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491 Health - Nanotechnology Resources

Misc. - Numbers

3D bioprinted human cartilage cells can be implanted
Swedish researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and Sahlgrenska Academy have successfully induced human cartilage cells to live and grow in an animal model, using 3D bioprinting. the results will move development closer to a potential future in which it will be possible to help patients by giving them new body parts through 3D bioprinting.
March 23, 2017
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3D printed patch helps guide growing blood vessels
Ischemia results when narrowed, hardened or blocked blood vessels starve tissue, often resulting in heart attack, stroke, gangrene and other serious conditions. Surgery can correct the problem in large vessels, but treatment is much more complex in vessels that are smaller or damaged by prior treatment. Professor Christopher Chen (BME, MSE) is developing a method using 3D-printed patches infused with cells that offer a promising new approach to growing healthy blood vessels.
June 13, 2017
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3D Sponge Made of Carbon Nanotubes Shows Promise for Biomedical Implementations
A multi-disciplinary research, spanning several years has revealed that a new 3D sponge composed of carbon nanotubes was capable of promoting nerve fiber growth, linking separated neural explants and offering a practical reconnection.
July 18, 2016
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Misc. - A

A bioink by any other name: Clarifying definitions in 3-D bioprinting
A new article in Future Science OA is looking to identify and define key terms associated with bioinks and bioprinting ("A bioink by any other name: terms, concepts and constructions related to 3D bioprinting").
July 25, 2016
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A golden opportunity for drug targeting
Gold complexes can be delivered to target organs in living mice, where they can speed chemical reactions for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, show RIKEN researchers (Angewandte Chemie International Edition, "In vivo gold complex catalysis within live mice"). This paves the way for future clinical applications in humans.
June 30, 2017
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A ground-breaking method for screening the most useful nanoparticles for medicine
The use of nanoparticles – small, virus-sized elements developed under laboratory conditions – is increasingly widespread in the world of biomedicine. this rapidly-evolving technology offers hope for many medical applications, whether for diagnosis or therapies.
February 3, 2017
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A look at the molecular quality assurance within cells
Proteins fulfill vital functions in our body. they transport substances, combat pathogens, and function as catalysts. In order for these processes to function reliably, proteins must adopt a defined three-dimensional structure. Molecular "folding assistants", called chaperones, aid and scrutinize these structuring processes. with participation from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a team of researchers has now revealed how chaperones identify particularly harmful errors in this structuring process.
August 25, 2016
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A minimalist theory to predict protein movements
Proteins are large molecules that carry out all basic cell functions. In order to achieve this, they continually change shape by expanding or contracting parts; they hide surfaces or reveal them to interaction with other molecules.
September 6, 2016
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A multifunctional biophotonic platform enabled by moire metasurfaces
Biophotonics has recently captured strong interests from both academic and industry due to the high potential of applying photonic technologies to biomedical applications, including cell manipulation and biological analysis.
October 12, 2016
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A nanofiber matrix for healing
A new nanofiber-on-microfiber matrix could help produce more and better quality stem cells for disease treatment and regenerative therapies.
February 14, 2017
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A nanotechnology method for storing vaccines at room temperature
Shipping vaccines in an unbroken temperature-controlled supply chain (a "cold chain") all the way to recipients is a major logistical and financial challenge in remote areas and developing countries. According to Doctors Without Borders, the need to keep vaccines within a temperature range of 2-8°C is one of the main factors behind low immunization-coverage rates.
November 30, 2016
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A new adjustable optical microprobe for the analysis and control of deep brain regions
Researchers from the IIT- Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Lecce, Italy, and the Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA, have developed a new optical microprobe able to control brain electrical activity by projecting light on wide volumes or selected portions of the central nervous system in an very controlled fashion.
June 19, 2017
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A new direction in ophthalmic development: Nanoparticle drug delivery systems
Most ophthalmic diseases are usually treated with topically administered drug formulations (e.g. eye drops). Their main disadvantage is the short time of contact with the eye, which leads to a low degree of absorption of the active substance (less than 5% of the drug administered). this requires frequent instillation, which usually leads to a high systemic exposure.
January 3, 2017
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A new Drug and Nanoparticle Combination for Triple Negative Breast Cancer
A research team from the UK has developed a prospective new drug for confronting the highly aggressive "triple negative" breast cancer (TNBC), as well as a nanoparticle for delivering the drug directly into the cancer cells.
March 17, 2017
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A new graphene-based sensor kit for the rapid detection of diseases in blood plasma and lysate
Scientists at the University of Southampton, developed a new sensor, which can rapidly and accurately detect tiny amounts of oligonucleotides related to diseases.
January 17, 2017
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A New Look at Evolution of Protein Nano-Machines
Proteins perform vital functions of life. They digest food and fight infections and cancer. They are in effect nano-machines, each one of them designed to do a specific function. But how did they evolve to fulfil those needs, how did the genes encode the structure and purpose of proteins?
May 25, 2017
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A new window to understanding the brain
Scientists in recent years have made great strides in the quest to understand the brain by using implanted probes to explore how specific neural circuits work.
August 29, 2016
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A physical mechanism to make the transport of cellular cargo efficient and specific
In order for cells to function properly, cargo needs to be constantly transported from one point to another within the cell, like on a goods station. this cargo is located in or on intracellular membranes, called vesicles. These membranes have a signature, and only those with the correct signature may fuse with the membrane of another organelle into one compartment.
August 31, 2016
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A step forward in 3D printing functional human tissues
Toward the ultimate goal of engineering human tissues and organs that can mimic native function for use in drug screening, disease modeling, and regenerative medicine, a Wyss Institute team led by Core Faculty member Jennifer Lewis, Sc.D., has made another foundational advance using three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting.
October 11, 2016
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Accurate design of large icosahedral protein nanocages pushes bioengineering boundaries
Inspired by the forms and functions of protein molecule machines and materials observed in nature, such as the shells that protect virus genomes, researchers have now engineered ten large, 120-subunit, two-component protein complexes. These structures not only build themselves with atomic-level accuracy, but also can encapsulate other materials.
July 21, 2016
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Acoustic Waves Used to Drive Fluids at the Nanoscale
A group of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego have effectively used acoustic waves to transport fluids via small channels at the nanoscale. this innovative method is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that may be used for microrobotics applications and drug discovery.
November 16, 2016
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AFM imaging and characterization of nematodes in their natural environment
Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a free-living soil nematode, has become an important experimental model for biomedical research. this nematode has been successfully employed in genetics, ageing research, behavioral assays, drug screening and (nano)toxicology.
November 16, 2016
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After the heart attack: Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure
During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells within the tissue. But the damage doesn't end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart's walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. If nothing is done, the patient can eventually experience heart failure.
August 22, 2016
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Algorithms offer insight into cellular development
Through RNA sequencing, researchers can measure which genes are expressed in each individual cell of a sample. a new statistical method allows researchers to infer different developmental processes from a cell mixture consisting of asynchronous stages.
August 31, 2016
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An injectable guidance system for nerve cells
In many tissues of the human body, such as nerve tissue, the spatial organization of cells plays an important role. Nerve cells and their long protrusions assemble into nerve tracts and transport information throughout the body. When such a tissue is injured, an accurate spatial orientation of the cells facilitates the healing process. Scientists from the DWI -- Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials in Aachen developed an injectable gel, which can act as a guidance system for nerve cells.
April 5, 2017
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Analog DNA circuit does math in a test tube
DNA computers could one day be programmed to diagnose and treat disease
August 23, 2016
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Application of Nanomaterials for Treatment of Neurological Disorders
The application of nanotechnology in the field of neuroscience poses numerous challenges. Despite this fact, nanotechnology has the potential of having a remarkable impact on the knowledge of functioning of the nervous system, its failure in disease, and the development of less-invasive and advanced diagnostic techniques to enable intervention in the pre-clinical stage of neurological disease even before substantial neurological damage.
November 2, 2016
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Applying nanotechnology to make porous acupuncture needles
Professor Su-Il In's research team from the Department of Energy Systems Engineering succeeded in developing porous acupuncture needles that offer enhanced therapeutic properties by applying nanotechnology on the acupuncture needles for the first time in the world.
October 17, 2016
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Artificial cartilage under tension as strong as natural material
Biomedical engineers at the University of California, Davis, have created a lab-grown tissue similar to natural cartilage by giving it a bit of a stretch. The tissue, grown under tension but without a supporting scaffold, shows similar mechanical and biochemical properties to natural cartilage.
June 12, 2017
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Artificial fluorescent membrane lipid shows active role in living cells
Biological membranes, such as those surrounding animal cells, are made up of lipids and proteins. Because these molecules do not usually mix well, they are distributed within different regions of the membrane. This segregation is achieved in a number of ways, including the formation of domains based on particular lipids such as cholesterol or sphingomyelin (SM).
June 5, 2017
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Artificial muscle for soft robotics: low voltage, high hopes
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a dielectric elastomer with a broad range of motion that requires relatively low voltage and no rigid components.This type of actuator could be used in everything from wearable devices to soft grippers, laparoscopic surgical tools, entirely soft robots or artificial muscles in more complex robotics.
July 21, 2016
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Artificial muscles show more flex
Artificial muscles made significant gains when a literal twist in the development approach uncovered the tensile or stretchy abilities of polymer fibers once they were twisted and coiled into a spring-like geometry. In a similar manner to the powerful climbing tendrils of cucumber plants, the unique geometry gives the coil a flexing motion when fiber material shrinks a reaction that can be controlled with heat.
October 30, 2016
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Atomic scale pipes available on demand and by design
Materials containing tiny capillaries and cavities are widely used in filtration, separation and many other technologies, without which our modern lifestyle would be impossible. Those materials are usually found by luck or accident rather than design. It has been impossible to create artificial capillaries with atomic-scale precision.
September 7, 2016
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Atomic structure reveals how cells translate environmental signals
Culminating a nearly 10 year effort, researchers have determined the atomic resolution structure of a key molecule that translates signals from a cell's local environment into a language that the cell can understand and use.
April 18, 2017
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Misc. - B

