep shuts down programs involved in immune response, study shows
Many people report getting sick when they don't get enough sleep. a new study helps explain why.
January 27, 2017
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Climate change may increase rates of sleep loss
Climate change may keep you awake -- and not just metaphorically. Nights that are warmer than normal can harm human sleep, researchers show in a new paper, with the poor and elderly most affected. According to their findings, if climate change is not addressed, temperatures in 2050 could cost people in the United States millions of additional nights of insufficient sleep per year. By 2099, the figure could rise by several hundred million more nights of lost sleep annually.
May 26, 2017
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contract research organization offering monitoring of clinical trials in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Poland.
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Clinical trial assesses efficacy of experimental treatment in individuals with cervical spinal cord injury
Physicians at Rush University Medical Center became the first in Illinois to inject AST-OPC1 (oligodendrocyte progenitor cells), an experimental treatment, into the damaged cervical spine of a recently paralyzed man as part of a multicenter clinical trial.
September 14, 2016
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Clemson researchers focus on improving overall safety of football helmet facemasks
A team of Clemson University researchers and an Upstate businessman believe they can help make football a little safer by creating a facemask that can help reduce the severity of head injuries by increasing overall helmet protection.
December 23, 2016
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Cluster headaches give intense pain but can be treated, says expert
Often called the suicide headache because of the excruciating intensity of the pain, cluster headaches are three times more likely to strike men than women.
November 18, 2016
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Cognitive-related neural pattern to activate machines
A study has identified a functional brain pattern linked to cognitive behavior able to activate an iPad's touchscreen. Results may be useful in brain-machine interfaces, of particular interest for people with physical difficulties to communicate with the outside world.
June 13, 2017
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Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press publishes new book on key aspects of ciliary biology
Nearly every cell in the human body has one or more protrusive structures called cilia or flagella. These power cell movement and fluid flow, sense the extracellular environment, coordinate cell signaling, and establish left-right asymmetry during development. Mutations in genes that encode cilia can lead to disorders known as ciliopathies.
December 6, 2016
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College students take more time to recover from concussion, study shows
A new study, presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada, shows college students take significantly more time to recover from a concussion than the general national average of seven to 14 days.
February 6, 2017
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Color-tinted sunglasses may provide relief from photophobia in post-concussion patients
Following a concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), patients may suffer from light sensitivity or photophobia, making it challenging to return to normal activities. The sensitivity may also trigger or exacerbate headaches.
July 4, 2017
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Colorado tick fever: Symptoms, treatment, and prevention
Colorado tick fever is also known as mountain tick fever, American tick fever, and Rocky Mountain tick fever.
July 6, 2017
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Combination of biologic and phototherapy treatment appears to be safe, effective in treating psoriasis
The review, entitled "Combining biologic and phototherapy treatments for psoriasis: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability," was carried out by a group of researchers in the USA. they conducted an extensive PubMed search for studies that evaluated the safety and efficacy of the combination of biologic and narrowband ultraviolet B (NBUVB) phototherapy to treat moderate-to-severe psoriasis.
August 10, 2016
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Combination of NSAIDs and gastric protection can lead to inflammation in small intestine
Patients with inflammatory diseases are often prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. they are also often recommended to use a proton pump inhibitor to protect their stomach. In a joint study, clinical pharmacologist Markus Zeitlinger and gastroenterologist Werner Dolak from MedUni Vienna showed that this combination of medication can result in inflammation in the small intestine. However, if an antibiotic (rifaximin) is additionally given, the intestine remains protected.
April 11, 2017
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Combination treatment found to effective in patients with tophaceous gout
The drug lesinurad in combination with febuxostat was better at lowering blood levels of urate than febuxostat alone in a phase III clinical trial of 324 patients with tophaceous gout. Over 12 months, significantly more patients in the combination group achieved target levels of urate than patients in the febuxostat group.
June 9, 2017
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Common drug for allergies and asthma could prevent fibrosis, reduce need for liver transplants
A drug commonly used for the prevention of allergies and asthma someday could find new use in preventing liver disease and reducing the need for transplants, according to new research published in the October 2016 edition of the scientific journal Hepatology.
October 12, 2016
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Common drugs for treating back pain provide little benefit, research reveals
Commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, used to treat back pain provide little benefit, but cause side effects, according to new research from the George Institute for Global Health.
February 2, 2017
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Common heartburn drugs tied to higher risk of death
Use of proton pump inhibitors - a class of drug taken by millions to treat heartburn and reduce stomach acid - is tied to a higher risk of premature death. So concludes a large study that followed nearly 350,000 United States veterans.
July 4, 2017
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Common Painkillers don't Ease back Pain: Study
Patients who took NSAIDs were also 2.5 times more likely to suffer gastrointestinal side effects
February 2, 2017
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Commonly prescribed drug for treating weak bone condition linked to increased risk of 'micro-cracks'
A type of drug used to treat weak bones is associated with an increased risk of 'micro-cracks' in bone, according to new research.
March 1, 2017
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Commonly prescribed gastric acid drug may increase death risk, study shows
The findings add to a growing body of evidence linking the use of PPIs to a range of health problems including kidney damage, bone fracture and dementia. The authors of the current study say it may be time to restrict the indications for PPI use and the amount of time patients take the treatment for.
July 4, 2017
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Company Delays Launch of Muscular Dystrophy Drug
The U.S. launch of a drug for a rare disorder called Duchenne muscular dystrophy will be paused due to concerns about its price, Marathon Pharmaceuticals told patient advocates this week.
February 14, 2017
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Comprehensive online resource provides grief support to many Canadian users
When Bonnie's husband of 41 years, Ray, died in 2013, she likened the experience to an earthquake. as his wife, she was at its epicentre and her life needed the most rebuilding. Their three children, friends and others grieved, but they experienced the tremors and were less intensely affected.
October 5, 2016
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Comprehensive surgical options could benefit osteoporosis patients with medication-related jaw necrosis
Osteoporosis patients who suffer drug side effects that result in painful exposed bone in the jaw could benefit if they are treated with one of the more comprehensive surgical options that could lower the risk of relapse and repeat surgery, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
July 4, 2017
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Computational model of the brain shows what triggers Tourette 'tics'
Tourette syndrome is a neurological disease in which patients make a series of repetitive, involuntary movements and sounds that are commonly referred to as 'tics'. a new study uses a computational model to simulate the neurological basis for the illness, which could help researchers to design new therapies in the future.
March 31, 2017
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Computerized model illuminates need for standardized care in heart, lung transplantations
Using the results from a computerized mathematical model, Johns Hopkins researchers investigated whether they could improve heart and lung transplantation procedures by transferring patients from low-volume to high-volume transplant centers.
September 14, 2016
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Concerns of use of nanotechnologies in the field of brain-machine interfaces
In April, Nano2All, a EU Horizon 2020 project, organized a citizen dialogue on the role of nanotechnologies in the field of brain-machine interfaces.
May 22, 2017
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Concussion Symptoms' Return Normal During Recovery
It's not a setback, pediatric specialist says
August 05, 2016
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Connecting the dots between dreams and brain disease
REM sleep disorders could be early warning sign for neurological disease later in life
May 29, 2017
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Conservation endocrinology sheds light on a changing world
The endocrine system is the set of glands that release hormones directly to the blood. Through the monitoring of endocrine responses, the field of conservation endocrinology can make contributions to conservation planning and the understanding of species' adaptations.
April 26, 2017
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Contact dermatitis or contact eczema?
Does dermatitis refer to the same condition as eczema and are contact dermatitis and contact eczema the same thing?
December 21, 2016
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Contact dermatitis: Triggers and treatment
Most people experience the unpleasant itching of contact dermatitis at least once in their lifetime.
June 26, 2017
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Continuous Brain Stimulating Implant Helps Relieve Epileptic Seizures
In what may be a major development for some patients with epilepsy, researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that continuous electrical stimulation of the brain's cortex can reduce the frequency of seizures, and in some cases their intensity and duration.
September 23, 2016
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Controlled drinking more difficult to achieve than total abstinence from alcohol, study shows
People who are seeking treatment for alcohol dependence and whose goal is to quit drinking entirely are more likely to achieve this goal if they are treated by a care provider who advocates total abstinence. Those who wish to learn to drink in moderation are not as successful, even when they are treated by a care provider who works with controlled consumption. These are the results of a study carried out at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. London Business School, Antai at Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Copenhagen Business School are amongst the holders.
September 14, 2016
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Convenience of buying medicine online does not outweigh risks, says expert
With the rise of on-demand delivery, prescription medicine joins the countless list of items that can be ordered online with the click of a button.
July 29, 2016
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Could You Spot Bed Bugs in a Hotel Room?
Survey finds they're a major worry for U.S. travelers, but many can't identify the annoying pests
June 14, 2017
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CPAP therapy may help improve nighttime acid reflux symptoms in patients with OSA
A new study suggests that CPAP therapy may help improve the symptoms of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.
October 3, 2016
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Create perfect bedtime routine in autumn with BetterYou transdermal magnesium, recommends sleep expert
Don't lose sleep over the clocks going back this October, instead prepare your bedtime routine with BetterYou transdermal magnesium says sleep expert.
September 15, 2016
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CRNAs urge patients to learn about risks, benefits of pain relief treatments
The opioid crisis is one of the largest challenges facing today's healthcare professionals and the patients for whom they care. for the National Patient Safety Foundation's Patient Safety Awareness Week, March 12-18, 2017, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) across the country are urging surgical, obstetric, and chronic pain patients to join with their anesthesia professionals to learn about the risks and benefits of the pain relief options available to them, which may include opioid and non-opioid treatments.
March 8, 2017
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Crowdsourcing effort helps develop mathematical model to forecast scent of molecule
You can anticipate a color before you see it, based solely on the length of light waves. Music can be interpreted from notes on a page without being heard. not so with odor. the only way to tell if something will smell like roses or turpentine, sea breeze or gasoline, is to sniff it.
February 21, 2017
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CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle
Using high-resolution electron microscopy, Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have uncovered new details of the structure and function of an intracellular channel that controls the contraction of skeletal muscle. the findings, published today in Cell, could lead to new treatments for a variety of muscle disorders.
September 22, 2016
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Curasan reveal plan for orthopedic product campaign
Curasan AG, a leading specialist for medical products in the field of orthobiologics, has received the market clearance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and thus the authorization to market its synthetic bone regeneration material CERASORB Ortho FOAM in the United States.
December 9, 2016
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Cushioned Shoe Inserts Won't Guard Against Injury
But custom-made foot orthotics might help, researchers report
December 13, 2016
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Misc. - D

Daffodils, Margaritas Among Surprise Skin Dangers
There are many hidden hazards that can cause itch or rash, dermatologists warn
March 3, 2017
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Dataiku and Bioserenity team up to develop wearable device for improving epilepsy diagnosis
Dataiku and Bioserenity, two European based companies, have partnered to create a wearable device which is aimed to improve the diagnosis of epilepsy. Dataiku, the maker of predictive analytics software, has created a data analysis application that has been combined with a wearable device developed by Bioserenity. the result monitors patients in real-time to help doctors effectively diagnose epilepsy.
September 2, 2016
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Daytime light exposure could help combat sleep disturbances linked to evening use of electronic devices
The use of smartphones and tablet computers during evening hours has previously been associated with sleep disturbances in humans. a new study from Uppsala University now shows that daytime light exposure may be a promising means to combat sleep disturbances associated with evening use of electronic devices.
August 11, 2016
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Deficiency in important enzyme leads to alcohol dependency
A research group under the leadership of Linkg University Professor Markus Heilig has identified an enzyme whose production is turned off in nerve cells of the frontal lobe when alcohol dependence develops. the deficiency in this enzyme leads to continued use of alcohol despite adverse consequences.
August 30, 2016
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Dehydration headaches: Signs, treatment, and prevention
Headaches are one of the most common causes of pain and missed days of work. But what are the key signs that a headache might be due to dehydration?
May 19, 2017
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DeKaye Consulting, Inc
specializing in hospital finance, accounts receivable, physician practice, medical records, managed care, and EDI systems management.
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Delaying school start time linked to variety of benefits for teen students
A new position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) asserts that the school day should begin at 8:30 a.m. or later for middle school and high school students.
April 17, 2017
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Dendritic cells develop from specialized progenitors, research shows
Dendritic cells are gatekeepers of Immunity and are crucial for the detection and initiation of Immunity against pathogens and foreign substances. Up to now, dendritic cell subtypes were thought to develop from one common progenitor. Now, in a joint effort, researchers from A*STAR Singapore Immunology Network, LIMES-Institute and cluster of excellence ImmunoSensation from University of Bonn and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases were able to show with single cell resolution that this important component of the human immune system develops from specialized progenitors.
May 5, 2017
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DeNovix pink spectrophotometer - fluorometer won by Ukraine National Acaedemy of Science
DeNovix Inc., a US based manufacturer of instrumentation for bioresearch, is proud to announce the winner of a Special Edition Pink DS-11 FX+ Spectrophotometer / Fluorometer. the winner, randomly chosen from thousands of eligible entries to the company's drawing, is Dr. Olena Livinska of the National Academy of Science of Ukraine.
April 17, 2017
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Desalination can increase prevalence of inadequate iodine intake
Hebrew University study suggests that desalination can dramatically increase the prevalence of inadequate iodine intake.
September 19, 2016
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Deviated septum: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
A deviated septum refers to a displacement of the thin wall within the nose that separates the nasal cavity.
July 7, 2017
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Dialysis with graphene
Dialysis, in the most general sense, is the process by which molecules filter out of one solution, by diffusing through a membrane, into a more dilute solution. Outside of hemodialysis, which removes waste from blood, scientists use dialysis to purify drugs, remove residue from chemical solutions, and isolate molecules for medical diagnosis, typically by allowing the materials to pass through a porous membrane.
June 29, 2017
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Digital technology can help people make smarter drinking decisions
Some individuals struggle to make healthy decisions about their drinking in risky situations. Technology can help. Researchers are finding ways by which digital interventions can help people make smarter drinking decisions, leading to reduced alcohol-related injuries and illness. These findings will be shared at the 40th annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in Denver June 24-28.
June 28, 2017
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Direct versus indirect inguinal hernias: Symptoms, causes, and treatment
There are many different types of hernias. An inguinal hernia is when a bulge or protrusion of tissue occurs in the groin area. They occur within the inguinal canal and can extend into the scrotum in males.
May 17, 2017
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Discarding donated kidneys based on biopsy results may be inappropriate, say researchers
Researchers have found that discarding donated kidneys on the basis of biopsy findings may be inappropriate. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), may help address the organ shortage by keeping valuable organs from being thrown away.
July 6, 2017
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Discovery of early biomarkers paves way for new insight into Huntington's disease
Early warning signs of Huntington's disease have been uncovered in a sheep carrying the human HD mutation, leading the way for new insight into this devastating illness, a new study in Scientific Reports has found.
February 22, 2017
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Discovery of vital molecule could lead to better treatment of respiratory conditions
Respiratory conditions could be better targeted and treated, thanks to the discovery of the vital molecule which regulates breathing - according to research by the University of Warwick.
February 1, 2017
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Disney Research Software Turns Photos Into Digital Dental Impressions
Disney is much more than cartoons, toys, and amusement parks. the company runs a high tech research arm that often comes up with unusual and innovative devices and technologies that often have relevance to medical practice. the latest publicly announced project from Disney Research is a 3D reconstruction software that uses data gathered from photos or videos of people's teeth to create accurate virtual models of those teeth.
December 9, 2016
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Distracted? Slowing down, not a safe option
Drivers who slow down while using mobile phones have the potential to increase on-road conflicts, a new study warns. Distracted drivers reducing their speed might sound favorable in terms of safety, but it could also lead to other types of crash risk, say investigators.
April 11, 2017
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Disturbances in the body's carbon monoxide metabolism linked to circadian disruption
Chronobiologists from Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin have shown that the body's carbon monoxide metabolism is closely linked to the body's circadian (internal) clock. Carbon monoxide, a toxic gas found in exhaust fumes and cigarette smoke, is also an endogenous by-product of the degradation of heme, the hemoglobin cofactor responsible for giving red blood cells their color.
December 6, 2016
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Disturbed sleep might worsen suicidal thoughts
Insomnia, nightmares, and erratic sleep times could be indicators of worsening suicidal thoughts among young adults, a new study suggests.
June 30, 2017
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Do 'Early Birds' Get the Healthier Worm?
Late-to-bed types appear to have poorer eating habits, study says
March 3, 2017
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Do probiotic deodorants really work?
We tested 6 brands, risking pit stains and smelliness, so you don't have to.
July 3, 2017
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Do You Have 'Social Jet Lag?'
Throwing your sleep schedule off to party on weekends may be hard on your heart, study says
June 7, 2017
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Doctors Try Brain-Training for 'Phantom Limb Pain'
Robotic technology offers insight into the post-amputation phenomenon
October 27, 2016
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Does symmetry matter for speed? Study finds Usain Bolt may have asymmetrical running gait
Right and left legs of the world's fastest man may perform differently
June 28, 2017
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Does the sex of a cell matter in research?
New guide aims to counter inherent sex bias in research of metabolic diseases
June 6, 2017
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Dogs role in detecting disease shown to be supported by the public
An overwhelming majority of the public support the use of trained dogs in the detection of human diseases, a poll commissioned by Medical Detection Dogs has found.
October 11, 2016
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Domos HME Consulting Group
home medical equipment consulting: compliance audits; reimbursement; sales and marketing strategies; and accreditation preparation.
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Dopamine: Far more than just the 'happy hormone'
Dopamine is a so-called messenger substance or neurotransmitter that conveys signals between neurons. It not only controls mental and emotional responses but also motor reactions. Dopamine is particularly known as being the "happy hormone." It is responsible for our experiencing happines.
August 31, 2016
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Dorothea Dix: Redefining mental illness
During the 19th century, mental health disorders were not recognized as treatable conditions. they were perceived as a sign of madness, warranting imprisonment in merciless conditions. One woman set out to change such perceptions: Dorothea Lynde Dix.
May 5, 2017
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Double chin: Causes and how to get rid of one
Seeing a double chin in the mirror may be a sign of weight gain or obesity, but that is not always the case.
June 28, 2017
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Double voiding: a guide to bladder-emptying techniques
Urinary frequency can mean that a person wakes up numerous times a night wanting to go to the restroom. Sometimes they may go only to feel they need to go again just minutes later. These are just some of the problems associated with urinary frequency.
April 3, 2017
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Drop in lead exposure may be significant factor behind decrease in crime rates
Exposure to lead in the preschool years significantly increases the chance that children will be suspended or incarcerated during their school careers, according to research at Princeton University and Brown University. Conversely, a drop in exposure leads to less antisocial behavior and thus may well be a significant factor behind the drop in crime over the past few decades.
June 29, 2017
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Drought May Beckon Bigger West Nile Outbreaks
Dry environment might alter how easily mosquito-borne virus is transmitted, researchers say
February 8, 2017
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Drug allergies: What you need to know
Drug allergies cause specific allergic reactions to drugs or medications. They are different from side effects, and these differences need to be understood.
June 15, 2017
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Drug for boosting immune system shows promise as potential new treatment for lupus
A drug originally used to boost the immune system is showing promise as a potential new treatment for lupus, Monash University-led research published today shows. Lupus is an autoimmune disease, where the immune system attacks the body's own organs and tissues.
August 09, 2016
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Drug OD Deaths Have Nearly Tripled Since 1999: CDC
Whites, middle-aged adults hardest hit, new report finds
February 24, 2017
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Drug or alcohol problems among veterans may increase risk of suicide, study finds
Veterans who have drug or alcohol problems are more than twice as likely to die by suicide as their comrades, a new study finds. and women veterans with substance use disorders have an even higher rate of suicide -- more than five times that of their peers, the research shows.
March 16, 2017
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Drug shows promise for treating alcoholism
Study finds an anti-inflammatory medication appears to reduce cravings, improve mood
February 1, 2017
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Drug Stelara May Ease Crohn's Disease
Medication is potentially helpful for those who didn't find relief from other treatments, researchers say
November 17, 2016
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Drug to treat alcohol use disorder shows promise among drinkers with high stress
NIH-funded multi-site clinical trial suggests that smokers may also benefit.
September 29, 2016
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Drug-resistant genes spread through environmeducts
First study to track antibiotic resistance in beef production suggests researchers and policy-makers need to switch focus to combat drug-resistant bugs
March 8, 2016
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Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning: What to Know
If you're like most parents, you probably figure once your child is done swimming or playing in the water, his risk of drowning is over. But "dry" and "secondary" drowning can happen hours after he's toweled off and moved on to other things. There are steps you can take to keep your child safe.
May 17, 2017
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Duke Health-led researchers identify new information about signaling mechanism of cells
Duke Health-led researchers have discovered new information about the signaling mechanism of cells that could one day help guide development of more specific drug therapies.
August 04, 2016
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Duke researchers link specific differences in brain structure to multiple forms of mental disorder
A Duke University study is the first to link specific differences in brain structure to what is common across many types of mental illness.
April 11, 2017
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Duke researchers modify popular drug-delivery technology to evade immune responses
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have reconfigured a popular drug-delivery technology to evade immune responses that have halted some clinical trials.
December 1, 2016
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DZNE scientists find new mechanism that allows damaged neurons to regenerate
Releasing molecular brake allowed damaged neurons to regenerate
October 7, 2016
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Misc. - E

E-LyteSport
Sports Nutrition for Serious Athletes. the ultimate sport drink!
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Early initiation of prophylaxis linked to lower rates of PE and DVT in patients with severe brain injuries
People who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at high risk for developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). PE is a leading cause of death in these patients. But blood-thinning medications started within 72 hours of hospital arrival have a significant protective effect against these conditions in patients with severe TBI, and do not increase risk of bleeding complications or death, according to study results published online as an "article in press" on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website in advance of print publication.
July 21, 2016
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East Earth Trade Winds
Suppliers of Chinese herbs and herbal products, books on Chinese medicine and philosopy, essential oils and much more!
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Eating meat may increase risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a serious condition and a growing concern in Western societies. a recent, large-scale study finds an increase in risk with the consumption of animal protein.
April 21, 2017
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Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions
When a patient is diagnosed with eczema, the diagnosis of another medical condition may not be far behind.
July 28, 2016
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Eczema patients treated by drug-producing microbes found on their own skin
Certain friendly bacteria are rare on patients but can still kill Staph aureus.
February 24, 2017
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Eczema's Effects More Than Skin Deep
Itchy skin condition also linked to a number of other ills, skin specialist says
July 29, 2016
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EFMT technology results in greater reduction of major depressive disorder symptoms
A treatment for depression using Emotional Faces Memory Task (EFMT), a technology originally developed by two Mount Sinai researchers, resulted in a significantly greater reduction of major depressive disorder (MDD) symptoms compared to a control group, according to initial clinical results presented at the Society of Biological Psychiatry Annual Scientific Convention on May 19, 2017, in San Diego. EFMT is a cognitive-emotional treatment that is delivered via an app on the Click Neurobehavioral Intervention (CNI) platform , a clinically-validated patient engagement platform developed by Click Therapeutics.
June 5, 2017
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Einstein awarded more than $160 million NIH grant in federal fiscal year 2016
Investigators at Albert Einstein College of Medicine were awarded more than $160 million from the National Institutes of Health in federal fiscal year 2016. the grants provide critical support for major research projects in aging, intellectual and developmental disabilities, diabetes, cancer and infectious diseases. other key areas for which Einstein received federal support include developmental brain research, neuroscience, advanced cellular imaging, cardiac disease and initiatives to reduce health disparities.
December 28, 2016
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Elevated levels of brain protein linked to longer recovery period after concussion
Elevated levels of the brain protein tau following a sport-related concussion are associated with a longer recovery period and delayed return to play for athletes, according to a study published in the January 6, 2017 issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. the findings suggest that tau, which can be measured in the blood, may serve as a marker to help physicians determine an athlete's readiness to return to the game.
January 6, 2017
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Elevated rate of autism symptoms found in children with Tourette syndrome
Restrictive interests, repetitive behaviors common in both disorders, study show
June 22, 2017
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Electrical Brain Stimulation May Treat Bulimia
Though preliminary, it found symptoms of eating disorder lessened in first 24 hours after treatment
January 25, 2017
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Electron microscopy reveals how vitamin a enters the cell
Using a new, lightning-fast camera paired with an electron microscope, scientists have captured images of one of the smallest proteins in our cells to be "seen" with a microscope.
August 25, 2016
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Elite High Schools May Increase Risk of Addiction
Rates are two to three times higher than national norms
June 1, 2017
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Empathy from the sick may be critical to halting disease outbreaks
A little empathy can go a long way toward ending infectious disease outbreaks. That's a conclusion from researchers who used a networked variation of game theory to study how individual behavior during an outbreak of influenza -- or other illness -- affects the progress of the disease, including how rapidly the outbreak dies out.
March 16, 2017
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Employees can increase alcohol consumption to risky levels at time of retirement, study shows
Every tenth employee increases their alcohol consumption to risky levels at the time of retirement from full-time employment. However, the increase seems to be temporary as risky drinking often decreases during the retirement. for most pensioners, alcohol consumption remains below the risk levels before and after retirement. the results of the new Finnish study were published in the esteemed Addiction journal.
March 31, 2017
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Endoplasmic reticulum stress in the brain may cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Disruptions in a protein folding process occurring in the brain, known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, may cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, independent of other factors. A research team at the George Washington University (GW) published their results in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight.
May 25, 2017
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Engineers develop a new noninvasive method to detect infections in prostheses
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip and other joint replacements. the method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses.
December 14, 2016
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Enzyme that cleaves beta carotene may control testosterone levels
An enzyme that converts the dietary carotenoid beta carotene into vitamin a in the body may also regulate testosterone levels and growth of the prostate, a new study found.
December 6, 2016
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Enzyme treatment may prevent or reduce liver damage caused by excess alcohol consumption
An intestinal enzyme previously shown to keep bacterial toxins from passing from the gastrointestinal system into the bloodstream may be able to prevent or reduce the liver damage caused by excess alcohol consumption.
April 25, 2017
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Enzyme treatment reduces alcohol-induced liver damage in mouse models
An intestinal enzyme previously shown to keep bacterial toxins from passing from the gastrointestinal system into the bloodstream may be able to prevent or reduce the liver damage caused by excess alcohol consumption, investigators report.
April 25, 2017
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Epigenetic changes promote development of fatty liver in mouse and human
Mice with a strong tendency to obesity already exhibit epigenetic changes at six weeks of age, inducing the liver to amplify its production of the enzyme DPP4 and release it into the circulation. Over the long term, this favors the development of a fatty liver. Such changes in DNA methylation are also detectable in humans with fatty liver and suggest a similar causal chain.
January 9, 2017
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Epigenetic program leading to vessel differentiation
Identification of histone and transcriptional regulation in vessel differentiation
May 19, 2017
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Epigenetics takes center stage with this year's Addiction Science Awards
NIDA announces awardees at the 2017 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair.
May 19, 2017
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Epilepsy and natural treatments: Can they help?
Epilepsy is a disease that disrupts the electrical activity of the nervous system, causing seizures.
June 14, 2017
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Epilepsy drug discovered in fish model shows promise in small pediatric clinical trial
NIH-funded research suggests zebrafish models may be efficient resource for identifying drugs for clinical use.
February 9, 2017
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Epilepsy Foundation launches new campaign to raise awareness of SUDEP among people with epilepsy
Epilepsy.com Publishes new Expert Consensus Report Identifying Four Key Actions to Help Reduce Risk of Seizures
September 16, 2016
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Epilepsy patients more likely to experience increased risk of discrimination than general population
In a recent analysis, people with epilepsy were seven-fold more likely to have reported experiencing discrimination due to health problems than the general population. this risk was greater than other chronic health problems such as diabetes, asthma and migraines.
September 19, 2016
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EPO blood doping has little effect on amateur cyclists' road race performance
According to a new study published in The Lancet Haematology, recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), a performance augmenting drug has little effects on high-intensity laboratory cycling test among well-trained amateur cyclists; yet in the laboratory time trial test and endurance road-race up Mont Ventoux (France), the augmenting effects were typically undetectable.
June 30, 2017
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Eppendorf to exhibit wide range of solutions to address common laboratory challenges at Lab Innovations 2016
Eppendorf UK will showcase a range of solutions designed to address some of the most common challenges shared by scientists, and technical laboratory personnel at the upcoming Lab Innovations 2016 show, running from the 2nd - 3rd November, at the Birmingham NEC. with the latest state-of-the-art solutions from Eppendorf, researchers and scientists working within the life science industry can simplify, streamline, and potentially eliminate cumbersome lab work, whilst at the same time succeeding in generating reproducible and reliable results.
October 4, 2016
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Ethicon collaborates with Touch Surgery to deliver simulated surgical training for improving patient outcomes
Ethicon, Inc., part of the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies, announces a strategic collaboration with Touch Surgery to help improve patient outcomes by delivering simulated surgical training based on the safe and efficacious use of Ethicon products in a free mobile app that can reach medical professionals in even remote regions of the world.
August 26, 2016
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ETS provides key tips to be healthy during autumn and winter
Go for paper towels when drying hands to help keep the bugs at bay
October 27, 2016
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European Union may be catching up to the United States in nonmedical prescription drug abuse
There is a high rate of prescription pain reliever abuse in Europe, largely accounted by opioids, according to the first comparative study of prescription drug abuse in the European Union, which was conducted by researchers at RTI International and published in BMC Psychiatry.
August 05, 2016
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Evolution of nose shape was guided by climate
In a first-of-its-kind study, a team of researchers from Pennsylvania State University recently gained new insight into the shape of the human nose. the climate that our ancestors evolved in appears to play a role in the width of our noses.
March 17, 2017
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Evolution: the Movie, courtesy of a really big Petri dish
New technique lets researchers visibly trace evolving lineages of bacteria
September 13, 2016
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Exablate Neuro Focused Ultrasound System Effectively Treats Essential Tremor Without Surgery
The new England Journal of Medicine just published a study evaluating InSightec's Exablate Neuro focused ultrasound system for treatment of essential tremor. the system received FDA approval to market the device only last month and the study results make clear why. Essentially, transcranial focused ultrasound thalamotomy was effective in reducing hand tremor at three and stayed reduced compared to a control group a year following treatment.
August 25, 2016
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ExactVu Micro-Ultrasound System for Prostate Imaging and Biopsy Guidance Cleared in Europe
Exact Imaging, a Canadian firm, won the European CE Mark to introduce its ExactVu prostate imaging and biopsy guidance system to the European market. It is a micro-ultrasound system that provides a resolution down to 70 microns, allowing a physician to visualize the prostate in real time and in high detail. the ExactVu relies on a 29 MHz transducer that is placed directly against the prostate to identify suspect lesion that should be sampled in a biopsy and to help guide the biopsy to the target location.
November 30, 2016
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Exosomes, The Elusive Tiny Vesicles Produced by Cells, Have Lots of Potential for Medicine
Exosomes are tiny capsules (30-130 nanometers) produced by cells that seem to be involved in all sorts of processes within the body, but only lately have they been properly studied. Because these natural nanoparticles are involved in many different biochemical processes, they may be relevant for a wide variety of clinical applications including diagnostics, therapy, and tracking of disease progression.
June 26, 2017
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Experimental drug targets nucleus of allergen-sensitized cells
Study suggests blocking transcription factor to treat severe lung ailments
April 18, 2017
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Experimental PfSPZ malaria vaccine provides durable protection against multiple strains in NIH clinical trial
An investigational malaria vaccine has protected a small number of healthy U.S. adults from infection with a malaria strain different from that contained in the vaccine, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, sponsored and co-conducted the Phase 1 clinical trial.
February 21, 2017
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Experimental technology monitors and maintains drug levels in the body
A new technology can monitor and maintain the level of drug in the bloodstream of animals. If it works in people, it could deliver the optimal dose of life-saving drugs and prevent harmful over- or underdosing.
May 10, 2017
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Expert hopes to dispel myths behind becoming living kidney donor
It is no secret that the United States --in particular, New York -- needs more people to register as living organ donors. According to the National Kidney Foundation, more than 100,000 people in the country are awaiting a kidney transplant.
March 10, 2017
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Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.
Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center and New York State Psychiatric Institute have found that legislation reducing access to firearms has lowered firearm suicide rates in other countries. this finding is based on evidence from around the world on the relationship between firearm ownership and firearm suicide rates.
July 29, 2016
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Experts update cystic fibrosis guidelines for better diagnosis and personalized treatment
An international research group of 32 experts from nine countries has updated the guidelines for diagnosing the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. the researchers expect that these guidelines will provide better direction for clinicians looking at patients with symptoms of the disease to make a correct diagnosis and recommend personalized treatment.
January 31, 2017
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Extensor tendonitis: Causes, recovery, and prevention
Extensor tendons are found just under the skin of the hand or the top of the feet. Extensor tendonitis is an inflammation of these tendons, and many factors can cause it.
June 5, 2017
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Misc. - F