Berkeley Lab Experiments Highlight Most Active Areas of Reactions on Nanoscale Particles
A research team working at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel confirmed with a unique infrared probe that jagged surfaces and defects found at the edges of nanosized platinum and gold particles are significant hot spots for chemical reactivity.
January 12, 2017
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Big data approach to predict protein structure
Nothing works without proteins in the body, they are the molecular all-rounders in our cells. If they do not work properly, severe diseases, such as Alzheimer's, may result. to develop methods to repair malfunctioning proteins, their structure has to be known. Using a big data approach, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to predict protein structures.
March 24, 2017
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Biocompatible nanomaterial that can be controlled with light finds a use in gene delivery
A tiny therapeutic delivery system that can control the body's ability to manufacture proteins has been developed by Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology researchers.
September 22, 2016
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Biodegradable polymer coating for implants
Medical implants often carry surface substrates that release active substances or to which biomolecules or cells can adhere better. However, degradable gas-phase coatings for degradable implants, such as surgical suture materials or scaffolds for tissue culturing, have been lacking so far.
December 14, 2016
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Bioengineering Professor Wins Materials Today Embracing Challenge Award for Research in Nanomaterials
Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, has announced that Professor Kytai Nguyen is the winner of the first Materials Today Embracing Challenge Award. Prof. Nguyen was given the award for the personal challenges she overcame to make a significant contribution to nano-materials research and education.
September 22, 2016
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Biomaterials for the regeneration of bone and cartilage tissues from apple waste
Researchers from UPM and CSIC have employed waste from the agri-food industry to develop biomaterials that are able to act as matrices to regenerate bone and cartilage tissues, which is of great interest for the treatment of diseases related to aging (Journal of Cleaner Production, "Multivalorization of apple pomace towards materials and chemicals. Waste to wealth").
March 30, 2017
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Biomaterials of the future will modulate the reaction of the organism to the implant
Researchers from Universidad Politecnica have developed an innovative procedure that may significantly improve the therapeutic capacity of implants.
December 20, 2016
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Biomedical 'skin-like bandage' is stretchy, durable and long lasting
A skin-like biomedical technology that uses a mesh of conducting nanowires and a thin layer of elastic polymer might bring new electronic bandages that monitor biosignals for medical applications and provide therapeutic stimulation through the skin.
November 16, 2016
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BioSpa Live Cell Imaging System Provides Convenience and Consistency for Live Cell Analysis
BioTek's BioSpa Live Cell Imaging System fully automates live cell imaging workflows for robust, real-time results without the need for manual intervention.
December 12, 2016
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Boosting the lifetime, effectiveness of electronic biomedical devices
Modern electronic biomedical devices are enabling a wide range of sophisticated health interventions, from seizure detection and Parkinson's disease therapy to functional artificial limbs, cochlear implants and smart contact lenses.
March 8, 2017
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Brain-on-a-chip built on nanowire scaffolds
Neurons are the basic computational units or cells in the brain and they form connections between other neurons to form neuronal circuits. When these neurons are at work in the brain -- during learning, thinking, sensing, etc -- they pass off information from one neuron to the other via their synaptic interconnects.
May 12, 2017
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Breaking new ground in ultrafast X-ray science
A research team based in Germany are using a new compact hard X-ray source to shine new light on important questions in structural biology.
December 13, 2016
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Bringing artificial enzymes closer to nature
Scientists at the University of Basel, ETH Zurich, and NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering have developed an artificial metalloenzyme that catalyses a reaction inside of cells without equivalent in nature. this could be a prime example for creating new non-natural metabolic pathways inside living cells, as reported today in Nature.
August 29, 2016
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Bringing nano environmental health and safety assessment to the wider discussion on risk governance of key enabling technologies
The EU FP7 Sustainable Nanotechnologies (SUN) Project is coming to its end in March 2017. the project has designed its final events to serve as an effective platform to communicate the main results achieved in its course within the Nanosafety community and bridge them to a wider audience addressing the emerging risks of Key Enabling Technologies (KETs).
October 30, 2016
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Bruker unveils Next-Generation Preclinical Imaging Systems for Advanced Translational Research at World Molecular Imaging Congress
New, highest-performance microCT system and novel SiPM PET insert for simultaneous PET/MRI introduced.
September 7, 2016
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Building Nanocages can Help Observe G-Quadruplex Biomolecules
Macromolecules regularly fold and unfold themselves inside cells. the functions of these macromolecules can be determined by their various three-dimensional structures. Having an in-depth knowledge on molecule folding, complex physical processes that have an impact on allergies, cancers, and diseases can be easily understood.
March 28, 2017
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Misc. - C

Catching proteins in the act
Some of the fastest processes in our body run their course in proteins activated by light. the protein rhodopsin sees to it that our eyes can rapidly take in their ever-changing surroundings. Free-electron X-ray lasers such as SwissFEL at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI now make it possible for the first time to catch such processes in flagranti.
August 22, 2016
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Catholic University of Rome Uses the JPK NanoWizard® AFM & CellHesion® Systems to Understand how Cells Sense and Respond to Mechanical Stimuli
JPK Instruments, a world-leading manufacturer of nanoanalytic instrumentation for research in life sciences and soft matter, reports on the work of Professor Marco De Spirito's research group at the Catholic University of Rome. the group uses a NanoWizard® AFM and CellHesion® module to study how cells sense and respond to mechanical stimuli.
April 13, 2017
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Cell smasher
We're all pretty familiar with what happens when we sustain a knock on the head: First, the all-too-audible crack, accompanied perhaps by a moment of surprise. Then, the swelling and, if we're lucky, just a minor bump or scrape.
February 2, 2017
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Chance meeting leads to creation of antibiotic spider silk
A chance meeting between a spider expert and a chemist has led to the development of antibiotic synthetic spider silk.
January 4, 2017
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Chemists bring mixed folded proteins to life with nanoparticles
Scientists from ITMO University in Saint Petersburg and Hebrew University in Jerusalem have found a way to recover a protein structure after its chemical denaturation. The method is based on electrostatic interaction between folded, or denatured, proteins and alumina, which unwrap them.
June 9, 2017
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Chemists created nanoparticles for safe imaging of tumors
Chemists from Russia and Switzerland created biosafe luminescent nanoparticles for imaging tumors and blood vessels damaged by heart attack or stroke. the particles are made of hafnium oxide that is allowed for intravenous injection, and doped with ions of rare earth metals. the scientists hope that the development will give an alternative to toxic quantum dots and help imaging deep tissues without harming a human body. the study appeared in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces.
March 21, 2017
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Choosing the right substrate for the right function
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a unique molecular mechanism responsible for the substrate preference of ubiquitin-specific proteases.
April 4, 2017
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Closer look at atomic motion in molecules may benefit biotechnology researchers
Every molecule holds a complex landscape of moving atoms — and the ability to single out and examine individual nuclear vibrations may unlock to the secret to predicting and controlling chemical reactions. now a new method, developed by researchers in Sweden, enables biotech researchers to do just that.
February 15, 2017
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Color-coded chemistry tests get a boost
With a prestigious early career award grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), one chemist wants to make color-coded testing of diseases easier.
February 2, 2017
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Combating wear and tear
By the time someone realizes they damaged a ligament, tendon or cartilage from too much exercise or other types of physical activity, it's too late. the tissue is stretched and torn and the person is writhing in pain.
March 22, 2017
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Computer simulation of protein synthesis reveals awesome complexity of cell machinery
Life depends on proteins. These molecules are produced continually in our cells, which act as microscopic production lines - but the process is so complex we have barely begun to understand it. Exploring protein synthesis may, however, be the key to revealing how the body controls the thousands of reactions occurring simultaneously inside us.
March 16, 2017
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Considering the role of gravity for accurate weighing results, described in new Mettler Toledo whitepaper
During weighing, a balance's axis needs to be parallel to the force of gravity to be accurate. Learn how to ensure a balance is level to improve weighing results with a free reference guide from METTLER TOLEDO--the third of 12 monthly offers contained in the lab equipment manufacturer's 2017 e-calendar.
April 3, 2017
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Controllable light-emitting materials to advance light sensing and nanomedicine
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have developed an approach to control the photoluminescence and solid-state emission of bismuth complexes by complexation with phenylazomethine dendrimers. this research not only sheds light on the structure of a rare, luminescent bismuth complex, but will also be used to advance the potential applications of luminous dendrimers, especially in light harvesting, sensing, electronics, photonics, and nano-medicine.
September 23, 2016
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Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan
Can you please outline your latest research where you triggered the apoptosis 'switch' on in cancer cells forcing them to commit 'suicide'?
August 15, 2016
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Curbing the life-long effects of traumatic brain injury with neuron-targeted nanoparticle
A fall down the stairs, a car crash, a sports injury or an explosive blast can all cause traumatic brain injury (TBI). Patients often recover. But in the days or weeks following the hit, they can develop other serious, chronic conditions, such as depression and thinking and memory problems.
August 17, 2016
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Misc. - D

Deconstructing osmosis provides insight for medical and industrial use
Osmosis, the fluid phenomenon responsible for countless slug deaths at the hands of mischievous children, is fundamentally important not only to much of biology, but also to engineering and industry. Most simply put, osmosis refers to the flow of fluid across a membrane driven by a (solute) concentration difference -- like water from a salted slug's cells or absorbed by the roots of plants.
May 18, 2017
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Dendrimer nanomedicine - developing efficient therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders
A dendrimer is a polymeric nanostructure built around a core unit. There are several branching units around the core units in a layer-by-layer fashion which defines the growth, size, and the microenvironment within the dendrimer.
June 21, 2017
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Designing ultrasound protein tools with molecular engineering
Ultrasound imaging is used around the world to help visualize developing babies and diagnose disease. Sound waves bounce off the tissues, revealing their different densities and shapes. the next step in ultrasound technology is to image not just anatomy, but specific cells and molecules deeper in the body, such as those associated with tumors or bacteria in our gut.
August 25, 2016
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Detecting mercury with gold nanorods
Mercury is harmful even in small amounts. Detecting it currently requires expensive equipment. Researchers are working on a faster and cheaper alternative: a portable sensor that can perform a rapid analysis in the field. the key is finding something small and accurate enough to do the job.
March 7, 2017
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Deploying therapeutic nano-payloads to cells
The founding mission of MIT may seem like an unusual meal-time story for a child. But when Mark Bathe was growing up, it was a regular topic of conversation around the dinner table.
June 5, 2017
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Development of a novel carbon nanomaterial 'pot'
A novel, pot-shaped, carbon nanomaterial developed by researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan is several times deeper than any hollow carbon nanostructure previously produced. this unique characteristic enables the material to gradually release substances contained within and is expected to be beneficial in applications such as drug delivery systems.
August 05, 2016
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Diamonds that deliver
It's not enough to design new drugs.
February 24, 2017
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Disposable biosensors made from newspaper
Paper, probably the cheapest and most widely used flexible and eco-friendly material in daily life, is a promising substrate for making flexible devices ranging from electronics to microfluidics, energy storage and sensors.
January 10, 2017
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Dissolvable Battery to Power Transient Implantable Devices
We've seen the development of dissolvable brain implants and other so-called "transient electronics" that are slowly washed away and disappear some time after implantation. One thing missing but required for these devices to be fully implantable and dissolvable is a battery that does the same at about the same rate.
August 11, 2016
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DNA Self-Assembly Allows Control of the Optical Properties of Plasmonic Metamolecules
Plasmonic nanoparticles reveal properties based on their geometries and relative positions. Now, researchers have developed a simple way to control the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures that strongly rely on their spatial arrangement.
April 25, 2017
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DNA-based nanocontainers for drug delivery
Scientists from the London Centre for Nanotechnology have engineered a novel nanoscale drug delivery vehicle which can be tuned to release a range of cargos.
August 30, 2016
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Do cells have exotic vibrational properties?
A little-understood biological property that appears to allow cell components to store energy on their outer edges is the possible key to developing a new class of materials and devices to collect, store and manage energy for a variety of applications, a team of researchers at new Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and Yeshiva University has proposed.
February 28, 2017
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Driving the performance of nanosystems to the limit
A joint CEA / University of Grenoble-Alpes research team, together with their international partners, have developed a diagnostic technique capable of identifying performance problems in nanoresonators, a type of nanodetector used in research and industry.
March 8, 2016
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Dry/wet adhesive materials for wound care inspired by octopus suckers
Everyday challenges in medical and surgical practice involve stopping bleeding, closing wounds, and repairing organs. Various hemostatic agents, sealants, and adhesives have been developed to provide easier, faster, and more pragmatic approaches of tissue closure.
May 25, 2017
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Dust-size sensors could heal you from the inside
UC Berkeley scientists say tiny implantable sensors could treat multiple health issues
August 08, 2016
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Misc. - E