Face can reveal if someone is rich or poor, study finds
Put on a happy face, your success may depend on it, suggests a study by psychology researchers at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Arts and Science.
July 6, 2017
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Facebook Royalty Reveal Master Plan to 'Cure all Diseases'
Back in April, Mark Zuckerberg announced to the world that he is, in fact, God, and said he wanted to "[help] to cure all diseases by the end of this century." Today, accompanied by Priscilla Chan, his wife and co-pilot on the God plane, Mark announced a $3 billion plan to cure disease.
September 21, 2016
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Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan pledge $3 billion to cure all diseases
The couple is donating $600 million for a new research facility in San Francisco.
September 21, 2016
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Facebook's next frontier: Brain-computer interfaces
Facebook's tech development team are currently working on a way for users to type with their minds, without the need for an invasive implant. Updating your status with thoughts alone may one day become a reality.
May 10, 2017
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FAQ: Tick-Borne Diseases
Although Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne infection in the U.S, ticks can transmit 20 diseases, according to the CDC. Some of these -- like Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Powassan virus and ehrlichiosis -- can be fatal.
July 4, 2017
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Fatty liver: Diagnosis of advanced fibrosis from stool microbes shows promise
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease affects millions of people in the United States. the condition is often not detected until it is well advanced, and a definitive diagnosis requires an invasive biopsy of the liver. One subtype can lead to severe liver cirrhosis and cancer. Now, promising results from a preliminary study set the stage for a noninvasive test that only requires a stool sample. the test examines the makeup of gut microbes in the stool sample.
May 3, 2017
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FDA approves new drug to treat adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Siliq (brodalumab) to treat adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Siliq is administered as an injection.
February 15, 2017
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FDA Approves new Treatment for Dust Mite Allergies
Odactra is a year-round treatment for reactions to the tiny bugs that share your home
February 23, 2017
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FDA approves new treatment for wide range of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Emflaza (deflazacort) tablets and oral suspension to treat patients age 5 years and older with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disorder that causes progressive muscle deterioration and weakness. Emflaza is a corticosteroid that works by decreasing inflammation and reducing the activity of the immune system.
February 9, 2017
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FDA Asks Maker of Opioid Painkiller to Pull Drug
Agency says the powerful medication's risk for abuse now outweighs any benefit
June 9, 2017
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FDA authorizes marketing of new Aera system to treat patients with chronic ETD symptoms
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today permitted marketing of a device that uses a small balloon to treat persistent Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD), a condition in which pressure, pain or clogged or muffled sensations occur in the ear.
September 16, 2016
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FDA OKs Injectable Psoriasis Drug for Tough Cases
But Siliq poses increased risk of suicidal behavior, agency warns
February 16, 2017
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FDA OKs Large Studies of Ecstasy to Treat PTSD
Large-scale Phase 3 clinical trials of the illegal party drug Ecstasy as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were approved Tuesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
November 30, 2016
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FDA: don't Give Kids Meds with Codeine, Tramadol
Agency strengthens warning labels on these medications to address dangers
April 20, 2017
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FDA's OK on trial opens possibility of prescription ecstasy in five years
Researchers get go-ahead after party drug turns lives around in small trials.
November 30, 2016
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Fear of stigma or sanction keeps many doctors from revealing mental health issues, study finds
Even as doctors across America encourage their patients to share concerns about depression, anxiety and other concerns, a new study suggests the doctors may be less likely to seek help for those same concerns about themselves.
September 22, 2016
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Fecal microbiota transplant may be effective treatment option for ulcerative colitis, research suggests
A single transplant of microbes contained in the stool of a healthy donor is a safe and effective way to increase diversity of good bacteria in the guts of patients with ulcerative colitis, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. the findings suggest that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) might be an effective treatment for the disease, which causes inflammation and ulcers in the digestive tract.
April 27, 2017
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Feds: Drug Company Delayed Cheaper Generics by Flooding the FDA with Paperwork
Given that a brand-name prescription drug stands to lose a significant chunk of its market share once a lower-price generic becomes available, you can understand why a drug company would want to do anything it can to delay the cheaper alternative, even if you disagree with their intentions.
February 7, 2017
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Female genital sores: Causes and diagnosis
Female genital sores have a number of causes, the most common of which are sexually transmitted infections, including herpes.
June 13, 2017
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Fentanyl Overdose Deaths Double in a Year
The front line in the epidemic of drug overdoses in the U.S. has shifted from the prescription pad to the street, a new study shows.
December 20, 2016
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Few Seniors Go Online for Health-Care Needs
Hopes have been high that digital technology would improve seniors' health care, but a new study suggests that few older Americans are on board.
August 02, 2016
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Fido or Fluffy can bring you a Health Boost
And here are tips to help choose the right pet for you
May 16, 2017
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Finding real rewards in a virtual world
Remembering where a goal is requires the same parts of the brain in virtual reality as it does in the real world, a new study demonstrates. the study showed that mice performed poorly on the virtual test if they lacked Shank2, a protein known to be associated with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disabilities.
May 1, 2017
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Findings reveal how Ca2+ promotes endothelium-mediated feedback vasodilation in arterioles
Vasoconstriction must be balanced with vasodilation, particularly in the arterioles that supply tissues with blood. Endothelial cells protrude through holes in the internal elastic lamina in arterioles to make contact with vascular smooth muscle cells.
July 4, 2017
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Fingerprint-like pattern that evolves during development provides clues to mental health problems
Like a fingerprint, the connections of the human brain render us distinct from one another. In a study just published in Nature Neuroscience, researchers from the University of Oslo revealed that such a unique, fingerprint-like pattern evolves during development and is sensitive to mental health.
February 22, 2017
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Finnish researchers identify molecular mechanism that controls migration of early macrophages
Leukocytes which arise during the embryonic period regulate iron metabolism and the growth of the mammary gland in adults.
October 17, 2016
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Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis
The Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz) at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, will start the phase II clinical trials of a vaccine for schistosomiasis, called 'Sm14 Vaccine'. the initiative is one of the health research and development projects prioritized by the World Health Organization (WHO), aiming to ensure the access of populations from developing countries to public health tools based on cutting edge technologies.
August 26, 2016
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First genetic location found for anorexia nervosa
Eating disorders affect millions of people in the United States, and anorexia nervosa is considered to have the highest mortality rate of all psychiatric conditions. for the first time, new research identifies a genetic location that helps to shed more light on the causes of this illness.
May 12, 2017
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First interactive 3D video hologram displays live footage of internal organs
UK scientists are developing an interactive holographic video created from an MRI or CT scan that can display live footage of internal organs in front of a user where features can be rotated, enlarged, and isolated, delivering a breakthrough in medical imaging and education.
January 3, 2017
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First licensed vaccine could reduce burden in regions with high-levels of dengue infection
The first licensed vaccine for the potentially life-threatening dengue virus should only be used in moderate-to high impacted regions, new research has predicted.
November 30, 2016
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First mutations in human life discovered
Archaeological traces of embryonic development seen in adult cells
March 22, 2017
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First national survey reveals high burden of iodine deficiency among Israelis
62% of school-age children and 85% of pregnant women in Israel have low iodine intakes, according to the country's first national iodine survey. Government funding and legislation, and a government-regulated program of salt or food iodization, are essential to reducing the deficiency, which poses a high risk of impaired neurological development.
March 27, 2017
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First randomized controlled trial of deep brain stimulation for chronic pain shows promise
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral striatum/anterior limb of the internal capsule is safe and feasible in addressing the affective component of pain in patients with post-stroke pain syndrome, report investigators.
June 19, 2017
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First study to explore language and LSD since the 1960s: new study shows LSD's effects on language
The consumption of LSD, short for lysergic acid diethylamide, can produce altered states of consciousness. this can lead to a loss of boundaries between the self and the environment, as might occur in certain psychiatric illnesses. now a team of researchers studies how this psychedelic substance works in the brain.
August 18, 2016
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First UK guideline provides recommendations to manage adults with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome
The first UK guideline on the care of adults with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome has been published today by the British Society of Rheumatology. The guidelines are accredited by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) which recognizes robust, evidence-based and critically evaluated high-quality processes applied to developing a clinical guideline.
June 30, 2017
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First-ever neuroscience conference to explore ultra-personal approach to brain health
For three days this week, Roanoke, Virginia, is the capital of the precision neuroscience world.
October 7, 2016
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First-in-human study shows positive results for new medicine that could reduce maternal deaths
The Monash University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (MIPS) today announced positive results from a first-in-human study of a new, inhaled form of a medicine that could significantly reduce maternal deaths around the world. the results open the possibility of a streamlined pathway to registration, meaning that the medicine could be accessible to mothers much sooner than would otherwise be possible.
March 21, 2017
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Five of the best apps to train your brain
It is no secret that as we age, our brain function declines. However, studies have suggested that keeping mentally active - particularly when older - can help to maintain cognitive functioning. Brain training apps are considered a useful aid for mental stimulation, but which one is right for you? we present our pick of five of the best brain training apps around.
March 31, 2017
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Five of the best blogs for stress relief
Feeling stressed? Everyone faces stress from time to time. However, long-term stress can build up and have an adverse impact on health. Taking steps to reduce and cope with stress can prevent these effects. we look at five of the best blogs that help with stress management.
March 28, 2017
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Five ways to better prepare for planned or elective surgery
What's a tried-and-true way to prepare for surgery and anesthesia? by paying close attention to the healthcare professionals who will be delivering your care and providing them with essential information about your health status, history, and habits.
March 31, 2017
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Flame retardant exposure linked to income, BMI and household smoking
A class of flame retardants known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been phased out of production in the US out of concern for their potential neurotoxic effects, particularly in young children. But the compounds persist in older furniture, plastics and textiles, and in dust. now a new report examines the factors that help predict which children could be at a higher risk for exposure to these compounds.
December 21, 2016
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Flexible Stick-On Electrode Array Accurately Records Brain Activity for Epilepsy Surgery
Surgical treatment of epilepsy requires accurately identifying where in the brain aberrant electrical signals originate. So far this has been less than ideal and current electrocorticography is only able to point to fairly large volumes of the brain as the source of the unwanted signals. now a scientific collaboration has shown that a new device, called the NeuroGrid, is able to record brain activity from swathes of neurons and individual neurons at the same time.
November 14, 2016
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Fluctuation in intracellular calcium ion concentration impacts brain shape
The first step in shaping the brain is that the neural plate, a sheet-like cell layer, curves to form the neural tube. Assistant Professor Makoto Suzuki of the National Institute for Basic Biology, Professor Naoto Ueno, and their colleagues have shown that during the process of neural tube formation a transient increase in the concentration of calcium ions in cells causes these morphological changes and is essential for neural tube formation.
March 30, 2017
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Forget the Epipen–It's Time for An Epi-Pill
A Tablet that Dissolves Under the Tongue Could Replace Expensive Auto-Injectors
October 14, 2016
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Forget Tony Stark's Iron Man -- exosuits of the future will be spandex
It turns out there are better ways to enhance strength than heavy metal armor
January 25, 2017
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Forget your shrink. Woebot will see you now
Depressed? Anxious? A friendly new chatbot out of Stanford University wants to help you crush the self-defeating thoughts bringing you down.
June 6, 2017
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Free online risk assessment tool can help reduce costs of occupational musculoskeletal injuries
Employers can reduce the costs of occupational musculoskeletal disorders by using a free online risk management tool created by ergonomic researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden.
June 15, 2017
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Fresh insights into immune cell could signal new approach to treating life-threatening lung condition
Fresh insights into a life-threatening lung condition triggered by blood poisoning could signal a new approach to treating the disease, researchers found.
November 3, 2016
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Frontal lobe: Functions, structure, and damage
The frontal lobe of the brain is vital to our consciousness, as well as functions that appear uniquely human, such as spoken language.
June 29, 2017
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FSU study finds no evidence that brain games improve cognitive function
Be skeptical of ads declaring you can rev up your brain's performance by challenging it with products from the growing brain-training industry.
April 17, 2017
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Fungal toxins become easily aerosolized, leading to potential indoor health risk
Toxins produced by three different species of fungus growing indoors on wallpaper may become aerosolized, and easily inhaled. The findings, which likely have implications for "sick building syndrome," were published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
June 23, 2017
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Misc. - G

Gambling addicts have poor ability to assess and adapt to high risk situations, fMRI study finds
You've been losing all night, and now another bad hand. So why raise?
April 17, 2017
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Garrick Hyde Consulting
offers benchmarking and consulting services for hospitals and healthcare organizations, with an emphasis in department-level costs, productivity, and skill mix.
Provides a Service
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GE Receives FDA Clearance for MAGiC Multi-Contrast MRI Technique
GE Healthcare has received FDA clearance for its revolutionary MAGiC (MAGnetic resonance image Compilation) multi-contrast MRI technique, which allows the user to generate multiple image contrasts in a single scan. with conventional MRI imaging generating these contrasts takes a separate scan lasting several minutes for each type of contrast.
September 29, 2016
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Gene editing technique reverses Huntington's in mouse model
Research, published this week in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, offers hope for people with Huntington's disease. Gene editing could be the key to an eventual cure.
June 19, 2017
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Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems
Two new studies from the University of Iowa suggest that gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis (CF).
September 20, 2016
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Gene Therapy Might Mend Badly Broken Bones
Animal experiments suggest this may be a potential alternative to bone grafts, researchers say
May 17, 2017
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Genes and the environment equally affect language-related brain activity
Researchers showed that brain activity in the a is equally affected by environmental and genetic factors. they also demonstrated that verbal memory is related to language-related brain activity. the findings provide novel insights into how language is influenced by genes and the environment.
December 29, 2016
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Genetics reveal mysteries of hard-to-treat bacterial infection in cystic fibrosis
New research on bacteria that cause major problems for those with cystic fibrosis reveals clues as to how it proliferates for so long in the lungs and offers new ideas for treatments to explore.
March 27, 2017
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Genital Herpes Vaccine Promising in Animal Trials
Two-pronged approach tested on lab monkeys, guinea pigs
January 19, 2017
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Genome engineering-based methods pave way for new treatment of patients with sickle cell disease
A team of physicians and laboratory scientists has taken a key step toward a cure for sickle cell disease, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to fix the mutated gene responsible for the disease in stem cells from the blood of affected patients.
October 12, 2016
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Georgia State study: Social media, Internet can be reliable tools for forecasting disease outbreaks
When epidemiological data are scarce, social media and Internet reports can be reliable tools for forecasting infectious disease outbreaks, according to a study led by an expert in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University.
January 19, 2017
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German scientists design molecular paintbrush technique to control and monitor key intracellular processes
The plasma membrane serves as a major hub for signal cascades to control crucial cellular processes. But it is a fluid medium, which makes the signaling processes difficult to monitor. Now, German scientists have designed a molecular "paintbrush" technique to trigger, control, and also monitor signaling processes. as they write in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their modular system made of light-activatable molecular building blocks can, for example, induce patterned contraction inside living cells.
March 31, 2017
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Get Help for your Hemorrhoids
Five years ago, childbirth brought Loriel Adams of Tampa, FL, a bundle of joy in the form of a baby boy. But it also brought painful hemorrhoids that she's been dealing with ever since.
September 13, 2016
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GHIT Fund invests in phase 3 clinical trial for pediatric formulation of 'snail fever' drug
The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT Fund), a unique Japanese public-private partnership formed to battle infectious diseases around the globe, today announced 11 new investments totaling US$23 million that could help deliver a range of new innovative therapies for a host of debilitating conditions.
March 31, 2017
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Going to bed later on weekends may harm your health
"Social jet lag" is a term that describes what happens when people go to sleep and wake up later on weekends than they do during the week. A new study assesses the impact of social jet lag on overall health.
June 5, 2017
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Good and Mad: the Healthy Way to be Angry
You walk in the door after work. Before you can kick off your shoes, you see it hanging there on the wall: a 60-inch TV your partner bought without talking to you first. you explode. a huge argument ensues. you part angry.
September 15, 2016
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Google Brain's neural-net AI dreams up its own encryption strategy
It's fun to write about developments in artificial intelligence like they're harbingers of an impending AIpocalypse. Jokes about our new robot overlords notwithstanding, computers are getting scary smart these days, and it's not always flattering to compare humans with AI. the machines can outperform humans in a lot of important ways: we routinely trust robot surgeons, diagnostic databases, and autopilot chauffeurs with our lives, just to name a few.
October 27, 2016
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Grasp Feedback Technology to Help Prosthetic Users Feel What They're Holding
Prosthetic devices of the future, in order to be highly functional and easy to use, will have to incorporate sensors that can relay to the user the pressure of a hand grasp and what the texture of a touched object is like. Researchers from Rice University in Texas and University of Pisa in Italy have combined their expertise to built a prototype system that provides real-time feedback about the size of an object that a powered prosthetic hand is grasping.
May 31, 2017
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Griffith University to collaborate with Olymvax for new vaccine technology that could benefit millions
Griffith University will partner with a Chinese pharmaceutical, Olymvax Biopharmaceuticals Inc. for a new vaccine that could benefit millions.
August 02, 2016
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Ground-breaking research on the side effects of therapy
While many people who suffer from depression and anxiety are helped by seeing a psychologist, others don't get better or actually get worse. Psychological treatment can have negative side effects, like any medicine.
February 7, 2017
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'Groundbreaking' Research offers Dyslexia Clues
Brain scans revealed that those with the reading disorder showed less ability to 'adapt' to sensory information
December 21, 2016
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Groundbreaking research unravels structure of infectious prions that cause mad cow disease
Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta has identified the structure of the infectious prion protein, the cause of "mad cow disease" or BSE, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, which has long remained a mystery.
September 8, 2016
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'Groundbreaking' technology enables quadriplegic man to move his limbs
Hundreds of thousands of Americans have a spinal cord injury, and many of those affected are paralyzed from the shoulders down. for these patients, neuroprosthetic technology may offer some hope. a new study showcases a man with quadriplegia who has managed to move his arms and hands using the new technology.
March 28, 2017
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Misc. - H

Hair analysis may help diagnose Cushing Syndrome, NIH researchers report
Small study suggests that high cortisol level in hair may foretell hard-to-diagnose disorder.
February 9, 2017
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Hallucinogens: Future of Mental Health Treatment?
The long, strange trip of research into the benefits of hallucinogenic drugs may be taking another turn.
January 13, 2017
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Hand-held EEG device can quickly assess brain bleeding in head injuries
In a clinical trial conducted among adults in 11 hospitals, researchers have shown that a hand-held EEG device approved in 2016 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that is commercially available can quickly and with 97 percent accuracy rule out whether a person with a head injury likely has brain bleeding and needs further evaluation and treatment.
April 5, 2017
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Happiness declining in U.S. due to 'social crisis'
Levels of happiness in the United States are falling, according to results from the World Happiness Report 2017, and it appears to be down to a "social crisis."
March 19, 2017
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Happy Marriage, Healthier Spouses
Nurturing each other translates to nurturing your health
June 16, 2017
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Happy music helps recall positive memories
Happy memories spring to mind much faster than sad, scary or peaceful ones. Moreover, if you listen to happy or peaceful music, you recall positive memories, whereas if you listen to emotionally scary or sad music, you recall largely negative memories from your past.
February 28, 2017
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Harnessing Solar Energy to Power Synthetic Skin May Open new Prospects for Prosthetics
A research team from the University of Glasgow has developed a new way of harnessing solar energy to power 'synthetic skin'. this could result in the creation of advanced prosthetic limbs capable of bringing back the sense of touch to amputees.
March 24, 2017
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Harvard researchers develop new portable device that can quickly produce highly aligned nanofibers
Harvard researchers have developed a lightweight, portable nanofiber fabrication device that could one day be used to dress wounds on a battlefield or dress shoppers in customizable fabrics.
March 1, 2017
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Heads Up tackling education program helps reduce concussion rates among high school football athletes
Consistently using a tackling education program appears to help lessen youth football concussion severity and occurrence, say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty day in San Diego, CA.
March 19, 2017
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Healing wounds with cell therapy
An experimental treatment in mice allows the reprogramming of blood cells in order to promote the healing process of cutaneous wounds. This new therapeutic approach could prove to be beneficial in healing challenging wounds in diabetics and major-burn victims.
May 29, 2017
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Healthy adults with small inferior frontal cortex more likely to suffer from anxiety, study finds
Healthy college students who have a relatively small inferior frontal cortex - a brain region behind the temples that helps regulate thoughts and emotions - are more likely than others to suffer from anxiety, a new study finds. they also tend to view neutral or even positive events in a negative light, researchers report.
April 13, 2017
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Healthy Habits you Should Give Yourself Credit For
It's easy to feel overwhelmed by all the changes you want to make in the new year, from eating right to moving more. But if you take a step back and look at your day-to-day actions, you may realize you're already making a lot of healthy choices. While there's always room for improvement, if you can check off these basic habits, you're on the right road to a healthy body and mind.
January 9, 2017
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Heat shock regulator controlled by on/off switch and phosphorylation
Researchers have determined how the master transcriptional regulator of the heat shock response, known as heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), is controlled in yeast. Understanding how HSF1 works, how it is regulated, and how to fine tune it in a cell-type specific way could lead to therapies for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.
November 14, 2016
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Heavy breathing: Ten causes and treatments
Heavy breathing can feel like suffocation, making each breath a struggle. For some people, heavy breathing feels like pressure on the chest, as if an elephant is sitting on them.
July 3, 2017
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Heavy Drinking May Mean Hefty Health Tab Later
Study suggests alcohol might harm brain, body even if one stops abusing by age 30
November 2, 2016
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Hebrew University announces launch of new Center for conducting research on cannabinoids
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem has announced the launch of a Multidisciplinary Center on Cannabinoid Research. the new Center will serve as one of the world's leading institutes for conducting and coordinating research about cannabinoids, endocannabinoids and medical Cannabis. In addition, it will promote collaboration and disseminate information.
April 5, 2017
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Her Home Showed High Lead. She Wasn't Told
Laura, who lives in the Atlanta suburb of Roswell, volunteered to have her water tested when the North Fulton County water system contacted her in 2015. She had read the shocking stories about Flint, MI, and was curious about her own plumbing.
June 12, 2017
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Here is Apple's smart plan for digital health
Apple is going to be good for your health
September 26, 2016
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Heroin Epidemic Expands Its Grip on America
Use of the narcotic grew 5-fold in a decade, helped by scourge of prescription painkiller abuse
March 28, 2017
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Heroin use linked to epigenetic alterations in the brain
The past few years have seen an explosion of heroin abuse and deaths from opiate overdose. But little is known about the molecular underpinnings of heroin addiction. a new study in Biological Psychiatry found that heroin use is associated with excessive histone acetylation, an epigenetic process that regulates gene expression.
March 14, 2017
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Herpetic whitlow: Symptoms, causes, and treatment
Herpetic whitlow or whitlow finger is a painful infection that may cause other symptoms to show up. The infection may appear in adults or children, and there are several ways to treat it.
May 31, 2017
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High cortisol levels during morning sessions provide more benefits to psychotherapy patients
Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests.
October 5, 2016
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High folate intake may increase risk of peripheral neuropathy in older adults with common gene variant
Consuming too much folate (vitamin B9) is associated with increased risk for a nerve-damage disorder in older adults who have a common genetic variant. Although variable by race or ethnic background, an estimated one in six people in the U.S. carry two copies of a genetic variation in TCN2, a gene that codes for a vitamin B12 transport protein. for some of these individuals, the TCN2 variation (referred to as GG) can lead to conditions related to vitamin B12 deficiency even if they consume normal amounts of B12.
October 12, 2016
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High level use of opioids may affect survival of liver transplant recipients, study finds
An analysis of nearly 30,000 patients undergoing liver transplantation in the United States between 2008 and 2014 found elevated death and organ loss rates in the first 5 years after transplantation among recipients with the highest use of opioid pain medications while on the waiting list.
February 23, 2017
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High school football isn't linked to brain problems later on -- if you played in the 1950s
This counters some of the narrative around traumatic brain injury
July 3, 2017
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High-tech alternative to brain surgery safe, effective for treatment of essential tremor
A study published today in the prestigious new England Journal of Medicine offers the most in-depth assessment yet of the safety and effectiveness of a high-tech alternative to brain surgery to treat the uncontrollable shaking caused by the most common movement disorder. and the news is very good.
August 25, 2016
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Higher death rate among youth with first episode psychosis
NIH-funded study highlights need for increased early intervention programs.
April 6, 2017
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Highly stressful situations for police officers linked to dysregulation of cortisol pattern
For most people, cortisol, the vital hormone that controls stress, increases when they wake up. it's the body's way of preparing us for the day.
February 6, 2017
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Hitchhiking of drugs on incorrect targets can cause adverse side effects
It probably isn't surprising to read that pharmaceutical drugs don't always do what they're supposed to. Adverse side effects are a well-known phenomenon and something many of us will have experienced when taking medicines.
August 26, 2016
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Holst Centre Introduces Next Generation Health Patch
Holst Centre introduced their next generation health patch during electronica, an international electronic trade show held Nov. 8-11 in Munich, Germany. Holst Centre is a research and development institution founded by the collaboration between imec and TNO.
November 18, 2016
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Home Care Association of Washington
non-profit association for licensed home health, hospice, and home care agencies. Includes consumer information.
Provides a Service
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Home remedies for bronchitis: What works best?
Bronchitis is an inflammation or swelling of the lining of the bronchial tubes, otherwise known as the bronchi.
May 31, 2017
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Horror movie scenes help researchers identify key neural pathway for processing fear
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have identified a key neural pathway in humans that explains how the brain processes feelings of fear and anxiety, a finding that could help scientists unlock new ways to treat mental health disorders.
February 8, 2017
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How 9 Health Experts Stick to Their Resolutions
if you're gearing up for a new year -- and a "new you" -- in 2017, you're in good company. Even top health experts admit they want to take better care of their bodies and minds. Wondering how they stay on track? You're in luck. we asked nine experts, from doctors to dietitians, how they stay motivated to achieve their new Year's resolutions. Here are their top tips.
January 10, 2017
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How B cell metabolism is controlled: GSK3 acts as a metabolic checkpoint regulator in B cells
New research addresses the lack of knowledge about how B cell metabolism adapts to each of their various environments -- development in the bone marrow, proliferation and hypermutation in the lymph nodes and spleen and circulation in the blood. new findings show that the protein GSK3 acts as a metabolic sensor, or checkpoint, that promotes the survival of circulating B cells while limiting growth and proliferation of B cells in germinal centers.
January 23, 2017
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How do dreams affect brain disorders?
Research presented at the latest Canadian Neuroscience Meeting connects fascinating insights into the science of dreams with the risk of developing neurological disorders.
May 30, 2017
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How do we override sleepiness? Brain region identified
A paper published this week in the journal Neuron peers into a region of the brain involved in the state of wakefulness. The findings could help to design treatments for conditions such as insomnia and depression-related sleep disturbances.
June 9, 2017
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How Does Daylight Saving Time Affect your Health?
On March 12, most of us (unless you live in Arizona or Hawaii) will set our clocks ahead one hour. Losing an hour of sleep to gain an extra hour of sunlight may seem like a small change, but springing forward interrupts your circadian rhythm -- or your sleep-wake cycle.
March 8, 2017
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How does lack of sleep impair memory formation? Study sheds light
Sleep is known to play a key role in learning and memory formation, but what happens to these important brain functions when we fail to get enough sleep? Researchers from the University of Michigan provide some answers with their new study.
April 10, 2017
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How does poor sleep affect our ability to learn? Study investigates
Most of us know that a good night's sleep is key for happiness and productivity, and that conversely, a night of poor sleep can have negative effects on our performance during the day. But a new study manages to find precisely the brain area responsible for learning new skills and shows how it can be affected by poor sleep quality.
May 23, 2017
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How does the body process pain? Study sheds new light
Currently available pain medications have limited efficacy and numerous side effects. New research, however, provides deeper insights into how our bodies process pain, paving the way for an innovative, more effective way of targeting chronic pain.
June 1, 2017
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How internal circadian clocks in neurons encode external daily rhythms of excitability
Researchers have identified a key mechanism linking the master molecular clock in the brain to changes in the external firing activity of those circadian clock neurons. It involves the GSK3 kinase enzyme, which is also the target of mood-stabilizing drugs used to treat bipolar disorder.
November 14, 2016
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How modern life affects our physical and mental health
Modern day living is a multifaceted compendium of evolving technology and social media. Communication outlets are changing every part of our lives so rapidly that it can be tough to adjust. Are technology and media affecting our physical and mental health?
July 3, 2017
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How proteins reshape cell membranes
Small 'bubbles' frequently form on membranes of cells and are taken up into their interior. the process involves EHD proteins. Scientists have now shed light on how these proteins assemble on the surface of a cell and reshape its membrane.
February 24, 2017
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How Safe is your Tattoo Ink?
Before you get that dolphin tattooed on your ankle or "Mom" on your bicep, be warned: the ink used in tattoos may be harmful -- even years later.
August 26, 2016
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How stable manure protects against allergies
Improved hygiene has largely eliminated infectious diseases from everyday life. There is, however, a downside to this progress: the number of allergies is growing steadily. If the immune system is not kept busy by bacteria, viruses and worms, it sometimes overreacts to harmless things like pollen.
March 8, 2017
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How to improve the appearance of bags under your eyes
Bags under the eyes, known medically as infraorbital edema, are a concern for many people, especially as they age.
April 3, 2017
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How to improve your chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments
Chromatrap® has published a comprehensive Applications Compendium that includes hints and tips to improve your Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, increase the effectiveness of your ChIP-seq library preparation and brings together its latest application notes in one informative document.
October 27, 2016
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How to manage nocturia: Treating an overactive bladder at night
Simply put, nocturia is too much urination at night. the condition involves regularly waking up in the night to urinate.
April 10, 2017
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How to Stop Feeling Anxious Right Now
While it's normal to get nervous about an important event or life change, about 40 million Americans live with an anxiety disorder, which is more than the occasional worry or fear. Anxiety disorders can range from a generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), which is intense worrying that you can't control, to panic disorder -- sudden episodes of fear, along with heart palpitations, trembling, shaking, or sweating.
March 2, 2017
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How to treat an overactive bladder with natural remedies
Overactive bladder is a condition where the bladder is unable to hold urine normally.
April 24, 2017
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How video games affect the brain
Video gaming is clearly a popular form of entertainment, with video gamers collectively spending 3 billion hours per week in front of their screens. Due to their widespread use, scientists have researched how video games affect the brain and behavior. Are these effects positive or negative? We examine the evidence.
July 10, 2017
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How well do vaccines work? new technique offers greater insight
"Synthetic controls" give health researchers a better statistical tool.
February 8, 2017
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HSE researchers uncover new brain mechanism that generates cognitive dissonance
A new study by HSE researchers has uncovered a new brain mechanism that generates cognitive dissonance - a mental discomfort experienced by a person who simultaneously holds two or more contradictory beliefs or values, or experiences difficulties in making decisions. The results of the study have been published in the paper 'Open Access Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive Dissonance (Revised): an EEG Study' in The Journal of Neuroscience.
May 17, 2017
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Human Brain Project receives 89 million euros from the European Commission
The European Commission and the Human Brain Project Coordinator, the ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, have signed the first Specific Grant Agreement, releasing EUR 89 million in funding retroactively from 1st April 2016 until the end of March 2018.
September 12, 2016
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Huntington's disease monkey model embodies full array of symptoms similar to human patients
Transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys display a full spectrum of symptoms resembling the human disease, ranging from motor problems and neurodegeneration to emotional dysregulation and immune system changes, scientists at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University report.
July 21, 2016
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Hyaluronidase enzyme may be effective treatment option for spasticity caused by neurological injury
A naturally occurring enzyme called hyaluronidase may be an effective alternative treatment for spasticity, or muscle stiffness, a disabling condition in people who have had a stroke or other brain injury.
September 23, 2016
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Misc. - I

Ichthyosis vulgaris: Pictures, diagnosis, and treatment
Ichthyosis vulgaris is a skin condition where the skin's surface becomes dry, thick, and scaly. But how does this condition get diagnosed and treated?
July 6, 2017
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IDIBELL researchers reveal role of endoplasmic reticulum in cell death process due to starvation
Researchers from the Cell death group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Cristina Muñoz-Pinedo, have characterized the cell death process due to starvation, in which the endoplasmic reticulum plays a leading role. Their work, chosen as the cover of the latest Molecular and Cellular Biology journal, was carried out within TRAIN-ERs, a European collaborative action that studies diseases associated with this cellular organelle.
May 3, 2017
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iKeyp for Safe At-Home Storage of Sensitive Medications
Thanks to poorly thought-out regulatory changes, Americans are going head over heels for prescription opioids, and so a chronic pain patient's drug cabinet is no longer safe from addicted family members. to help protect the stash, Solo Technology Holdings plans on releasing a smart electronic safe that can also assist in managing patient's daily drug regimen.
August 10, 2016
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ILAE's new epilepsy classification empowers clinicians and patients to make more informed treatment decisions
It has been nearly three decades since experts published a classification system related to epilepsy. Now, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) provides an update to systems that includes many types of seizures not captured in the older version, allowing clinicians and patients to make more informed decisions concerning treatment. the three companion articles are published today in Epilepsia.
March 10, 2017
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Image-based modeling
A novel tool for realistic simulations of artificial bone cultures
December 29, 2016
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Imaging agent linked to risk of AKI may be less hazardous than previously thought
A new analysis indicates that radiocontrast, which is commonly used during selected imaging tests may be less hazardous than previously thought. the findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), suggest that imaging studies that might help save or improve lives are being unnecessarily withheld from patients owing to exaggerated fears.
September 29, 2016
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Imaging beyond the diffraction limit with the HyVolution 2 and the Leica TCS SP8 STED ONE
With the Super-Resolution Technology HyVolution 2 and the Leica TCS SP8 STED ONE Nanoscope, Leica Microsystems expands its product portfolio for light microscopy having resolution beyond the diffraction limit.
November 3, 2016
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Imbalanced gut microbiome linked to systemic sclerosis, study suggests
Americans and Norwegians with systemic sclerosis had higher levels of bacteria that can cause inflammation and lower levels of bacteria that are believed to protect against inflammation compared with healthy people.
May 12, 2017
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Immune system defect makes Addison's patients prone to respiratory infections
Research led by University of Birmingham scientists has found that people suffering from the adrenal disorder known as Addison's disease suffer from an immune system defect which makes them prone to potentially deadly respiratory infections.
March 1, 2017
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Imperfect bite linked to poor postural and balance control
In recent years there has been increasing medical interest in correcting teeth that do not touch perfectly in order to prevent problems such as jaw pain, gaps between teeth and crowding. Now, a new study carried out by Spanish researchers has concluded that dental occlusion is also related to the control of posture and balance.
September 14, 2016
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Important element of immune defense against fungal infections discovered
Fungal infections are a serious health risk. they can be harmful especially to patients whose immune system is compromised through illness or chemotherapy. Scientists have discovered an important mechanism in the body's defenses against fungi. the discovery explains, among other things, why people with certain genetic variations are more susceptible to fungal infections.
December 19, 2016
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Improper methylation of cilia protein linked to increased risk of neural tube defects
Research published online in the FASEB Journal shows that the improper methylation of a protein called "Septin2," which regulates the structure of cilia, was associated with an increased risk of having a neural tube defect (NTD) and confirms that cilia are important factors in determining susceptibility of NTDs.
May 11, 2017
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Improve Allergy Warnings on Food Products: Experts
Food allergy warning labels are confusing for consumers and need to be improved, experts say.
December 1, 2016
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Impulsive meth users more likely to have started taking drug at earlier age, study shows
Methamphetamine users who described themselves as impulsive were more likely to have started taking the drug at an earlier age, a study of more than 150 users showed.
October 27, 2016
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In 2017, I've turned basic mental health into a competitive game
Like apparently everyone on the planet, I find it hard to keep up with new Year's resolutions long-term. Psychology tells us that making idealistic plans for the future is easy, but in the present, we're still stuck with the conditions that helped build all the bad habits we're trying to overcome.
January 13, 2017
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Increased alcohol consumption linked to higher risk of rosacea in women
Women who are concerned about the health of their skin may want to think twice the next time they reach for a chardonnay or a Cosmo.
April 20, 2017
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Increasing specific brain fats could be potential strategy for preventing epileptic seizures
Increasing the concentration of specific fats in the brain could suppress epileptic seizures. this is evident from ground-breaking research carried out by the research groups of Professor Patrik Verstreken (VIB-KU Leuven) and Professor Wim Versees (VIB-Vrije Universiteit Brussel). the results of their close collaboration have been published in the leading trade journal Nature Structural & Molecular Biology.
September 23, 2016
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Independent panel of experts develop roadmap for preventing youth suicide
An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has developed a 10-year roadmap for advancing research to prevent youth suicide. the panel listed 29 recommendations that address three critical issues: improving data systems, enhancing data collection and analysis methods, and strengthening the research and practice community.
October 5, 2016
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Infectious Disease Society of America
The IDSA Education and Research Foundation supports research and education activities that improve patient care and provide information about infectious diseases for the benefit of physicians, scientists, health care professionals and the public.
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Ingrown hair: Treatment and prevention
Ingrown hairs can be painful and a nuisance. They typically affect people with thick, curly hair, and can become infected if left untreated. But, how should they be treated and can they be prevented?
June 15, 2017
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Injections to treat psoriasis: Types, benefits, and risks
Injections are an option for treating the skin condition known as psoriasis.
April 17, 2017
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Injuries more likely to occur in youth flag football than tackle football, study shows
University of Iowa Health Care researchers report that the results of a study of injury rates in youth football leagues did not show that flag football is safer than tackle football.
February 14, 2017
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Inosine treatment can help restore motor control after cortical injury
Brain tissue can die as the result of stroke, traumatic brain injury, or neurodegenerative disease. When the affected area includes the motor cortex, impairment of the fine motor control of the hand can result. In a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers found that inosine, a naturally occurring purine nucleoside that is released by cells in response to metabolic stress, can help to restore motor control after brain injury.
August 03, 2016
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Innovative technology streamlines clinical trial management, improves patient experience
The University of Alabama at Birmingham recently integrated a clinical research management system that allows patient consent, data and documents from multiple sites to automatically flow from the the Enroll® e-Consenting tablet application by Mytrus into the Velos eResearch interface.
July 21, 2016
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Insect venom shortage stings allergy sufferers this summer
As summer begins, signaling peak time for insect stings, allergists across the U.S. are warning of a shortage of a little-known but crucial product -- honeybee, hornet and wasp venom extracts used in shots that prevent life-threatening reactions.
June 29, 2017
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Insights on optimal treatment of Paget's disease of bone
In a study of patients with Paget's disease of bone -- a common skeletal disorder that can lead to bone deformity, fractures, osteoarthritis, and bone pain -- long-term intensive bisphosphonate therapy conferred no clinical benefit over giving bisphosphonates only when patients felt bone pain.
February 8, 2017
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Integrating mental and physical healthcare leads to better clinical outcomes, lower costs
A major new study shows that delivering integrated mental and physical healthcare in team-based primary care settings at Intermountain Healthcare results in better clinical outcomes for patients, lower rates of healthcare utilization, and lower costs.
August 29, 2016
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International scientific teams find potential approach against parasites
Research teams from the National Institutes of Health and abroad have identified the first inhibitor of an enzyme long thought to be a potential drug target for fighting disease-causing parasites and bacteria. the teams, led by NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and University of Tokyo scientists, sorted through more than 1 trillion small protein fragments called cyclic peptides to uncover two that could shut down the enzyme. the finding, reported April 3, 2017 in Nature Communications, could set the stage for the potential development of new types of antimicrobial drugs.
April 3, 2017
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International study suggests Nodding syndrome caused by response to parasitic protein
NIH-funded study also identifies potential new mechanism for some forms of epilepsy.
February 15, 2017
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Intervention Drug Rehab Association provides dual diagnosis programs to increase recovery rates
Addiction and mental illness are closely related. According to the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 8.4 million American adults have a mental illness as well as an addiction. However, these men and women are unlikely to receive treatment.
August 11, 2016
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Intestinal flora likely to have effect on person's response to drugs
Intestinal flora has multiple influences on human health, but researchers have revealed that it is also likely to have an effect on the body's response to drugs. Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan strongly suggests that changes in the intestinal flora, caused by antibacterial and antibiotic drugs or individual differences between people, may have an effect on a person's response to drugs including side effects.
August 12, 2016
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Intraductal papilloma: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
An intraductal papilloma is a non-cancerous growth that occurs within the milk ducts of the breast. It can be a solitary growth (on its own), or multiple.
May 4, 2017
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Intraoperative methadone offers promise to reduce need for pain medications during recovery
"This is a new application for an old pain medication that offers hope for reducing the development of acute pain in the first few days after surgery, as well as chronic postoperative pain and the need for opioid medications following discharge from the hospital," said Glenn S. Murphy, M.D., lead study author and physician anesthesiologist at NorthShore University Health System in Evanston, Illinois.
April 24, 2017
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Intuitive's New Budget Friendly da Vinci X Robotic Surgical System Cleared in U.S.
Intuitive Surgical is following up on the European clearance from a month ago for its da Vinci X robotic surgical system with a similar clearance from the FDA. The da Vinci X is a budget friendly cousin of existing offerings from Intuitive, yet offers many of the same capabilities and is upgradeable to include various others. All of the tools, such as staplers, firefly, and vessel sealers are available on the da Vinci X, as is the same training and support that is included with the more expensive devices.
May 31, 2017
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Investigational biomarker surpasses current gold standard test for identifying brain shunt infections
In a study of children with brain shunts at Children's of Alabama, a University of Alabama at Birmingham investigational biomarker outperformed the current "gold standard" test for detecting bacterial infections in the shunts.
August 30, 2016
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Investigational PfSPZ malaria vaccine demonstrates considerable protection in Malian adults for duration of malaria season
An investigational malaria vaccine given intravenously was well-tolerated and protected a significant proportion of healthy adults against infection with Plasmodium falciparum malaria – the deadliest form of the disease – for the duration of the malaria season, according to new findings published in the February 15th issue of the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases. the study participants live in Mali, Africa, where they are naturally exposed to the parasite.
February 16, 2017
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Iron deficiency anemia: Causes, symptoms, and management
Iron deficiency anemia is a condition where there are too few red blood cells in the body due to a shortage of iron.
June 26, 2017
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Iron deficiency: an interview with Dr Thierry Teil
How common is iron deficiency and who does it affect?
November 30, 2016
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Is all that Flossing Really Worth It?
Review of available data finds no good evidence for a benefit, despite dental groups' recommendations
August 02, 2016
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Is Blue Light Bad For Your Health?
Peek into the typical American household after dinner and you'll find the occupants bathed in a faint bluish glow. As parents fire off late emails on their laptops or lie in bed with eyes fixed on e-readers, kids update their Snapchat accounts or squeeze in one last game on their phones.
June 19, 2017
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Is it lice? Know the symptoms
Lice are tiny parasitic insects that feed on blood and live in hair. But what are the symptoms to look out for to catch and treat lice quickly?
June 19, 2017
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Is It Wise to Take a Steroid for a Sore Throat?
Study seeking antibiotic alternatives found that only one-third of patients improved within 48 hours
April 18, 2017
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Is our social media behavior still influenced by our culture? this is how Finns, Poles and Americans differ
Even though we think ourselves as global citizens, we still differ in terms of how we behave online and what motivates our behavior online. a new study in the field of international marketing reveals that the cultural values and practices are still very much influencing the way consumers use different social media platforms when engaging with their favorite companies.
May 9, 2017
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Is Surgery Always Necessary for Gallstones?
Study found some people with gallstone pancreatitis are OK years later even without gallbladder removal
April 7, 2017
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Is the dark really making me sad?
I ask if she's a winter person: "No, I am not," she replies stiffly. "I like the Sun.'
March 22, 2017
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Is Your Smartphone Giving You Carpal Tunnel?
Maybe, especially for folks who spend more than 5 hours a day on their devices, study says
June 23, 2017
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ISCT announces reasons for opposing current version of REGROW Act on cell therapies
The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT), the global society of clinicians, researchers, regulatory specialists, technologists, and industry partners dedicated to the translation of cellular therapy into safe and effective therapies to improve patients' lives, today announces its reasons for opposition to the current version of the REGROW Act - the US government's legislative efforts to promote faster patient access to effective new cellular therapies.
August 24, 2016
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Isolating veterans with PTSD can constrain healing and further stress the family
Since 9/11, more than 2 million men and women have deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and other conflict zones as part of the war on terror. With up to 20 percent now reporting symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, both they -- and their families -- must cope with the invisible wounds of war. Symptoms of PTSD can include irritability, isolation, agitation, jumpiness, nightmares, sleep disturbances and substance abuse. All of these can take a toll not just on the person with PTSD, but on their loved ones as well.
July 3, 2017
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Isolation of human NP cells may offer way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure
In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at the Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.
September 12, 2016
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ISU entomologist urges summertime precautions against mosquitoes and ticks
Ryan Smith, an assistant professor of entomology at Iowa State University is encouraging Iowans to take precautions this summer when spending time outdoors in areas commonly populated by mosquitoes and ticks, which can transmit West Nile virus and other diseases that can have serious or potentially fatal outcomes.
June 22, 2017
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It's all in the math: new tool provides roadmap for cell development
Researchers have created a new tool, based on the principles of topology, to generate a roadmap of the many possible ways in which a stem cell may develop into specialized cells.
May 1, 2017
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IUPUI researchers find differing risks for binge drinking based on race, income and age
A new study led by Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis assistant professor of psychology Tamika Zapolski has found differing risks for binge drinking based on race, income and age.
June 9, 2017
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Misc. - J

JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata
Seventy-five percent of patients with moderate to severe alopecia areata–an autoimmune disease that causes patchy, and less frequently, total hair loss–had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib, reported researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). by the end of their treatment, average hair regrowth was 92 percent.
September 22, 2016
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JAMA - the Journal of the American Medical Association
To Promote the Science and Art of Medicine and the Betterment of the Public Health.
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Jaw Bone Osteogenesis Following Injection of Gel Containing Bone-Augmenting Agents
The degeneration of alveolar bone is a precursor to tooth loss and an ongoing issue for those who already wear dentures. Efforts to regenerate bone using agents such as recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) have been challenging, since high levels of such growth factors can trigger inflammation and tumorigenesis. Alternatively, a peptide named OP3-4 may inhibit bone degeneration and stimulate bone forming cell differentiation.
August 24, 2016
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Jaw pain: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Jaw and facial pain is a common problem affecting millions of people worldwide. It causes many treatment challenges in the healthcare community when it comes to diagnosis and treatment.
April 27, 2017
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Johns Hopkins researchers discover group of nerve cells in the skin responsible for 'active touch'
Working with genetically engineered mice -- and especially their whiskers -- Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a group of nerve cells in the skin responsible for what they call "active touch," a combination of motion and sensory feeling needed to navigate the external world. the discovery of this basic sensory mechanism, described online April 20 in the journal Neuron, advances the search for better "smart" prosthetics for people, ones that provide more natural sensory feedback to the brain during use.
April 21, 2017
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Job satisfaction can impact overall health in people in their early 40s
Job satisfaction in your late 20s and 30s has a link to overall health in your early 40s, according to a new nationwide study.
August 22, 2016
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Misc. - K

KAIST researchers fabricate ultrathin, transparent oxide TFTs for wearable display
With the advent of the Internet of Things era, strong demand has grown for wearable and transparent displays that can be applied to various fields such as augmented reality and skin-like thin flexible devices. However, previous flexible transparent displays have posed real challenges to overcome, which are, among others, poor transparency and low electrical performance.
July 29, 2016
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Ketamine may not reduce post-surgery pain, delirium
Ketamine is commonly prescribed to help alleviate post-surgery delirium and pain, but a new, multicenter trial suggests that the drug may be useless in treating these symptoms.
May 31, 2017
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Key feature for modeling how cells spread in fibrous environments
Many studies have shown that stiffness of the extracellular matrix, the fibrous network of collagen that surrounds cells, promotes cellular mobility; cells can get a better grip on stiffer surfaces and thus invade neighboring tissue. New research by scientists in the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science is diving deeper into this relationship, showing that stiffness is not the only factor researchers should consider when studying this process.
June 15, 2017
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Kidney graft success depends on age, sex of donor and recipient, study reveals
The success of kidney transplant is dependent on the age and sex of both the donor and the recipient, according to research published today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The study, which was a collaboration between a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM), revealed that young women had poorer transplant outcomes compared to young men, whereas women of post-menopausal age had similar or slightly better outcomes than men of the same age.
June 8, 2017
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Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster Ride
Study supports stories from patients who passed the urinary obstruction while on a thrill ride
September 28, 2016
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Kidney transplants: Many discarded kidneys could prolong life
The results of a new study suggest that high discard rates among donated kidneys could be avoided in the future. Researchers say that even kidneys with poor biopsy results may be more efficient in prolonging patients' lifespans than other treatments.
July 7, 2017
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KIT researchers use high-resolution microscopy to uncover how scavenger cells repair muscle fibers
Everybody knows the burning sensation in the legs when climbing down a steep slope for a long time. It is caused by microruptures in the cell membrane of our muscle fibers. These holes in the cell envelopes must be closed as soon as possible as otherwise muscle cells will die off.
September 21, 2016
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Know thyself to understand others
New study tests value of perspective-taking training in understanding other people's mental states
May 18, 2017
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Misc. - L

Lab-grown human colons change study of GI disease
Stem cell derived organoids fill gap in modeling common ailments
June 22, 2017
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Lack of appropriate clothing can affect overall well-being of people with mobility disabilities
There are many important events in a person's life, including weddings, graduations, school dances and job interviews. the clothing industry has long profited from these events and the special clothing they require. However, according to new research from the University of Missouri, approximately 30 million Americans living with mobility challenges and impairments lack the appropriate clothing required for social engagements, work and exercise.
December 5, 2016
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Lack of 'beauty sleep' might hinder your social life
New research proves that there is such a thing as "beauty sleep," after finding that just 2 nights of poor sleep can make one appear less attractive and healthy to others.
May 19, 2017
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Lancaster researchers look for better ways to let go emotionally-charged digital possessions
Researchers are looking at better ways of helping grieving people let go of emotionally-charged digital content after the death of loved ones or the break-up of relationships.
August 25, 2016
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LARC benefits wider population of potential users than previously thought
Benefits of increased voluntary uptake of LARC may extend to wider populations than previously thought, according to a major study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
September 21, 2016
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Late bedtime linked to lower perceived control of obsessive thoughts
A late bedtime is associated with lower perceived control of obsessive thoughts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
June 19, 2017
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LCSB researchers identify how the body influences differentiation of progenitor cells
Stem cells are unspecialised cells that can develop into any type of cell in the human body. So far, however, scientists only partially understand how the body controls the fate of these all-rounders, and what factors decide whether a stem cell will differentiate, for example, into a blood, liver or nerve cell.
March 15, 2017
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Lending a hand: Student 3D prints functional, affordable prosthetic
A physics student adapted open source plans for a prosthetic hand to build a highly functional, affordable prosthetic, outlines a new report.
December 9, 2016
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Leading experts in iron deficiency to participate in 3rd European Iron Academy meeting
The 3rd European Iron Academy (EIA) took place on the 12th and 13th September 2016 in Berlin, Germany, and brought together over 450 clinicians with an interest in iron deficiency.
September 16, 2016
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Learning foreign languages can enhance the brain's ability to code information
Scientists from the Higher School of Economics (HSE) together with colleagues from the University of Helsinki have discovered that learning foreign languages enhances the our brain's elasticity and its ability to code information. the more foreign languages we learn, the more effectively our brain reacts and processes the data accumulated in the course of learning.
September 2, 2016
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Learning to downregulate amygdala activity could help gain control of emotional responses
Training the brain to treat itself is a promising therapy for traumatic stress. the training uses an auditory or visual signal that corresponds to the activity of a particular brain region, called neurofeedback, which can guide people to regulate their own brain activity.
September 12, 2016
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Less fear: how LSD affects the brain
LSD reduces activity in the region of the brain related to the handling of negative emotions like fear, research shows. These results could affect the treatment of mental illnesses such as depression or anxiety.
April 4, 2017
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Less is best when treating burn patients with blood transfusions
Reducing by half the typical amount of blood provided through transfusions to burn patients makes no difference in terms of patient outcomes, a new multi-center study led by UC Davis researchers shows.
April 26, 2017
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Letter from the Editor: June 2017
Summer is officially here, and although medicine is always a hot topic, the subject of health has recently taken the political center stage with the Senate's unveiling of their healthcare bill last week.
June 29, 2017
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Leukoplakia: Symptoms, causes, and prevention
Leukoplakia is a condition that causes thick, plaque-like white patches on the tongue, gums, and lining of the mouth.
May 30, 2017
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Light powers new chemistry for old enzymes
Enzymes are nature's tools for catalyzing life's essential reactions. Though unrivaled in their efficiency and selectivity, enzymes only carry out a narrow range of natural reactions, limiting their usefulness in modern organic synthesis.
December 21, 2016
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Light treatment can help increase anthocyanin production in turfgrasses
Anthocyanins, plant pigments known for their health-promoting properties, are in demand for medicinal and industrial uses. Anthocyanins have become sought-after natural products, but the small number of plants that naturally produce anthocyanins has limited their widespread use. Researchers at the Ohio State University say the results of their recent study (HortScience, September 2106) can help to increase the environmental and economic sustainability of anthocyanin extract production in turfgrasses such as rough bluegrass.
December 28, 2016
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Link between surgery and Guillain-Barre syndrome discovered
Autoimmune disease and cancer may be risk factors
November 23, 2016
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Link between weather, chronic pain is emerging through an innovative national smartphone research project
Preliminary findings from a mass participation study have indicated a link between weather conditions -- specifically rain and lack of sunshine -- and chronic pain.
September 7, 2016
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Liquid crystal technique could be new way to control drug delivery process
Liquid crystals are strange substances, both fish and fowl. they can flow like a liquid, but have the orderly molecular structure of a crystalline solid. and that internal structure can be changed by small cues from outside.
September 13, 2016
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Listerine foot soak: Does it work?
Promises that a Listerine foot soak will leave dry, cracked feet rejuvenated and smooth have been making their way around Pinterest. But will a Listerine foot soak work?
May 23, 2017
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Liver damage caused by low protein diet can be repaired, study finds
Damage caused to the liver by a low protein diet can be repaired, a new study just published in the prestigious journal 'Nutrition' has found.
March 27, 2017
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Liver pain: Symptoms and causes
Liver pain can be felt in the upper part of the abdomen, on the right hand side. It can be a sign of a serious disease, so medical attention may be necessary.
May 3, 2017
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London Consulting
services in forensic anthropology, analysis of human remains from historic and archaeological sites, and biomedical writing and editing for general and technical audiences.
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Loneliness can make a cold feel worse, say researchers
Having a cold is always an unpleasant experience, but, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association, feeling lonely can make cold symptoms seem even worse.
March 31, 2017
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Long-Term West Nile Deaths: Higher Than Thought?
Texas study estimates mortality rate from the mosquito-borne disease at 13 percent
November 14, 2016
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Losing tropical forest might raise risks of human skin ulcers, deformed bones
Bacteria causing Buruli disease prosper with certain landscape changes
December 6, 2016
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Lots of Red Meat May be Tied to Gut Disorder
Diverticulitis involves tears or blockages in colon and can be very painful
January 10, 2017
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Low oxygen reverses neurodegenerative disease in mice
When the cells' mitochondria do not work properly, the human body can develop a mitochondrial disease. new research paves the way for treating mitochondrial diseases that affect the brain, showing that oxygen deprivation has unexpected therapeutic benefits - at least in mice.
May 9, 2017
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Loyola Medicine participates in major study of rare lung disease that affects Puerto Ricans
Loyola Medicine is enrolling patients in the first major study of a rare, debilitating lung disease that disproportionately affects people from Puerto Rico.
July 7, 2017
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LudusScope Turns Microbiology Into Real Games
At Stanford University microbiologists were worried that their field is not attracting young talent because there's not enough tools and games to play with real microbes. Hoping to overcome this, they developed a smartphone microscopy system, called LudusScope, that can be used to play games with real light sensitive eukaryotes.
October 14, 2016
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LUKE Arm, World's Most Advanced Prosthetic, Finally Being Prescribed to Wounded Warriors
Even though Princess Leia has succumbed to her illness, the LUKE Arm, named after one of her most loyal warriors, is beginning to be distributed to wounded warriors from the U.S. military. Developed by Dean Kamen's DEKA Integrated Solutions Corp. and manufactured by Mobius Bionics, with both companies based in Manchester, new Hampshire, the device is probably the most advanced arm prosthetic ever to be commercialized. Its development was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
December 28, 2016
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Misc. - M

Machine learning accurately identifies suicidal behavior using person's spoken or written words
Using a person's spoken or written words, new computer tools can identify with great accuracy whether that person is suicidal, mentally ill but not suicidal, or neither.
November 7, 2016
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Machine learning to help physicians
Physicians have long used visual judgment of medical images to determine the course of cancer treatment. a new program package reveals changes in images and facilitates this task using deep learning.
November 14, 2016
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Magnesium may prevent bone fractures
New research - conducted by scientists from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom and the University of Eastern Finland in Kuopio - suggests that low levels of magnesium may increase the risk of bone fractures and that, conversely, high levels may ward off this cause of disability.
April 13, 2017
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Magnetic resonance technology can improve fatty liver diagnosis
Taking tissue samples from the liver to diagnose fatty liver can be replaced in most cases by a painless magnetic resonance investigation. this is the conclusion of a new study from Linköping University in Sweden, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology. the authors propose that the current value considered to be a normal amount of fat in the liver should be lowered.
April 5, 2017
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Making brain implants smaller could eliminate scarring, extend life of devices
Many diseases, including Parkinson's disease, can be treated with electrical stimulation from an electrode implanted in the brain. However, the electrodes can produce scarring, which diminishes their effectiveness and can necessitate additional surgeries to replace them.
May 16, 2017
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Making brain implants smaller could prolong their lifespan
Thin fibers could be used to deliver drugs or electrical stimulation, with less damage to the brain
May 16, 2017
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Managing stress, improving pain coping strategies may minimize need for opioids after surgery
Helping patients to better manage stress and improve coping strategies related to pain may minimize the need for opioids following ankle fracture surgery, according to new research appearing in the July 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
July 6, 2017
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Marijuana and erectile dysfunction: what is the connection?
Erectile dysfunction refers to a man's inability to get and maintain an erection firm enough to have sex.
April 25, 2017
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Marijuana could help treat drug addiction, mental health, study suggests
Using marijuana could help some alcoholics and people addicted to opioids kick their habits, a new study suggests. the research also found some evidence that medical cannabis may help with symptoms of depression, PTSD and social anxiety. However, the review concluded that cannabis use might not be recommended for conditions such as bipolar disorder and psychosis.
November 16, 2016
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Marriage Could Boost Health for Same-Sex Couples
Survey found those who'd exchanged vows were better off physically and mentally than their single peers
April 18, 2017
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Married individuals have lower levels of stress hormone than unmarried, divorced people
Studies have suggested that married people are healthier than those who are single, divorced or widowed. a new Carnegie Mellon University study provides the first biological evidence to explain how marriage impacts health.
February 13, 2017
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Man Feels Sensations in His Paralyzed Hand Through a Robotic Prosthetic
Researchers from University of Pittsburgh and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), successfully managed to bring back the feeling of sensation to a man severely paralyzed a decade earlier.
October 14, 2016
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Many in U.S. Say 'No' to Scented Rooms, Products
More than half would prefer fragrance-free hotels, workplaces
November 2, 2016
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Many parents support expansion of health education in schools, new survey reveals
Teaching kids about drugs, alcohol and sex appears to be less controversial than ever before with the majority of parents in a new poll saying schools should and do teach these subjects.
September 19, 2016
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Mark Zuckerberg is Funding a Facebook for Human Cells
The billionaire is the first major donor to back the idea of creating an atlas of all human cells.
October 30, 2016
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Mathematical model helps explain how the brain forms new memories without wiping out old ones
Columbia scientists have developed a new mathematical model that helps to explain how the human brain's biological complexity allows it to lay down new memories without wiping out old ones -- illustrating how the brain maintains the fidelity of memories for years, decades or even a lifetime. this model could help neuroscientists design more targeted studies of memory, and also spur advances in neuromorphic hardware -- powerful computing systems inspired by the human brain.
October 4, 2016
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Maverick Healthcare Consultants
Source of information on evaluating health provider quality and performance.
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Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease
An article published today in the new England Journal of Medicine updates the medical community on a potentially devastating liver disease that afflicts approximately 29,000 Americans. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, or PSC, is a condition that damages the ducts that carry digestive bile from the liver to the small intestine. Many individuals affected by this disease eventually require a liver transplant for continued survival.
September 22, 2016
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Mayo launches new High Altitude and Harsh Environments Medical Clinic
Mayo Clinic is seeing patients with concerns about traveling to high altitudes at the recently established High Altitude and Harsh Environments Medical Clinic.
November 18, 2016
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MCSports.com
Shop for the best selection of Fitness Equipment!
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MDI Biological Laboratory receives NIH grant for research on peripheral neuropathy
The MDI Biological Laboratory has announced that it has received a grant of $456,500 over two years from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the study of peripheral neuropathy.
August 17, 2016
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Measles Complication: More Common Than Thought?
One more reason to get your child vaccinated against the disease, infection experts say
October 28, 2016
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Measuring BTMs could be practical way to identify patient's adherence to osteoporosis medications
Oral bisphosphonates are common first line treatments for osteoporosis. However, approximately half of patients who begin osteoporosis treatment do not follow their prescribed treatment and/or discontinue treatment within a year. Identifying low adherence to medication - a problem commonly seen with many chronic diseases - is a critical issue as it jeopardizes the efficacy of treatment, leaving osteoporosis patients unprotected against fractures.
January 30, 2017
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Medications that increase effect of natural brain opioids may be better way to reduce anxiety
Published in Nature Communications by University of Sydney scholars, the findings suggest medications that boost the effect of natural brain opioids might be a better way to reduce anxiety than 'receptor-binding' opioid drugs like morphine, which have major side effects.
March 23, 2017
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Medical Alert Jewelry
can save your life, order one today.
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Medical Consulting Group
management and marketing services for ophthalmology, optometry and plastic surgery.
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Medical School Admissions Consulting
offered by Judy Colwell, M.A., consultant and personal achievement coach.
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Medical students developing smart helmet to help diagnose concussions
A smart helmet that can help diagnose concussions in football players is being developed by medical students at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso (TTUHSC El Paso).
August 25, 2016
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'Medical Tattoos' Help Hide Surgical Scars
Pigments can restore more natural appearance that patients are happy with, study finds
September 23, 2016
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Medical Technology Consulting, LLC & Medical Imaging Links
provides technical marketing and product development services to medical imaging manufacturers.
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Medicrea Group to implement LIFETIME WARRANTY on patient-specific UNiD technology
The Medicrea Group,® (Alternext Paris: FR0004178572 -- ALMED) worldwide leader pioneering the development and manufacture of personalized analytical services and implant solutions for the treatment of complex spinal conditions, announced today that the Company will implement a LIFETIME WARRANTY on its patient-specific UNiD™ technology. the warranty will cover all UNiD™ Thoracolumbar Rods, UNiD™ Cervical Rods and all associated MEDICREA components implanted in the United States from November 1, 2016.
November 3, 2016
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MedUni Vienna scientists show that addictive cravings can be detected after death
A protein known as FosB in the reward centre of the brain alters in chronically ill people suffering from an addictive disorder (e.g. heroin addiction): it is genetically modified, split off and shortened. this modification under the stimulus of the drug results in the protein being more stable and therefore remaining longer in this part of the brain than in its original form - even as much as several weeks after withdrawal of the drug.
December 21, 2016
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Memories stored in same neuron can be selectively erased, study suggests
Different types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and McGill University and published today in Current Biology.
June 22, 2017
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Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows
A new study shows that when you finish your spouse's sentences or answer a fill-in-the-blank question, you're engaging the brain's relay station for memories, the hippocampus. Until now, scientists largely neglected this area in relation to language.
September 21, 2016
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Men's Health Consulting
promotes better health in men by offering consultation for organizations and training for professionals and consumers.
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Mental Health Myths Abound in the U.S.
For instance, survey finds less than half can recognize anxiety
May 2, 2017
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Mental health researchers make promising breakthrough in early detection of psychosis
Mental health researchers have made a promising breakthrough in the early detection of the risk of psychosis, with the eventual hope that patients could be given appropriate treatments earlier to prevent psychotic episodes from occurring.
October 14, 2016
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Mental Illness Affects About 10 million Adults
More than a third aren't getting help, federal study says
June 12, 2017
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Mental illness does not impact bariatric surgery outcomes, study finds
People with pre-existing mental health conditions had nearly identical results in weight loss after bariatric surgery as compared to those with no known mental health conditions. Published in Obesity, the scientific journal of the Obesity Society (TOS), this is the first large-scale study of its kind to examine the relationship of preoperative mental illness to weight loss and health care use after bariatric surgery.
April 25, 2017
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Mercury levels drop in Atlantic bluefin tuna
Pollution can seem like a vague, general problem, but sometimes it is specific and personal. People with asthma living in some major cities know to keep tabs on the ozone report in the weather forecast, for example. and frequent anglers should be keenly aware of how much of their catch they put on the dinner table because of mercury contamination in fish.
December 6, 2016
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Mesenteric adenitis: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Mesenteric lymphadenitis, also known as mesenteric adenitis, is an inflammation of the lymph nodes in the mesentery.
May 3, 2017
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Mettler Toledo describe how to eliminate impact of static on weighing results
Lab operators are often shocked to learn how subtle electrostatic charges can have a significant impact on weighing results. a new white paper from METTLER TOLEDO describes the damage static can cause and documents 13 ways to eliminate this force at the balance.
May 1, 2017
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MGH researchers develop magnetic coils for selective and reliable neural stimulation
Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have developed what appears to be a significant improvement in the technology behind brain implants used to activate neural circuits responsible for vision, hearing or movement.
December 9, 2016
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Mice study finds new approach to halt cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus
Molecules that scavenge debris from dying cells appear to halt the cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus, while also enhancing the body's ability to combat flu, according to Duke Health studies in mice.
August 16, 2016
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Mice study shows how WAVE1 protein regulates the brain's response to cocaine
Cocaine is one of the most addictive substances known to man, and for good reason: by acting on levels of the "feel-good" chemical dopamine, it produces a tremendous sensation of euphoria.
February 15, 2017
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Micro-gene protects brain from developing epilepsy
Increased levels of a micro-RNA could have a protective effect that explains why identical stressors trigger seizures in some people but not in others.
June 5, 2017
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Microscopic probes simplify process of measuring electrical signals in small animals
Microscopic probes developed at Rice University have simplified the process of measuring electrical activity in individual cells of small living animals. the technique allows a single animal like a worm to be tested again and again and could revolutionize data-gathering for disease characterization and drug interactions.
April 17, 2017
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'Microwave helmet' may cut time taken to evaluate head injuries
A portable device that covers the head and uses microwave technology to examine brain tissue in prehospital settings could cut the time it takes to evaluate brain injuries. So conclude researchers after evaluating their "microwave helmet" in a small trial.
March 10, 2017
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Mild sedative could reduce risk of post-operative delirium
A mild sedative could greatly reduce the risk of people experiencing delirium after an operation, according to new research.
October 14, 2016
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'Mindfulness' Probably Won't Cure your back Pain
But one specialist still isn't ruling out this complementary therapy
April 25, 2017
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Miniature Sensor Measures Velocity of Blood Flow Below Skin
Kyocera Corporation out of Kyoto, Japan has announced the development of a tiny optical sensor for measuring blood flow within subcutaneous tissue. Readings from such a device may help assess how injured tissue is healing, produce evidence of dehydration, and detect altitude sickness. Many other applications may come to light as this kind of technology becomes widely available for use by the public.
December 21, 2016
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MIT researchers develop novel method for multiscale imaging of the brain tissue
MIT researchers have developed a new technique for imaging brain tissue at multiple scales, allowing them to peer at molecules within cells or take a wider view of the long-range connections between neurons.
July 27, 2016
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MIT researchers develop precise technique to measure dopamine in the brain
MIT researchers have devised a way to measure dopamine in the brain much more precisely than previously possible, which should allow scientists to gain insight into dopamine's roles in learning, memory, and emotion.
March 3, 2017
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MIT Scientists Unveil Radiation-free MRI Brain Imaging Tracer
Existing methods of spotting the presence of specific molecules in the brain requires using chemical or radioactive markers. These can have side effects for patients, at times be difficult to acquire and use, and they're limited in their spatial and temporal resolutions. now scientists at MIT have come up with an entirely new method of imaging molecules that uses targeted proteins and MRI to get a quality picture of activity inside the brain.
December 13, 2016
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MMJ Labs launches VibraCool Massaging Ice Therapy for joint and muscle pain relief
MMJ Labs LLC., industry leaders in non-invasive pain relief, have announced the launch of their newest product, VibraCool® Massaging Ice Therapy. VibraCool® incorporates Cool-Pulse™ technology, leveraging the physiologic pain relievers of high frequency vibration and ice in a product optimized for athletes and chronic joint pain sufferers.
November 23, 2016
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Mobile device management strategy in healthcare
Jamf's mission is very simple: we want to help organizations succeed with Apple devices. it's a very broad mission, Apple devices are getting used increasingly more in businesses, for example healthcare providers and in a variety of other industries, such as education. Our goal is to help them succeed with Apple devices to either empower their employees, empower their teachers or students, and help IT be more effective and efficient.
March 9, 2017
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Modifying huntingtin protein protects against behavioral symptoms in Huntington's model mice
There is new hope in the fight against Huntington's disease. Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that changing a specific part of the huntingtin protein prevented the loss of critical brain cells and protected against behavioral symptoms in a mouse model of the disease.
August 16, 2016
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'Molecular prosthetics' can replace missing proteins to treat disease
Researchers have demonstrated that a small molecule can transport iron in human cells and live animals when proteins that normally do the same job are missing, a condition that often causes severe anemia in patients. Such "molecular prosthetics" might treat a host of incurable diseases caused by protein deficiencies, such as anemias, cystic fibrosis or certain types of heart disease.
May 11, 2017
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Molecular study of skin proteins uncovers predisposition to eczema
New research shows for the first time that a lack of the key barrier protein filaggrin alone may be responsible for changes in skin proteins and pathways that make people susceptible to eczema. It builds on previous work that shows a lack of the protein is strongly tied to the development of eczema.
May 5, 2017
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Molecule discovery may lead to new drugs for brain and spinal cord injury
A new study reveals that a small molecule produced by a fungus may stimulate the regeneration of axons - the slender, "thread-like projections that carry electrical signals" between nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. the researchers believe that the discovery could lead to much needed new drugs that repair damage to the central nervous system.
March 9, 2017
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More alcohol-related injuries occur at home than at licensed premises, say researchers
Of all alcohol-related injuries in various public hospital emergency departments in Queensland, Australia, more occurred at home than at licensed premises.
October 13, 2016
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More flexible approach can improve efficiency of preclinical research, study shows
The translation of preclinical research findings into effective treatments continues to deliver unsatisfactory results. When experimental diagnostic and treatment approaches are applied in practice, many of them fail.
March 31, 2017
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More Research Cites Salt's Potential Health Risks
Every half-teaspoon or so raises risk of premature death by 12 percent, study suggests
October 3, 2016
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Most Opioid Users OK with Getting Antidote: Survey
More than a third said it improved their drug-taking behavior
September 13, 2016
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Mothers in therapy for substance use recover faster if children take part in treatment, study shows
Mothers in therapy for drug and alcohol use recover faster if their children take part in their treatment sessions, according to a first-of-its-kind study.
November 2, 2016
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Mount Sinai awarded $10 million grant to explore cellular, molecular mechanisms of GVHD
Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have been awarded a $10 million from the National Cancer Institute to explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a common side effect that occurs after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and to develop novel therapeutic strategies for BMT patients with cancer that begin in the cells of blood-forming tissue or hematologic malignancies.
October 13, 2016
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Mouth ulcers: Causes and symptoms
Mouth ulcers are painful areas in the mouth and gums. They are also known as canker sores.
June 19, 2017
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MPFI researchers induce and visualize formation of new synapses in real time in live animals
Advancing our understanding of how proper connections are formed in the brain
August 11, 2016
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MRI for Drug Delivery and Imaging at Same Time
MRI machines allow doctors to look at hidden details inside our bodies, but soon they may be used to also deliver drugs in a highly targeted manner. Normally, a systemic medication traves along with blood's natural currents, finding itself in parts where it is not needed while delivering only a small amount of the drug to the target destination.
October 11, 2016
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MU researcher discovers new class of materials that may have widespread applications
Polyhedral boranes, or clusters of boron atoms bound to hydrogen atoms, are transforming the biomedical industry. These manmade materials have become the basis for the creation of cancer therapies, enhanced drug delivery and new contrast agents needed for radioimaging and diagnosis. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has discovered an entirely new class of materials based on boranes that might have widespread potential applications, including improved diagnostic tools for cancer and other diseases as well as low-cost solar energy cells.
January 25, 2017
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Multi-Modality Imaging Probe to Diagnose Cancer Inside Body, Help Avoid Biopsies
These days, identifying cancerous tissue within the body requires a biopsy and a review of the extracted sample in a pathology lab. a team of German scientists have been working toward a way of spotting tumors using an endoscopic approach that doesn't involve actually having to take samples. They've developed a multi-modality laser-based imaging probe that is capable of differentiating tissue types without requiring the use of a staining dye.
May 2, 2017
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Multitasking brain mechanism examined
Multitasking is the holy grail of all efficient workers. Recent research, published in the journal Current Biology, lifts the lid on how we might all manage this feat more efficiently.
June 23, 2017
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Mumps Cases Surge In U.S.
Mumps is making a comeback.
April 17, 2017
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Music in the brain: the first imaging genetic study linking dopaminergic genes to music
Sounds, such as music and noise, are capable of reliably affecting individuals' moods and emotions, possibly by regulating brain dopamine, a neurotransmitter strongly involved in emotional behavior and mood regulation. However, the relationship of sound environments with mood and emotions is highly variable across individuals. a putative source of variability is genetic background, a study shows.
December 21, 2016
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Myeloid-derived suppressor cells may serve as biomarkers for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), have discovered that the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is increased in the blood of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). the higher the number of MDSC, the more limited the lung function.
September 2, 2016
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Misc. - N