Edible Ginger-Derived Nano-Lipid can be Used to Treat Colon Cancer
According to a study conducted by researchers at the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, Southwest University in China, and the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Wenzhou Medical University, nano-lipids that are derived from a particular group of edible ginger can be used to effectively target and deliver chemotherapeutic drugs that are used for colon cancer treatment.
September 12, 2016
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Efficient nanowire solution for a big-name pollutant
Winter cold snaps often bring tragic stories of Americans killed by carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless gas present in the emissions of gas-powered generators and vehicles. Several thousand more people are treated for carbon monoxide poisoning each year. While we currently rely on carbon monoxide detectors, new research points the way to a new approach: direct elimination of the gas.
January 9, 2017
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Engineered intrinsically disordered proteins provide biomedical insights
Biomedical researchers have engineered the first examples of biomimetic structures composed from a mysterious class of proteins that lack any sort of internal structure.
January 31, 2017
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Engineering heart valves with nanofibers
The human heart beats approximately 35 million times every year, effectively pumping blood into the circulation via four different heart valves. Unfortunately, in over four million people each year, these delicate tissues malfunction due to birth defects, age-related deteriorations, and infections, causing cardiac valve disease
May 18, 2017
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Engineers create artificial skin that 'feels' temperature changes
A team of engineers and scientists at Caltech and ETH Zurich have developed an artificial skin capable of detecting temperature changes using a mechanism similar to the one used by the organ that allows pit vipers to sense their prey.
January 30, 2017
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Engineers create new devices that emulate human biological synapses
Engineers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are leading a research team that is developing a new type of nanodevice for computer microprocessors that can mimic the functioning of a biological synapse–the place where a signal passes from one nerve cell to another in the body.
September 29, 2016
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Engineers reveal fabrication process for revolutionary transparent sensors
In 2014, when University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers announced in the journal Nature Communications ("Graphene-based carbon-layered electrode array technology for neural imaging and optogenetic applications") that they had developed transparent sensors for use in imaging the brain, researchers around the world took notice.
October 13, 2016
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Enhancing molecular imaging with light
In 2014, an international trio won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, a technique that made it possible to study molecular processes in living cells.
July 25, 2016
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Environmental researchers are developing new biosensors for testing water
Biologists from the University of Tübingen are part of an interdisciplinary team which has developed novel biosensors that enable pharmaceutical products to be detected more effectively in water. These sensors can measure two types of pharmaceutical substances — beta-blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — in real-time and in low concentrations.
March 9, 2017
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ERC grant to develop smart artificial skin
Skin is one of the main human sensory organs. Through our skin we feel humidity, temperature and pressure -- sensory impressions which are passed on to our brains as signals. the technological imitation of a system such as human skin and its information processing presents an enormous challenge to the technology of intelligent materials.
October 4, 2016
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Europium-Doped Lanthanum Phosphate Nanorods Determine Fluid Flow in Complex Channels
A Franco-Dutch International team including Scientists from the laboratories of Condensed Matter Physics and Hydrodynamics at Paris-Saclay University and the Van't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences at the University of Amsterdam has developed an innovative technique for accurately determining, in real time, the fluid flow in capillary networks.
June 21, 2017
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Essen BioScience Launches the IncuCyte® S3 Live-Cell Analysis Platform
Essen BioScience, a pioneer and leader in the field of cell-based assays and instrumentation used for drug discovery and basic research, has launched the IncuCyte® S3 live-cell analysis platform for real-time, automated measurements of cell health, proliferation, movement and function directly inside a standard incubator.
April 3, 2017
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EVG brings high-volume manufacturing process solutions to biotechnology and medical device market
EVG leverages more than 15 years of experience in biotech R&D and industry-proven substrate bonding and lithography solutions and expertise to support next-generation biotechnology device manufacturing
September 27, 2016
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Exosomes - biological nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease
Exosomes - tiny biological nanoparticles which transfer information between cells - offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease, the most comprehensive overview so far of research in the field has concluded.
June 22, 2017
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Exosomes Offer Enormous Potential as a Basis for Detecting and Treating Disease
A new review highlights that tiny nanoparticles provide major potential in detecting and treating disease.
June 23, 2017
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Expanding point-of-care disease diagnostics with ultrasound
Fast, accurate and inexpensive medical tests in a doctor's office are only possible for some conditions. to create new in-office diagnostics for additional diseases, researchers report in the journal ACS Nano a new technique that uses ultrasound to concentrate fluorescently labeled disease biomarkers otherwise impossible to detect with current equipment in an office setting.
January 25, 2017
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Extremely colorful, incredibly bright and highly multiplexed
Biomedical researchers are understanding the functions of molecules within the body's cells in ever greater detail by increasing the resolution of their microscopes. However, what's lagging behind is their ability to simultaneously visualize the many different molecules that mediate complex molecular processes in a single snap-shot.
June 21, 2017
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Extremely Minute Extracellular Needle-Electrodes for Brain Mapping
Researchers from the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology have developed needle-electrodes with a diameter of 5 µm on block modules with the dimensions 1 mm x 1 mm.
October 26, 2016
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Misc. - F

Fast lab-on-chip detects effects of poison
A new lab-on-a-chip system, developed by the University of Twente in the Netherlands, is capable of fast analysis of the effects of toxic substances on hemoglobin, for example. It mimicks human metabolism (Lab on a Chip, "Oxidation and adduct formation of xenobiotics in a microfluidic electrochemical cell with boron doped diamond electrodes and an integrated passive gradient mixer").
October 4, 2016
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Fast, efficient sperm tails inspire nanobiotechnology
Just like workers in a factory, enzymes can create a final product more efficiently if they are stuck together in one place and pass the raw material from enzyme to enzyme, assembly line-style. That's according to scientists at Cornell's Baker Institute for Animal Health, the first team to recreate a 10-step biological pathway with all the enzymes tethered to nanoparticles.
December 1, 2016
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Fatty Acid Oxidation Kit
AMSBIO has introduced the MitoXpress® Xtra Fatty Acid Oxidation (FAO) kit to facilitate the convenient measurement of FAO-driven respiration.
December 14, 2016
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Feeding Nanoparticles to Worms Helps Testing Biological Force Sensor Technology
Worms that are a millimeter-long and capable of digesting a nanoparticle-laced meal of their favorite bacteria could help to develop a way to see the working of cellular forces within human bodies and also in processes like cancer growth and wound healing.
January 3, 2017
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Feeling the heat in cells
Tiny flat sensors that stick to the surface of living cells can provide detailed measurements of heat transfer at the cell surface. Developed at KAUST, these new sensors resolve some of the practical challenges of working with these tiny cells as well as enable novel diagnostic techniques.
April 14, 2017
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Fermented foams: Graphene composite foams using beer yeasts
The use of graphene as an additive can give mechanical and electrical benefits to composite materials, making them multifunctional. In a novel fermentation method, Graphene Flagship researchers have developed graphene-containing rubber foams with unusual mechanical and electrical behaviours: when stretched, the composite foams expand and become more conductive. These unexpected properties could be promising for use in smart filters and medical devices.
June 1, 2017
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First 3D observation of nanomachines working inside cells
Today scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) present a study in Cell ("The in vivo architecture of the exocyst provides structural basis for exocytosis") where they have been able to observe protein nanomachines (also called protein complexes)–the structures responsible for performing cell functions–for the first time in living cells and in 3D. this work has been done in collaboration with researchers at the University of Geneva in Switzerland and the Centro Andaluz de Biología del Desarrollo in Seville.
January 26, 2017
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First Demonstration of Brain-inspired Device to Power Artificial Systems
New research, led by the University of Southampton, has demonstrated that a nanoscale device, called a memristor, could be used to power artificial systems that can mimic the human brain.
October 11, 2016
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Five ways bioengineers want to use 3-D printing
Now that 3D printing has made it easier to generate custom-made prosthetics, bioengineers are looking ahead at manufacturing actual cellular material. Such technology could be the basis for personalized biomedical devices; tissue-engineered skin, cartilage, and bone; or even working bladders.
August 11, 2016
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Flexible biosensor detects glucose from small amounts of sweat
Researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas are sweating the small stuff in their efforts to develop a wearable device that can monitor an individual's glucose level via perspiration on the skin.
October 13, 2016
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Flexibility is key in mechanism of biological self-assembly
A new study has modeled a crucial first step in the self-assembly of cellular structures such as drug receptors and other protein complexes, and found that the flexibility of the structures has a dramatic impact on how fast two such structures join together.
March 17, 2017
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'Flying saucer' quantum dots hold secret to brighter, better lasers
Fresh insights into living cells, brighter video projectors and more accurate medical tests are just three of the innovations that could result from a new way of fabricating lasers.
March 19, 2017
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Food additive E171: first findings of oral exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles
Researchers from INRA and their partners have studied the effects of oral exposure to titanium dioxide, an additive (E171) commonly used in foodstuffs, especially confectionary. they have shown for the first time that E171 crosses the intestinal barrier in animals and reaches other parts of the body.
January 24, 2017
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Foster Pureease™ Technology Improves Process Consistency for Urethane Extrusions
Foster Corporation, a leader in custom polymers for medical devices, now offers thermoplastic urethanes (TPU) with PureEase™ technology for improved extrusion processing control.
July 19, 2016
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FSU Professor Takes Big Step Forward in Understanding Nanotech-Based Drugs
Nanotechnology has become a growing part of medical research in recent years, with scientists feverishly working to see if tiny particles could revolutionize the world of drug delivery.
March 9, 2017
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Misc. - G

Gentle cancer treatment using nanoparticles works
Cancer treatments based on laser irridation of tiny nanoparticles that are injected directly into the cancer tumor are working and can destroy the cancer from within. Researchers have developed a method that kills cancer cells using nanoparticles and lasers.
August 03, 2016
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Gentle cancer treatment using nanoparticles works
Cancer treatments based on laser irridation of tiny nanoparticles that are injected directly into the cancer tumor are working and can destroy the cancer from within. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute and the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Copenhagen have developed a method that kills cancer cells using nanoparticles and lasers.
August 03, 2016
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Gentle sensors for diagnosing brain disorders
Flexible, low-cost sensor technology leading to safer and improved diagnoses and treatment of brain disorders has been developed by Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) scientists (Small, "Deterministic integration of out-of-plane sensor arrays for flexible electronic applications").
September 30, 2016
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Geometry and particle hitchhiking: a new window into improving nanopharmaceuticals for personalized medicine
In a newly published study in Nature Nanotechnology, the shape and geometry of nanoparticles can have a significant impact in modulating adverse injection reactions and offer realistic solutions for patients receiving nanopharmaceuticals--drug delivery systems specializing in microscopic-particle drug combinations.
April 18, 2017
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German authorities update their joint research strategy 'Nanotechnology - health and environmental risks of nanomaterials'
Adopting a long-term research strategy, the federal agencies responsible for the safety of humans and the environment - i.e. the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA), the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), the National Metrology Institute (PTB) and the German Environment Agency (UBA) - have been involved with the rapid development of new materials since 2008. the focus is on issues of worker, consumer and environment protection which are now being extended beyond nanomaterials and other innovative materials. the goal is to ensure a type of use of new materials that is safe and sustainable for users and the environment across their entire life cycle, i.e. from material development, production and processing to application, recycling or disposal.
September 27, 2016
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Gold nanocone array for regulating neuronal behavior
Researchers from Forschungszentrum Jülich have reported the enhanced neurite outgrowth of rat primary cortical neurons on the periodic gold nanocone arrays created on the soft and flexible Teflon films.
June 22, 2017
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Good vibrations help reveal molecular details
Five years of hard work and a little "cosmic luck" led Rice University researchers to a new method to obtain structural details on molecules in biomembranes.
February 15, 2017
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Graphene demonstrates remarkable potential as life-saving antioxidant
Treated particles of graphene derived from carbon nanotubes have demonstrated remarkable potential as life-saving antioxidants, but as small as they are, something even smaller had to be created to figure out why they work so well.
January 26, 2017
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Graphene Nanoribbons in Solutions Possess Properties for Use with Biological Systems
According to researchers at Rice University, graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) can be adapted for biological applications, such as drug delivery, DNA analysis, and biomimetic applications, as they bend and twist easily in solution.
August 16, 2016
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Graphene sheets capture cells efficiently
A single cell can contain a wealth of information about the health of an individual. Now, a new method developed at MIT and National Chiao Tung University could make it possible to capture and analyze individual cells from a small sample of blood, potentially leading to very low-cost diagnostic systems that could be used almost anywhere
March 3, 2017
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Ground-breaking method for screening the most useful nanoparticles for medicine
Researchers have devised a rapid screening method to select the most promising nanoparticles, thereby fast-tracking the development of future treatments. In less than a week, they are able to determine whether nanoparticles are compatible or not with the human body -- an analysis that previously required several months of work. this discovery, may well lead to the swift, safe and less expensive development of nanotechnology applied to medicine.
February 3, 2017
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Group blazes path to efficient, eco-friendly deep-ultraviolet LED
The darkest form of ultraviolet light, known as UV-C, is unique because of its reputation as a killer - of harmful organisms.
March 3, 2017
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Growing gold: Researchers develop gold nanowires for biomedical procedures
Grown like a snowflake and sharpened with a sewing machine, a novel device by Kansas State University researchers may benefit biomedical professionals and the patients they serve during electrode and organ transplant procedures.
October 19, 2016
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Growing large-volume protein crystals bigger, better in space
An out of this world experiment to grow large-volume protein crystals aboard the International Space Station has proven successful. These sorts of crystals, which may be used in everything from basic biomedical research to drug design, can be grown bigger and better in microgravity -- a finding that may help the pharmaceuticals industry ease a drug design bottleneck, since difficult-to-grow large crystals are sometimes needed for experiments on structure that can guide drug design.
July 25, 2016
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Misc. - H

Hair Massage Enables Faster Delivery of Nanoparticle-Based Treatment to Roots
Shiny and smooth - this is how hair is visualized in advertisements for various shampoos. However, in reality, the surface of hair looks far more uneven when viewed by physicists under microscopes. the hair surface looks much more rugged, as it is formed of ratchet-like, saw-tooth scales.
January 30, 2017
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High Quality Proteins for Killer Cell Receptor Research
AMSBIO announces a suite of high quality proteins and biotinylated proteins for research into killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors.
November 16, 2016
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High-resolution biomolecule imaging
Determining the exact configuration of proteins and other complex biological molecules is an important step toward understanding their functions, including how they bind with receptors in the body. But such imaging is difficult to do. It usually requires the molecules to be crystallized first so that X-ray diffraction techniques can be applied – and not all such molecules can be crystallized.
February 15, 2017
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High-resolution imaging with conventional microscopes
MIT researchers have developed a way to make extremely high-resolution images of tissue samples, at a fraction of the cost of other techniques that offer similar resolution.
April 18, 2017
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How cells move
It's a known fact that cells can move around the body, but how they do it has been unknown -- until now.
October 10, 2016
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How mechanical force triggers blood clotting at the molecular scale
Using a unique single-molecule force measurement tool, a research team has developed a clearer understanding of how platelets sense the mechanical forces they encounter during bleeding to initiate the cascading process that leads to blood clotting.
August 15, 2016
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How solvents affect the skin
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method that makes it possible to see how individual molecules from solvents in skin creams, medicated ointments and cleaning products affect and interact with the skin's own molecules.
January 17, 2017
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How to hack a cell
The human body is made up of trillions of cells, microscopic computers that carry out complex behaviors according to the signals they receive from each other and their environment. Synthetic biologists engineer living cells to control how they behave by converting their genes into programmable circuits.
April 5, 2017
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How to power up graphene implants without frying cells
In the future, our health may be monitored and maintained by tiny sensors and drug dispensers, deployed within the body and made from graphene -- one of the strongest, lightest materials in the world. Graphene is composed of a single sheet of carbon atoms, linked together like razor-thin chicken wire, and its properties may be tuned in countless ways, making it a versatile material for tiny, next-generation implants.
September 23, 2016
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How to power up graphene implants without frying cells
In the future, our health may be monitored and maintained by tiny sensors and drug dispensers, deployed within the body and made from graphene – one of the strongest, lightest materials in the world. Graphene is composed of a single sheet of carbon atoms, linked together like razor-thin chicken wire, and its properties may be tuned in countless ways, making it a versatile material for tiny, next-generation implants.
September 23, 2016
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How to train your drugs: from nanotherapeutics to nanobots
Nanotechnology is creating new opportunities for fighting disease -- from delivering drugs in smart packaging to nanobots powered by the world's tiniest engines.
June 26, 2017
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Human Brain Project specifies its research goals
The European Human Brain Project (HBP) presented its new strategic objectives at its annual meeting in Florence in mid-October and now published them in the journal Neuron ("The Human Brain Project: Creating a European infrastructure to decode the Human Brain"). the scientists are aiming to decode the human brain. T
November 14, 2016
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Misc. - I