Nanoarray sniffs out and distinguishes multiple diseases
Before modern medical lab techniques became available, doctors diagnosed some diseases by smelling a patient's breath. Scientists have been working for years to develop analytical instruments that can mimic this sniff-and-diagnose ability.
December 21, 2016
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Nanosubmarine with self-destroying activity
Autonomous targeting and release of drugs at their site of action are desired features of nanomedical systems.
May 30, 2017
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NASPGHAN clinical practice guidelines recommend screening test for NAFLD in obese children
A screening test for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)--a serious condition that may have lifelong health consequences--is recommended for all obese children aged nine to eleven years, according to clinical practice guidelines developed by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN).
December 1, 2016
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National Joint Registry study finds disparities in hip or knee joint replacements for ethnic minorities
Researchers have found that the number of both hip and knee replacement operations for Black and Asian ethnic minorities are lower than expected when compared to Whites.
March 22, 2017
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National mental-health survey finds widespread ignorance, stigma
Less than half of Americans can recognize anxiety. Most people don't know what to do about depression even when they spot it. and nearly 8 in 10 don't recognize prescription drug abuse as a treatable problem.
April 27, 2017
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Naturally occurring protein shows promise as biocontrol weapon against schistosomiasis
A naturally occurring protein has been discovered that shows promise as a biocontrol weapon against schistosomiasis, one of the world's most prevalent parasitic diseases, Oregon State University researchers reported today in a new study.
February 15, 2017
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Naturally-occurring protein controls shape and activity of white blood cells to combat sepsis
Boosting levels of a protein that controls the shape and activity of a crucial group of white blood cells improves survival and recovery chances during sepsis.
August 08, 2016
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Nearly 20% of children with celiac disease have persistent enteropathy despite gluten-free diet
Even after a year on a gluten-free diet, nearly 20 percent of children with celiac disease continue to have intestinal abnormalities (enteropathy) on repeat biopsies, reports a study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.
November 7, 2016
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Negative pressure wound therapy effectively heals deep perivascular groin infections
Shorter wound healing time, fewer dressing changes and the opportunity for earlier discharge from the hospital. These are some of the benefits of negative pressure wound therapy to treat wound infections in connection with vascular surgery at the groin.
October 14, 2016
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Nephrologists uncover link between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease
Mayo Clinic nephrologists have uncovered a connection between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease. In a paper published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers announce a persistent decline in kidney functioning following an individual's first case of kidney stones.
November 2, 2016
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Neuro-prosthesis helps man with complete paralysis to regain hand and arm movements, study shows
A man who was paralysed from the shoulders down has been able to feed himself and drink as a result of a novel neuro-prosthesis which reconnects his brain with his muscles.
March 29, 2017
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Neurons modulate the growth of blood vessels
A team of researchers shake at the foundations of a dogma of cell biology. by detailed series of experiments, they proved that blood vessel growth is modulated by neurons and not, as assumed so far, through a control mechanism of the vessel cells among each other. the results are groundbreaking for research into and treatment of vascular diseases, tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases.
January 10, 2017
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Neurologists identify cause of immune-mediated neuropathies
Wurzburg neurologists have discovered an antibody that is involved in triggering certain forms of neuropathies. this discovery also allowed them to show a way to treat these diseases successfully.
August 03, 2016
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Neuropathic pain could be significantly reduced by targeting brain cells
Neuropathic pain - which affects more than 1 million Americans - could be reduced or even eliminated by targeting brain cells that are supposed to provide immunity but, in some instances, do the opposite, causing chronic pain that could last a lifetime.
August 08, 2016
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Neuroprosthetics: Recovering from injury using the power of your mind
Neuroprosthetics, also known as brain-computer interfaces, are devices that help people with motor or sensory disabilities to regain control of their senses and movements by creating a connection between the brain and a computer. In other words, this technology enables people to move, hear, see, and touch using the power of thought alone.
May 19, 2017
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Neuroscientists demonstrate revolutionary new way of mapping the brain at single-neuron resolution
Neuroscientists today publish in Neuron details of a revolutionary new way of mapping the brain at the resolution of individual neurons, which they have successfully demonstrated in the mouse brain.
August 19, 2016
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Neuroscientists elucidate how serotonin helps to deal with unfamiliar changing environment
Serotonin, one of the major chemical messengers serving neuronal communication, is usually associated with the direct regulation of affective states and mood in general. But growing evidence suggests that one of the core functions of this neurotransmitter may be to facilitate our adaptation to changes in the world around us - which, in turn, may indirectly impact mood.
March 16, 2017
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Neuroscientists show how nerve cells synchronize rhythmically to connect parts of the brain
Thinking, feeling, acting - our brain is the control center in the head that steers everything we do. a network of about 100 billion nerve cells linked together by around 100 trillion synapses provides the basis for these mechanisms. Neuroscientists at the German Primate Center (DPZ) - Leibniz Institute for Primate Research examined for the first time how this neural network is organized and how the flow of information between different brain areas is coordinated at the level of individual nerve cells.
August 25, 2016
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New algorithms may revolutionize drug discoveries, and our understanding of life
A new set of machine learning algorithms that can generate 3-D structures of tiny protein molecules may revolutionize the development of drug therapies for a range of diseases, from Alzheimer's to cancer.
February 7, 2017
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New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain
Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. In a new study, a research group at Uppsala University describes their development of a new antibody design that increases brain uptake of antibodies almost 100-fold.
January 16, 2017
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New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients
Penn Medicine today launched its first Apple ResearchKit app, focused on patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory condition that can affect the lungs, skin, eyes, heart, brain, and other organs. the effort marks Penn's first time using modules from Apple's ResearchKit frame the institution's focus on mobile health and innovative research strategies.
January 17, 2017
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New approach could help tackle behavior change challenges across the globe
A new approach to behavior change which has been shown to successfully change hygiene, nutrition and exercise-related behaviors is described in a paper published in Health Psychology Review.
September 13, 2016
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New Approach to Concussion Diagnosis
Ability to process sound provides clues about brain injury, researchers say
December 22, 2016
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New article examines why some individuals exhibit stress-resilient characteristics
Adapting to Stress: Understanding the Neurobiology of Resilience, an article recently published in Behavioral Medicine, examines the way our bodies, specifically our brains, become "stress-resilient." There is a significant variation in the way individuals react and respond to extreme stress and adversity–some individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder or major depressive disorder–others recover from stressful experiences without displaying significant symptoms of psychological ill-health, demonstrating stress-resilience.
September 2, 2016
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New article explores cost-effectiveness of initial diagnostic protocols for microscopic hematuria
Detecting red blood cells in the urine of asymptomatic patients who don't see blood when they urinate (asymptomatic microscopic hematuria) is common but it can signal cancer in the genitourinary system.
April 17, 2017
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New biomarkers may help in diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease
The diagnosis, understanding and management of Crohn's disease may have just received a helping hand from a joint ASU Biodesign Institute and Mayo Clinic study aimed at developing a better blood test for the disease.
March 9, 2017
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New biosensor could detect multiple disease biomarkers in small blood sample
Researchers at the University of York have developed a new sensor that is capable of detecting multiple proteins and enzymes in a small volume of blood, which could significantly speed up diagnostic healthcare processes.
September 14, 2016
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New brain map reveals landscape of the cerebral cortex
The age of exploration has long passed, but there is at least one area still largely uncharted: the human brain. Now, a detailed new map by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis lays out the landscape of the cerebral cortex - the outermost layer of the brain and the dominant structure involved in sensory perception and attention, as well as distinctly human functions such as language, tool use and abstract thinking.
July 21, 2016
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New Caltech study shows how chaperones protect ribosomal proteins
For proteins, this would be the equivalent of the red-carpet treatment: each protein belonging to the complex machinery of ribosomes -- components of the cell that produce proteins -- has its own chaperone to guide it to the right place at the right time and protect it from harm.
February 3, 2017
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New cause of brain defects in tuberous sclerosis complex
A new molecular pathway that inhibits the myelination of neurons in the brains of patients with the rare genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) has been discovered by researchers. the study suggests new ways to treat some of the neurological symptoms associated with TSC, including autism and epilepsy.
February 9, 2017
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New CBIT therapy can help lessen frequency of tics
When Dr. Laura Duda goes into an elementary school classroom, she can usually spot one or two children who have a tic - a rapid, involuntary movement or sound such as sniffing, blinking their eyes or scrunching their faces.
July 21, 2016
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New chartbook illustrates burden of chronic illnesses
A new publication illustrates the burden that chronic illnesses impose on American society, demonstrating through charts and graphics how 60 percent of American adults suffer from at least one chronic health condition and 42 percent have more than one.
May 31, 2017
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New compound could kill parasites of three neglected diseases
Scientists have identified a compound that can kill the parasites responsible for three neglected diseases: Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and sleeping sickness. These diseases affect millions of people in Latin America, Asia and Africa, but there are few effective treatments available.
August 08, 2016
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New computational approach could enable more patients with epilepsy to benefit from surgery
A computational approach developed at Boston Children's Hospital, described in the journal Neurosurgery, published online May 2, 2017, could enable more patients with epilepsy to benefit from surgery when medications do not help. the approach streamlines the seizure monitoring process required for surgical planning, making surgery a more feasible and less risky option for patients.
May 2, 2017
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New computational model provides a tool for improving the production of valuable drugs
An extensive study involving partners from five continents has resulted in a model describing the metabolism of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). this model can be used to improve and accelerate the production of biotherapeutics, cancer drugs, and vaccines.
December 1, 2016
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New Cooler Keeps Organs at Right Temperature Prior to Transplantation
University of Wisconsin is well know for its work on organ preservation. After all, the ViaSpan cold storage solution for pancreas, liver, and kidneys, was developed in the late 1980s by Folkert Belzer and James Southard at the University of Wisconsin. this technology is being used clinically to this day.
November 14, 2016
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New discovery could be a major advance for neurological diseases
Findings will have far-reaching implications for the understanding of memory
February 13, 2017
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New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis
Every year, millions of people are treated for cystitis, but despite its prevalence, the disease is still a scientific mystery. now a research team from University of Southern Denmark has succeeded in identifying how the bacteria responsible for the disease cause the disease to develop. this is a cause for optimism that more effective treatment methods can be developed.
August 30, 2016
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New discovery could potentially lead to treatments for Crohn's disease
Scientists at the University of British Columbia have made a discovery that could potentially lead to treatments for a debilitating complication of Crohn's disease.
September 2, 2016
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New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema
Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new disease gene that, when mutated, appears to increase the risk in a small number of people of developing emphysema and a lung-scarring condition known as pulmonary fibrosis.
August 10, 2016
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New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis
Most people have never heard of mastocytosis. it's a rare, sometimes deadly, immune disorder. now new research may help those with advanced mastocytosis and possibly many more people, too. "This is the first drug that's shown to be effective in this very rare disease," says Tracy George, MD, at the University of new Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center.
September 6, 2016
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New drug target could help prevent opioid tolerance and addiction
Researchers have identified a brain mechanism that could be a drug target to help prevent tolerance and addiction to opioid pain medication, such as morphine, according to a study by Georgia State University and Emory University.
August 23, 2016
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New Electrode Implants Wrap Around Nerves
Draper, an engineering company based in Cambridge, MA, has developed an electrode implant that may drastically improve how amputees control and feel through their prosthetic devices. Unlike other electrode arrays, Draper's device is designed to have the electrodes wrap around the nerves and not simply be placed against them. this should allow for a much more targeted and nuanced electrical stimulation that would in turn lead to greater dexterity and tactile awareness.
September 22, 2016
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New fluorescence microscopy approach improves image resolution by merging three views into one
Researchers have developed a new fluorescence microscopy approach that significantly improves image resolution by acquiring three views of a sample at the same time. Their new method is particularly useful for watching the dynamics of biological processes, which can provide insights into how healthy cells work and what goes wrong when diseases occur.
August 11, 2016
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New FSG article explains key terms linked to bioinks and bioprinting
Future Science Group (FSG) today announced the publication of a new article in Future Science OA looking to identify and define key terms associated with bioinks and bioprinting.
July 25, 2016
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New gene therapeutic approach could save people suffering from muscle wasting disease
A discovery by Washington State University scientist Dan Rodgers and collaborator Paul Gregorevic could save millions of people suffering from muscle wasting disease.
July 27, 2016
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New global Human Cell Atlas initiative could revolutionise diagnosis and treatment
An ambitious global initiative to create a Human Cell Atlas - a description of every cell in the human body as a reference map to accelerate progress in biomedical science - is being discussed at an International meeting in London this week. Ultimately, the Human Cell Atlas would revolutionise how doctors and researchers understand, diagnose and treat disease.
October 14, 2016
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New 'GPS' neuron discovered
A new type of neuron that might play a vital role in humans' ability to navigate their environments, report investigators. The discovery is an important step towards understanding how the brain codes navigation behavior at larger scales and could potentially open up new treatment strategies for people with impaired topographical orientation like Alzheimer's patients.
May 29, 2017
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New guidelines provide recommendations for prevention and management of surgical site infections
A Loyola Medicine surgeon is first author of new guidelines for the prevention, detection and management of surgical site infections, which affect as many as 300,000 patients per year in the United States.
January 19, 2017
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New HemaApp uses smartphone camera to screen for anemia
In the developing world, anemia -- a blood condition exacerbated by malnutrition or parasitic disease -- is a staggeringly common health problem that often goes undiagnosed.
September 7, 2016
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'New human rights' proposed to fend off thought theft and brain control. Hello, 1984!
During the last century, science managed to make gigantic leaps in understanding how the human brain functions. Unfortunately, the majority of the most significant experiments and researches were carried out on Nazi captives, within the dark halls of concentration camps. Cutting through people's brains and exposing them to highly inhumane stimulations showed us a lot about how we think, memorize, perceive, etc.
April 27, 2017
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New imaging method helps observe activation of neural circuits in the brain
Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other is the ultimate dream of neuroscientists! a new imaging method now makes it possible to observe the activation of large neural circuits, currently up to the size of a small-animal brain, in real time and three dimensions.
October 14, 2016
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New insights into epidermal cells could explain how skin maintains barrier when shedding
The discovery of the shape and binding capability of epidermal cells could explain how skin maintains a barrier even when it is shedding.
November 30, 2016
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New insights on how fatigue impacts performance
Due to its common usage, the word fatigue has so many meanings that it is essentially meaningless. we propose fatigue be considered a symptom that indicates a decline in work capacity due to actual and perceived reductions in performance capabilities. the level of fatigue reported by an individual person indicates the size of the reduction indicates how much their work capacity has been lowered.
December 2, 2016
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New IU study finds neutral attitudes toward bisexual men and women
While positive attitudes toward gay men and lesbians have increased over recent decades, a new study led by researchers at IU's Center for Sexual Health Promotion shows attitudes toward bisexual men and women are relatively neutral, if not ambivalent.
October 30, 2016
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New light-sensing molecule discovered in the fruit fly brain
The discovery could help inform future research into degenerative retinal disorders.
May 10, 2017
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New mathematical model provides 'disease causation index'
Patients with complex diseases have a higher risk of developing another. Multi-morbidity represents a huge problem in everyday clinical practice, because it makes it more difficult to provide successful treatment. by analysing data from all over Austria, scientists have managed to develop a mathematical model that can be used to distinguish whether a disease has a genetic or environmental cause.
December 27, 2016
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New mathematical models show critical tipping point for swelling of brain cells
When brain cells don't get enough energy, caused by a stroke or trauma, they can start swelling rapidly. new mathematical models of this mechanism, developed by Koen Dijkstra of the University of Twente in the Netherlands, show a critical tipping point: at lower energy levels, there is no way back.
March 23, 2017
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New medication shows promise against liver fibrosis in animal studies
A new drug developed by scientists at the National Institutes of Health limits the progression of liver fibrosis in mice, a hopeful advance against a condition for which there is no current treatment and that often leads to serious liver disease in people with chronic alcoholism and other common diseases.
July 27, 2016
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New mice study identifies trick to enhance memories
Imagine if playing a new video game or riding a rollercoaster could help you prepare for an exam or remember other critical information.
September 7, 2016
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New minimally invasive approach to diagnose hyperparathyroidism
Almost all of us have four parathyroid glands, located next to the thyroid gland in the neck. they are an organ only the size of a grain of rice, but critical for controlling our body's calcium levels. Unfortunately, hyperparathyroidism - when an excess of parathyroid hormone is produced - goes undiagnosed or diagnosed late.
October 22, 2016
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New model of Williams syndrome may shed light on neurobiology of the human social brain
In a study spanning molecular genetics, stem cells and the sciences of both brain and behavior, researchers at University of California San Diego, with colleagues at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and elsewhere, have created a neurodevelopmental model of a rare genetic disorder that may provide new insights into the underlying neurobiology of the human social brain.
August 11, 2016
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New Modular Wheelchair Design with Pneumatic Height Adjustment
Phil Eaglesham, a Corporal in the UK's Royal Marine Commandos, caught Q fever while serving in Afghanistan and lost his ability to walk due to the disease. He partnered with the Medical Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre to overcome some of the downsides of existing wheelchairs and create a new useful mobility device.
January 3, 2017
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New molecular mechanism may explain pain relieving drug's diverse benefits
Aspirin's ability to reduce the risk of both cardiovascular disease and colon cancer has been a welcome, yet puzzling, attribute of the pain reliever that has been a mainstay in medicine cabinets for more than 100 years.
September 7, 2016
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New mutation predisposes patients under osteoporosis treatment to atypical femur fractures, study finds
A team of researchers of the University of Barcelona and the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) have discovered a new mutation that has an impact on the bone so that it is vulnerable to the bisphosphonate, a drug used to treat osteoporosis.
May 4, 2017
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New nanoallergen technology could help provide clear, accurate assessment of peanut allergies
Researchers have developed a novel platform to more accurately detect and identify the presence and severity of peanut allergies, without directly exposing patients to the allergen, according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
June 27, 2017
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New NIAAA strategic plan aims to advance alcohol research across a broad spectrum of areas
As scientific advances continue to expand our understanding of how alcohol affects human health and point to new ways to address alcohol-related harm, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has released its 2017-2021 strategic plan for research.
May 15, 2017
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New NJR report highlights that patient factors can have major impact on revision of hip replacements
Younger joint replacement patients, who are likely to be more active, may put more strain on their implants and increase the risk of revision, a new report published today (Tuesday 13 September 2016) has said.
September 13, 2016
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New non-drug approach may help manage pain in individuals receiving addiction treatment
It's a Catch-22 with potentially deadly consequences: People trying to overcome addiction can't get treatment for their pain, because the most powerful pain medicines also carry an addiction risk.
July 27, 2016
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New nonsurgical approach shows promise in treating adolescent athletes with VCD
A new study shows that a novel, nonsurgical approach to treating vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) can help 3 out of 4 adolescent athletes, who did not respond to conventional therapy, breathe better during training and competition. Vocal cord dysfunction (also known as exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction) is a common condition characterized by the throat inexplicably closing during rigorous exercise. It can dramatically increase breathing difficulty, diminish performance and often causes panic in those who experience it.

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New optical nanosensor enables spatiotemporal mapping of the brain with improved accuracy
Neuronal activity results in the release of ionized potassium into extracellular space. Under active physiological and pathological conditions, elevated levels of potassium need to be quickly regulated to enable subsequent activity. this involves diffusion of potassium across extracellular space as well as re-uptake by neurons and astrocytes.
February 23, 2017
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New paper provides insights into impact of music therapy on anxiety of surgical patients
A new paper published in the September 2016 issue of the AORN Journal provides insights into the impact of implementing a music therapy program for surgical patients.
September 13, 2016
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New partnership funds research studies that aim to improve quality of palliative care for people with MND
Marie Curie and the Motor Neurone Disease (MND) Association have today announced the funding of three new research studies that aim to improve the quality of palliative and end of life care received by people with MND.
March 23, 2017
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New partnership to provide clinicians with latest guidance on treating endocrine disorders
The Endocrine Society and Medscape announced today a new partnership that brings together the Society's expertise and Medscape's innovative, peer-to-peer digital platforms and award-winning content to provide clinicians with the latest guidance and most relevant insights on diagnosing and treating diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, infertility, and other endocrine disorders.
March 31, 2017
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New pathway towards treatments for inflammatory diseases
A molecule thought to play a key role in some inflammatory diseases can be switched off by two widely used medicines, new research has shown. Scientists have identified a new biochemical pathway that can be controlled using metformin - a medicine used by diabetics to control blood sugar levels - and salicylate - the main ingredient in aspirin.
November 9, 2016
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New possibilities in malaria drug development
Bringing three powerful chemical groups together offers new possibilities in drug development.
March 8, 2016
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New program may help overcome barriers to identifying live kidney donors
A new program may help overcome common barriers to finding living kidney donors. the program will be highlighted at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL.
November 17, 2016
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New project focuses on development of social robot to help people with acquired brain injury
Improving the autonomy and care of dependent people with acquired brain injury is the scientific and technological challenge of the Retogar project led by researchers from the University of Alicante Institute for Computer Engineering Research (IUII), Miguel Cazorla and José García. These experts started in January and will be focusing on the project through 2019, with virtual reality applications and 3D interfaces, as well as sensors to monitor the movements of this type of patients.
June 29, 2017
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New portable device can quickly find markers of sepsis from single drop of blood
A new portable device can quickly find markers of deadly, unpredictable sepsis infection from a single drop of blood.
July 3, 2017
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New Radioactive Tracer Lights Up Brain's Connections to Study Disorders
Various brain disorders change the physical nature of synapses in the brain, but this fact has been useless in clinical practice because evaluating these changes could only be done once the patient passes away. now researchers at Yale University have developed a technique, published on in journal Science Translational Medicine, that relies on PET (positron emission tomography) and a novel tracer to image billions of synapses at the same time.
July 21, 2016
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New report explores safety of inks used for tattoos and permanent makeup
Tattoos are becoming ever more popular. In the EU, the number of people with tattoos has increased from 5% in 2003 to 12% in 2016 (60 million people in the EU-28), with at least half of them having more than one tattoo. a new JRC report explores the safety and regulation of the inks used for tattoos and permanent makeup.
August 19, 2016
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New research could lead to improved therapies for global parasitic disease
Recently published research from Iowa State University biomedical scientists details new methods for studying a parasitic nematode that sickens millions worldwide, a development that could lead to improved therapies.
May 9, 2017
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New research defines impact of cannabis on health
A report published this week consolidated all evidence published since 1999 regarding the therapeutic benefits and health risks associated with cannabis and cannabis-derived products, such as marijuana.Marijuana plant
January 13, 2017
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New research design offers way to assess safety of approved drugs
As the pace of drug approvals accelerates and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) faces potential budget cuts, a new research design from Perelman School of Medicine scientists offers a new way to successfully assess safety of newly approved drugs, as well as drugs that have been on the market for a long time and have had a marked rise in their use.
June 9, 2017
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New research finds link between misbehavior on and off field for NFL players
New research conducted at UT Dallas found NFL players who drew the most penalties also had more criminal arrests than their teammates.
January 10, 2017
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New research finds optimum time to study for college students
A new cognitive research study used two new approaches to determine ranges of start times that optimize functioning for undergraduate students. Based on a sample of first and second year university students, the University of Nevada, Reno and the Open University in the United Kingdom used a survey-based, empirical model and a neuroscience-based, theoretical model to analyse the learning patterns of each student to determine optimum times when cognitive performance can be expected to be at its peak.
April 12, 2017
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New research identifies mechanism that may lead to treatment of fibrosis in scleroderma
The prognosis for patients diagnosed with scleroderma - an autoimmune disease characterized by fibrosis of the skin - is not typically a rosy one. with limited treatment options available, those suffering from the disorder can face disabling hardening and tightening of their skin. Scleroderma can also affect the blood vessels, lungs and other internal organs.
October 30, 2016
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New research offers crucial step towards understanding cause of myopathy
Pioneering research using the tropical zebrafish could provide new insights into the genetic basis of myopathy, a type of human muscle disease.
July 6, 2017
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New research reveals link between fluid volume and temperature during hard work in hot weather
New research from the University of Montana demonstrates a unique relationship between fluid volume and fluid temperature during arduous work in the heat. the study, published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, indicated that an ice slurry/water mixture was as effective as ambient water even when consumed in half the quantity. Investigators also emphasized the importance of rest.
October 19, 2016
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New research reveals link between sickle cell trait and increased risk of developing kidney failure
New research indicates that being born with one copy of the sickle gene puts an individual at elevated risk for developing kidney failure requiring dialysis. the findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), may have important public policy implications for genetic counseling for individuals with sickle cell trait (SCT).
March 10, 2017
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New research seeks to find most effective medication for preventing life-threatening clot
Every year in the United States, thousands of high-risk fracture patients who have been admitted to trauma centers will suffer life-threatening blood clots related to the fracture. In rare cases these clots can even travel to the lungs, where they can cause sudden death.
September 16, 2016
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New research sheds light on inner mechanisms underlying learning and memory
New research published online in the FASEB Journal sheds important light on the inner workings of learning and memory. Specifically, scientists show that a plasma membrane protein, called Efr3, regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor-tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling pathway (BNDF-TrkB) and affects the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus of adult brains. In turn, this generation of new neurons plays a significant role in learning and memory.
May 11, 2017
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New research shows how to prevent prions from growing into deadly diseases
Prion diseases are scary, incurable and fatal. they first gained notoriety when cows became infected by prion proteins and, in turn, infected people. Fervor surrounding mad cow disease resulted in the U.S. banning imports of beef from the European Union for 15 years.
March 21, 2017
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New review finds link between exposure to alcohol marketing and youth drinking behavior
A new analysis of 12 long-term studies published since 2008 from across the globe finds that young people under the legal drinking age who are more exposed to alcohol marketing appear more likely to start drinking early and also to engage in binge drinking.
January 10, 2017
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New risk factors for anxiety disorders
Several newly discovered variants of a gene increase the risk of developing anxiety disorders. a research team aims to derive new therapies from this finding which are better tailored to the individual patients.
February 24, 2017
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New sensor technology could speed up blood test analysis
A new sensor has been developed that is capable of detecting multiple proteins and enzymes in a small volume of blood, which could significantly speed up diagnostic healthcare processes.
September 14, 2016
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New sensors can detect single protein molecules
Modified carbon nanotubes could be used to track protein production by individual cells
January 24, 2017
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New Spine Stimulation Device Provides Pain Relief
High-frequency therapy helps block pain signals better than low-frequency treatments, study finds
November 9, 2016
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New studies uncover socioeconomic disparities linked to health of lupus patients
Two new studies have uncovered socioeconomic disparities related to the health of patients with lupus. a study in Arthritis & Rheumatology found a link between poverty and worse disease-associated medical complications over time, and a study in Arthritis Care & Research discovered that the frequency of adverse pregnancy outcomes in Black and Hispanic patients with lupus is higher than that in White women with the disease.
May 8, 2017
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New study explains brain mechanisms linked to lack of sensitivity to music
Researchers from the Cognition and Cerebral Plasticity group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute and the University of Barcelona (IDIBELL-UB), in collaboration with researchers from the University of McGill (Montreal), have published a new study in which brain mechanisms associated to the lack of sensitivity to music are explained.
November 17, 2016
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New study explores circadian timekeeping to create genetic knock-out rescue mice
A new study from the laboratory of Hiroki Ueda at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center investigates circadian timekeeping with a novel approach to creating genetic knock-out rescue mice. Published in Molecular Cell, the study shows how this technique was used to quickly create numerous mouse lines, each with different mutations in a circadian regulator called CRY1. Studying each mutation and the effects on behavior showed that specific changes to the protein affected the duration of the circadian period.
December 22, 2016
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New study finds link between PTSD and metabolic syndrome, cortical thickness
Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of cardiometabolic conditions, may be a biological mechanism linking posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to structural brain abnormalities, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry. the findings highlight the need to develop effective interventions for PTSD to treat not only the symptoms associated with the disorder, but also potential ensuing metabolic and neurodegenerative consequences, which may be suggestive of premature aging.
August 31, 2016
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New study finds link between memory mechanisms and resistance to epilepsy
A new study undertaken jointly by researchers from the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa and European researchers, published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, exposes a new biological mechanism that, on the one hand, damages a very specific type of memory, but at the same time provides resistance to epilepsy. Research student Elham Taha from the laboratory of Prof. Kobi Rosenblum, who undertook the research, explains: "In both healthy and sick brains, the relationship between the activities of the nerve cells that cause the transfer of information and activities delaying the transmission of information is extremely important.
November 24, 2016
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New study finds opioid dependence affects perception of cute images of babies
A new pilot study has found that opioid dependence - which includes dependence on drugs such as heroin - affects how 'cute' we perceive images of children to be. as cuteness can trigger caregiving motivation, this result indicates that the opioid system may have significant effects on our ability to care for others.
September 19, 2016
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New study in Baltimore finds larger mosquito populations in lower-income neighborhoods
A new study published in the Journal of Medical Entomology reports that in Baltimore, Maryland, neighborhoods with high levels of residential abandonment are hotspots for tiger mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus). This environmental injustice may leave low-income urban residents more vulnerable to mosquito-borne disease.
June 30, 2017
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New study investigates ways to increase protein intake in older people living in the community
A new study from Bournemouth University has investigated how to increase protein intake in older people living in the community. The study found that for the majority of people a simple intervention, such as adding sauce to a lunch meal, made a significant difference. Importantly, the effects were sustained in the following meal too.
July 10, 2017
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New study provides reassuring information about safety of osteoporosis drug
A new study provides reassuring information about the short-term and long-term safety of denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that is used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis.
March 17, 2017
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New study raises serious safety concerns in clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver injury
Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. Caspase inhibitors have therapeutic potential to treat and prevent apoptosis-mediated liver injury, and some are currently in clinical trials.
October 20, 2016
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New study re-writes parts of the rulebook on evolution of mammalian brains
A new study involving The University of Queensland, which might be useful for biomedical research, re-writes parts of the rulebook on how mammalian brains - including our own - could have evolved.
July 4, 2017
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New study reveals endocrine biological function of brown adipose tissue
Brown adipose tissue -main organ generating heat in the body- is also an endocrine organ that secretes signaling factors that activate the fat and carbohydrates metabolism.
September 28, 2016
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New study shows how developing brain learns to recognize and react to subtle sensory signals
A new study describes a key mechanism in the brain that allows animals to recognize and react when subtle sensory signals that might not seem important on their own occur simultaneously. Such "multisensory integration" (MSI) is a vital skill for young brains to develop, said the authors of the paper in , because it shapes how effectively animals can make sense of their surroundings.
March 23, 2017
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New study shows strong link between childhood obesity and hip diseases
Significant hip deformities affect around 1 in 500 children. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain, and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood.
July 7, 2017
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New study suggests increased levels of hypocretin in the brain may play role in cocaine addiction
A new study from scientists at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), funded by the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), suggests that increased levels of a molecule in the brain, called hypocretin, may contribute to cocaine addiction.
August 10, 2016
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New study to explore link between sleep and chronic pain
Washington State University will lead a study to understand the relationship between sleep and chronic pain, part of a nationwide effort to address the rising abuse of opioid pain relievers and expand the arsenal of non-drug treatment options.
December 5, 2016
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New study to explore ways of helping chronic pain patients get back to work
Researchers from the University of Warwick's Medical School are leading a novel study to explore ways of helping people with chronic pain back to work.
November 16, 2016
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New survey shows one-third of students experience high levels of psychological distress
More than one in three - an estimated 328,000 -- Ontario students in grades seven to 12 report moderate-to-serious psychological distress, according to new survey results from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). Girls are twice as likely as boys to experience psychological distress.
July 21, 2016
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New technique for identifying illicit drugs can provide high sensitivity and rapid results
For the identification of illicit drugs in forensic toxicological casework, analysis can be delayed and potentially compromised due to lengthy sample preparation. However a new technique has been developed that can provide high sensitivity and fast results.
November 16, 2016
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New technique improves accuracy, reduces costs of real-time assessment of kidney function
A new technique developed by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab promises to improve accuracy and lower costs of real-time assessment of kidney function, reports an article published this week by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in the Journal of Biomedical Optics.
May 5, 2017
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New technology can instantly provide in-field characterization of unknown liquids
A new company will commercialize sensing technology invented at Harvard University that can perform instant, in-field characterization of the chemical make-up and material properties of unknown liquids.
August 04, 2016
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New technology may help scientists better understand circadian rhythm in individual cells
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Georgia has developed a new technology that may help scientists better understand how an individual cell synchronizes its biological clock with other cells.
November 3, 2016
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New technology platform propels the use of 'organs-on-chips'
A novel technology platform has been developed that enables the continuous and automated monitoring of so-called 'organs-on-chips' -- tiny devices that incorporate living cells to mimic the biology of bona fide human organs.
March 8, 2017
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New test could lead to early diagnosis and effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury
A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion, according to Peter J. Bergold, PhD, professor of physiology and pharmacology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and corresponding author of a study newly published online by the Journal of Neurotrauma.
February 16, 2017
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New test reveals the truth about how much urine is in swimming pools
Scientists have designed a new way of testing the amount of urine present in swimming pools, according to a Canadian study.
February 23, 2017
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New therapy for osteoporosis provides protection against bone fractures in postmenopausal women
A recent analysis of results from a randomized controlled clinical trial indicates that abaloparatide-SC, a novel therapy for osteoporosis, provides consistent protection against bone fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis regardless of their baseline bone density, age, and previous history of fracture.
September 19, 2016
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New therapy to treat spinal cord injuries shows improvements in motor function
A new therapy to treat spinal cord injuries in people who have lost all motor and sensory function below the injury site shows additional motor function improvement at 6-months and 9-months following treatment with 10 million AST-OPC1. the positive efficacy results from an ongoing research study were announced on Jan. 24 in a conference held by Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc., the biotechnology company that manufactures AST-OPC1.
January 24, 2017
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New tool accurately predicts risk of chronic disease
Chronic illness affects millions of people in the United States every year and accounts for a large proportion of the total number of deaths. new research proposes a clinical tool that can be used to accurately predict the risk of chronic disease.
March 17, 2017
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New treatment offers hope for kidney failure and transplant patients with rare disorder
A novel treatment offers kidney failure and kidney transplant patients with a rare disorder new hope. the treatment allows targeted elimination of plasma cell clones producing abnormal proteins that deposits in the kidneys and leads to kidney failure, according to new research.
May 3, 2017
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New treatment option could provide effective therapy for patients with dermatologic conditions
Alopecia areata, atopic dermatitis and vitiligo are highly visible dermatologic conditions that can have a negative effect on patients' quality of life and overall health. An emerging treatment option, however, could provide effective therapy for patients with these conditions.
March 3, 2017
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New treatment receives FDA approval to reduce complications of sickle cell disease
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Endari (L-glutamine oral powder) for patients age five years and older with sickle cell disease to reduce severe complications associated with the blood disorder.
July 7, 2017
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New treatment strategies increase lifespan of transplanted kidneys
New treatment strategies over the last few decades have meant that nowadays 95% of transplanted kidneys function well for at least one year and that the average lifespan of a transplanted organ is between 10 and 15 years. In 1989, one in five kidneys was no longer functional after one year.
May 29, 2017
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New urine test could potentially reduce fatigue-related mistakes
Doctors, pilots, air traffic controllers and bus drivers have at least one thing in common – if they're exhausted at work, they could be putting lives at risk. But the development of a new urine test, reported in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, could help monitor just how weary they are. the results could potentially reduce fatigue-related mistakes by allowing workers to recognize when they should take a break.
November 30, 2016
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New Way to Detect Brain Injury in NFL Players?
The goal: to spot early signs of concussion-related head trauma
November 28, 2016
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New, improved microcontact printing technology offers big hope for disease detection
OIST researchers develop a simple printing method to create effective disease detection tools.
June 30, 2017
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Newly discovered micro-gene may protect against epilepsy
Epilepsy affects tens of millions of people worldwide, but the causes of epileptic seizures remain largely unknown. New research may have found a micro-gene that explains why some brains develop epileptic seizures while others do not.
June 6, 2017
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Next-generation nanoparticle nasal spray for drug delivery to the brain
Delivering life-saving drugs directly to the brain in a safe and effective way is a challenge for medical providers. One key reason: the blood-brain barrier, which protects the brain from tissue-specific drug delivery. Methods such as an injection or a pill aren't as precise or immediate as doctors might prefer, and ensuring delivery right to the brain often requires invasive, risky techniques.
April 12, 2017
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NIAID scientists discover rare genetic susceptibility to common cold
Unusual case provides insight into leading cause of acute illness worldwide.
June 12, 2017
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Night time sleep problems increase risk of suicidal thoughts and attempts
The link between sleep problems and suicidal thoughts and behaviours is made starkly clear in new research from the University of Manchester, published in the BMJ Open.
August 24, 2016
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NIH announces 2017-2018 Medical Research Scholars Program Class
The National Institutes of Health has selected 42 talented and diverse students, representing 35 U.S.-accredited universities, for the sixth class of its Medical Research Scholars Program (MRSP). the MRSP received a record number of applications during the 2017-2018 application cycle. the 42 selected participants consist of 39 medical, two dental, and one veterinary student; 48 percent are female and eight individuals are from underrepresented minority groups. There are five second year, 35 third, and two fourth year students in the class; six of the 42 have had previous NIH research experience. the accepted scholars begin their MRSP fellowship in July/August of this year.
May 10, 2017
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NIH announces winners of public-private undergraduate biomedical engineering design competition
Teams designed devices targeting health care problems and underserved communities.
August 23, 2016
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NIH begins study of vaccine to protect against mosquito-borne diseases
Experimental vaccine targets mosquito saliva.
February 21, 2017
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NIH Common Fund announces 2016 High-Risk, High-Reward Research awards
NIH to fund 88 awards on high-impact biomedical research.
October 4, 2016
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NIH contributes to global effort to prevent and manage lung diseases
NIH-funded trial will measure health benefits of clean cookstoves.
October 19, 2016
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NIH designates $42.7 million for food allergy research consortium
Consortium will continue seeking food allergy treatment strategies over next seven years.
March 31, 2017
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NIH initiates pilot grant program for innovative neurological research
Pilot award strategy designed to enhance funding stability to researchers.
January 26, 2017
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NIH led researchers develop software that could facilitate drug development
A team of researchers led by a National Institutes of Health investigator, Teresa Przytycka, Ph.D., has developed a new software tool called AptaTRACE that could be an important advance for drug developers and other scientists who want to identify molecules that bind with high precision to targets of interest.
July 29, 2016
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NIH names Dr. Joshua Gordon director of the National Institute of Mental Health
National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., announced today the selection of Joshua A. Gordon, M.D., Ph.D., as director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Dr. Gordon is expected to join NIH in September.
July 28, 2016
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NIH researchers identify novel role for Hsp60 protein in tissue regeneration and wound healing
National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a novel role for a gene known as heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), finding that it is critical in tissue regeneration and wound healing. the study found that topical treatment of an Hsp60-containing gel dramatically accelerates wound closure in a diabetic mouse model.
October 27, 2016
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NIH researchers trace origin of blood-brain barrier 'sentry cells'
Finding in zebrafish may contribute to understanding cognitive decline of aging.
April 11, 2017
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NIH researchers unveil new wound-healing role for protein-folding gene in mice
National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a novel role for a gene known as heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), finding that it is critical in tissue regeneration and wound healing. the study found that topical treatment of an Hsp60-containing gel dramatically accelerates wound closure in a diabetic mouse model.
October 27, 2016
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NIH statement on World Malaria day -- April 25, 2017
Statement of B. Fenton Hall, M.D., Ph.D., and Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
April 25, 2017
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NIH study determines key differences between allergic and non-allergic dust mite proteins
Finding may lead to better therapies for individuals with dust mite allergies.
October 19, 2016
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NIH to recognize 12 champions of environmental health research
Awards are part of the NIEHS 50th anniversary celebration.
October 7, 2016
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NIH-sponsored expert panel issues clinical guidelines to prevent peanut allergy
Recommendations focus on introducing peanut-containing foods to infants.
January 5, 2017
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Nine effective home remedies for earache
People may think that earaches are just a minor nuisance, but they can cause debilitating pain. While waiting for medical care or for antibiotics to work, some home remedies can help.
June 23, 2017
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Nine possible complications of ankylosing spondylitis
Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that often lasts a lifetime. Anyone diagnosed with the condition should be aware of the complications that it presents to health.
May 18, 2017
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Nine ways to treat and prevent razor burn
Shaving with a razor is one of the quickest and most cost-effective ways to remove facial or body hair. However, one of the disadvantages of this method of hair removal is the risk of razor burn.
July 4, 2017
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Nipple piercing infection: Risks and side effects
Nipple piercings are popular but can be risky. The nipple is a sensitive part of the body, and piercings need to be treated with care.
June 29, 2017
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NIST study details challenges faced by people with mobility impairments during emergency evacuation
An announcement comes over the office public address system: "A fire has been reported in the building. this is not a drill. Please move to the nearest stairwell and exit the building."
August 26, 2016
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Nitrogen doped bimodal cellular structure activated carbon produced
Phenol-urea-formaldehyde (PUF) organic foam were used as precusors for the new monolithic nitrogen-containing microporous cellular activated carbons production. Carbonization and CO2 activation were used to prepare this novel monolithic nitrogen-containing activated carbon foam with both interconnected macroporous and micro/meso- porosity structures from the developed PUF organic foam.
December 29, 2016
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No added benefit proven for pulmonary arterial hypertension drug, IQWiG finds
Selexipag is approved for long-term treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in adults with moderate to severe symptoms. the drug can be used either as combination therapy with other blood-pressure lowering drugs or as monotherapy in patients who are not candidates for these therapies
October 7, 2016
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No benefit in treating mildly low thyroid function in pregnancy, NIH network study finds
There appears to be no benefit to treating mildly low thyroid function during pregnancy, according to a study by a National Institutes of Health research network.
March 1, 2017
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Nocturia is the top cause of sleep disturbance
'On World Sleep day sleep experts encourage people to understand the value of healthy and solid sleep. In particular, if they need to go to the toilet more than once in the night they have nocturia, a condition which affects one in three adults over the age of 30 and two thirds of adults over the age of 65.'.
March 17, 2017
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Non-Destructive Nanowire Technology Could Quicken Development of Drugs to Treat Neurological Diseases
Nanowires capable of recording the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail have been developed by a research team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego. this new nanowire technology could be a futuristic platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable scientists to properly understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.
April 12, 2017
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Non-destructive screening method enables quick, safe identification of pharmaceutical tablet properties
Information on significant properties of pharmaceutical tablets, such as their mechanical strength and dissolution, can now be obtained without resorting to the conventional, time-consuming and destructive testing methods, according to a new study completed at the University of Eastern Finland. a new structural descriptive parameter based on terahertz (THz) time-domain techniques allow for a non-invasive detection of pharmaceutical tablet parameters, constituting a research breakthrough in the field of pharmacy.
January 10, 2017
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Non-invasive technique for examining fatty tissues could revolutionize medicinal drug testing
That's the hope of Associate Professor Noriyuki Yanaka and researchers at Hiroshima University who have developed a non-invasive way to assess the anti-inflammatory properties of fortified health foods and medications.
January 31, 2017
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Non-invasive technology from EarlySense allows people to accurately monitor their sleep at home
EarlySense, the market leader in contact-free continuous monitoring solutions, announced today new research that confirms high accuracy of its home consumer sensor when compared to polysomnography (PSG), the testing process used in clinics around the world to detect sleeping disorders. the peer-reviewed study, published in the December issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, found 92.5% agreement between LIVE by EarlySense and the PSG system.
January 16, 2017
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Non-professional forums on the internet for suicidal people can facilitate psychological improvement
Numerous offerings are available on the Internet for suicidal people desperately seeking advice. These can be divided into professional offerings run by crisis centres and those operated by non-professionals. Even the latter can help to improve the subjective situation, so long as they are so-called "anti-suicide forums".
November 11, 2016
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Nova Southeastern University hosts international conference organized by IACFS/ME
Chronic fatigue syndrome, sometimes referred to as myalgic encephalomyelitis, a mysterious, debilitating and misunderstood disease that affects an estimated 1 million Americans, will be the focus of an international conference on October 27-30, 2016. the biennial meeting targeting researchers, clinicians, patients and others impacted by CFS/ME, will be held at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
October 20, 2016
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Novartis presents new findings from global psoriasis survey at EADV Congress
Novartis presented new findings from the largest global survey to date of people with psoriasis, showing many do not achieve the treatment goal of clear skin or even believe it is a realistic goal. People with the disease also report that they face discrimination, humiliation, and mental illness, according to the research presented at the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Congress.
October 5, 2016
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Novel Femur Window Chamber Model for Long-Term Optical Access to Bone Marrow Compartment
The biological complexity of bone marrow is driven by the diverse array of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells that orchestrate intricate biological activities, such as immune and tumor regulation, as well as hematopoiesis. Observing and tracking the complex cellular interactions and activities within the bone marrow niche are limited by currently available techniques, such as blood counts and histology, which use a "snapshot" of static evidence to infer such dynamics in vivo.
August 09, 2016
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Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice
More than half of children with epilepsy outgrow their seizures, yet the mechanism underlying this remission is unknown.
August 26, 2016
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Novel procedure to seal off lymphatic fluid leaks improves symptoms in patients with single-ventricle disease
Focusing on a rare but devastating complication in patients with single-ventricle heart disease, a research team has revealed the role of leakage from the liver's lymphatic system, and used a novel procedure to seal off those leaks and improve symptoms in patients.
June 29, 2017
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Novel risk genes for bipolar disorder
Researchers conducted a genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder (BD), and identified novel risk genes. One of these genes (FADS) is related to lipid metabolism (e.g., omega3/6 polyunsaturated fatty acids); therefore, they concluded that lipid abnormality may be involved in BD pathophysiology. Elucidating an independent association between these two phenotypes provides a foundation for new therapeutic strategies.
January 26, 2017
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Novel small molecule tracer for PET imaging spots blood clots
Blood clots in veins and arteries can lead to heart attack, stroke, and pulmonary embolism, which are major causes of mortality. In the featured article of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's July 2017 issue, German researchers show that targeting GPIIb/IIIa receptors, the key receptor involved in platelet clumping, with a fluorine-18 labeled ligand is a promising approach for diagnostic imaging. Current imaging modalities rely on structural characteristics, such as vascular flow impairment, and do not address the critical molecular components.
July 6, 2017
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Novel study method identifies 15 genomic regions associated with depression
Data from consumer genomic analysis company identifies sites of potential risk genes
August 1, 2016
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NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use
A chance observation in a Southern California fast food restaurant led Luis Martinez, Ph.D., to wonder about the connections behind wound healing problems and methamphetamine use.
August 19, 2016
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NYU Lutheran offers many treatment options for kidney stone sufferers
Frederick A. Gulmi, MD, chief of urology at NYU Lutheran, cautions anyone who has never had a bout with kidney stones.
August 24, 2016
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NYU scientists find that emotional brain states can persist for long periods of time
Emotional experiences can induce physiological and internal brain states that persist for long periods of time after the emotional events have ended, a team of New York University scientists has found. this study, which appears in the journal Nature Neuroscience, also shows that this emotional "hangover" influences how we attend to and remember future experiences.
December 27, 2016
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Misc. - O

Obstructive sleep apnea can increase risk for PE recurrence
Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major risk for patients suffering from venous thromboembolism (VTE) and can often be fatal. While advanced age, lack of exercise, and obesity all contribute to PE, it has been hypothesized that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may also promote the formation of blood clots. Because VTE is a chronic condition with reoccurring episodes of PE, researchers wanted to examine how OSA affected the rate of repeat PE occurrence.
December 6, 2016
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OCD linked to inflammation in the brain
Obsessive-compulsive disorder is an intrusive condition that remains difficult to treat. This is due, in part, to the causes behind the disorder remaining hidden. Recent research, however, points the finger at brain inflammation.
June 22, 2017
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OCD May Be Linked to Inflammation in the Brain
Breakthrough could spur better treatments for anxiety disorder, researchers say
June 22, 2017
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Octobot: a Completely Soft and Flexible Robot May One day Invade Our Bodies
Harvard University researchers built what they describe as the world's first completely soft robot. the device looks like an octopus and is appropriately named Octobot. Though it resembles a toy, the core technology within it may one day be used for medical applications such as minimally invasive surgery and imaging of the GI tract.
August 25, 2016
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Older patients feel voiceless in decision-making process for dialysis, study finds
Starting dialysis treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) should be a shared decision made by an informed patient based on discussions with a physician and family members. However, many older dialysis patients say they feel voiceless in the decision-making process and are unaware of more conservative management approaches that could help them avoid initiating a treatment that reduces their quality of life, according to a study led by Tufts University researchers.
August 31, 2016
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One in three Australians report health problems from fragranced consumer products
Many people report health problems -- ranging from migraine headaches to asthma attacks -- when exposed to common fragranced consumer products such as air fresheners, cleaning products, laundry supplies, and personal care products.
March 6, 2017
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Online group therapy can be as effective as face-to-face treatment for bulimia nervosa
Eight years ago, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill launched a new kind of clinical trial to compare the effectiveness of online therapy - delivered through group chat sessions - to face-to-face group therapy for the treatment of bulimia nervosa, an eating disorder marked by recurrent episodes of binge eating (or eating an unusually large amount of food and feeling out of control) coupled with purging behaviors such as vomiting, laxative abuse, or excessive exercise.
November 30, 2016
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Online relapse prevention tool offers 'cheap accessible option' for people with bipolar disorder
An online relapse prevention tool for Bipolar Disorder offers a "cheap accessible option" for people seeking support following treatment, say researchers.
April 28, 2017
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Open-source research mechanism could lead to discovery of new, cheap medicines for malaria
Malaria is one of the leading causes of mortality in developing countries -- last year killing more than 400,000 people. Researchers worldwide have found the solution for drug discovery could lie in open, "crowd-sourced" science.
September 16, 2016
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Operational mechanism of Acid-sensing Ion Channel plays pivotal role in transmitting pain signals
Professor Byung-Chang Suh's research team from the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences succeeded in identifying a new operational mechanism principle of the 'Acid-sensing Ion Channel,' which recognizes internal pain in an organism.
September 13, 2016
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Opioid abuse following urologic surgery documented
About 1 in 1,111 patients who undergo urologic surgery experience opioid dependence or overdose, a study has found. Patients at highest risk were younger, underwent inpatient surgery, had longer hospital stays, were on Medicaid or Medicare or had a history of depression or COPD.
May 30, 2017
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Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows
Researchers from the University Health Network's Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) have determined that patients who have not had an opioid prescription within a year prior to their procedure are at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after major surgery.
August 11, 2016
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Opioid users treated in compulsory drug detention centre more likely to relapse, study shows
People with chronic opioid use disorders are more likely to relapse and do so sooner if they are treated in a compulsory drug detention centre rather than a voluntary drug treatment centre using methadone maintenance therapy, according to the first study comparing the outcome of both approaches published in the Lancet Global Health.
December 9, 2016
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Opioid-Related Deaths Might be Underestimated: CDC
Death certificates from drug-linked infections may not label painkillers as possible cause
April 25, 2017
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Oral allergy syndrome: Foods, symptoms, and treatments
Oral allergy syndrome is an allergic reaction that specifically affects the mouth, lips, tongue, and throat. It is related to allergic rhinitis, otherwise known as hay fever.
March 23, 2017
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Orthostatic hypotension: Causes, symptoms, and prevention
Orthostatic hypotension, also called postural hypotension, is defined as a sudden drop in blood pressure caused by a change in posture, such as when a person stands up quickly.
June 29, 2017
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OSA patients face elevated risk of perioperative complications
Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) face an elevated risk of perioperative complications; the risk is even higher if the diagnosis has not been made before surgery. this is so for many OSA patients.
July 28, 2016
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Osteoporosis: ACP update treatment guidelines for preventing bone fractures
To reduce the risk of hip and vertebral fractures in women with osteoporosis, physicians should treat them with the bisphosphonates risedronate, alendronate, or zoledronic acid, or alternatively with the biologic agent denosumab.
May 9, 2017
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Outdated medical imaging technology places patients at potential risk for safety
The age of the installed base of medical imaging equipment is continuing to decline dramatically, placing patients at avoidable risk. to draw attention to this deterioration in equipment and the potentially serious consequences, COCIR is launching a new infographic at the 3rd edition of the EuroSafe Imaging presence at the European Congress of Radiology (ECR).
March 19, 2017
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Overactive bladder: Signs and symptoms
The bladder is the organ that collects urine from the kidneys and expels it when it is full. Ideally, a person can control their bladder, when they choose to urinate, and the amount of times they urinate during the day. When a person has an overactive bladder, they cannot always control these functions.
March 30, 2017
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Overactive bladder: Symptoms, myths, and misconceptions
Overactive bladder is a common condition marked by symptoms relating to the frequency and urgency of urination.
April 6, 2017
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Oxford Instruments announces the Launch of the SampleProtect Measurement System for Sensitive Samples used in Spectroscopy Experiments
Oxford Instruments is pleased to announce the launch of the unique SampleProtect measurement system. It is ideal for ESD protection and is optimised for opto-electrical measurement experiments, ensuring sensitive samples are protected throughout the whole experiment. It also minimises the time taken to obtain first experimental results.
November 15, 2016
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Oxytocin levels affect synchronization in leader/follower relationship
When standing in a crowd at a concert, clapping hands along with the music on stage, it may be that people with higher levels of oxytocin are better synchronised with the beat of the music than those with lower levels of oxytocin.
December 9, 2016
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Oxytocin system may be key target for developing medications to treat opioid addiction
A new review of published research indicates that the oxytocin system--a key player in social reward and stress regulation--is profoundly affected by opioid use. Therefore, it may be an important target for developing medications to treat opioid addiction and to prevent relapse.
April 5, 2017
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Misc. - P

Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won't Spur Addiction
Sports may actually provide protective effect against opioid abuse
July 25, 2016
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Painkillers might not work if you are sleep deprived, study suggests
New research uncovers unexpected links between sleep deprivation and pain sensitivity. the findings may have significant implications for pain management therapies.
May 8, 2017
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Panel develops plan for preventing youth suicide
An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health has developed a 10-year roadmap for advancing research to prevent youth suicide. the panel listed 29 recommendations that address three critical issues: improving data systems, enhancing data collection and analysis methods, and strengthening the research and practice community.
October 4, 2016
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Parents face difficulty in choosing right allergy medication for their kids
Tulips, songbirds and itchy little eyes -- all are sure signs of spring.
April 17, 2017
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Parents with bipolar benefit from self-help tool
Online self-management support for parents with Bipolar Disorder leads to improvements in parenting and child behavior.
May 17, 2017
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Patent analysis reveals that saffron bioactives can be used to treat multiple disorders
Increased stress levels, sleep disorders and obesity have become hallmarks of present lifestyle. These conditions are often correlated with serious health problems such as cancer, diabetes, cerebral ischemia, stroke, etc. Due to huge costs of current medical treatments for managing such problems along with undesired side effects, people are looking for natural remedies.
March 27, 2017
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Patients Often Reject Drug-Only Psych Treatment
Compliance more likely when doctors prescribe talk therapy, study finds
March 6, 2017
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Patients with cLBP more likely to use illicit drugs, study reports
People living with chronic low back pain (cLBP) are more likely to use illicit drugs -- including marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine -- compared to those without back pain, reports a study in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer.
July 21, 2016
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Patients with family history of bipolar disorder more likely to engage in violence, study finds
A large population worldwide is affected by bipolar disorder and the heritability stands at around 80%.
February 3, 2017
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Patients with pulmonary embolism experience long term limitations to physical stamina
A multi-centre clinical study, led by Dr. Susan Kahn at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH), determined that nearly half of the patients who suffer a pulmonary embolism (PE) -- a blood clot in the lung -- experience long term limitations to their capacity for physical activity and that this had a negative impact on their quality of life.
March 21, 2017
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PCT screening could be promising tool to help shorten hospital stays, reduce costs for sepsis patients
New retrospective study in CHEST found procalcitonin testing at admission reduced the length of stay and total cost of care
January 10, 2017
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Pemphigoid: Symptoms, types, and treatment
Pemphigoid is a family of rare autoimmune conditions that causes blistering and rashes on the skin and mucous membranes.
June 21, 2017
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Penile Implant for Erectile Dysfunction Erects Itself When Heated
Researchers at University of Wisconsin-Madison recently reported on a new penile implant designed to help men with erectile dysfunction. the device relies on nitinol, a memory alloy composed of nickel and titanium that was developed at the now defunct Naval Ordnance Laboratory. the metal responds to temperature changes by changing its shape, and the implant takes a compact bent shape when at body temperature while erecting into an impressively straight shape once it is warmed up slightly.
January 17, 2017
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Penn researchers unravel missing steps involved in movement of cellular cargo
Every time a hormone is released from a cell, every time a neurotransmitter leaps across a synapse to relay a message from one neuron to another, the cell must undergo exocytosis. this is the process responsible for transporting cellular contents via lipid-encapsulated vesicles to the cell surface membrane and then incorporating or secreting them through membrane fusion.
January 24, 2017
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Penn scientists develop combined medical and surgical care plan for managing Crohn's disease
The first published combined medical and surgical care plan for managing septic perianal Crohn's disease, a serious complication that occurs in around 40 percent of Crohn's disease patients, has been developed by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. the plan and its results took more than a decade to develop and are based on patient outcomes.
August 23, 2016
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Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis
Psoriasis is a much-misunderstood disease, often kept under wraps by sufferers who want to hide their skin lesions. this week, Dr. Sara Ferguson, a dermatologist at Penn State Medical Group in State College, separates fact from myth about psoriasis and the various treatment options.
August 26, 2016
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Penn State scientists develop citrate-based fluorescent sensor for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis
Penn State biomaterials scientists have developed a new, inexpensive method for detecting salt concentrations in sweat or other bodily fluids. the fluorescent sensor, derived from citric acid molecules, is highly sensitive and highly selective for chloride, the key diagnostic marker in cystic fibrosis.
October 7, 2016
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Penn study provides explanation for link between social isolation and greatss
Social isolation has been linked to a wide range of health problems, as well as a shorter lifespan in humans and other animals. In fact, during a U.S. Senate hearing on aging issues this spring, a representative for the Gerontological Society of America urged lawmakers to support programs that help older adults stay connected to their communities, stating that social isolation is a "silent killer that places people at higher risk for a variety of poor health outcomes."
June 27, 2017
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Penn study sheds light on role of essential compound in maintaining optimal muscle function
Maintaining proper levels of an essential helper molecule is crucial for optimal muscle function, according to a study led by Joseph Baur, PhD, an assistant professor of Physiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. some athletes are already taking supplements to increase synthesis of this compound, called NAD, with the hopes of reversing the natural decay associated with aging of the mitochondria, the cell's powerhouses.
August 10, 2016
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Penn study shows synchronized refill program enhances medication adherence
Programs aimed at helping patients adhere to prescription medication regimens have become an area of interest for researchers as nearly half of patients do not take medications as prescribed. In a new study, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Humana Inc. show that a refill synchronization program - in which patients were able to receive all refills at the same time - increased medication adherence by more than 10 percent in some patient subgroups.
August 09, 2016
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PennTech® brand from SP Scientific get new, dedicated website
SP Scientific announces the launch of a new dedicated website for its PennTech® brand of advanced aseptic processing equipment for the pharmaceutical and biotech industries.
January 3, 2017
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People sensitive to sexual disgust more likely to make duty-based moral judgments, study suggests
Every person has both utilitarian (consequentialist) and Kantian (duty- or rule-based) moral intuitions, which are activated in different situations in different ways. the field of Moral Psychology studies these types of intuitions and the psychological factors behind them. the emotion of disgust has been found to influence the formation of moral judgments.
April 13, 2017
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People with bipolar disorder more than twice as likely to have suffered childhood adversity
People with bipolar disorder are more than twice as likely to have suffered childhood adversity. Bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme depressive and manic states which impair quality of life and increase suicide risk. An urgent need in this field is better understanding of risk factors that can be used to improve detection and treatment.
October 12, 2016
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People with burnout symptoms react faster to negative sounds of voice, study reveals
Approximately every fourth working aged Finn experiences symptoms of burnout that include exhaustion, cynicism and reduced professional efficacy and often also difficulties in concentration and memory.
April 10, 2017
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People with chronic tic disorder have higher suicide risk than general population
People with Tourette's disorder or chronic tic disorder are over four times more likely to die by suicide than the general population, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry. Dr. David Mataix-Cols of Karolinska Institute, Sweden, led the study of the largest group of patients with tic disorders in the world.
July 4, 2017
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People with epilepsy face increased risks of discrimination and other negative life events
In a recent analysis, people with epilepsy were seven-fold more likely to have reported experiencing discrimination due to health problems than the general population. this risk was greater than other chronic health problems such as diabetes, asthma and migraines.
September 19, 2016
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People with family history of alcoholism more likely to hold onto painful memory of hangovers
People with a family history of alcoholism are already known to be at a greater risk of developing a drinking problem, but new research led by Psychologist Dr Richard Stephens at Keele University has found they are also more likely to hold onto the painful memory of hangovers.
March 19, 2017
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People with PTSD appear to suffer from disrupted context processing, say researchers
For decades, neuroscientists and physicians have tried to get to the bottom of the age-old mystery of post-traumatic stress disorder, to explain why only some people are vulnerable and why they experience so many symptoms and so much disability.
October 7, 2016
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Peptide acts as mediator for learning
In order to adapt to changes in the environment, the brain produces new nerve cells even at adult age. These young neurons are crucial for memory formation and learning. Scientists have now discovered that a small peptide plays the role of a mediator in this process. In response to an external stimulus such as a varied environment, the mediator peptide boosts the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells.
April 7, 2017
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Periodic limb movement disorder: Symptoms and treatment
Periodic limb movement disorder is a condition characterized by repetitive movements of the limbs during sleep.
June 14, 2017
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PERK protein could be target for development of new drugs for progressive supranuclear palsy
The brain disease "progressive supranuclear palsy" is currently incurable and its symptoms can only be eased to a very limited degree. PSP impairs eye movements, locomotion, balance control, and speech. Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the Technical University of Munich have now discovered a molecular mechanism that may help in the search for effective treatments. Their study focusses on a protein called PERK. a team of researchers led by Prof. GHnger reports on this in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine.
February 6, 2017
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Pets Invaluable to Those with Mental Conditions
6 out of 10 patients put furry or feathered friends at the top of their support list, study finds
December 9, 2016
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Pharmacists with expanded role in patient oversight reduce hospital readmission rates, study shows
Pharmacists given an expanded role in patient oversight can reduce the likelihood of high-risk patients returning to the hospital, according to a new study that underscores a potential cost-saving solution for a growing physician shortage.
March 16, 2017
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Pheochromocytoma: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
Pheochromocytoma is a rare tumor that develops in the adrenal glands in the body.
July 3, 2017
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Philips unveils new products for healthy lifestyle at IFA 2016
At this year's Internationale Funkausstellung (IFA) in Berlin, Germany, Royal Philips today announced a range of new products that empower consumers to stay healthy, live well and enjoy life.
September 2, 2016
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Photovoice interventions could lead to complete recovery of sexual assault survivors
One out of every six American women has experienced a sexual assault or an attempted sexual assault or rape in her lifetime, according to the National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While more than half of female survivors of rape report symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), previous research has found that not all survivors respond to traditional treatments for PTSD, causing their symptoms to resurface over time.
November 22, 2016
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Physical Therapy Equals Surgery for Carpal Tunnel
Conservative approach should be the first option, researcher says
March 24, 2017
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Physician explains how poor or low-quality sleep hinders common resolutions
Making new Year's resolutions is easy. Keeping them – beyond a couple of weeks, at least – is tough.
January 20, 2017
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Pig-human hybrid brings us closer to barnyard organ factories
It's a big, ethically murky step, but pig-human organs are still far away.
January 27, 2017
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Pill Expands In Stomach to Stay for Weeks Delivering Medication
Many drugs require precise ingestion regimens that optimize the effect of the medication, but getting patients to follow the schedule is often easier said than done. Additionally, some drugs may work better if only they could be delivered continuously in small doses, over a period of days or weeks.
November 17, 2016
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Pillbox for Windows 10 helps you remember your medication
Pillbox is a Windows 10 app designed to be a simple and user-friendly alarm application that reminds you to take daily medication.
March 28, 2017
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Pilonidal cyst: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
A pilonidal cyst develops in the cleft between the buttocks. Just as any other cyst, a pilonidal cyst can become infected and pus-filled.
June 19, 2017
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Pitt researchers shed more light on neurobiology of reading
Reading is a relatively modern and uniquely human skill. for this reason, visual word recognition has been a puzzle for neuroscientists because the neural systems responsible for reading could not have evolved for this purpose.
July 21, 2016
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Pittcon conference registration opens for 2017
The Registration Committee today announced that conferee registration is now open for Pittcon 2017, the world's premier annual conference and exposition for laboratory science. the event will be held March 5-9, 2017, at the West Hall of McCormick Place, Chicago, IL.
October 4, 2016
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Pittcon to co-program at JASIS international symposium
Pittcon is pleased to once again co-program at JASIS, one of the largest Asian exhibitions for analytical and scientific instruments. this year's symposium, organized by Dr. Fu-Tyan Lin, the Pittcon 2017 program chairman, will be "New Approaches in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Biomolecular Applications."
September 2, 2016
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Plant sugar source can drive malaria transmission by modulating mosquito-Plasmodium interactions
Female mosquitoes are well known blood-feeders, but they also consume sugar sources such as nectar, fruits and tree sap. a study published on August 4th in PLOS Pathogens suggests that the plant-based part of their diet affects malaria transmission by influencing the host-pathogen interaction between Anopheles mosquitoes and Plasmodium parasites.
August 05, 2016
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Plant-based drug for hemophilia shows promise in animal models
People with hemophilia require regular infusions of clotting factor to prevent them from experiencing uncontrolled bleeding. But a significant fraction develop antibodies against the clotting factor, essentially experiencing an allergic reaction to the very treatment that can prolong their lives.
February 13, 2017
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Plantar flexion: Function, anatomy, and injuries
Plantar flexion describes the extension of the ankle so that the foot points down and away from the leg.
July 6, 2017
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Plastic surgeon from new Jersey shares lesser-known details about tummy tuck surgery
A tummy tuck can dramatically improve a person's body contours, flattening and firming the belly, tightening muscles, and eliminating sagging skin, but for those of us who are not plastic surgeons, what goes into creating great tummy tuck results has largely remained a mystery–until now. In a new interview series, new Jersey board certified plastic surgeon Dr. Paul M. Parker shares some lesser-known details about tummy tuck surgery and recovery, which he encourages anyone considering the procedure to read before making a decision about surgery.
August 25, 2016
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Plastics compound, BPS, often substituted for BPA, alters mouse moms' behavior and brain regions
Impaired behavior in pregnant and lactating mice
December 22, 2016
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Pleural effusion: Causes, diagnosis, and treatment
Pleural effusion is caused by many disorders and can potentially be life-threatening.
June 21, 2017
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Pneumothorax: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Pneumothorax, commonly called a collapsed lung, can be a painful and worrying experience.
June 27, 2017
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Polydipsia: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Polydipsia is the medical term for extreme thirst, which does not improve no matter how much a person drinks.
July 3, 2017
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Poor and less-educated older Americans more likely to suffer from chronic pain, research shows
Poorer and less-educated older Americans are more like to suffer from chronic pain than those with greater wealth and more education, but the disparity between the two groups is much greater than previously thought, climbing as high as 370 percent in some categories, according to new research by a University at Buffalo medical sociologist.
February 8, 2017
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Poor Sleep May Worsen Suicidal Thoughts
Treating insomnia might help improve emotional well-being, researchers suggest
June 28, 2017
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Popcorn lung: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Popcorn lung is a rare condition that causes airway scarring due to inflammation and eventually lung damage.
July 7, 2017
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Popular Heartburn Drugs May Boost Death Risk: Study
It's not the first time the drugs, also known as PPIs, have been linked to health dangers. Previous studies have tied the drugs to kidney problems, dementia, and bone fractures, although not all research has agreed.
July 3, 2017
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Positive change in sleep linked to better physical and mental wellbeing, study shows
Improving your sleep quality is as beneficial to health and happiness as winning the lottery, according to research by the University of Warwick.
March 16, 2017
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Pot Derivative May Curb Tough-to-Treat Epilepsy
Cannabidiol lowered frequency, severity of seizures in trials, but without a 'high'
December 6, 2016
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Pot Smokers May Face Greater Risk of Alcohol Abuse
Marijuana users also less likely to quit drinking, researchers say
March 8, 2016
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Potential drug could become first effective treatment option for Prader-Willi syndrome
Duke Health researchers have identified a drug-like small molecule that, in animal experiments, appears to be an effective treatment for a genetic disorder called Prader-Willi syndrome.
December 27, 2016
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Potential new treatment for cocaine addiction
A promising new drug treatment for cocaine addiction has been discovered by researchers. the experimental therapy, which involves administering a drug currently used in cancer therapy trials, treats cocaine addiction by inhibiting memories responsible for cravings.
August 31, 2016
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Potential new treatment for cystic fibrosis uncovered
Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease that affects tens of thousands of people in the United States and worldwide. There is currently no cure for the condition, but new research proposes a novel therapeutic approach that may soon stop the disease from progressing.
April 10, 2017
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Powerful MRI Machine Reveals Brain Remembers how to Control Missing Limbs
In a potentially important finding for the future of prosthetics, scientists at Oxford University showed that people who had their hands amputated even decades ago still maintain the representation of those hands in their brains. Scientists have long suspected that areas of the brain that end up not being used eventually forget how to do the things they previously knew.
September 6, 2016
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Pre-surgery information can help predict cognitive decline after postoperative delirium, study finds
Evidence suggests that experiencing delirium after surgery can lead to long-term cognitive decline in older adults. However, not everyone who experiences delirium will suffer this fate. After a recent study, researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research and Brigham and Women's Channing Division of Network Medicine (both Harvard Medical School affiliates) have discovered that we can predict cognitive decline after postoperative delirium using pre-surgery information from patients, particularly information on pre-surgery cognitive function.
March 15, 2017
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Prescription sleep aids may stimulate suicidal thoughts or actions
Prescription sleep aids appear to carry a rare risk of suicide, most typically when they cause the unexpected response of stimulating rather than quietening patients, researchers say.
October 4, 2016
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Princeton-Intel collaboration builds new software to decode brain scans
Early this year, about 30 neuroscientists and computer programmers got together to improve their ability to read the human mind.
February 24, 2017
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Prices of Generic Heart Failure Drugs Vary Widely
Patients can spend from $12 to $400 a month to fill common prescriptions, study reveals
November 15, 2016
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Probing the brain in high resolution with graphene based neural probes
Graphene-based transistors enable a flexible neural probe with excellent signal-to-noise ratio. Such probes are useful for examining neural activity for understanding diseases, as well as in neuroprosthetics for control of artificial limbs.
March 27, 2017
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Probiotic could help alleviate hay fever symptoms
Itchy eyes, runny nose, and sneezing; allergy season is just around the corner. According to a new study, however, symptoms of hay fever could be reduced with a simple probiotic.
March 2, 2017
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Proctalgia fugax and anal pain: Causes and treatments
Proctalgia fugax refers to the sudden onset of severe pain in the rectum area, which can last from seconds to minutes. the pain is sporadic and can be without warning.
May 2, 2017
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Professional baseball players struggle to return to play after biceps tenodesis, research shows
Professional baseball players struggle to return to a high level of play after biceps tenery, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty day in San Diego. the study examined how players with SLAP tears responded to biceps tenodesis.
March 19, 2017
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Progress Report on a Novel Approach to Brain Computer Interfaces, Neural Dust
It has been a while since the concept of neural dust was first proposed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. Since then, the engineers have published multiple papers on the device. In fact, they have just reported data on device validation and neural activity recorded from the peripheral nervous system of rats.
August 04, 2016
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Promising new therapeutic target could lead to better prognosis of spinal muscular atrophy
According to studies, approximately one out of every 40 individuals in the United States is a carrier of the gene responsible for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disease that causes muscles to weaken over time.
July 25, 2016
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Promoting innate detoxification mechanisms could be efficient strategy to reduce cellular oxidative stress
Promoting innate detoxification mechanisms in the body and discovering which supplements increase the efficacy of those biochemical pathways could be an efficient strategy to reduce the cellular oxidative stress and protect our health, according to an article published in the journal Food Chemistry, by the researchers Rafael Franco, from the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona, and Eva Martínez Pinilla, from the Institute of Neurosciences of Asturias (INEUROPA) and the University of Oviedo.
June 21, 2017
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Psoriasis in pictures: Different types and symptoms
Psoriasis is one of the most common autoimmune diseases. It causes changes in the skin and can trigger psoriatic arthritis.
April 4, 2017
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Psoriasis on the face: Symptoms, causes, and treatments
Psoriasis is a skin condition that causes cells to develop rapidly on the skin. this growth can create thick, scaly patches that may be itchy and uncomfortable.
April 28, 2017
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Psoriasis scars: Treatment and prevention
Psoriasis is a skin disease that can cause scaly red and silvery patches to form on many areas of the body. These areas include around the joints, trunk, and scalp.
April 14, 2017
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Psoriasis versus dandruff: how to tell the difference
Dandruff and psoriasis of the scalp can look very similar. Both skin conditions produce flakes of skin, but there are some differences.
April 12, 2017
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Psoriasis versus seborrheic dermatitis: how to tell the difference
Psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis can look similar. some people may have both of these skin conditions, but the two disorders have some key differences.
April 12, 2017
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Psychiatrist explains how the brain blocks memory to help get through traumatic event
Everyone has done something they probably want to forget–falling face first on the stage at your high school graduation or asking a woman how far along she is only to find out she isn't even pregnant. Wanting to squash these not-so-great memories is human nature, but is it possible to intentionally forget a traumatic experience?
December 9, 2016
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Psychological tools help high-risk chronic pain patients to taper opioid use
Psychological support and new coping skills are helping patients at high risk of developing chronic pain and long-term, high-dose opioid use taper their opioids and rebuild their lives with activities that are meaningful and joyful to them.
June 29, 2017
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PTSD 'should be viewed as a systemic disorder'
A new study finds that adults with post-traumatic stress disorder are much more likely to experience sleep disorders, gastrointestinal problems, cardiovascular diseases, and numerous other health conditions. as such, researchers say that post-traumatic stress disorder should be considered a systemic disorder, as opposed to just a psychological condition.
April 3, 2017
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Pupil dilation patterns of speakers and listeners synchronize during shared attention, study finds
A new Dartmouth study finds that listeners are most likely to tune in when a speaker delivers the most emotional peaks of his/her narrative, as revealed by synchronous pupil dilation patterns of speakers and listeners due to shared attention.
April 11, 2017
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Pyk2 deficits contribute to memory problems in Huntington's disease mouse model
Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the UB and from IDIBAPS together with a team from the University Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC, France) and the Institute du Fer à Moulin, published a study in Nature Communications, which demonstrates that the regulation in Pyk2, a protein-tyrosine kinase, causes alterations of the synaptic plasticity involved in memory tasks, associated with the hippocampus in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's.
June 13, 2017
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Misc. - Q

Quack trial to resurrect brain-dead folks revived with new location
After getting shut down in India last year, US-based company announces new plans.
June 1, 2017
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Quality Management Consulting Group Ltd.
healthcare consulting, peer review, case review for doctors, nurses,and administrators.
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Quest Diagnostics analysis shows workforce drug use in U.S. reaches 10-year high
Annual Drug Testing Index reveals fifth straight year of increases in detection rate of amphetamine and heroin; marijuana positivity increases 47 percent since 2013 in oral fluid testing
September 16, 2016
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Quickly determine dissolved particle concentration in solution
The K-7400S Semi-Micro Osmometer from KNAUER allows fast and easy analysis of aqueous liquids. Using the proven technology of freezing point depression, the device determines the total concentration of all dissolved particles of a solution. this makes it suitable especially for quality control in the industrial sector and for the use in research laboratories.
April 12, 2017
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Misc. - R