Imaging at the speed of light
Tiny micro- and nanoscale structures within a material's surface are invisible to the naked eye, but play a big role in determining a material's physical, chemical, and biomedical properties
March 14, 2017
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Imaging technique shows molecular machinery at work
New imaging methods that allow researchers to track the individual protein molecules on the surface of cells have been developed by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. The results offer unprecedented insight into how cells sense and respond to their environments.
June 7, 2017
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Imaging the birth of new brain cells
The adult brain was long regarded as being unable to grow new neurons–you were stuck with what you had. we know now that this view is wrong and that the human brain continues to produce new neurons throughout our lives.
November 11, 2016
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Imaging the inside of cells using polymeric nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are particles that are smaller than 100 nanometers. they are typically obtained from metals and, because of their tiny size, have unique properties that make them useful for biomedical applications. However, without treatment to make their surfaces biologically inert, their effectiveness is severely limited.
November 1, 2016
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Imaging the Inside of Cells Using Polymeric Nanoparticles
Researchers at the University of Tokyo continue to discover new ways to improve the effectiveness of nanoparticles as biomedical tools.
November 2, 2016
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Imec and Holst Centre Present the World's Most Energy-Efficient Biomedical Sensor Hub for Wearable Health Applications
World-leading research and development center for nano-electronics and digital technology, imec, and Holst Centre (established by imec and TNO), today announced a new sensor hub integrated as a system-on-chip (SoC) intended for a broad range of wearable health devices and applications.
October 5, 2016
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Implantable microrobots: Innovative manufacturing platform makes intricate biocompatible micromachines
A team of researchers led by Biomedical Engineering Professor Sam Sia at Columbia Engineering has developed a way to manufacture microscale-sized machines from biomaterials that can safely be implanted in the body. Working with hydrogels, which are biocompatible materials that engineers have been studying for decades, Sia has invented a new technique that stacks the soft material in layers to make devices that have three-dimensional, freely moving parts.
January 4, 2017
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Improving DNA-detecting transistors with graphene
Researchers in India and Japan have developed an improved method for using graphene-based transistors to detect disease-causing genes.
February 24, 2017
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Improving the resolution of flow lithography produced nanostructures
Flow-lithography is a lithographic method for continuously generating polymer microstructures for various applications such as bioassays, drug-delivery, cell carriers, tissue engineering and authentication. a team of researchers in Korea has demonstrated the use of a wobulation technique to enhance the resolution of flow lithography produced nanostructures.
December 6, 2016
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Improving tissue cryopreservation with magnetic nanoparticles
A research team, led by the University of Minnesota, has discovered a groundbreaking process to successfully rewarm large-scale animal heart valves and blood vessels preserved at very low temperatures. the discovery is a major step forward in saving millions of human lives by increasing the availability of organs and tissues for transplantation through the establishment of tissue and organ banks.
May 9, 2017
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In-cell molecular sieve from protein crystal
In nature, proteins are assembled into sophisticated and highly ordered structures, which enable them to execute numerous functions supporting different forms of life. the exquisite design of natural proteins prompted scientists to exploit it in synthetic biology to engineer molecules that can self-assemble into nanoparticles with desired structure and that may be used for various purposes such as gas storage, enzyme catalysis, intracellular drug delivery, etc.
February 9, 2017
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In-mouse catalysis
Address and deliver: a gold catalyst can be delivered to a target organ in a higher organism where it performs a chemical transformation visualized by bioimaging.
February 17, 2017
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Inexpensive Method to Analyze Force Responses of Thousands of Similar Molecules Simultaneously
From the tension of contracting muscle fibers to hydrodynamic stresses within flowing blood, molecules within our bodies are subject to a wide variety of mechanical forces that directly influence their form and function. by analyzing the responses of single molecules under conditions where they experience such forces we can develop a better understanding of many biological processes, and potentially, develop more accurately acting drugs. But up until now experimental analysis of single molecule interactions under force have been expensive, tedious and difficult to perform because it requires use of sophisticated equipment, such as an atomic force microscope or optical tweezers, which only permit analysis of one molecule at a time.
March 18, 2016
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Infrared-emitting quantum dots open new window for biological imaging
For certain frequencies of short-wave infrared light, most biological tissues are nearly as transparent as glass. Now, researchers have made tiny particles that can be injected into the body, where they emit those penetrating frequencies. the advance may provide a new way of making detailed images of internal body structures such as fine networks of blood vessels.
April 10, 2017
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Innovative Approach for Screening the Most Promising Nanoparticles for Medicine
Tiny, virus-sized elements or nanoparticles created in laboratory conditions are gaining in popularity in the field of biomedicine. this quickly-evolving technology provides hope for several medical applications, both for therapies and diagnosis.
February 6, 2017
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Innovative Approach for Targeted Drug Delivery Through Nanodiamond-Enhanced MRI
Nanodiamonds are synthetic industrial diamonds that measure only a few nanometers. Recently, nanodiamonds have attracted significant attention due to their ability to carry out targeted delivery of cancer drugs and vaccines, and for other applications. to date, there have been limited possibilities for imaging nanodiamonds.
April 27, 2017
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Integrating biomolecules with metal-organic frameworks
(Nanowerk Spotlight) Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are well-ordered, lattice-like crystals. The nodes of the lattices are metals -- such as copper, zinc, nickel or cobalt -- which are connected by organic molecules.
July 4, 2017
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Misc. - J

Just add water: Biomolecular manufacturing 'on-the-go'
Even amidst all the celebrated advances of modern medicine, basic life-saving interventions are still not reaching massive numbers of people who live in our planet's most remote and non-industrialized locations. the World Health Organization states that one half of the global population lives in rural areas. and according to UNICEF, last year nearly 20 million infants globally did not receive what we would consider to be basic vaccinations required for a child's health.
September 22, 2016
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Misc. - K

'Knitted muscles' provide power
Researchers have coated normal fabric with an electroactive material, and in this way given it the ability to actuate in the same way as muscle fibres. the technology opens new opportunities to design "textile muscles" that could, for example, be incorporated into clothes, making it easier for people with disabilities to move.
January 26, 2017
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Misc. - L

Lab-on-a-Chip breakthrough aims to help physicians detect cancer and diseases at the nanoscale
IBM scientists have developed a new lab-on-a-chip technology that can, for the first time, separate biological particles at the nanoscale and could help enable physicians to detect diseases such as cancer before symptoms appear.
August 1, 2016
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Lab-on-a-Stick: miniaturised clinical testing for fast detection of antibiotic resistance
A portable power-free test for the rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has been developed by academics at Loughborough University and the University of Reading.
August 23, 2016
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Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
The ability to deliver cargo like drugs or DNA into cells is essential for biological research and disease therapy but cell membranes are very good at defending their territory. Researchers have developed various methods to trick or force open the cell membrane but these methods are limited in the type of cargo they can deliver and aren't particularly efficient.
March 23, 2017
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Laser printing with nanoparticles holds promise for medical research
Electronic devices that can not only be implanted in the human body but also completely dissolve on their own -- known as "bioresorbable' electronics -- are envisioned by many as one of medical technology's next frontiers. a new study by Missouri University of Science and Technology researchers suggests that a laser printing technique using nanoparticles could help unlock a more cost-effective approach to building sturdier and safer components.
May 15, 2017
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LaVision BioTec Reports on the Measurement of Mouse Brain Activity from a Single Snapshot -- the Latest Work Published in Cell from Dr Nicolas Renier at the Rockefeller University in new York
Bielefeld, October 11, 2016: LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, report on the latest work of Nicolas Renier, a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the laboratory of Marc Tessier-Lavigne at the Rockefeller University in New York where he applies light sheet microscopy to measure activity in a mouse brain from a single snapshot.
October 11, 2016
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Learning how to fine-tune nanofabrication
Daniel Packwood, at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), Patrick Han at Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University and Taro Hitosugi at Tokyo Institute of Technology (and Visiting Professor at AIMR, Tohoku University) are improving methods for constructing tiny "nanomaterials" using a "bottom-up" approach called "molecular self-assembly".
March 1, 2017
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Lipid nanoparticles for gene therapy
25 years have passed since the publication of the first work on solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers as a system for delivering drugs. So the European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics has prepared a special edition for which it asked the PharmaNanoGene group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country to produce a piece of work reviewing the application of SLNs and NLCs in gene therapy since the group's significant contributions made in this area have been included in various international scientific publications.
February 14, 2017
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Living sensors at your fingertips
Engineers and biologists at MIT have teamed up to design a new "living material" – a tough, stretchy, biocompatible sheet of hydrogel injected with live cells that are genetically programmed to light up in the presence of certain chemicals.
February 16, 2017
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Longer-lasting pain relief with metal-organic frameworks
To treat headaches, back pain or fever, most of us have reached for ibuprofen at one point
April 26, 2017
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Low-Cost Lab-on-a-Chip Could Revolutionize Medical Diagnostics
An ordinary inkjet printer has been used by scientists from the Stanford University School of Medicine to develop a technique to produce an inexpensive and reusable diagnostic "lab on a chip."
February 7, 2017
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Luminescence switchable carbon nanodots follow intracellular trafficking and drug delivery
Tiny carbon dots have, for the first time, been applied to intracellular imaging and tracking of drug delivery involving various optical and vibrational spectroscopic-based techniques such as fluorescence, Raman, and hyperspectral imaging. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated, for the first time, that photo luminescent carbon nanoparticles can exhibit reversible switching of their optical properties in cancer cells.
February 13, 2017
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Luminescence switchable carbon nanodots follow intracellular trafficking and drug delivery
Tiny carbon dots have, for the first time, been applied to intracellular imaging and tracking of drug delivery involving various optical and vibrational spectroscopic-based techniques such as fluorescence, Raman, and hyperspectral imaging. Researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, that photo luminescent carbon nanoparticles can exhibit reversible switching of their optical properties in cancer cells.
February 13, 2017
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Misc. - M