Raising the curtain on cerebral malaria's deadly agents
NIH scientists film inside mouse brains to uncover biology behind the disease.
December 6, 2016
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Ramp-up tones could be effective alerting method to reduce stress on firefighters
An article published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene that examines long-term health effects suffered by emergency responders indicates that "ramp-up" alert tones can help reduce stress on firefighters.
October 5, 2016
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Rapid adaptation of Aspergillus fungus presents doctors with a dilemma
The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is capable of rapid genetic adaptation in both natural environments and in humans according to a study. this presents doctors with a dilemma: prescribe medication that may increase drug resistance or not providing treatment and increase the likelihood of the fungus settling in the lungs?
September 26, 2016
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Rare Disease day at NIH event features advances in rare diseases research
Rare diseases affect an estimated 25 million Americans. on Feb. 27, 2017, the National Institutes of Health will host Rare Disease day at NIH to raise awareness about rare diseases, the people they affect, and research collaborations that are making a difference.
February 22, 2017
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Rare genetic variations linked to severe porphyria
An international research team has linked rare variations in a cell membrane protein to the wide variation in symptom severity that is a hallmark of porphyria, a rare disorder that often affects the skin, liver and nervous system. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital helped to lead the research, which appears today in the journal Nature Communications and suggests possible new treatment strategies.
August 10, 2016
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Rat Lungworm: A Nasty Parasite With an Uglier Name
A new study has found that nearly a quarter of rats that researchers tested in Florida carried a nasty parasite with a name as ugly as its host.
June 30, 2017
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Reduced mastication impairs memory and learning functions, research reveals
Recently, frequency of mastication has dramatically decreased along with changes in dietary habits. Masticatory stimulation has influence on the development of the central nervous system as well as the growth of maxillofacial tissue in children. Recently, deterioration of masticatory function due to aging and the consequent reduction of brain function has become major problems. Although the relationship between mastication and brain function is potentially important, the mechanism underlying is not fully understood.
July 10, 2017
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Reducing DVT and leg ulcers through personalized compression socks
What was the vision behind Isobar Compression's deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) solution?
July 4, 2017
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Refugees have specialized treatment needs due to past trauma and loss
In a study of children and adolescents referred for mental health services at US trauma treatment sites, there were important differences in the experiences of refugee youth who were displaced by war-related violence relative to immigrants and those born in the United States.
June 15, 2017
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Rehabilitation programme for heart disease could help bowel cancer patients
Could rehabilitation programmes for heart disease patients be used to help people recovering from bowel cancer get back on their feet? That's the question cancer care experts at the University of Stirling have been exploring.
September 28, 2016
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Rejuvenating the brain's disposal system
A characteristic feature of Alzheimer's disease is the presence of so called amyloid plaques in the patient's brain -- aggregates of misfolded proteins that clump together and damage nerve cells. Researchers have now discovered a strategy to help the brain remove amyloid plaques.
December 21, 2016
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Relieve stress and anxiety with this top-rated meditation app
We're living in anxious times where it can be tough to take the time to reflect and relax your mind with some mindful meditation. There are many mindfulness apps available out there, but not all are created equal. You'll want to find one that's been thoughtfully designed and optimized for personalization.
June 15, 2017
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Rely Services
is HIPAA Compliant Company & saves upto 40% or more on all your Data entry, Medical transcription and Voice transcription services.
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Remote Controlled Microbots for Medical Uses Inside Body
Researchers at Ecole polytechnique federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have developed a technique for building "mobile micromachines" inspired by origami that can be controlled and powered remotely using magnets. the goal is to eventually use the technology to create diagnostic and therapeutic devices that can travel through the body and perform specific actions, reaching areas and doing tasks that are difficult with existing techniques.
July 25, 2016
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Removing flowers from invasive shrub could reduce malaria transmission
Proper management of an invasive shrub in mosquito-prone regions could reduce mosquito populations and malaria transmission, say researchers.
July 4, 2017
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Renishaw applauds University Hospital of Wales on first robotic-assisted neurosurgery for epilepsy
Renishaw is pleased to congratulate the University Hospital of Wales on a successful first robotic assisted stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) neurosurgery procedure. this landmark procedure, which identified the source for epileptic seizures, coincided with BioWales, an annual conference, which celebrates Wales' position as a global pioneer in the life science sector.
April 13, 2017
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Repetition of other parts of speech can influence magnitude of syntactic priming effect
According to Glasgow and HSE/Northumbria researchers, repetition of non-verbs as well as verbs can boost the effect of syntactic priming, i.e. the likelihood of people reproducing the structure of the utterance they have just heard.
April 17, 2017
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Report: LG's next flagship might come earlier than expected
For the last few years, LG has been on a bit of a crusade, the objective of which is to make its flagship line achieve maximum popularity. The manufacturer has resorted to all sorts of unconventional approaches, from making the 2016 LG G5 modular, to releasing this year's G6 in March with the hopes of selling as many units as possible before the Galaxy S8 and other Android flagships managed to hit the shelves.
June 15, 2017
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Report: Secret Apple team is working to make your iPhone a medical record hub
Your lab results, prescriptions, and doctor's visits could soon be accessible from your iPhone.
June 15, 2017
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Research finding opens door to new treatment options for inflammatory rheumatism
Enthesitis, inflammation of tendons where they attach to the bone, is a common medical problem which underlies various forms of inflammatory rheumatism. Although around 1% of the population is affected, the mechanisms driving this type of inflammatory condition is poorly understood. Research by Professor Dirk Elewaut (VIB-UGent/UZ Gent), in collaboration with Professor Geert van Loo (VIB-UGent) at VIB's inflammation research center (IRC), is now changing this. the researchers have demonstrated that macrophages, a particular type of white blood cell, play a key role. the findings reveal a mechanism which could lead to new treatments for certain types of inflammatory rheumatism.
August 23, 2016
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Research finding opens new avenues to tailor drug development with Upsalite
For the first time, researchers have revealed the nanostructure of the mesoporous magnesium carbonate Upsalite® and pore size control was achieved without organic templates or swelling agents. by controlling the pore structure of the material the amorphous phase stabilisation exerted on poorly soluble drug compounds can be tuned and the drug delivery rate can be tailored.
August 11, 2016
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Research findings could lead to effective repair therapies for peripheral nerve damage
Research published today, 30th January 2017 online in the Journal of Cell Biology, has for the first time identified how a bodily protein allows nerves of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) to repair following injury.
January 30, 2017
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Research findings could lead to new ways of preventing or treating organ transplant rejection
An international team led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found that targeting certain donor cells lowered the risk of organ rejection in mice that underwent kidney and heart transplants.
August 24, 2016
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Research findings elucidate how neurons process, represent touch in rat and the human brain
When reaching into a pocket or purse, it is easy to use the sense of touch to distinguish keys from loose change. Our brains seamlessly integrate the tactile, sensory cues from our fingers with hand movements to perceive the different objects.
August 02, 2016
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Research findings hold promise for new therapies using proliferating cells to treat patients with FECD
Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear have, for the first time, identified rapidly proliferating cells (known as "neural crest-derived progenitor cells") in the corneal endothelium of specimens from normal corneas and from corneas with Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy (FECD), a condition in which the cells responsible for keeping the cornea clear die prematurely – often leading to blindness. the findings, published today in the American Journal of Pathology, hold promise for new therapies to be developed using the proliferating cells to return normal clearing abilities to the cornea in patients with FECD.
September 14, 2016
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Research findings offer detailed insight into mechanics of learning
Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin can now map what happens neurologically when new information influences a person to change his or her mind, a finding that offers more insight into the mechanics of learning.
November 2, 2016
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Research findings offer more insight into complexity and robustness of the brain
The brain is well capable of coping with the erratic way individual brain cells transmit information. this robustness is quite useful because variation in signal transmission doesn't merely concern noise, but also contains valuable information. this is the finding of research conducted by neuroscientists from the University of Amsterdam. Their results are published in the current issue of Cell Reports.
August 19, 2016
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Research findings open door to new class of analgesics for treating neuropathic pain
New research published online in the FASEB Journal suggests that a novel therapeutic target called LPCAT2 may prove effective against pain that is not receptive to the current treatments. this study has also revealed the existence of a platelet alleviating factor (PAF) pain loop, suggesting a possible role for PAF-receptor antagonists.
March 28, 2017
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Research findings point to potential new targeted therapy for SMA
For the first time, scientists found that in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the affected nerve cells that control muscle movement, or motor neurons, have defects in their mitochondria, which generate energy used by the cell. Impaired mitochondrial function and structure in motor neurons were discovered before symptoms occurred, suggesting a role in disease development.
September 15, 2016
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Research findings pave way to effective strategies for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis
A study shows that stimulating the production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), one of the cytokines released by cells of the immune system, can be an effective strategy for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis, considered one of the six most important parasitic diseases affecting humans.
August 25, 2016
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Research finds no link between mouth and anus with embryonic blastopore
Animals often form either the mouth or the anus from an opening that appears in the early embryo, which is called the blastopore.
December 20, 2016
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Research finds no 'weekend admission effect' for patients with hip fracture in the NHS
New research has found NHS patients admitted to hospital at the weekend with a hip fracture are at no greater risk of death compared to weekdays. In fact, the risk of death during the hospital stay was lower at the weekend than in the week. Only a delay to surgery; undergoing surgery on a Sunday, when provision for operations in many hospitals is less, being discharged from hospital on a Sunday; or out of hours were associated with an increased risk of death at 30 days.
March 27, 2017
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Research highlights interaction between biological clock and sleep loss at regional brain level
Ever wondered what happens inside your brain when you stay awake for a day, a night and another day, before you finally go to sleep? In a new study published today in the journal Science, a team of researchers from the University of Liege and the University of Surrey have scanned the brains of 33 participants across such a 2-day sleep deprivation period and following recovery sleep.
August 11, 2016
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Research lays groundwork to develop realistic 'biomimetic neuroprosthetics'
By applying a novel computer algorithm to mimic how the brain learns, a team of researchers -- with the aid of the Comet supercomputer based at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego and the Center's Neuroscience Gateway -- has identified and replicated neural circuitry that resembles the way an unimpaired brain controls limb movement.
May 11, 2017
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Research provides insights for why some epilepsy patients continue to experience postoperative seizures
New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Brain, has highlighted the potential reasons why many patients with severe epilepsy still continue to experience seizures even after surgery.
November 17, 2016
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Research provides insights into how light may interact with the brain to affect sleep
Humans are diurnal animals, meaning that we usually sleep at night and are awake during the day, due at least in part to light or the lack thereof. Light is known to affect sleep indirectly by entraining--modifying the length of--our circadian rhythms and also rapidly and directly due to a phenomenon known as masking. But while a great deal is known about how light affects circadian rhythms, little is known about the direct effects of light on sleep: Why do we tend to wake up if the lights are flipped on in the middle of the night?
June 23, 2017
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Research provides new insights into how the brain protects consolidation of new memories
Throughout our waking lives we are exposed to a continuous stream of stimuli and experiences. some of these experiences trigger the strengthening of connections between neurons in the brain, and begin the process of forming memories.
December 6, 2016
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Research redefines role of Spop protein during bone development
Loss of a key protein leads to defects in skeletal development including reduced bone density and a shortening of the fingers and toes -- a condition known as brachydactyly. the discovery was made by researchers at Penn State University who knocked out the Speckle-type POZ Protein (Spop) in the mouse and characterized the impact on bone development.
December 9, 2016
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Research sheds light on key genes essential to pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori
Professor Frederic Veyrier's most recent research, in collaboration with the team of Professor Hilde De Reuse at the Institut Pasteur, has shed light on key genes essential to the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori bacterium, which causes gastric infections. Like other microorganisms, this pathogen underwent genetic modifications through the course of evolution that enabled it to adapt to its environment.
December 21, 2016
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Research sheds new light on reasons behind recurrent aphthous stomatitis
A burning pain sensation - and treatments that do not work. this is what daily life is like for many of those who suffer from recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Research from the Sahlgrenska Academy now sheds new light on the reasons behind this condition found in the mouth.
March 28, 2017
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Research shows clear link between heart and the brain of LQTS patients
Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center recently discovered a genetic link between Long QT Syndrome (LQTS), a rare cardiac rhythm disease, and an increased risk for seizures. the study also found that people with LQTS who experience seizures are at greater risk of sudden cardiac death.
July 29, 2016
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Research shows pNaKtide can attenuate development of NAFLD and atherosclerosis
Building on their recent research focusing on a peptide, pNaKtide, designed to block the oxidant amplifying function of the cellular sodium-potassium pump, researchers at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine have successfully demonstrated that pNaKtide, can attenuate the development of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and atherosclerosis.
March 15, 2017
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Research suggests new type of congenital muscular dystrophy
A newly discovered mutation in the INPP5K gene, which leads to short stature, muscle weakness, intellectual disability, and cataracts, suggests a new type of congenital muscular dystrophy.
February 10, 2017
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Research using pig knees may improve treatment of joint injuries in young people
Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have published research on how the knees of pigs compare to human knees at various stages of maturity -- a finding that will advance research by this group and others on injury treatment in young people.
May 15, 2017
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Research: Surgical approaches may not offer added benefit to patients with tennis elbow
Surgical approaches to treating tennis elbow may not offer additional benefit to patients, as discussed in research presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty day in San Diego. the study, a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial, explored patient responses to a common surgery aimed at repairing a damaged elbow, compared to a placebo procedure.
March 19, 2017
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Researchers aim to repurpose former experimental cancer therapy to treat muscular dystrophy
Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by a faulty gene that leads to progressive muscle weakness.
June 13, 2017
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Researchers closer to cracking neural code of love
Neuroscientists have discovered a key connection between areas of the adult female prairie vole's brain reward system that promotes the emergence of pair bonds. Results from this study could help efforts to improve social abilities in human disorders with impaired social function, such as autism.
May 31, 2017
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Researchers compare how neuronal activity differs in conscious and anesthetized mice
Establishing how the brain produces consciousness is one of the most challenging research questions in the field of neuroscience. In an effort to get closer to an answer, a team led by Dr. Mazahir T. Hasan, a researcher with Charite's NeuroCure Cluster of Excellence, joined forces with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg.
November 11, 2016
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Researchers create a roadmap of bipolar disorder and how it affects the brain
Global study reveals thinning of gray matter in brain regions responsible for inhibition, emotion
May 2, 2017
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Researchers create a T-shirt that monitors the wearer's breathing rate in real time
Researchers have created a smart T-shirt that monitors the wearer's respiratory rate in real time. This innovation paves the way for manufacturing clothing that could be used to diagnose respiratory illnesses or monitor people suffering from asthma, sleep apnea, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
May 18, 2017
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Researchers create a T-shirt that monitors the wearer's breathing rate in real time
Researchers at Universite Laval's Faculty of Science and Engineering and its Center for Optics, Photonics, and Lasers have created a smart T-shirt that monitors the wearer's respiratory rate in real time.
May 18, 2017
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Researchers create first animal model of rare disease linked to problem of adrenal glands
The name of the gene is Armc5, for Armadillo repeat containing 5. Until now, its function was unknown. After 10 years of research, a team at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has succeeded in deleting this gene in experimental mice and discovered that its loss gives rise to a heretofore unidentified syndrome. this syndrome is provisionally called Armadillo Syndrome.
February 7, 2017
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Researchers define action profile of experimental drug intended to treat chronic pain
At high doses, drug candidate BIA 10-2474 binds not only to the protein that it targets, but to other proteins as well. It thus deactivates proteins that are involved in the metabolism of nerve cells. This is what an international group of researchers from Leiden University and Erasmus MC, among others, write in Science (9 June).
June 9, 2017
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Researchers describe ultrasensitive detection of protein linked to multiple autoimmune diseases
Researchers in France have developed a new method that will allow doctors to detect minute amounts of a protein called interferon- in patient samples. the technique, which is described in the study "Detection of interferon- protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease" published April 18 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine ("Detection of interferon alpha protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease"), will aid the diagnosis and treatment of numerous autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and dermatomyositis.
April 18, 2017
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Researchers detect protozoa in drinking water that cause diarrheal outbreaks
Researchers from the University of Zaragoza (Spain) have analyzed drinking water and detected oocysts of Cryptosporidium and cysts of Giardia, two protozoa that cause outbreaks of diarrhea in humans. The levels detected are very low and do not represent a health risk; however, according to the study, the ubiquity of these parasites and the inefficiency of conventional water treatment in reducing them may present a public health issue.
June 28, 2017
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Researchers develop computational method to guide surgeons during brain surgery
Researchers from the University of Luxembourg, in cooperation with the University of Strasbourg, have developed a computational method that could be used to guide surgeons during brain surgery.
June 15, 2017
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Researchers develop efficient computational method to create new drugs
Researchers of the University of Barcelona have developed a more efficient computational method to identify new drugs. the study, published in the scientific journal Nature Chemistry, proposes a new way of facing the discovery of molecules with biological activity.
December 1, 2016
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Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue
Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualization of oxygen in tissue. a team led by Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos, Chair for Biological Imaging at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Director of the Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging at the Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen , has developed a new approach to this task.
July 28, 2016
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Researchers develop new approach to manufacturing mechanical metamaterials
Ill-fitting joint sockets, contact dermatitis and sebaceous cysts are just a few of the problems plaguing prosthetic patients. they are all a result of the pressure that their prosthetic devices place on the soft tissue of their bodies.
July 29, 2016
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Researchers develop new biocompatible materials for soft-tissue adhesion
Researchers at Okayama University describe in Acta Biomaterialia a new type of biocompatible adhesive material. The adhesive, made from nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite, glues both synthetic hydrogels and mouse soft tissue, providing a promising alternative to organic materials currently in use for clinical applications.
June 30, 2017
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Researchers develop new blood test that can accurately diagnose concussions
Scientists from Children's Health Research Institute, a program of Lawson Health Research Institute, and Western University have developed a new blood test that identifies with greater than 90 per cent certainty whether or not an adolescent athlete has suffered a concussion.
November 7, 2016
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Researchers develop new computation method for better estimation of indoor carbon dioxide
Measurements of indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are used to evaluate indoor air quality, which is strongly linked to the levels of contaminants, such as gases and particles, circulating about with CO2. this information also can be used to control ventilation, which helps clean the air, and reduce the need for heating and cooling, which saves energy.
April 28, 2017
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Researchers develop new method to quickly diagnose kidney damage
Researchers from Aarhus University have developed a method for diagnosing kidney damage that is both quick and precise. Once the first patients are placed in the scanner, it will not take more than 45 minutes to make a diagnosis.
February 9, 2017
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Researchers develop new system with robot hands that learns how to grasp objects
Cluster of Excellence CITEC presents new system that learns how to grasp objects
June 8, 2017
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Researchers develop new way to test strength of immune response
The immune system orchestrates large and small scale attacks on innumerous targets: viruses, bacteria, cancer, but it also misfires causing allergy or autoimmune reactions. Compounding the problem, not every immune reaction is equal - sometimes a necessary reaction is not strong enough or at times it's too strong.
October 27, 2016
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Researchers develop optimized sensors to study biochemical underpinnings of learning and memory
Learning and memory are crucial aspects of everyday life. When we learn, our neurons use chemical and molecular signals to change their shapes and strengthen connections between neurons, a process known as synaptic plasticity. In Ryohei Yasuda's lab at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI), scientists are working to understand how these molecules send messages throughout the neuron.
March 9, 2017
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Researchers develop sensor-equipped gloves to accurately measure muscle stiffness
Everyone experiences stiff muscles from time to time, whether after a rigorous workout, in cold weather, or after falling asleep in an unusual position. People with cerebral palsy, stroke and multiple sclerosis, however, live with stiff muscles every single day, making everyday tasks such as extending an arm extremely difficult and painful for them. and since there isn't a foolproof way to objectively rate muscle stiffness, these patients often receive doses of medication that are too low or too high.
April 20, 2017
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Researchers develop wearable patch to monitor person's blood-alcohol levels in sweat
Overconsumption of alcohol can lead to errors in judgment, causing, for example, some people to get behind the wheel when they are impaired. to help imbibers easily and quickly know when they've had enough, scientists have developed a flexible, wearable patch that can detect a person's blood-alcohol level from his or her sweat.
August 03, 2016
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Researchers devise new way of creating common anti-malarial medication
Researchers at Cardiff University have devised a new way of creating a drug commonly used as the first line of defence against malaria around the world.
March 15, 2017
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Researchers discover 'Developmental Split-Brain syndrome' caused by biallelic mutations in DCC gene
In a study published in Nature Genetics, Dr Saumya Jamuar, co-founder of Global Gene Corp and a visiting scientist at Harvard Medical School, under the supervision of Prof Christopher Walsh and A/Prof Timothy Yu of Harvard Medical School, reports on a new disease entity that they discovered in their quest to map novel human disorders related to brain development.
March 3, 2017
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Researchers discover how fat soluble vitamins may offer viable solution for treating cystic fibrosis
Researchers from Queen's University Belfast have discovered why antibiotics for treating people with cystic fibrosis are becoming less effective and how fat soluble vitamins might offer a viable solution.
March 27, 2017
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Researchers discover new culture method that unlocks natural fighter function of immune T cells
Mayo Clinic and University of Washington researchers have discovered a new culture method that unlocks the natural fighter function of immune T cells when they are passing through the bloodstream. this allows T cell armies to be raised directly from blood that naturally recognize and target proteins that are present on most human cancers.
February 14, 2017
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Researchers discover new pathway that opens door to treat non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Researchers from the University of South Carolina, Duke University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Metabolon Inc. Research Triangle Park have discovered a new pathway in the liver that opens the door to treat non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition that affects up to 25 percent of the population and may lead to cirrhosis and eventually liver cancer or failure, and likely other liver diseases.
December 9, 2016
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Researchers discover new therapeutic target for controlling fatal allergic reactions
Researchers in France have identified a molecular motor that controls the release of inflammatory factors that cause severe and fatal allergic reactions.
October 22, 2016
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Researchers discover network of neural regions involved in spread of seizures
A flurry of coordinated activity in a brain-spanning network of neurons may sound like the formation of a brilliant new idea, but it is actually the description of a seizure. Understanding why and how this synchronization spreads would be a critical tool in treating severe epilepsy.
September 13, 2016
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Researchers discover novel pathway for immune recovery following bone-marrow transplantation
New research has shown how a cell surface molecule, Lymphotoxin β receptor, controls entry of T-cells into the thymus; and as such presents an opportunity to understanding why cancer patients who undergo bone-marrow transplant are slow to recover their immune system.
August 25, 2016
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Researchers discover promising target for treatment of leishmaniasis
Each year, about 2 million people contract leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease transmitted by the bite of a sand fly. the cutaneous form of the disease results in disfiguring skin ulcers that may take months or years to heal and in rare cases can become metastatic, causing major tissue damage.
February 24, 2017
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Researchers elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying negative effects of early-life stress
Scientists have long known that chronic exposure to psychosocial stress early in life can lead to an increased vulnerability later in life to diseases linked to immune dysfunction and chronic inflammation, including arthritis, asthma, cancer, diabetes, heart disease and even mental illness. But the isms underlying the negative effects of early exposure to stress are unknown.
October 22, 2016
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Researchers engineer new thyroid cells
May lead to new therapies for thyroid disorders
February 2, 2017
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Researchers explain novel approach for analyzing diverse immune responses
The response to infection is highly variable from one individual to another. the Milieu Interieur consortium, coordinated by Prof. Matthew Albert (Immunobiology of dendritic cells Unit, Institut Pasteur / Inserm) and Dr Lluis Quintana-Murci (Human Evolutionary Genetics Unit, Institut Pasteur / CNRS) seek to establish the parameters that characterize the immune system of healthy individuals and its natural variability.
September 16, 2016
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Researchers explore essential cell behavior with crystal sensor
A team of scientists has developed a new tool to monitor under a microscope how cells attach to an adjacent substrate. Studying adhesion events can help researchers understand how tissues grow, how diseases spread, and how stem cells differentiate into more specific cell types.
January 31, 2017
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Researchers find antibody to be effective against radiation-induced fibrosis
Radiation therapy is part of the treatment regimen for about two thirds of cancer patients today. Radiotherapy is well tolerated in most cases, but it can also lead to damage in healthy tissues that are also irradiated. One debilitating side effect is radiation-induced fibrosis. Fibrosis is a process of scarring by which healthy tissue is replaced by less elastic connective tissue, which leads to hardening and functional impairments.
March 31, 2017
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Researchers find common brain abnormalities shared across multiple emotional disorders
Researchers have long known that emotional disorders have a lot in common. Many often occur together, like depression and social anxiety disorder. Treatments also tend to work across multiple disorders, suggesting shared underlying elements. But perhaps the most common shared characteristic is that almost all emotional disorders involve persistent negative thinking.
September 28, 2016
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Researchers find effective cure for social anxiety disorders
Social phobia is the most common anxiety disorder of our time. But the current treatment regimen for patients with this diagnosis has not proven very effective. now a team of Norwegian and British researchers believe they have found a cure for social anxiety disorders.
December 21, 2016
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Researchers find key risk factors for physical decline among survivors of ARDS
A new study by a team of Johns Hopkins researchers found that most survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decline physically in the five years after hospital discharge, and those at higher levels of risk of decline are older and had greater medical problems prior to hospitalization for ARDS.
October 3, 2016
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Researchers find link between dopamine neurotransmitter system and facial recognition
In a recent study, researchers at Center for BrainHealth, working in collaboration with colleagues in Sweden, have revealed a link between the dopamine neurotransmitter system in the brain and an individual's ability to recognize faces.
October 3, 2016
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Researchers find long-lasting benefits of gene therapy in dog model of myotubular myopathy
Researchers who previously showed that a gene therapy treatment could save the lives of dogs with a deadly disease called myotubular myopathy--a type of muscular dystrophy that affects the skeletal muscles--have found that the therapy is long-lasting. The results support a clinical trial in patients.
June 7, 2017
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Researchers find new ways to create, deliver therapies for many immune-medicated neuropathies
Researchers at LSTM are looking at new ways to create and deliver medications for a wide range of immune-medicated neuropathies, by developing new synthetic versions of the treatment currently seen as the last resort option by doctors; intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy.
July 6, 2017
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Researchers find switch that helps restore damaged axons
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found a switch that redirects helper cells in the peripheral nervous system into "repair" mode, a form that restores damaged axons.
September 16, 2016
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Researchers find way to use ultrasound for monitoring fluid levels in the lung
A team of engineering and medical researchers has found a way to use ultrasound to monitor fluid levels in the lung, offering a noninvasive way to track progress in treating pulmonary edema - fluid in the lungs - which often occurs in patients with congestive heart failure. the approach, which has been demonstrated in rats, also holds promise for diagnosing scarring, or fibrosis, in the lung.
March 21, 2017
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Researchers gain new insights into how proteins help immune defense mechanism in the body
Researchers have gained new insights into the mechanisms with which certain proteins help the immune defense mechanism in the human body. Pathogens such as viruses or bacteria are wrapped in membrane blebs and rendered harmless there. What are known as guanylate-binding proteins are crucial in this. How they contribute to the process that was investigated by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut and the University of Cologne, together with other partners from Erlangen and Geneva.
July 4, 2017
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Researchers identify altered activity in distinct areas of the brain during hypnosis sessions
Your eyelids are getting heavy, your arms are going limp and you feel like you're floating through space. the power of hypnosis to alter your mind and body like this is all thanks to changes in a few specific areas of the brain, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered.
July 28, 2016
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Researchers identify factors associated with stopping treatment for opioid dependence
Individuals with opioid use disorder who are treated with buprenorphine, a commonly prescribed drug to treat addiction, are more likely to disengage from treatment programs if they are black or Hispanic, unemployed, or have hepatitis C according to a study.
January 5, 2017
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Researchers identify mechanism to recover aging of Progeria patients
DGIST's research team has identified a mechanism that can recover the aging of patients with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS). DGIST announced that the Chair Professor Park SangChul of new Biology (Head of Well-Aging Research Center) and the research team led by Professor Lee YoungSam has discovered a drug that can improve the aging of HGPS patients and identified the mechanism of aging recovery by using the drug.
April 4, 2017
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Researchers identify promising new drug treatment for cocaine addiction
A team of researchers led by Cardiff University has discovered a promising new drug treatment for cocaine addiction.
August 31, 2016
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Researchers identify underlying cause of obsessive-compulsive disorder
An overactive molecular signal pathway in the brain region of the amygdala can lead to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). a research team from Würzburg has established this connection.
March 16, 2017
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Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment
People with cystic fibrosis (CF) need help to ensure they are getting correct nutrition and the right amount of enzymes. they also need constant reminders. Researchers are now developing a digital support device to promote autonomy, but are finding that this is no easy task.
September 28, 2016
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Researchers Produce Graphene Membrane for Dialysis Applications
By definition, dialysis is a process in which molecules are filtered out of a solution by getting diffused through a membrane into a comparatively dilute solution. Apart from hemodialysis in which waste is eliminated from blood, Researchers employ dialysis for removing residue from chemical solutions, purifying drugs and for isolating molecules for medical diagnosis, generally by making the materials to go through a porous membrane.
June 29, 2017
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Researchers propose zebrafish as model to predict effects of EDCs
Water is vital for our survival. However, water quality is always a concern for public health authorities as it may contain diverse environmental pollutants, including endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).
November 18, 2016
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Researchers provide new insight into the brain mechanisms underlying dyslexia
Researchers have provided new insight into the brain mechanisms underlying a condition that causes reading and writing difficulties.
January 24, 2017
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Researchers receive $800,000 grant to reconnect neural communication between parts of the brain
Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the University of Colorado Boulder have won a $800,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to try and reconnect neural communication between parts of the brain where it has been severed.
August 18, 2016
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Researchers report latest findings on harmful effects of alcohol
Researchers from around the country who are studying alcohol's negative effects on the body discussed their latest findings during a meeting at Loyola University Chicago's Health Sciences campus.
November 17, 2016
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Researchers sequence genome of parasitic worm that causes river blindness
Scientists have sequenced the genome of the parasitic worm responsible for causing onchocerciasis--an eye and skin infection more commonly known as river blindness. Through their work, researchers have gained insight into the workings of the parasite and identified proteins that potentially could be targeted with existing drugs or provide areas for developing new treatments and a preventive vaccine.
November 21, 2016
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Researchers shed new light on roots of dystonia
Researchers at VIB-KU Leuven have managed to get a clearer view on the roots of dystonia, a neurological disorder that causes involuntary twisting movements. Led by Rose Goodchild (VIB-KU Leuven) and supported by the Foundation for Dystonia Research, the VIB scientists unraveled the mechanism by which DYT1 dystonia - the disease's most common hereditary form - causes cellular defects. the findings shed new light on this poorly understood condition - and may, ultimately, lead to new medical approaches to overcome it.
August 09, 2016
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Researchers show how cellular stress regulates production of hemoglobin
Our ability to breathe oxygen is critical to our survival. this process is mediated by the hemoglobin in our blood, which carries oxygen. Since air contains less oxygen on high mountains, the body is under pressure to make hemoglobin rapidly -- a stressful time. But what role does cellular stress play in the production of hemoglobin?
April 4, 2017
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Researchers study space-exposed worms to improve understanding of regenerative health
Flatworms that spent five weeks aboard the International Space Station are helping researchers led by Tufts University scientists to study how an absence of normal gravity and geomagnetic fields can have anatomical, behavioral, and bacteriological consequences, according to a paper to be published June 13 in Regeneration.
June 9, 2017
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Researchers Target Insecticide-Resistant Bedbugs
New fungal-based pesticide might knock out insects that survive current chemicals
March 31, 2017
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Researchers test new approach to treat metabolic diseases without organ transplant
With a shortage of donor organs, Mayo Clinic is exploring therapeutic strategies for patients with debilitating liver diseases. Researchers are testing a new approach to correct metabolic disorders without a whole organ transplant.
July 27, 2016
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Researchers uncover genetic gains and losses in Tourette syndrome
NIH-funded study finds new clues to brain disorder.
June 21, 2017
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Researchers uncover major clue to how mucus becomes abnormal in CF airways
People with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer repeated lung infections because their airway mucus is too thick and sticky to keep bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens from causing chronic infection.
March 23, 2017
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Researchers uncover new potential target for treating spinal muscular atrophy
Though spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in its most severe form remains incurable and fatal in early childhood, researchers are sustaining a multipronged counterattack for patients and their families. the first treatment for the disease gained U.S. market approval in December. now a new discovery led by Brown University scientists deepens the basic understanding of how the genetic mutation that causes SMA appears to undermine the communication between motor neurons and the muscles they control.
May 2, 2017
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Researchers uncover new preventative way to battle against Ascaris roundworm infection
Scientists working out of Trinity College Dublin, Maynooth University, and Queen Mary University of London have unearthed a potential new preventative option to combat Ascaris roundworm infection. Ascaris lumbricoides is an intestinal parasite that results in severe health consequences, including growth retardation and impaired cognitive development. the infection, which affects an estimated one billion people worldwide, is particularly common in Third World countries and is estimated to be responsible for 60,000 deaths per annum.
August 08, 2016
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Researchers uncover seven risk genes for insomnia
An international team of researchers has found, for the first time, seven risk genes for insomnia. With this finding the researchers have taken an important step towards the unraveling of the biological mechanisms that cause insomnia. In addition, the finding proves that insomnia is not, as is often claimed, a purely psychological condition.
June 12, 2017
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Researchers uncover two factors that play crucial role in chronic autoimmune disorders
Researchers from Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear have uncovered two factors responsible for the chronic, lifelong nature of autoimmune disorders, which tend to "flare up" intermittently in affected patients. These two factors are cell-signaling proteins called cytokines–specifically Interleukin-7 and -15 (IL-7 and IL-15)–that are secreted by cells of the immune system and help modulate memory Th17 cells, a subset of T cells which are known to contribute to autoimmune disorders. Until now, it was unclear how Th17 cells maintained memory; the study results show that IL-7 and IL-15 signal the Th17 cells to chronically reside in the body. These findings, published online in the Journal of Autoimmunity, may lead to the development of new therapies to address a variety of chronic autoimmune disorders.
January 4, 2017
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Researchers unravel how drug interacts with ribosome to halt protein production
The discovery of a chemical compound that halts the production of a small set of proteins while leaving general protein production untouched suggests a new drug search strategy: Find compounds that target undesired proteins before they are even made.
March 23, 2017
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Researchers using internet to find study participants may hamper recruitment of minority, poor people
Recruiting minorities and poor people to participate in medical research always has been challenging, and that may not change as researchers turn to the internet to find study participants and engage with them online, new research suggests.
July 29, 2016
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Researchers who study HED identify mechanism that may be disrupted in male pattern baldness
It is almost axiomatic in medicine that the study of rare disorders informs the understanding of more common, widespread ailments. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania who study an inherited disorder of skin, hair follicles, nails, sweat glands, and teeth called hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) have identified a mechanism that may also be disrupted in male pattern baldness, a more common condition.
June 8, 2017
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Retirement period may widen socio-economic inequalities in stress and health, study suggests
A new paper published in the Journal of Gerontology suggests that the period around retirement may widen socio-economic inequalities in stress and health.
May 5, 2017
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Review examines link between insomnia and alcohol dependence
Individuals with alcohol dependence often have sleep-related disorders such as insomnia, circadian-rhythm sleep disorders, breathing-related sleep disorders, movement disorders, and parasomnias such as sleep-related eating disorder, sleepwalking, nightmares, sleep paralysis, and REM sleep behavior disorder.
October 5, 2016
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Review highlights progress made in addressing chronic pandemic of neglected tropical diseases
The Lancet published a review of the progress made in addressing, as lead author David Molyneux calls it, the chronic pandemic of neglected tropical diseases.
September 15, 2016
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Review provides new understanding of cytokine mediated effects on inflammatory disorders
Researchers studying chronic inflammation that can lead to the development of lung diseases such as asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and cancer, are focusing on the role cytokines play in regulating the behavior of fibroblast cells and the extracellular matrix. the most recent evidence on cytokine regulation of inflammatory disease in the lung is presented in a comprehensive review article published in Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research (JICR) from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
March 24, 2017
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Revised wheelchair can effortlessly tackle stairs
The Balgrist campus is bustling with activity. After ten months and countless technical changes, the revised wheelchair from the Scewo team is ready for its first test drive. with one eye on the regulations and another on the wheelchair, Pascal Buholzer accompanies Scewo driver Josep Ballester through the obstacle course. While the wheelchair effortlessly tackles the stairs, its manoeuvrability when opening doors and its stability on uneven ground leave something to be desired.
August 19, 2016
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Revolutionary surgery improves airway and jaw position in children with Treacher Collins syndrome
A revolutionary surgery developed by Dr. Richard Hopper, surgical director of Seattle Children's Craniofacial Center, called subcranial rotation distraction, is changing the lives of children who are tracheostomy dependent. Seattle Children's Craniofacial Center is the first in the world to use subcranial rotation distraction to improve the airway and jaw position in children with Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare genetic condition that affects the development of a baby's facial skeleton, skin and face muscles before birth.
July 27, 2016
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Reye's syndrome: What you need to know
Reye's syndrome is a rare disorder that can cause serious damage to albody, but particularly to the brain and liver.
June 16, 2017
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Rhabdomyolysis: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Rhabdomyolysis is a condition in which skeletal muscle tissue dies, releasing substances into the blood that cause kidney failure.
July 4, 2017
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Rhythm of breathing influences emotional judgments and memory recall
Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered for the first time that the rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the human brain that enhances emotional judgments and memory recall.
December 6, 2016
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Rib cage pain: Six possible causes
Rib cage pain is a common complaint that can be caused by factors, ranging from a fractured rib to lung cancer. The pain associated with the rib cage may be sudden and sharp or dull and aching.
June 27, 2017
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Rice University scientists uncover new clues to cause of Huntington's disease
Rice University scientists have uncovered new details about how a repeating nucleotide sequence in the gene for a mutant protein may trigger Huntington's and other neurological diseases.
November 11, 2016
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Robotic Crawling Assistant for Kids at Risk of Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral palsy can be detrimental to the physical development of a child, but the earlier therapy is initiated the better are its results. the trick is to identify young children at risk of CP and to provide them with a therapy that helps with long term development. to that end, researchers at University of Oklahoma created a device that helps infants crawl around the floor while their brain activity is being monitored.
August 02, 2016
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Rogue cell phone surveillance gives rise to mobile threat defense
Researchers have developed a system to detect surveillance devices; Gartner recommends companies integrate defenses with current EMM efforts
June 15, 2017
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Routine Genital Herpes Testing not Recommended
Early diagnosis won't change course of the STD, which is incurable, advisory panel says
December 20, 2016
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RSNA 2016: SyntheticMR launches REMyDI for easy quantification of myelin volume in the brain
SyntheticMR AB introduces REMyDI, automatic quantification of myelin volume in the brain. Easy quantification of myelin allows clinicians to follow myelination in the developing brain and monitor myelin degeneration in patients with demyelinating and neurodegenerative disorders. REMyDI is a unique feature of the SyMRI® post-processing software from SyntheticMR.
November 30, 2016
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RUB researchers identify new rare muscle disorder
A new rare muscle disorder has been identified by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB). this hereditary disease is caused by a defect in the BICD2 gene that manifests itself in altered cellular transport processes in skeletal muscle cells. Patients suffer from muscle weakness in the legs, an unsteady gait and permanent risk of stumbling.
March 22, 2017
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Russian physicists propose unique method to avoid implants rejection
A group of Russian physicists, with the contribution from their Swiss colleagues, developed a way to use the therapeutic effect of heating or cooling the tissues due to the magnetocaloric effect.
August 05, 2016
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Rutgers' new drug candidate may help fight malaria
Malaria killed about 440,000 people - mostly young children - last year, but a new drug candidate discovered at Rutgers may help fight the long-dreaded disease.
March 8, 2016
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Rutgers opens first-episode psychosis outpatient clinic for young adults
Psychotic illness affects approximately 100,000 young people nationwide, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. But until recently, new Jersey had no clinics to help teens or young adults within their first two years of exhibiting symptoms when intervention is likely to be most effective.
March 10, 2017
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Misc. - S

Safer Heads Prevail with new HS Football Rule
When full-contact practices were limited, blows to the head dropped, study found
July 27, 2016
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Salk researchers develop new method to create unlimited numbers of precursor kidney cells
Salk Institute scientists have discovered the holy grail of endless youthfulness--at least when it comes to one type of human kidney precursor cell. Previous attempts to maintain cultures of the so-called nephron progenitor cells often failed, as the cells died or gradually lost their developmental potential rather than staying in a more medically useful precursor state.
August 25, 2016
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Sami victims of domestic violence seek help less often than other Norwegians
People with Sami background who experience domestic violence seek help from the authorities less often than other Norwegians. A new report has looked at what may be done.
June 9, 2017
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Samsung updates S Health with a dose of friendly competition
Samsung is giving its S Health app a minor overhaul, switching up the layout and making it easier for users to compare fitness levels with friends. There's also a new service named Ask Experts that lets users start Q&As with local healthcare professionals to ask questions about their workouts. it's currently only available in South Korea but will "expand to other countries in the near future."
August 22, 2016
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Sarcoidosis: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Sarcoidosis is a condition involving the growth of persistent or inappropriate granulomas or clumps of inflammatory cells. But what causes them and how can they be treated?
June 27, 2017
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Sarepta Therapeutics wins accelerated approval from FDA for Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) injection, the first drug approved to treat patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Exondys 51 is specifically indicated for patients who have a confirmed mutation of the dystrophin gene amenable to exon 51 skipping, which affects about 13 percent of the population with DMD.
September 19, 2016
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Scarring can have negative impact on patients' quality of life
Whether it's from sudden trauma, scheduled surgery or serious acne, scarring can have a profound impact on patients.
July 28, 2016
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Schistosomiasis: the biggest killer you've never heard of?
What is schistosomiasis and how many people is it thought to affect each year?
July 4, 2017
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School-based intervention program has preventive effect on binge drinking in adolescents
An intervention program based on school class groups has a preventive effect on subsequent drinking behavior, especially binge drinking, in adolescents who had previously consumed alcohol.
May 22, 2017
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Scientific review cautions against unnecessary use of antioxidant supplements
The lay press and thousands of nutritional products warn of oxygen radicals or oxidative stress and suggest taking so-called antioxidants to prevent or cure disease. Professor Pietro Ghezzi at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School and Professor Harald Schmidt at the University of Maastricht have analyzed the evidence behind this. the result is a clear warning: do not take these supplements unless a clear deficiency is diagnosed by a healthcare professional.
July 21, 2016
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Scientists achieve closest view of working nerve synapses using custom-built microscope
The brain hosts an extraordinarily complex network of interconnected nerve cells that are constantly exchanging electrical and chemical signals at speeds difficult to comprehend. Now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report they have been able to achieve -- with a custom-built microscope -- the closest view yet of living nerve synapses.
March 24, 2017
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Scientists Activate Brain of Patient Coming Out of Coma
At the University of California, Los Angeles clinical researchers have successfully used focused ultrasound to "jump-start" the brain of a man coming out of a coma. the 25-year-old patient was barely conscious once he woke up from the coma, but soon after the initiation of treatment his condition improved measurably.
August 25, 2016
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Scientists activate neurons in the mouse brain by injecting virus containing light-sensitive proteins
Neurons that fire together really do wire together, says a new study in Science, suggesting that the three-pound computer in our heads may be more malleable than we think.
August 11, 2016
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Scientists apply generative neural network to create new pharmaceutical medicines
Scientists from Mail.Ru Group, Insilico Medicine and MIPT have for the first time applied a generative neural network to create new pharmaceutical medicines with the desired characteristics. by using Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) developed and trained to "invent" new molecular structures, there may soon be a dramatic reduction in the time and cost of searching for substances with potential medicinal properties.
February 9, 2017
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Scientists Built Blood-Brain Barrier On-a-Chip to Help develop Neuro Drugs, Understand Brain Diseases
At Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a mimic of the blood-brain barrier in the form of a microfluidic device. to show a proof-of-concept of this "organ-on-chip" technology, the team studied how inflammation affects the blood-brain barrier continuously for an extended period of time, while previous approaches have only provided discrete snapshots of the process.
December 23, 2016
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Scientists create new fluorescent protein to monitor the cell cycle
Cellular mitosis is the basis of all higher life. When you need new cells, they can be created through a process called mitosis, whereby a cell makes a copy of itself. this process is highly regulated within the body, but sometimes those mechanisms fail and cells can grow out of control. we call that cancer.
November 9, 2016
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Scientists create new scale to measure beliefs about sleep and pain in long-term pain patients
'I won't be able to cope with my pain if I don't sleep well' - research from the University of Warwick reveals that the way chronic pain patients think about pain and sleep leads to insomnia and poor management of pain.
September 21, 2016
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Scientists create organs-on-chips for large-scale drug screening
Microtissue technology seen as improvement for drug compound discovery
February 8, 2017
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Scientists create synthetic cellular communications system that can respond to pain relief signals
Scientists from Manchester and Bristol have successfully created a synthetic cellular communications system - which has successfully recognised signals involved in pain relief.
March 7, 2017
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Scientists demonstrate synapses between specific neuron types form clusters
The cerebral cortex resembles a vast switchboard. Countless lines carrying information about the environment, for example from the sensory organs, converge in the cerebral cortex. In order to direct the flow of data into meaningful pathways, the individual pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex act like miniature switchboard operators. Each cell receives information from several thousand lines.
July 21, 2016
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Scientists develop better material to regenerate bone tissue cells in shorter time
A new study has revealed a technology how to cover biodegradable implants with a human skeleton similar mineral.
December 20, 2016
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Scientists develop biocompatible, highly stretchable optical fibers for long-term diagnostics
Researchers from MIT and Harvard Medical School have developed a biocompatible and highly stretchable optical fiber made from hydrogel -- an elastic, rubbery material composed mostly of water. the fiber, which is as bendable as a rope of licorice, may one day be implanted in the body to deliver therapeutic pulses of light or light up at the first sign of disease.
October 17, 2016
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Scientists develop new class of pain medication without dangerous side effects
Scientists from Freie Universität Berlin and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin at Campus Benjamin Franklin have developed a new class of pain medication. Using new chemical synthesis methods, the conventional pain medication morphine was coupled to carrier molecules, so-called nanocarriers. Their bond is only broken in the target tissue, in the case of injuries in the inflamed environment, so the morphine cannot cause side effects in healthy tissues such as the brain or the intestinal wall. The research findings were published in the latest issue of the science journal eLife.
July 4, 2017
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Scientists develop new strategy to stop uncontrollable poison ivy itch
Scientists at Duke Health and Zhejiang Chinese Medical University have developed a strategy to stop the uncontrollable itch caused by urushiol, the oily sap common to poison ivy, poison sumac, poison oak and even mango trees.
November 7, 2016
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Scientists develop noninvasive approach to electrical deep brain stimulation
Current treatments that use electrical deep brain stimulation require a surgeon to open the skull and implant electrodes inside the brain. Now, in a new study using mice, scientists demonstrate a noninvasive approach called temporally interfering stimulation, which uses electrodes placed on the scalp to electrically stimulate regions deep inside the brain. The experimental technique does not require surgical implants and does not disturb surface brain tissue.
June 1, 2017
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Scientists develop novel method to widen usage of blood in biomarker discovery and analysis
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in collaboration with Estonian Competence Centre on Health Technologies have developed a new gene expression analysis method to widen the usage of blood in biomarker discovery and analysis. Their paper is published in the journal Scientific Reports.
August 16, 2016
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Scientists develop smart drug that safely removes fat from liver and blood vessels
Scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen have developed a 'smart' drug that safely clears the liver of fat and prevents blood vessels from clogging up. Similar to a trojan horse, the drug enters the liver with a trick: It uses a pancreatic hormone as a vehicle to transport a thyroid hormone to the liver while keeping it away from other organs. Once delivered, it improves both the cholesterol and the lipid metabolism while avoiding typical side effects of thyroid hormones.
October 13, 2016
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Scientists Discover More Clues to Stuttering
MRI shows involvement of brain areas controlling speech, attention and emotion
December 5, 2016
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Scientists discover new method to assess senescence across biomedicine
Scientists have discovered a new way to look for ageing cells across a wide range of biological materials; the new method will boost understanding of cellular development and ageing as well as the causes of diverse diseases.
October 5, 2016
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Scientists discover new role for autophagosomes in neurodegenerative diseases
Autophagosomes are at the center of attention, at least since the Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded for research on autophagy in 2016. the much talked about autophagosomes are small membrane vesicles in charge of waste disposal to promote recycling of its components.
April 11, 2017
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Scientists discover role of skin in spreading leishmaniasis
Scientists at the University of York have discovered that parasites responsible for leishmaniasis - a globally occurring neglected tropical disease spread by sand flies - are mainly acquired from the skin rather than a person's blood.
July 4, 2017
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Scientists discover sensor that may regulate tension in blood vessels
Physical forces like blood pressure and the shear stress of flowing blood are important parameters for the tension of blood vessels. Scientists have been looking for a measurement sensor for many years that enables the translation of mechanical stimuli into a molecular response, which then regulates the tension in blood vessels.
November 10, 2016
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Scientists discover way to visualize function of bone-resorbing cells in living mice
Researchers of Osaka University have discovered a way to visualize sites where bone-resorbing cells (osteoclasts) were in the process of resorbing bone in living mice. this real-time visualization of changes in osteoclast localization and activity allowed the successful measurement of bone resorption intensity. Since this enables simple and quick access to information on the activity of osteoclasts, this discovery will contribute to the early diagnosis of affected areas and the development of new therapeutic drugs.
August 17, 2016
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Scientists discover, count and determine new mitochondrial proteome in baker's yeast
Scientists describe a well-defined mitochondrial proteome in baker's yeast
June 29, 2017
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Scientists fabricate smart second skin to protect soldiers from biological and chemical threats
In work that aims to protect soldiers from biological and chemical threats, a team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists has created a material that is highly breathable yet protective from biological agents.
August 03, 2016
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Scientists find genetic underpinnings for eczema
Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, affects millions of people in the United States. While there is yet no cure for the condition and its causes are not fully understood, new research has uncovered some of its genetic underpinnings, bringing us closer to discovering novel therapies.
June 21, 2017
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Scientists find new functions of ANG protein that plays key role in regulation of blood cell formation
Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University scientists have found exciting, new functions of the protein angiogenin (ANG) that play a significant role in the regulation of blood cmportant in bone marrow transplantation and recovery from radiation-induced bone marrow failure. Since current bone marrow transplantations have significant limitations, these discoveries may lead to important therapeutic interventions to help improve the effectiveness of these treatments.
August 11, 2016
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Scientists find new target that may lead to future treatments for Kennedy's disease
If a disease affects motoneurons, cells that control voluntary muscle activity, researchers should focus their efforts on motoneurons to find potential treatments, right?
August 31, 2016
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Scientists Identify new Organ in Body
Scientists say they've identified a new organ in the body -- a swath of tissue dubbed the mesentery that connects the intestine to the abdomen and holds everything in place.
January 4, 2017
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Scientists identify potential drug for pre-treating cells that swell after mild traumatic brain injury
A team of biomedical engineering researchers at the University of Arkansas have identified a cause of fluid swelling of the brain, or cellular edema, that occurs during a concussion.
November 22, 2016
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Scientists identify potential link between eating Marmite and brain function
Scientists at the University of York have discovered a potential link between eating Marmite and activity in the brain, through the apparent increase of a chemical messenger associated with healthy brain function.
April 5, 2017
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Scientists identify potential therapeutic solutions to combat age-related fibrosis
The wear and tear of life takes a cumulative toll on our bodies. Our organs gradually stiffen through fibrosis, which is a process that deposits tough collagen in our body tissue. Fibrosis happens little by little, each time we experience illness or injury. Eventually, this causes our health to decline.
January 30, 2017
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Scientists illuminate the neurons of social attraction
The ancient impulse to procreate is necessary for survival and must be hardwired into our brains. now scientists have discovered an important clue about the neurons involved in that wiring. with a whiff of the opposite sex, certain hormone-sensitive neurons trigger pro-social behavior in mice and could play roles in anxiety, depression, and other mood-related conditions in humans
January 30, 2017
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Scientists learn more about how motors maneuver our cells' roadways
Much like motors power our cars, they also ensure that proteins get to the right place in our cells, and a wide variety of diseases - from cancer to heart problems - can result when they don't.
December 6, 2016
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Scientists Make Smaller, Flexible, and Effective Brain Probe with Gold and Graphene
Researchers from Korea have developed highly flexible neural electrodes with the ability to reduce tissue damage but still transmit clear brain signals.
April 20, 2017
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Scientists propose neuroscience framework for diagnosing addictions
Scientists at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health, propose using an assessment tool to diagnose addictive disorders that considers addiction-related behaviors, brain imaging, and genetic data. According to a new review article, the Addictions Neuroclinical Assessment (ANA) would facilitate future understanding of the origin of addiction at a biological level, and could ultimately lead to more effective individualized treatments for addictions. the review appears online in the journal Biological Psychiatry.
October 27, 2016
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Scientists reveal molecular elements that bridge anxiety and metabolism
Metabolic and anxiety-related disorders both pose a significant healthcare burden, and are in the spotlight of contemporary research and therapeutic efforts. Although intuitively we assume that these two phenomena overlap, the link has not been proven scientifically.
October 5, 2016
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Scientists reveal key details of the body's immune response to fungal infections
Every year, fungal infections threaten thousands of patients -- from those with depressed immune systems to others who have had surgeries or devices such as catheters implanted. Moreover, some anti-fungal medications are beginning to lose their power.
November 17, 2016
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Scientists shed new light on how common painkiller causes liver damage
Scientists have shed new light on how the common painkiller paracetamol causes liver damage.
January 31, 2017
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Scientists speed up muscle repair
Research could fight dystrophy, they say
October 5, 2016
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Scientists uncover Achilles' heel in unique kind of immune memory cells
The capacity for memory isn't exclusive to the brain. the immune system, with its sprawling network of diverse cell types, can recall the pathogens it meets, helping it to swiftly neutralize those intruders upon future encounters.
March 10, 2017
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Scientists unlock genetic code controlling limb regeneration
Many lower organisms retain the miraculous ability to regenerate form and function of almost any tissue after injury. Humans share many of our genes with these organisms, but our capacity for regeneration is limited. Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, are studying the genetics of these organisms to find out how regenerative mechanisms might be activated in humans.
August 05, 2016
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Scientists unravel how the body manages to keep blood flow in the brain so tightly controlled
The puzzle of how the brain regulates blood flow to prevent it from being flooded and then starved every time the heart beats has been solved with the help of engineering.
May 2, 2017
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Scientists Use 3D Printers to Recreate Kidney's Proximal Tubules
At Harvard's Wyss Institute researchers used a 3D printer to essentially recreate the proximal tubules found within kidneys, potentially opening up the possibility of printing complex structures that can be used to replace diseased tissues and organs.
October 13, 2016
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Scientists use light to control the logic networks of a cell
New technique illuminates role of previously inaccessible proteins involved in health, disease
January 5, 2017
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Scientists use novel theranostics technique for early thromboembolism diagnosis and treatment
Researchers from the University of Arkansas for Medical Science (USA), in collaboration with University Hospital Frankfurt and University Hospital Dresden, under the supervision of Prof. Vladimir Zharov and with the participation of Alexander Melerzanov, the dean of Department of Biological and Medical Physics (MIPT), conducted experiments on mice to detect blood clotting using photoacoustic flow-cytometry.
September 21, 2016
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Scrails Made from Ceramic May Replace Metal and Polymer Bone Screws
Metal titanium screws are commonly used to treat bone fractures, but they often have to be removed once the bone heals due to potential side effects. Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials, university hospitals of Giessen-Marburg and Bonn, and the University of Bremen have designed ceramic screw nails to stay implanted permanently, avoiding the trouble, anguish, and costs associated with follow-up surgeries.
October 28, 2016
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Screen all Adults for Sleep Apnea? Jury Still Out
Not enough data to advise for or against such screening, U.S. experts in prevention and medicine say
January 24, 2017
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SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds
New research has found spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy can be key to reducing or stabilizing the use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain. In a new study, researchers examined opioid usage data from more than 5,400 patients both prior to and after receiving an SCS system implant. In an SCS system, an implanted device similar to a pacemaker delivers low levels of electrical energy to nerve fibers, interrupting pain signals as they travel to the brain to reduce the sensation of pain.
January 20, 2017
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Seasonal allergies may alter the brain, study shows
Hay fever may do more than give you a stuffy nose and itchy eyes, seasonal allergies may change the brain, says a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience.
August 08, 2016
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Second MILabs preclinical imaging system installed at University of Pennsylvania
The University of Pennsylvania (UPENN), Philadelphia, PA, has completed installation of its second MILabs preclinical imaging system, a scalable U-CTUHR microCT system in the lab of Prof. Joel Karp in the Department of Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania.
July 4, 2017
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Seeing genes inside living cells
For Mazhar Adli, the little glowing dots dancing about on the computer screen are nothing less than the fulfillment of a dream. Those fluorescent dots, moving in real time, are set to illuminate our understanding of the human genome, cancer and other genetic diseases in a way never before possible.
April 14, 2017
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Self-learning robot hands
Researchers at Bielefeld University have developed a grasp system with robot hands that autonomously familiarizes itself with novel objects. The new system works without previously knowing the characteristics of objects, such as pieces of fruit or tools. It was developed as part of the large-scale research project Famula at Bielefeld University's Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC).
June 8, 2017
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Sense of smell is a unique product of genes and experience
New research suggests that an individual's unique sense of smell is the result of genes interacting with experience. a study of genetically similar mice shows that while genes may decide the types of odor-detecting cells that an animal has in its nose, its life history influences the numbers of different cell types, giving each animal a unique perception of smell.
April 26, 2017
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Seven effective steps to get rid of lice
Lice are tiny insects, about the size of a sesame seed, which live in the hair and on the scalp. They feed on human blood, and quickly die if they fall off the body. But what are the most effective ways to get rid of lice?
June 21, 2017
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Seventh Wave announces collaboration with Yecuris to study new liver disease therapies
Seventh Wave Laboratories, a consulting-based contract research organization that assesses the safety and efficacy of pharmaceutical products and medical devices, has announced an exclusive collaboration with Yecuris Corporation, a global leader in the development and use of humanized models in drug development research. The partnership enables the most predictive approach available to study new human liver disease therapies.
May 18, 2017
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Sexually Transmitted Diseases Hit All-Time High
More prevention efforts needed, agency STD specialists say
October 19, 2016
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Shared lifestyle and environment may contribute to risk of common diseases in families, study shows
Family history of disease may be as much the result of shared lifestyle and surroundings as inherited genes, research has shown.
July 21, 2016
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Sheffield researchers use JPK's NanoWizard AFM systems to study soft matter, biological systems at molecular scale
JPK Instruments, a world-leading manufacturer of nanoanalytic instrumentation for research in life sciences and soft matter, works closely with users at the University of Sheffield where their NanoWizard® AFM systems are being used to further understand soft matter and biological systems at the molecular scale in the Hobbs SPM Group in the Department of Physics.
March 9, 2017
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Short Pulsed Electric Fields for Prevention of Burn Scars
Although the proliferation of collagen-producing cells following burn injury is the body's natural response to trauma, the excessive collagen production leads to the formation of permanent, painful scars. Burn scars secondary to collagen cell proliferation cause intense and ongoing physical and psychological suffering to burn patients who survive the initial destruction of skin and tissue
August 11, 2016
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Shortage of low blood pressure drug for patients with septic shock linked to elevated risk of death
Patients with septic shock admitted to hospitals affected by the 2011 shortage of the drug norepinephrine had a higher risk of in-hospital death, according to a study published online by JAMA. the study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the 37th International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.
March 21, 2017
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Shutting down part of our brain can make us more creative
How does creativity work? And, more importantly, what can we do to become more creative individuals? These questions baffle the minds of neuroscientists, philosophers, artists, and corporate leaders alike, with phrases such as 'creative thinking' and 'creative problem-solving' on everyone's lips nowadays. New research may have finally found an answer, and it involves electrodes and a knowledge of the human brain.
June 7, 2017
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Silly Putty with Serious Sensing Capabilities
Researches from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and the University of Sao Paolo, Brazil have converted a silicone polymer, better known by Crayola's trademarked name Silly Putty, into an incredibly sensitive strain sensor. it's so sensitive that a piece of putty pressed against the carotid artery can detect not only the heart rate, but the blood pressure of a person. It can be made hundreds of times more sensitive than a traditional strain sensor, something the researchers demonstrated by detecting the footsteps of spiders walking over it.
December 9, 2016
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Simple intervention reduces suicidal behavior among active-duty service members, study finds
Suicidal behavior among active-duty service members can be reduced for up to six months with a relatively simple intervention that gives them concrete steps to follow during an emotional crisis, according to a new study from the University of Utah's National Center for Veterans Studies.
January 31, 2017
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Simple redesign of medication packages can help decrease patient errors and accidental overdoses
Medication errors are a common patient safety issue in the United States, with 1.5 million adverse drug events reported annually, often occurring in a home or other outpatient setting. Past research has indicated that inadequate or confusing labeling on packages of over-the-counter (OTC) medications is a likely contributor to many unintentional overdoses, particularly among the elderly population.
December 9, 2016
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Simulator Reenacts Drama Inside Mouth to Help Improve Toothbrushes and Toothpaste
All those pretty ads on TV showing how new toothbrushes sweep away build-up and bacteria from teeth have quite a bit of science behind them. Improvements in the brush shape, the bristles, and the toothpaste require a great deal of experimentation to see which are more effective at removing unwanted material.
March 8, 2016
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Singapore researchers discover new mechanism in the liver's response to blocked bile ducts
A multi-disciplinary team of researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore (MBI) at the National University of Singapore (NUS), the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) of A*STAR, and BioSyM, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology have described the mechanical principles adopted by liver cells as they remove excess bile during obstructive cholestasis. This study was published online in the Journal of Hepatology earlier this year.
June 30, 2017
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Single bout of exercise can have significant positive behavioral and cognitive effects
In a new review of the effects of acute exercise published in Brain Plasticity, researchers not only summarize the behavioral and cognitive effects of a single bout of exercise, but also summarize data from a large number of neurophysiological and neurochemical studies in both humans and animals showing the wide range of brain changes that result from a single session of physical exercise (i.e., acute exercise).
June 12, 2017
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Single high-intensity SBRT dose can be effective in treating early stage NSCLC patients
Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a specialized and highly targeted method of delivering radiotherapy, or radiation therapy, to treat cancer. this approach, used to treat many solid-tumor cancers, including lung, liver and kidney cancers, can mean greater convenience and quality of life for patients because it involves fewer individual treatments and can help to spare healthy tissue.
September 28, 2016
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Sinus infections: Are they contagious?
Sinus infections, also known as sinusitis, can be easily mistaken for the very contagious common cold.
July 4, 2017
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Six fixes for anterior pelvic tilt
Anterior pelvic tilt is a change in posture that happens when the front of the pelvis rotates forward, and the back of the pelvis rises.
May 11, 2017
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Six home remedies for hemorrhoids
Hemorrhoids are a common condition among adults that can cause a great deal of pain and discomfort if left untreated.
April 25, 2017
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Six mindfulness techniques for physicians
What goes through your mind in the moment before you walk into the room to see your next patient? A flurry of thoughts about all the patients you've already seen and the mountain of admin tasks you need to finish later today?
June 21, 2017
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Six sciatica stretches for pain relief
Sciatica itself is not a condition, but a very uncomfortable symptom of many potential problems in the back, pelvis, and hip.
June 14, 2017
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Six tips to incorporate movement into everyday life
Commuters and desk sitters have probably heard the news that sitting is not good for our health.
August 12, 2016
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Six ways your pet can boost health and well-being
On arriving home after a long, stressful day at work, you are greeted at the door by an overexcited four-legged friend. It can't fail to put a smile on your face. Pet ownership is undoubtedly one of the greatest pleasures in life, providing companionship and giggles galore. But the benefits do not end there; your pet could be doing wonders for your health and well-being.
June 2, 2017
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Sixteen aplastic anemia patients free of disease after bone marrow transplant and chemo
All patients off immunosuppressive drugs more than a year after transplant in small clinical trial
February 7, 2017
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Skimp on Sleep and you Just May Wind Up Sick
Study of n someone is sleep-deprived, immune system weakens
February 9, 2017
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Skin diseases: List of common conditions and symptoms
There are hundreds of skin conditions that affect humans. the most common skin conditions can have some symptoms that are similar, so it is important to understand the differences between them.
March 28, 2017
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Skin Patch May Help with Peanut Allergy
Delivering small amounts of peanut protein boosted tolerance for about half of young patients in study
October 28, 2016
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Skin rash: 34 pictures, causes, and treatments
A rash is defined as a widespread eruption of skin lesions; it is a very broad medical term. Rashes can vary in appearance greatly, and there are many potential causes. Because of the variety, there is also a wide range of treatments.
June 23, 2017
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Sleep Apnea May Boost Risk for Post-Op Problems
Certain patients should be checked for the disorder before having surgery, researchers say
October 17, 2016
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Sleep disorders: 3D video monitoring with intelligent software as new analysis option
The usual method of recording periodic leg movements in sleep for people with sleep disorders is to use electromyography (EMG), an electrophysiological method used in neurological diagnosis that measures muscle activity.
November 16, 2016
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Sleep disturbances predict increased risk for suicidal symptoms, study finds
Sleep disturbances can warn of worsening suicidal thoughts in young adults, independent of the severity of an individual's depression, a study has found.
June 28, 2017
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Sleep duration impacts treatment response for depressed patients with insomnia
Seven-hour, objective sleep duration increased rate of achieving depression and insomnia remission
June 5, 2017
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Sleepion 2 uses aromatherapy, soothing light and ambient sounds to promote deeper sleep
Cheero USA announced the Sleepion 2, an innovative sleep aid system that uses aromatherapy, soothing light and ambient sounds clinically proven to promote deeper sleep. Years of sleep research paved the way for development of this sleek three-in-one sleeping device that calms the mind, body and spirit.
June 8, 2017
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Small device detects initial signal of epileptic attack and provides effective relief
Researchers at Linkg University have developed in collaboration with French colleagues a small device that both detects the initial signal of an epileptic attack and doses a substance that effectively stops it. all this takes place where the signal arises - in an area of size 20ղ0 m known as a "neural pixel".
August 23, 2016
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Small group of cells within a plant embryo operate in similar way to the human brain
A new study has revealed a group of cells that function as a 'brain' for plant embryos capable of assessing environmental conditions and dictating when seeds will germinate.
June 5, 2017
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Smartphones have potential to transform data collection in rural areas, study shows
The use of smartphones enhances self-reporting of weather incidents, school attendance, illness, and other aspects of daily life in rural areas, a team of researchers has found. Its pilot study indicates that such technologies have the potential to transform data collection in these regions, providing near-real-time windows into the development of markets, the spread of diseases, and the diffusion of ideas and innovations.
November 10, 2016
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Snapchat from your face, get health advice from Apple (CNET Update)
The next evolution of wearable tech involves sunglasses with video cameras and watches with a doctor's diagnoses. CNET Update explores Snapchat Spectacles and Apple's reported plans for HealthKit.
September 26, 2016
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Sneezing elicits blinking response to protect the body from germs, says allergist
The changing weather brings about many things: holiday excitement, a different wardrobe and–perhaps most annoyingly–cold and flu season. Those around you have likely been sneezing more frequently, which may have prompted you to ponder, perhaps while applying mascara or driving in bumper-to-bumper traffic, if it is possible to sneeze with your eyes open.
December 9, 2016
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SnooZeal Prevents Snoring by Training Tongue During Daytime
Snoozeal Inc. is a company out of Seattle, Washington that won the European CE Mark for its snoring prevention device. the SnooZeal product consists of a mouth piece that places electrodes above and below the tongue, a control unit that connects to the mouthpiece, a remote control, and a smartphone app. It works by electrically stimulating the tongue to give it a workout and keep it from completely relaxing and collapsing during the night.
November 28, 2016
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Social jet lag emerged as significant circadian marker for health outcomes, study shows
Preliminary results of a new study show that social jet lag has emerged as an important circadian marker for health outcomes.
June 5, 2017
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Solar-powered graphene skin opens new possibilities for prosthetics
A new way of harnessing the sun's rays to power 'synthetic skin' could help to create advanced prosthetic limbs capable of returning the sense of touch to amputees.
March 23, 2017
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Some Lead Poisoning Tests May Be Faulty
But the majority of tests are unaffected, U.S. officials say
May 17, 2017
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Somogyi effect: Causes and prevention
The Somogyi effect, also known as the rebound effect, occurs in people with diabetes.
June 19, 2017
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South Asian women could be at greater risk of developing osteoporosis in later life, study finds
Pre-menopausal South Asian women could be more at risk of developing osteoporosis in later life than white Caucasian women, a new study in the Journal Bone reports.
March 21, 2017
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Specific molecular features control uptake of biguanides into mitochondria to inhibit respiration
The biguanides are a family of drugs with diverse clinical applications. Metformin, a widely used anti-hyperglycemic biguanide, suppresses mitochondrial respiration by inhibiting respiratory complex I. Phenformin, a related anti-hyperglycemic biguanide, also inhibits respiration, but proguanil, which is widely used for the prevention of malaria, does not.
August 12, 2016
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Spectroscopy and computer help RUB scientists gain new insights into workings of protein switches
Using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers at Ruhr-Universit㲠Bochum (RUB) have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. with high temporal and spatial resolution, they verified that a magnesium atom contributes significantly to switching the so-called G-proteins on and off.
January 16, 2017
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Spirometry: what to expect with the lung function test
Pulmonary function tests measure how well the lungs are working. a spirometry is a pulmonary function test that measures how much air a person breathes out, and how quickly.
May 3, 2017
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Spotting versus period: How to tell the difference
Most women experience at least one instance of non-period spotting, and for some, spotting is quite common. But how do women tell the difference between spotting and a proper period?
May 24, 2017
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SSRI treatment improves cognitive and social functioning in young children with fragile X
Treatment with sertraline may provide nominal but important improvements in cognition and social participation in very young children with fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the leading single-gene cause of autism, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found.
August 26, 2016
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Stanford scientists model how rising temperatures may influence mosquito behavior and disease risk
As temperatures rise with climate change, mosquito season extends past the summer months in many parts of the world. the question has been how this lengthened season influences the risk of being infected with mosquito-born diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika.
May 3, 2017
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Stay Social When you Have UC
Everyone needs people they can count on. That's especially true when you have a long-term condition such as ulcerative colitis (UC). your "squad" of friends, family, and loved ones can make your day.
November 15, 2016
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Stem cells may be responsible for vascular calcification in patients with kidney disease
Scientists have implicated a type of stem cell in the calcification of blood vessels that is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. the research will guide future studies into ways to block minerals from building up inside blood vessels and exacerbating atherosclerosis, the hardening of the arteries.
September 8, 2016
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Stomatitis: Types, causes, and treatment
Stomatitis is inflammation of the mouth. It affects the mucous membranes, which are the thin skin coverings on the inside surface of the mouth. The membranes produce the protective mucus, as well as lining the digestive system, from the mouth to the anus.
June 9, 2017
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Stranger's organ donation instigates six-way kidney swap
A stranger began a chain of events that eventually saved the lives of six people in desperate need of new kidneys. Her organ donation triggered a six-way kidney swap at Houston Methodist Hospital in July, the second largest of its kind performed at one institution in Texas.
August 02, 2016
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Stanford researchers discover new biological markers to measure progression of Huntington's disease
Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine have identified several new biological markers to measure the progression of the inherited neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease (HD). Their findings, which will be published online November 7 ahead of issue in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could benefit clinical trials that test new treatments for the disease.
November 7, 2016
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Statistical analysis reveals possible scientific misconduct in some bone health studies
A new study suggests probable scientific misconduct in at least some of 33 bone health trials published in various medical journals. the study used statistical methods to detect scientific misconduct or research fraud and calls into question the validity of a body of research work led mainly by one researcher in Japan.
November 10, 2016
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Stentrode Minimally Invasive Brain-Machine Interface: Interview with Dr. Thomas Oxley, Neurologist at Royal Melbourne Hospital
Australian researchers at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and the University of Melbourne have developed an electrode that can record brain activity from the motor cortex, without the need for invasive brain surgery. the electrode, called a stentrode, is implanted into a blood vessel in the brain using minimally invasive surgical techniques.
February 7, 2017
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Stress hormone has major effect on perception and perceptual learning
Stress is part of our everyday lives - while some thrive on it, it makes others sick. But what does stress do to our senses?
January 11, 2017
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Stress rash: How stress affects the skin
Most people experience a degree of stress as part of their daily life. The development of rashes on the skin is a common physical symptom of stress that can occur in us all.
May 26, 2017
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Stool microbes predict advanced liver disease
Proof-of-concept study suggests a noninvasive test for specific microbial population patterns could be used to detect advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
May 2, 2017
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Structural deficits may explain mood-independent cognitive difficulties in bipolar disorder
Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a new study reports a link between reduced functional activation and reduced cortical thickness in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder.
November 1, 2016
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Students given 100 times too much caffeine in experiment
Commentary: a UK university is heavily fined after an experiment involving caffeine went very, very wrong. a phone was at the heart of it.
January 25, 2017
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Students Make Martin Shkreli's Drug for $2 a Pill
A team of Australian high school students recreated the drug Daraprim for just $2 a pill in order to prove how cheap it is to make.
December 2, 2016
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Studies examine effectiveness of nasal sprays in reducing frequency, duration of HHT-related epistaxis
Two studies appearing in the September 6 issue of JAMA examine the effectiveness of nasal sprays to reduce the frequency and duration of nosebleeds caused by hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), an inherited condition characterized by abnormal blood vessels which are delicate and prone to bleeding.
September 6, 2016
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Studies find environment plays major role in shaping immune system
Like fingerprints, immune systems vary from person to person. and although we all inherit a unique set of genes that help us respond to infections, recent studies have found that our history and environment–like where and with whom we live–are responsible for 60% to 80% of the differences between individual immune systems, while genetics account for the rest.
September 29, 2016
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Study confirms that cocaine makes users more willing to partake in risky sex
Cocaine use has long been tied anecdotally to higher-than-usual rates of impulsive behavior, including risky sex, but the tie-in has been difficult to study with any scientifically controlled rigor.
February 2, 2017
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Study examines how 'nested interruptions' experienced by ICU nurses can affect patients' well-being
Intensive care units (ICUs) are one of the most challenging and complex environments in today's health-care system. ICU nurses, who perform various tasks critical to ensuring the safety of patients under their care, are frequently interrupted throughout the workday, sometimes as often as 15 times per hour.
February 23, 2017
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Study examines how sex alters time-course of inflammation in the brain after TBI
Male mice have much greater brain distress in the week following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) than female mice, including skyrocketing inflammation and nerve cell death, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center.
June 13, 2017
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Study explores antimicrobial and antiinflammatory activities of bovine colostrum
Colostrum is a thick, sticky, yellowish mammary secretion that all mammals provide to their newborns during the first 24-48 hours after delivery. Human newborns receive colostrum from their mothers during the first few hours after birth, and this 'Elixir of Life' not only provides naturally produced nutrients and antibodies in a highly concentrated low volume form but also creates the foundation of lifelong immunity.
October 7, 2016
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Study explores consequences of poor shoe choice on health of elderly individuals
As people get older, they experience changes in their foot morphology. If they do not change their shoe size along with these transformations, older people - most of whom choose the wrong shoes - suffer, among other things, anxiety, apathy, loss of balance and falls, according to a study by the University of a Coruña.
March 1, 2017
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Study explores ethnic differences in physical activity among kidney transplant patients
University of Leicester research explores ethnic differences in physical activity.
July 28, 2016
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Study explores how LSD can affect speech and language
The consumption of LSD, short for lysergic acid diethylamide, can produce altered states of consciousness. this can lead to a loss of boundaries between the self and the environment, as might occur in certain psychiatric illnesses. David Nutt, professor of Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College, leads a team of researchers who study how this psychedelic substance works in the brain.
August 18, 2016
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Study findings could pave way for better drugs to fight against parasitic infections
Immune cells, called macrophages, may rely on a compound to signal an attack to beat back attacks from parasitic worms, according to an international team of researchers, including Zissis C. Chroneos, associate professor of pediatrics, and microbiology and immunology at Penn State College of Medicine.
May 12, 2017
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Study findings provide insights into pharmacophobia
In the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics the attitudes of patients toward medication are analyzed, with special reference to pharmacophobia.
April 27, 2017
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Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage
In surprising findings, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Boston Children's Hospital (BCH) have discovered that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. the findings are consistent with recent research in adults, which showed that more than 33 percent of adult patients on a gluten-free diet have persistent intestinal damage, despite a reduction of symptoms or the results of blood tests.
November 30, 2016
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Study finds chances for recovery of women with anorexia or bulimia nervosa
A study from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators finds that, contrary to what is often believed, around two thirds of women with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa will eventually recover from their eating disorders. Recovery from bulimia tends to happen more quickly, but while less than a third of participants with anorexia were determined to have recovered an average of nine years after entering the study, almost 63 percent were recovered an average of 22 years later.
December 21, 2016
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Study finds decreased cysteine/cystine ratio could serve as accurate redox biomarker for epilepsy
Approximately 2.9 million people in the United States suffer from epilepsy, according to the CDC. for patients living with this diagnosis and their doctors it is often difficult to predict the onset or progression of chronic seizures. Thanks to a newly published study from the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Anschutz Medical Campus, that may be changing.
October 5, 2016
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Study finds effective interventions to prevent alcohol use among American Indian and rural youth
Community-based and individual-level prevention strategies are effective ways to reduce alcohol use among American Indian and other youth living in rural communities, according to a new study supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health. the National Institute on Drug Abuse also provided support for the study.
March 1, 2017
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Study finds football players may suffer from heat-related illness during first two weeks of practice
As the college football season heats up, a new University of Georgia study finds players are more likely to suffer from heat-related illness during the first two weeks of practice, especially those in the Southeast.
August 29, 2016
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Study finds great variations in view of withdrawing futile treatment for terminally ill patients
The views among physicians and the general public when it comes to deciding whether to withhold or withdraw treatment of terminally ill patients differ greatly. However, in a hypothetical case study at Ume㟕niversity in Sweden of a clearly hopeless medical case, great unanimity among physicians' and the public's assessments could be seen with regards to cancelling treatment or offering relief at the final stages of life.
January 20, 2017
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Study finds greater risk of suicide following initial episode of self-harm
New findings suggest that American adults who survive deliberate self-harm are at increased risk of suicide in the first year after such an event, indicating a need to direct clinical interventions in the critical 12 months following such episodes.
March 21, 2017
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Study finds high rate of misuse of seizure and pain drug
With increasing public attention to overdose deaths and misuse of prescription medications in the United States, researchers today presented the results of a new study looking at abuse and misuse of gabapentin, a medication used to treat seizures and relieve nerve pain often associated with shingles.
August 03, 2016
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Study finds impaired secretion of stress hormone in healthy Indigenous young adults
James Cook University scientists have made a disturbing finding about some young Indigenous people's biological reaction to stress, but one that could help close the health gap for indigenous people.
February 2, 2017
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Study finds increasing incidence of multiple recurring C. difficile infections
Intestinal infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile is the most frequent healthcare-linked infection in the United States. Each year it afflicts about half a million Americans, causes tens of thousands of deaths, and costs the nation's healthcare system an estimated $5 billion. Now researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found evidence that the most difficult C. difficile cases, known as multiple recurring C. difficile infections (mrCDI), are rapidly becoming more common.
July 4, 2017
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Study finds ketogenic diet as 'feasible' option for people with super-refractory status epilepticus
In a small phase I and II clinical trial, Johns Hopkins researchers and colleagues elsewhere found that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet was a safe and effective treatment option for the majority of adults experiencing a relatively rare, often fatal and always severe form of epilepsy marked by prolonged seizures that require medically induced comas to prevent them from further damaging the body and the brain.
February 27, 2017
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Study finds low utilization rates of life-saving medications for high-risk PE patients
A typical intervention for PE patients includes anticoagulants in an effort to prevent migration of the blood clot, but the higher-risk PE population - about 30 percent of all PE patients - are potential candidates for catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) and systemic thrombolysis (ST), both of which employ "clot-busting" medications known as tissue plasminogen activator (tPA).
March 19, 2017
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Study finds new drug treatment to be safe and well-tolerated in pediatric patients with anxiety
A pilot study of guanfacine, a controlled-release alpha2-agonist, in children and adolescents with general, separation-related, and social anxiety disorder showed the drug to be safe and well-tolerated and provided preliminary evidence of its potential effectiveness. the study supports further clinical testing of the drug in pediatric patients with anxiety
March 1, 2017
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Study finds no link between infant's ASD risk and influenza infection during pregnancy
A study of more than 196,000 children found no association between a mother having an influenza infection anytime during pregnancy and an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children, according to a new study published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
November 28, 2016
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Study finds no major difference in effectiveness of two classes of drugs in peritoneal dialysis patients
With cardiovascular disease being the No. 1 cause of death in end-stage kidney disease patients on peritoneal dialysis, a new study examined two classes of medications commonly prescribed to prevent cardiovascular events in these patients and found no significant difference in outcomes.
August 09, 2016
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Study finds one in three former ICU patients shows symptoms of depression
Almost one in three people discharged from hospital intensive care units has clinically important and persistent symptoms of depression, a so-called meta-analysis of reports on more than 4,000 patients suggests.
August 15, 2016
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Study finds positive health outcomes among married LGBT couples
Same-sex marriage has been the law of the land for nearly two years -- and in some states for even longer -- but researchers can already detect positive health outcomes among couples who have tied the knot, a University of Washington study finds.
April 13, 2017
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Study finds racial-ethnic disparities in emergency department opioid prescription for pain-related conditions
Dr. Astha Singhal, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine (GSDM), published a study that found a racial disparity in opioid prescriptions for emergency department visits for non-definitive pain-related conditions.
August 09, 2016
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Study finds tens of millions of Americans drink alcohol at dangerously high levels
Nearly 32 million adults in the United States (13 percent of the U.S. population aged 18 and older) consumed more than twice the number of drinks considered binge drinking on at least one occasion, according to a 2013 survey that asked about past-year drinking. This higher level of drinking is associated with increased health and safety risks. A report of the findings is online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
May 17, 2017
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Study finds thalamic DBS to be safe, effective treatment for young adults with Tourette syndrome
A surgical technique that sends electrical impulses to a specific area of the brain reduces the "tics," or involuntary movements and vocal outbursts, experienced by young adults with severe cases of Tourette syndrome, according to a new study led by investigators from NYU Langone Medical Center.
April 7, 2017
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Study finds that IV steroids decrease amount of pain medication needed for nerve blocks
Nerve blocks using local anesthetics, or numbing medicines similar to Novocain, are routinely performed by anesthesiologists to provide pain relief for patients undergoing surgery. Although techniques exist to provide several days of pain relief, they usually require special skills plus additional time and resources, and aren't always possible.
March 15, 2017
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Study finds worsening outcomes in service members five years after mild blast-induced concussion
NIH-funded research suggests need for new treatment strategies to help veterans recover.
May 10, 2017
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Study highlights critical gap in addiction treatment for young people with OUD
Buprenorphine and naltrexone are medications used to treat OUD that help prevent relapse and overdose when used appropriately. In late 2016, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended, for the first time, that providers offer medication treatment to adolescents with OUD.
June 19, 2017
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Study highlights importance of treating mental-health problems to reduce community violence
New research from North Carolina State University, RTI International, Arizona State University and Duke University Medical Center finds a host of factors that are associated with subsequent risk of adults with mental illness becoming victims or perpetrators of violence. the work highlights the importance of interventions to treat mental-health problems in order to reduce community violence and instances of mental-health crises.
December 22, 2016
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Study highlights need to control doping problem in amateur sports
A study led by the University of Granada (UGR) has shown that doping is not only a problem exclusive to professional sports, but also occurs in amateur sports.
March 1, 2017
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Study highlights role of BCL11A gene in intellectual disability syndrome
Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics have found a gene responsible for an intellectual disability disorder and proven how it works.
July 21, 2016
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Study highlights upward trend in alcohol-related injuries occurring at home
Of all alcohol-related injuries in various public hospital emergency departments in Queensland, Australia, more occurred at home than at licensed premises.
September 12, 2016
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Study identifies factors linked to disengagement from treatment for opioid use disorder
Individuals with opioid use disorder who are treated with buprenorphine, a commonly prescribed drug to treat addiction, are more likely to disengage from treatment programs if they are black or Hispanic, unemployed, or have hepatitis C according to a study published online in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment.
January 5, 2017
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Study identifies key mediator in learning process
The ability of the brain to respond and adapt to changes is scientifically called brain plasticity. this ability is the basis of all learning processes. new neurons, which can still be generated in the adult brain in specific areas, are instrumental in this process.
April 7, 2017
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Study identifies new mechanism of how inhibitory brain cells develop
Scientists have discovered that networks of inhibitory brain cells or neurons develop through a mechanism opposite to the one followed by excitatory networks. Excitatory neurons sculpt and refine maps of the external world throughout development and experience, while inhibitory neurons form maps that become broader with maturation. this discovery adds a new piece to the puzzle of how the brain organizes and processes information.
December 27, 2016
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Study identifies structural changes in genes that increase risk of Tourette syndrome
Researchers have identified structural changes in two genes that increase the risk of developing Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary motor and vocal tics.
June 21, 2017
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Study investigates differences between heavy and light drinkers
Heavy drinkers develop behavioral tolerance to alcohol over time on some fine motor tasks, but not on more complex tasks, according to a study led by a Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System researcher. While heavy drinkers showed less impairment than light drinkers on a rote fine motor test over time, they did not perform better on a test involving more short-term memory, motor speed, and more complex cognitive processing.
April 14, 2017
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Study of U.S. Navy healthcare personnel finds higher PTSD risk among women than men
A study of U.S. Navy healthcare personnel has shown that when comparing the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among women and men who had similar deployment experiences, and especially combat experience, the risk of PTSD was significantly higher among women.
February 23, 2017
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Study offers insight into earliest molecular steps that lead to organ rejection
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Toronto have uncovered the first molecular steps that lead to immune system activation and eventual rejection of a transplanted organ. The findings, published today in Science Immunology, may be used someday to create better donor-recipient matches and develop new ways to prevent rejection of transplanted tissues.
June 23, 2017
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Study offers new insights into brain mechanisms for spatial navigation
An international research team led by UvA researchers Jeroen Bos, Martin Vinck and Cyriel Pennartz has identified a new type of neuron which might play a vital role in humans' ability to navigate their environments. The discovery is an important step towards understanding how the brain codes navigation behaviour at larger scales and could potentially open up new treatment strategies for people with impaired topographical orientation like Alzheimer's patients. The team's results are published in the latest edition of Nature Communications.
May 29, 2017
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Study opens new range of therapeutic options for patients with atypical Rett syndrome
A translational, multicenter study carried out by research groups of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), San Juan de Dios Hospital (HSJD), the University of Barcelona (UB), Clinic Hospital (IDIBAPS), the University of Vic (UVic), Santa Creu i Sant Pau Hospital (IIB Sant Pau) and the thematic area of Rare Diseases (CIBERER), has unveiled the potential of D-serine -- a dietary supplement -- to improve the neuronal function of a patient with a mutation of the glutamate receptors associated to atypical Rett syndrome with severe encephalopathy.
July 4, 2017
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Study provides deeper understanding of how cells' crowded surfaces induce complex protein behavior
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have brought physics and biology together to further understand how cells' crowded surfaces induce complex protein behavior.
September 16, 2016
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Study provides greater understanding of psychology behind fear
What happens in the brain when we see other people experiencing a trauma or being subjected to pain? Well, the same regions that are involved when we feel pain ourselves are also activated when we observe other people who appear to be going through some painful experience.
May 25, 2017
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Study provides missing link for sex-dependent effects of mild brain blast injury
The brains of men and women are wired differently, and when it comes to traumatic brain injuries (TBI), women are more likely to develop subsequent neuropsychiatric disorders, like anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Until now, it's been unclear why that is, but a new study by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) provides that missing link - a potentially disrupted pathway in the brain.
April 4, 2017
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Study provides vital clues into biology of gambling addiction
Gambling addiction activates the same brain pathways as drug and alcohol cravings, suggests new research.
January 3, 2017
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Study quantifies burden of clinically impactful ADRs in general adult population
In a study of 1000 adult patients with unplanned admission to a tertiary hospital in Singapore, the prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) at the time of admission was 12.4 percent, and the prevalence of ADRs causing admission to the hospital was 8.1 percent.
September 19, 2016
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Study reports significant under-use of topical INS therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis patients
Chronic rhinosinusitis (a condition in which the cavities around nasal passages [sinuses] become inflamed and swollen, which interferes with drainage and causes mucus buildup) is a common and expensive-to-treat disease, which is primarily managed with prolonged medical therapies. Topical intranasal steroid (INS) therapy has been shown to be highly effective at improving CRS-specific symptoms and quality of life.
August 25, 2016
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Study reveals mechanism for illness-induced sleepiness in humans and animals
It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs, according to a study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. a study published this week in eLife reveals the mechanism for this sleepiness.
January 19, 2017
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Study reveals mechanism that regulates fluid intake in the body to prevent fatal water intoxication
A multi-institute study led by Monash University has revealed for the first time the mechanism that regulates fluid intake in the human body and stops us from over-drinking, which can cause potentially fatal water intoxication. the study challenges the popular idea that we should drink eight glasses of water a day for health.
October 7, 2016
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Study reveals neurological mechanism in concussions
New research examines what happens at the neuronal level during a concussion and reveals how a blow to the head causes swellings along the axon of the neuron. The new insights could help researchers to improve symptoms in patients with concussions.
June 12, 2017
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Study reveals new way to improve stability of common protein drugs
Gaining access to important biopharmaceuticals needed to treat illnesses and autoimmune diseases is one of the biggest obstacles developing countries be astronomical where these medications are needed most, and when doctors are able to acquire those medications they face another challenge - time. Drugs are perishable and some require refrigeration, which can be difficult to provide in the world's poorest regions.
December 2, 2016
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Study reveals positive experience and attitude of patients on electroconvulsive therapy
Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has long had a stigma of being a painful and barbaric method of treatment, but a new study found that patients undergoing ECT for a variety of psychiatric disorders view the therapy in a positive light.
June 5, 2017
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Study reveals swearing provides tolerance toward pain and makes individuals stronger
The study conducted by Dr Richard Stephens, from Keele University, and David Spierer and Emmanuel Katehis, from Long Island University Brooklyn, reveals that swearing aloud makes individuals stronger.
May 5, 2017
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Study reveals that large number of people in the U.S. drink at very high levels
Nearly 32 million adults in the United States (13 percent of the U.S. population aged 18 and older) consumed more than twice the number of drinks considered binge drinking on at least one occasion, according to a 2013 survey that asked about past-year drinking. This higher level of drinking is associated with increased health and safety risks.
May 17, 2017
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Study Sees Link Between Porn and Sexual Dysfunction
It could be creating unrealistic expectations for young, inexperienced men, researcher says
May 12, 2017
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Study sheds light on how key protein allows hearing to work
Although the basic outlines of human hearing have been known for years -- sensory cells in the inner ear turn sound waves into the electrical signals that the brain understands as sound -- the molecular details have remained elusive.
June 29, 2017
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Study sheds new light on biological mechanisms that drive flashbulb memory
Most people remember where they were when the twin towers collapsed in New York ... new research reveals why that may be the case.
September 8, 2016
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Study sheds new light on how medical diagnostics can be enhanced by obtaining several opinions
Methods of collective intelligence can result in considerably more accurate medical diagnoses, but only under certain conditions. a study headed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development has shed new light on how medical diagnostics can be boosted by obtaining several independent judgements. the researchers also found that the group composition is decisive for the quality of the diagnosis.
August 11, 2016
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Study sheds new light on poor sleep conditions during Antarctic summer
The continuous daylight conditions of summer in Antarctica are known to interfere with physiological functions such as sleep patterns and the release of melatonin, a hormone associated with circadian rhythms and sleep. Now, a study offers new information about why people in this region sleep poorly, and suggests that social behavior may also play a role.
March 10, 2017
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Study shows appendicitis patients can be safely discharged on same day of surgery
Patients with acute appendicitis who undergo laparoscopic appendectomy (surgical remove of the appendix) do not experience higher rates of postoperative complications or costly readmissions when sent home on the same day of their operations compared with patients hospitalized overnight, according to study results published online as an "article in press" on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website ahead of print publication.
November 15, 2016
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Study shows effect of spiritual retreats on neurotransmitter systems in the brain
More Americans than ever are turning to spiritual, meditative and religious retreats as a way to reset their daily life and enhance wellbeing. Now, researchers at the Marcus Institute of Integrative Health at Thomas Jefferson University show there are changes in the dopamine and serotonin systems in the brains of retreat participants.
March 23, 2017
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Study shows efficacy of biologics for mucosal healing in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
Although anti-inflammatory treatments are quite effective at reducing symptoms in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the mucosal lining of the intestine often remains ulcerated, and many patients still ultimately require surgery. Because of this, the goal of treatment is shifting towards mucosal healing rather than just symptom relief.
March 22, 2017
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Study shows how socially contagious itching is hardwired in the brain
Some behaviors -- yawning and scratching, for example -- are socially contagious, meaning if one person does it, others are likely to follow suit. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that socially contagious itching is hardwired in the brain.
March 10, 2017
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Study shows how spinal deformity affects success of total hip replacement
People with spinal deformity also requiring a total hip replacement are at greater risk for dislocation or follow-up revision surgery, suggesting that these higher-risk patients may benefit from a more personalized approach to their surgeries to reduce the risk of poorer outcomes.
March 17, 2017
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Study shows increase in hospital admissions for mental disorders during periods of heatwaves
A mental hospital-based study in Hanoi, Vietnam looked at if there is a relationship between heat exposure and mental health problems. the results showed significant increase in hospital admissions for mental illnesses during periods of heatwaves, especially during longer periods of heat exposure. this is according to a doctoral thesis from Umeå University.
March 21, 2017
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Study shows link between psychiatric symptoms and substance use among high school students
Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health with collaborators at the Federal University of Sao Paulo studied the relationship between psychiatric symptoms and patterns of substance use among high school students in Brazil and found that respondents with clinically significant scores on a behavioral screening questionnaire were more likely to use alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana in the past month compared to those without symptoms.
August 02, 2016
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Study shows link between susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia and exertional heat stroke
New research published online in the FASEB Journal may ultimately help athletes and trainers better understand who may be more at risk for heat stroke. In the report, scientists use animals to show that there is a link between the susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH) and exertional heat stroke.
May 11, 2017
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Study shows marathon participation causes temporary injury to kidneys
Researchers at Yale University have found that marathon runners can suffer Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), due to the physical tension they experience while running the race. Although AKI is a temporary injury that heals within a span of two days after the race, questions arise about the long-term impacts of this exhausting task.
March 30, 2017
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Study shows possibility to achieve immunological antibody memory with mucosal vaccination
If a vaccine is to protect the intestines and other mucous membranes in the body, it also needs to be given through the mucosa, for example as a nasal spray or a liquid that is drunk. the mucosa forms a unique immunological antibody memory that does not occur if the vaccine is given by injection.
September 14, 2016
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Study shows retinoic acid could prevent postsurgical lymphedema
A study conducted at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) showed that 9-cis retinoic acid (alitretinoin) could significantly prevent postsurgical lymphedema. Furthermore, the experiments were conducted with updated, easily reproducible mouse models that more accurately simulated lymphedema development in humans.
September 16, 2016
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Study shows septic systems as important sources of emerging contaminants in drinking water
A new analysis shows that septic systems in the United States routinely discharge pharmaceuticals, consumer product chemicals, and other potentially hazardous chemicals into the environment. The study, published June 15 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, is the most comprehensive assessment to date of septic systems as important sources of emerging contaminants, raising health concerns since many of these chemicals, once discharged, end up in groundwater and drinking water supplies.
June 27, 2017
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Study shows thinning of gray matter in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder
A new study has found brain abnormalities in people with bipolar disorder.
May 2, 2017
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Study takes first step towards identifying best practices for Mohs micrographic surgery
In an analysis of Medicare billing data submitted by more than 2,300 United States physicians, researchers have calculated the average number of surgical slices, or cuts, made during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), a procedure that progressively removes thin layers of cancerous skin tissue in a way that minimizes damage to healthy skin and the risks of leaving cancerous tissue behind.
April 28, 2017
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Study unravels mystery of how nerve cells are damaged in neurodegenerative diseases
A new study has uncovered a molecular mechanism in the prion protein, a protein responsible for neurodegenerative diseases, which may explain why nerve cells degenerate in these disorders.
May 25, 2017
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Study: Brain injury can increase impulsivity problems in rats
New research from the University of British Columbia confirms for the first time that even mild brain injury can result in impulse control problems in rats.
May 8, 2017
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Study: DBS shows promise for treating patients with post-stroke pain syndrome
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral striatum/anterior limb of the internal capsule is safe and feasible in addressing the affective component of pain in patients with post-stroke pain syndrome.
June 19, 2017
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Study: Logwood combustion emits substantial amount of secondary organic aerosols
Aerosol emissions from logwood combustion increase significantly when the emission ages in ambient air. a significant increase occurs already within three hours of aging, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. the emission increase was caused by the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in which gaseous organic compounds, released during the combustion, oxidise and condense on aerosol particles. this observation is very important, because current emission inventories do not take SOA emissions into consideration at all.
March 30, 2017
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Study: Using musical cues to learn physical task can change brain structure
People who practiced a basic movement task to music showed increased structural connectivity between the regions of the brain that process sound and control movement.
July 6, 2017
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Stuttering linked to reductions in blood flow in the brain area that controls speech production
A study led by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles demonstrates what lead investigator Bradley Peterson, MD, calls "a critical mass of evidence" of a common underlying lifelong vulnerability in both children and adults who stutter. they discovered that regional cerebral blood flow is reduced in the Broca's area - the region in the frontal lobe of the brain linked to speech production - in persons who stutter. More severe stuttering is associated with even greater reductions in blood flow to this region.
January 4, 2017
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Sub-second system seizures
Professor Neil Johnson, a physicist at the University of Miami College of Arts and Sciences, is interested in complex networks. He studies how fast-moving packets of information spread and interact in large networks like stock markets and the human brain, and what makes the overall system then behave in ways that are unexpected.
March 8, 2017
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Success in the 3-D bioprinting of cartilage
A team of researchers has managed to generate cartilage tissue by printing stem cells using a 3-D-bioprinter. the fact that the stem cells survived being printed in this manner is a success in itself. In addition, the research team was able to influence the cells to multiply and differentiate to form chondrocytes (cartilage cells) in the printed structure.
April 28, 2017
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Successful insomnia treatment may not require complicated neurofeedback, study shows
A new study published in Brain indicates that successful treatment for insomnia may not actually require complicated neurofeedback (direct training of brain functions). Rather, it appears patients who simply believe they're getting neurofeedback training appear to get the same benefits.
February 22, 2017
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Sun poisoning: Symptoms, treatment, and prevention
Sun poisoning is a skin reaction that occurs after exposure to sunlight. Understanding sun poisoning is important for knowing how to prevent it, and how to treat it.
June 19, 2017
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Sun protection can benefit both health and appearance
As the winter temperatures begin to thaw, many may be dreaming of a sun-drenched spring and summer, and some may be hoping to show off a tan. While these individuals may believe tanning makes them more beautiful, this habit can actually damage their skin in the long run.
March 3, 2017
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Sunflower seeds contaminated by toxic molds pose increased health risks
Michigan State University researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin produced by molds and pose an increased health risk in many low-income countries worldwide.
April 21, 2017
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Sunscreen may cause vitamin D deficiency, says study
Sunscreen is considered key when it comes to protecting against skin damage. a new study, however, suggests that there may be a significant drawback to using sunscreen: it could lead to vitamin D deficiency.
May 3, 2017
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Surgical approach may eliminate pseudoparalysis in patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears
Research presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty day in San Diego shows arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction (SCR), a surgical approach to treat irreparable rotator cuff tears, may eliminate pseudoparalysis and significantly improve shoulder function.
March 19, 2017
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Survey: More than 52% of people living with debilitating skin condition wait over four years for a diagnosis
To mark HS (hidradenitis suppurativa) Awareness Week from 5-11 June 2017, the Champions for Change campaign (developed and funded by AbbVie Ltd) calls for people who suspect they may have HS to go and see their GP without delay. In addition, it calls for the development of effective patient pathways, to ensure those living with HS see the right specialist at the right time to relieve unnecessary pressure on the NHS while improving patient outcomes.
June 6, 2017
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Swansea University experts assess contribution of ultra-rare genetic variation in common epilepsies
Despite progress in understanding the genetics of rare childhood epilepsies, the common adult forms of epilepsy have proven less amenable to traditional gene-discovery analyses.
March 13, 2017
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Swedish researchers prove that 3D bioprinted human cartilage cells can be implanted
Swedish researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and Sahlgrenska Academy have successfully induced human cartilage cells to live and grow in an animal model, using 3D bioprinting. the results will move development closer to a potential future in which it will be possible to help patients by giving them new body parts through 3D bioprinting.
March 23, 2017
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Sweetener found in urine lets slip how much we pee into pools: up to 75L
It's definitely gross, possibly harmful, but still far from deadly.
March 1, 2017
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Swodeam Consulting Inc.
clinial consulting and education in orthopedic manual therapy.
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Swollen eyelid: Twelve causes and treatments
A swollen eyelid is more than just a cosmetic annoyance. It can be terrifying, particularly if the swelling is severe enough to interfere with a person's ability to see.
July 4, 2017
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SyMRI approach provides myelin maps in scan times of only 5 minutes
It has been a long-standing dream in MRI to move from visualizing tissue contrast differences to directly imaging patient tissue properties. Recent developments within quantitative MRI have provided substantial steps forward in measuring the basic physical properties such as T1 and T2 relaxation times or proton density.
May 2, 2017
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Synergy Consulting Group Limited
specialists in pharmaceutical, medical, scientific, and medical diagnostic recruitment.
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Misc. - T