Machine learning helps researchers design less costly optical sensors
Finding practical solutions to detect proteins, cancer biomarkers, viruses and other small objects has been a key challenge for researchers worldwide for decades. These solutions hold promise for saving lives through more timely diagnosis and treatment of serious infections and diseases.
February 16, 2017
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Major breakthrough in the manufacture of red blood cells
Researchers have generated the first immortalised cell lines which allow more efficient manufacture of red blood cells.
March 23, 2017
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Making artificial cells like soap bubbles
Researchers at the University of Tokyo used MEMS technology to produce spherical vesicles (asymmetric giant lipid vesicles/liposomes) surrounded by a membrane that, like the membrane of our cells, has an inner and outer layer composed of different phospholipids.
August 05, 2016
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Making biological drugs with spider silk protein
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have managed to synthesise lung surfactant, a drug used in the care of preterm babies, by mimicking the production of spider silk. Animal studies reveal it to be just as effective as the biological drugs currently in clinical use.
May 23, 2017
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Making brighter protein predictions
Most methods for the structural characterization of biomolecules, such as X-ray crystallography or electron microscopy, require static or crystallized samples. Attaching fluorescent molecules to protein surfaces, however, enables direct imaging of dynamic biomolecular interactions using light, which could be improved, say A*STAR researchers, with predictive modeling of fluorescence lifetimes.
June 14, 2017
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Making every cell matter
Alginate hydrogels - which are derived from the polysaccharide found in brown seaweed - have emerged as an effective material for manipulating cells and tissues due to their biocompatibility and the ability to tune their mechanical and biochemical properties to match physiological conditions found inside the body.
October 30, 2016
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Making spintronic neurons sing in unison
What do fire flies, Huygens's wall clocks, and even the heart of choir singers, have in common? they can all synchronize their respective individual signals into one single unison tone or rhythm.
November 16, 2016
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Manipulation of liquid crystals could help control drug-delivery process
Liquid crystals are strange substances, both fish and fowl. they can flow like a liquid, but have the orderly molecular structure of a crystalline solid. and that internal structure can be changed by small cues from outside. a group of scientists at the University of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering has found a way to exploit this property to turn liquid crystals into a tool to manipulate the shape of synthetic cell membranes.
September 13, 2016
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Metamaterials Pointing to Smart Contact Lenses that can Change Their Optical Properties
Conventional contact lenses are used by millions of people with great success. But scientists are now realizing that there's a lot of potential for metamaterials that manipulate light in interesting ways to significantly improve the capabilities of contact lenses. While it's the overall shape of the lens that controls how it affects light, in a metamaterial fine structures smaller than the wavelength of light work together to manipulate incoming light and allow that kind of lens to be both thin and flat.
September 15, 2016
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Microbubbles and ultrasound open the blood-brain barrier to administer drugs
The impassable blood--brain barrier prevents microorganisms from entering our brain, however it also blocks medicines that could help treat Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Now, a Spanish physicist and other researchers at the University of Columbia (USA) have succeeded in embedding these substances in tiny lipid bubbles, in such a way that ultrasound can be used to release them into the specific area of the brain where they are needed.
November 30, 2016
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Microchip enables fast, precise measurement of single-cell growth
A new technique invented at MIT can precisely measure the growth of many individual cells simultaneously. the advance holds promise for fast drug tests, offers new insights into growth variation across single cells within larger populations, and helps track the dynamic growth of cells to changing environmental conditions.
September 6, 2016
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Microscopic Imaging of Large or Irregularly Shaped Samples
The ProZ motorised focus stand from Prior Scientific is the ideal solution for viewing and imaging of samples that may be too large, or irregularly shaped, to be fitted onto a standard microscope frame or stand, but still require high quality imaging.
December 6, 2016
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Microscopic submarines for your stomach
Tiny "submarines" that speed independently through the stomach, use gastric acid for fuel (while rapidly neutralizing it), and release their cargo precisely at the desired pH: Though it may sound like science fiction, this is a new method for treating stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs introduced by scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie ("Micromotors Spontaneously Neutralize Gastric Acid for pH-Responsive Payload Release").
January 23, 2017
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Microscopic Swimming Robots for Medicine Link, Break Up, Swarm in Groups
At Drexel University in Philadelphia, researchers have been working on tiny remote-controlled robotic microswimmers that may one day lead to tiny medical devices for surgery, drug delivery, and other applications. the investigators are reporting in the journal Scientific Reports on new microscopic robots that can split up and re-link together, gaining unique swimming abilities that are different depending on the configurations they take.
August 02, 2016
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Mimicking biological movements with soft robots
Designing a soft robot to move organically -- to bend like a finger or twist like a wrist -- has always been a process of trial and error. Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have developed a method to automatically design soft actuators based on the desired movement.
December 20, 2016
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miniDAWN TREOS II SEC-MALS Detector for Essential Protein and Polymer Characterization
Wyatt Technology, the world leader in instrumentation for absolute macromolecular and nanoparticle characterization, announces the launch of its next generation multi-angle light scattering (MALS) detector for SEC/GPC, the miniDAWN® TREOS® II. the TREOS II is the only SEC-MALS detector for size exclusion or gel permeation chromatography that offers full field serviceability, extended ease-of-use, and a built-in upgrade path from HPLC to UHPLC technology.
April 26, 2017
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Minimalist swimming microrobots
When scaling down robots to the micrometer scale for tiny tasks such as incising tissue and puncturing retinal veins, minimalism is key. to make smaller, simpler microrobots, researchers at Drexel University have developed a fabrication method which utilizes the minimum geometric requirements for fluid motion -- consisting of just two conjoined microparticles coated with bits of magnetic debris.
July 19, 2016
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Miniature Magnetic Implant for Drug Delivery
A team of researchers from the University of British Columbia have created a magnetic drug implant that could offer an alternative for patients having to take several pills or intravenous injections. this implant is the first of its kind in Canada.
February 14, 2017
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Miniature Super Magnets Could Help Advance Drug Delivery
Microscopic crystals could soon be transporting drugs within a person's body, taking them directly to diseased organs. this was thought to be unachievable in the past, as the crystals, which possess special magnetic attributes, were so tiny that scientists were not able to manipulate their movement.
November 15, 2016
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'Missing link' found in the development of bioelectronic medicines
New research, led by the University of Southampton, has demonstrated that a nanoscale device, called a memristor, could be the 'missing link' in the development of implants that use electrical signals from the brain to help treat medical conditions.
September 27, 2016
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MIT Engineers develop new Microfluidic Device that Mimics Muscle-Nerve Connection
MIT researchers have designed a microfluidic device that mimics the neuromuscular junction, the place where muscle and nerve meet.
August 05, 2016
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MIT Researchers develop Gene Therapy Method with Potential to Arrest Cancer Metastasis
A major cause of mortality in women with breast cancer is the spread of malignant cells around the body called as metastasis. Recently, a team of MIT researchers are in the process of formulating a new gene therapy method, which shows potential as a novel approach to prevent breast cancer tumors from metastasizing.
September 22, 2016
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MIT Tethers Nanoparticles to Make Cancer Cells More Vulnerable to Treatment
Researchers at MIT have developed an approach to make tumor cells more susceptible to particular types of cancer treatment by coating nanoparticles on the cells prior to delivering drugs.
March 21, 2017
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Moire Nanosphere Lithography allows fabrication of large-area tunable graphene metasurfaces
Graphene, one of the most exciting two-dimensional (2D) materials, has shown extraordinary optical properties due to strong surface plasmon polaritons supported by graphene nanostructure. Graphene metasurfaces show plasmonic resonance bands that can be tuned from mid-infrared (MIR) to terahertz (THz) regime. These plasmonic devices can be used for biosensing, spectroscopy, light modulation and communication applications.
August 16, 2016
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Molecular motor-powered biocomputers
Crashing computers or smartphones and software security holes that allow hackers to steal millions of passwords could be prevented if it were possible to design and verify error-free software. Unfortunately, to date, this is a problem that neither engineers nor supercomputers can solve.
March 19, 2017
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Misc. - N

Naked-eye plasmonic colorimetry and SERS dual-mode sensor (w/video)
Point-of-care diagnostics, food safety screening, and environmental monitoring will massively benefit from the label-free, inexpensive, rapid, handheld sensor devices that are currently under development.
August 19, 2016
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Nano fiber feels forces, hears sounds made by cells
Engineers have developed a miniature device that's sensitive enough to feel the forces generated by swimming bacteria and hear the beating of heart muscle cells. the device is a nano-sized optical fiber that detects forces down to 160 femtonewtons and sound levels down to -30 decibels. Applications include measuring bio-activity at the single cell level, or ultra-sensitive mini stethoscopes to monitor cellular acoustics in vivo.
May 15, 2017
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Nano-drip by nano-drip
This might considerably speed up crystal growth that is of major importance in a number of materials and applications. The liquid state of the building blocks in the preliminary stage might also accelerate the effectiveness of medicines.
June 21, 2017
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Nanoarray sniffs out and distinguishes multiple diseases
Before modern medical lab techniques became available, doctors diagnosed some diseases by smelling a patient's breath. Scientists have been working for years to develop analytical instruments that can mimic this sniff-and-diagnose ability.
January 11, 2017
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Nanobiotix Files for First Market Approval of NBTXR3 Product in Europe
NANOBIOTIX, a late clinical-stage nanomedicine company pioneering novel approaches for the local treatment of cancer, has filed for market approval (CE Marking) in Europe for its lead product, a first-in-class radio-enhancer, NBTXR3.
September 14, 2016
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'Nanobottles' offer blueprint for enhanced biological imaging
A pan-European team of researchers involving the University of Oxford has developed a new technique to provide cellular 'blueprints' that could help scientists interpret the results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping.
October 27, 2016
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Nanocellulose in medicine and green manufacturing
What if you could take one of the most abundant natural materials on earth and harness its strength to lighten the heaviest of objects, to replace synthetic materials, or use it in scaffolding to grow bone, in a fast-growing area of science in oral health care?
November 7, 2016
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Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI offers greater range of diagnostic and therapeutic applications
Nanodiamonds - synthetic industrial diamonds only a few nanometers in size - have recently attracted considerable attention because of the potential they offer for the targeted delivery of vaccines and cancer drugs and for other uses. Thus far, options for imaging nanodiamonds have been limited.
April 26, 2017
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Nanoelectronic barcoding on lab on a chip could monitor health, germs and pollutants
Imagine wearing a device that continuously analyzes your sweat or blood for different types of biomarkers, such as proteins that show you may have breast cancer or lung cancer.
June 12, 2017
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Nanoengineers 3-D print biomimetic blood vessel networks
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have 3D printed a lifelike, functional blood vessel network that could pave the way toward artificial organs and regenerative therapies.
March 2, 2017
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Nanofiber feels forces and hears sounds made by cells
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a miniature device that's sensitive enough to feel the forces generated by swimming bacteria and hear the beating of heart muscle cells.
May 15, 2017
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Nanofiber Mesh for Wrapping Injured Nerve and Promoting Regeneration
A NIMS-Osaka University collaborative research team created a mesh that can be wrapped around injured peripheral nerves to help their regeneration and repair their functions.
March 1, 2017
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Nanofluidic device speeds up quality control for biologics
Drugs manufactured by living cells, also called biologics, are one of the fastest-growing segments of the pharmaceutical industry. These drugs, often antibodies or other proteins, are being used to treat cancer, arthritis, and many other diseases.
May 22, 2017
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Nanoinjection increases survival rate of cells
In a new study to be found in Scientific Reports ("Survival rate of eukaryotic cells following electrophoretic nanoinjection"), they show that with this method, nine out of ten cells survive being injected with foreign molecules.
March 1, 2017
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Nanoinjection leads to significantly higher survival rate of living cells
How do tumours grow? and how do bacteria transform harmless substances into medical agents? When biophysicists want to understand what is happening in living cells, they have to introduce fluorescent probes or other foreign molecules. There are several ways to overcome the cell wall without causing the cell permanent harm.
March 1, 2017
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Nanomedicine could herald fast, easy way to spot early signs of disease
While more research is needed to confirm the findings published in the FASEB Journal, the use of FITR could herald a fast and easy way to spot early signs of infection, cancer, and difficult to diagnose neurological conditions.
March 21, 2017
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Nanomedicine researchers work on enhanced cellular uptake of nanoparticles
Nanotechnology has become a growing part of medical research in recent years, with scientists feverishly working to see if tiny particles could revolutionize the world of drug delivery.
March 8, 2017
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Nanoparticle biosensor able to detect HIV only one week after infection
In addition, the total test time is 4 hours, 45 minutes, meaning clinical results could be obtained on the same day. the research is published today in the journal PLOS ONE.
February 15, 2017
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Nanoparticle coating may eliminate cold storage for some tests
Many diagnostic tests use antibodies to help confirm a myriad of medical conditions, from Zika infections to heart ailments and even some forms of cancer. Antibodies capture and help detect proteins, enzymes, bacteria and viruses present in injuries and illnesses, and must be kept at a constant low temperature to ensure their viability – often requiring refrigeration powered by electricity. this can make diagnostic testing in underdeveloped countries, disaster or remote areas and even war zones extremely expensive and difficult.
January 4, 2017
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Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Help in Ophthalmic Development
Topically administered drug formulations (e.g. eye drops) are used to treat most ophthalmic diseases.
January 4, 2017
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Nanoparticle drug-delivery method holds promise for controlling crop parasites
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University are applying drug-delivery technology to agriculture to control parasitic roundworms more effectively and safely.
May 31, 2017
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Nanoparticle food additive found in candy, gum could alter digestive cell structure and function
The ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and act as a barrier to pathogens is "significantly decreased" after chronic exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide, a common food additive found in everything from chewing gum to bread, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of new York.
February 16, 2017
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Nanomedicine for patients with lung disease
Scientists based at Imperial College London have tested a new type of nanoparticle called metal organic frameworks (MOF) -- tiny metal cages less than 100 nanometres across that can be loaded with drug molecules -- which they believe could potentially be used to treat patients with a devastating condition called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).
July 3, 2017
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Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug development
Many scientists are pursuing ways to treat disease by delivering DNA or RNA that can turn a gene on or off. However, a major obstacle to progress in this field has been finding ways to safely deliver that genetic material to the correct cells.
February 8, 2017
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Nanoparticle tattoos mark the spot - for surgery - then disappear
Tattoos aren't just for body