Taking miniature organs from lab to clinic
Scientists have developed a gel for growing miniaturized body organs that can be used in clinical diagnostics and drug development. Organoids are miniature organs that can be grown in the lab from a person's stem cells. they can be used to model diseases, and in the future could be used to test drugs or even replace damaged tissue in patients.
November 16, 2016
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Talking therapy strengthens connections in the brains of people with psychosis, study shows
A new study from King's College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust has shown for the first time that cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) strengthens specific connections in the brains of people with psychosis, and that these stronger connections are associated with long-term reduction in symptoms and recovery eight years later.
January 17, 2017
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Targeted approach may improve recovery after concussion, experts say
Prescribed rest–both physical and mental–is the standard treatment for concussion. But a growing body of evidence suggests that a more active, targeted approach might provide better outcomes for some patients, reports a special article in the December issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS).
November 30, 2016
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Tattoo Aftercare: What to Know
Most people know that dirty tattoo needles can transmit infections like Hepatitis C.
June 8, 2017
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Technology by Mettler Toledo continues to replace time-cmethods
When a manufacturer of sprayed concrete technologies needed to reduce quality control (QC) drying time for one of its specialized products, METTLER TOLEDO helped it get its time-per-test down from four hours to just 15 minutes.
April 4, 2017
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Teen Suicide Thoughts Double in a Decade
New U.S. study coincides with concern around issue after Netflix releases '13 Reasons Why'
May 4, 2017
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Teenagers who access mental health services see significant improvements, study shows
Young people with mental health problems who have contact with mental health services are significantly less likely to suffer from clinical depression later in their adolescence than those with equivalent difficulties who do not receive treatment, according to new research.
January 19, 2017
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TELA Bio's OviTex RBSs implanted in 100 hernia repair procedures since FDA clearance in June 2016
TELA Bio, Inc., a surgical reconstruction company leading the development and commercialization of Reinforced BioScaffolds (RBSs) for soft tissue repair, today announced the company's OviTex™ RBSs have been implanted in more than 100 hernia repair procedures since receiving U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance in June 2016.
November 3, 2016
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Ten best home remedies for poison ivy
Exposure to poison ivy is problematic for many people, causing a condition known as contact dermatitis that is characterized by a rash and itching sensation.
June 23, 2017
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Ten health benefits of sex
Type "sexual health" into a search engine, and it is likely that you will be bombarded with pages of articles covering anything and everything, from sexual norms and advice on relationships, birth control, and pregnancy, to information about STDs and how to avoid them. what is less often discussed, however, is the abundant physical and psychological health benefits of sex. we have put together a list of the top health benefits of sex, as backed up by science.
April 13, 2017
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Ten home remedies for bronchitis
Bronchitis is a condition where the lining of the bronchial tubes in the lungs becomes inflamed.
March 17, 2017
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Tendon transfer for quadriplegics greatly underused, article reveals
A surgery for quadriplegics called tendon transfer can significantly improve hand and elbow function, but the procedure is greatly underused, according to an article in the journal Hand Clinics by Loyola Medicine hand surgeon Michael S. Bednar, MD, FAAOS.
August 24, 2016
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Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate
How many people are thought to be living with lung disease and why are many people unaware of their poor lung health?
July 27, 2016
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Texas A&M specialist explains what people need to know about mumps
Mumps may seem like a contagion relegated to history books, but like many other diseases of the past now preventable with a vaccine, mumps has been making a resurgence. Cases are at 10-year high and are especially common on college campuses across the country. now the Dallas area is seeing the largest outbreak in Texas in years. Cristie Columbus, MD, vice dean of the Texas A&M College of Medicine's Dallas campus and an infectious disease specialist, explains what people need to know about the mumps.
December 20, 2016
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The 10 best sleep apps
The benefits associated with a good night's sleep are endless, yet a significant number of people are not getting enough sleep on a regular basis. We have identified the best sleep apps out there to maximize your forty winks and send you happily off to dreamland.
June 7, 2017
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The chemistry of plants facing multiple stress scenarios
All living organisms harbor complex chemical networks inside their cells. The sum of all these chemical reactions is the driving force of life and is called metabolism. New research studies how plants adapt their metabolic networks to respond to different environmental stresses.
May 30, 2017
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The DEA just cut opioid production by 25 percent for next year
The agency cites falling demand, as well as the opioid epidemic
October 4, 2016
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The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano achieves major milestone with 1,000th robotic surgery
Surgeons on the medical staff at the Heart Hospital Baylor Plano achieved a major milestone when they performed that hospital's 1,000th robotic surgery March 31, nearly six years after initiating the program in November 2011.
April 7, 2017
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The Increasing Cost of the Heroin Epidemic
@3
June 14, 2017
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The infralimbic cortex: A window into cocaine addiction
Recent research published in the Journal of Neuroscience examines a part of the brain that plays an important role in addiction: the infralimbic cortex. The findings could help to treat addictive behavior in the future.
June 30, 2017
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The inventor of Siri says one day AI will be used to upload and access our memories
Tom Gruber says AI memory enhancement is inevitable.
April 25, 2017
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The Leka smart toy is a robot for children with developmental disabilities
To help them learn and communicate
January 4, 2017
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The mysterious powers of spider silks
Study brings 'Spider-Man' tech a step closer to biomedical applications
May 1, 2017
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The neuroscience of humor investigated
A study published in Frontiers in Neuroscience takes a look inside the brains of professional comedians and compares them with less humorous humans. they attempt to home in on the seat of creative humor and ask what it can tell us about creativity.
March 1, 2017
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The reasoning behind Apple's acquisition of Beddit
This could be Apple's reasoning for buying the sleep tracking company.
May 10, 2017
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The Role of Modern Technology to Treat Mental Health Conditions
Exponential Medicine 2016 was held last month in San Diego, California and videos from many of the presentations at the conference are now available. we just started watching the talks that most interest us and this one by Arshya Vahabzadeh M.D. about the potential for modern technology to influence mental health is fascinating and inspiring.
November 17, 2016
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The Truth About Gas
Though the words "burp" and "fart" make most kids giggle, adults usually get shy when they get gassy and pretend that it never happened. But sometimes, it's hard to ignore.
November 1, 2016
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These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs
CDC cites blood thinners, antibiotics, Diabetes drugs for nearly half of adverse drug-related events
November 22, 2016
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This After Severe Head Injury Brings Mixed Results
More patients survived, but more were in vegetative state, and little difference was seen in long-term disability
September 8, 2016
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This Helps Paralyzed Man Regain Sense of Touch
With implants, he also felt some sensation in his own fingers
October 13, 2016
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This Pill Delivers Medication Days Or Weeks After it's Swallowed
It Unfurls Into a Star So you Can't Poop It Out
November 16, 2016
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This Stick-On Sweat Monitor Knows When you Need a Drink
It's Being Tested by the Air Force and Sports Beverage Companies
November 23, 2016
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This World Kidney Day, pledge to maintain a healthy weight
NIH statement from Dr. Griffin P. Rodgers, Director, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
March 9, 2017
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Three brain chemicals affect how we handle uncertainty
New research has revealed how three important brain signaling chemicals affect the way that we handle uncertainty. It turns out that noradrenaline regulates our estimates of how unstable the environment is, acetylcholine helps us adapt to changing environments, and dopamine pushes us to act on our beliefs about uncertainty.
November 15, 2016
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Three-year course of treatment could banish symptoms of hay fever, study finds
Patients blighted by hay fever could markedly reduce symptoms for several years after a three-year course of treatment, but not after two years of treatment, researchers have found.
February 14, 2017
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Tic disorders: Causes, types, and diagnosis
Tics are irregular, uncontrollable, unwanted, and repetitive movements of muscles that can occur in any part of the body.
June 16, 2017
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Time Outdoors May Deliver Better Sleep
Camping and exposure to natural light helps prime your body for an earlier bedtime, researchers say
February 2, 2017
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Tiny light-emitting particles may provide unprecedented detail in biological imaging
For certain frequencies of short-wave infrared light, most biological tissues are nearly as transparent as glass. Now, researchers have made tiny particles that can be injected into the body, where they emit those penetrating frequencies. the advance may provide a new way of making detailed images of internal body structures such as fine networks of blood vessels.
April 10, 2017
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Tiny Probe for Measuring Temperatures Inside Brain
Scientists at the University of Adelaide and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics have developed a tiny probe for measuring the temperature inside the brain. as anyone with an extremely high fever will attest to, the brain doesn't respond well to high heat. Various diseases, drugs, and concussions can create swelling, inflammation, and other temperature changes, and studying how treatment affects these can be helped with an accurate brain thermometer.
July 21, 2016
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TMDU researchers inject gelatin-based gel carrying protein/peptide drugs to trigger bone augmentation
Researchers centered at Tokyo Medical and Dental University(TMDU) deliver a protein/peptide combination using an injectable gel carrier to promote bone formation in mouse jawbones
August 23, 2016
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Topical curcumin gel effective in treating burns and scalds
What is the effect of Topical Curcumin Gel for treating burns and scalds? In a recent research paper, investigators stress that use of topical curcumin gel for treating skin problems, like burns and scalds, is very different and appears to work more effectively, when compared to taking curcumin tablets by mouth for other conditions.
March 14, 2017
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TPU scientists develop new device to detect hazardous substances in water
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University have developed a device for the rapid analysis of liquids on the content of hazardous substances - such as heavy metals. Polytechnicers use a method based on polymer optodes - very small plastic matrices that can be made sensitive to specific substances by means of special reagents.
September 22, 2016
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Trac Services
TRAC Services are a regulatory affairs consultancy who help pharmaceutical companies meet the regulatory requirements needed to market and sell their products within Europe.
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Tracking down water pollution through DNA of algae
The degree of pollution of rivers resulting from human activities is assessed using different biotic indices. the latter reflect the ecological status of a river based on the quantity and diversity of organisms selected as bioindicators, due to their ecological preferences and tolerance to pollution. this is the case of diatoms, algae consisting of a single cell surrounded by a silica skeleton, recommended by researchers as one of the ideal bioindicators for rivers and lakes.
April 18, 2017
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Transcranial magnetic stimulation could bring back abandoned memories
It's clear that your working memory -- which holds attention on small things of short-term importance -- works, or you wouldn't be able to remember a new phone number long enough to dial it.
December 1, 2016
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Transparent Skull Implant for Repeat Brain Laser Therapy
Researchers at University of California, Riverside and Mexico's Centro de Investigaci򬟃ient쥩ca y de Educaci򬟓uperior de Ensenada have been working on confirming the safety and usefulness of their transparent cranial window implant we first reported on a few years ago. It was designed to allow lasers to be used to repeatedly treat locations deep inside the brain that are currently impossible to get to using traditional means.
July 21, 2016
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Treating animals may be part of global strategy to eradicate tropical diseases, study suggests
As the World Health Organization steps up its efforts to eradicate a once-rampant tropical disease, a University of Washington study suggests that monitoring, and potentially treating, the monkeys that co-exist with humans in affected parts of the world may be part of the global strategy.
April 12, 2017
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Treating metabolic abnormalities may improve symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant depression
Identifying and treating metabolic deficiencies in patients with treatment-resistant depression can improve symptoms and in some cases even lead to remission, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine published online today in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
August 12, 2016
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Treating PCOS in adolescent girls may help prevent future subfertility, research suggests
In adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), bringing the amount of abdominal visceral fat and liver fat down to normal restores ovulation, normalizes the symptoms of androgen excess, and may help prevent future subfertility, new research from Spain suggests. the results of the study will be presented Tuesday, April 4, at ENDO 2017, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Orlando.
April 4, 2017
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Treating Sleep Apnea May Ease Night Bathroom Trips
Research finds many men's urinary habits benefit when CPAP mask therapy is used
March 27, 2017
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Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?
Trifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) represent the latest in premium lens technology. they are tiny, artificial lenses that are implanted into the eye during a cataract or lens replacement procedure.
September 28, 2016
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Triggering the brain's auto-focus
Researchers pinpoint brain structure that links environmental cues to enhanced focus
January 25, 2017
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Tropical bed bug reappears after 60-year absence
Biologically, tropical bed bugs mirror common bed bugs in that they feed on human blood. So they're likely to cause similar health problems if you get a severe infestation: fear, anxiety, depression, sleeplessness, and itchy, blistery reactions on some people.
November 9, 2016
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Tropical Bedbugs Creeping back to Florida
These cousins to the common variety haven't been seen since the 1930s or '40s
November 11, 2016
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TSRI chemists devise versatile molecule-building tool for creating new drugs and chemical products
Chemists at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have devised a versatile molecule-building tool for creating new drugs and other chemical products.
March 9, 2017
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TSRI scientists discover potential way to stop meth relapse
New research from the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) suggests that the reason methamphetamine users find it so hard to quit--88 percent of them relapse, even after rehab--is that meth takes advantage of the brain's natural learning process.
March 31, 2017
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TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction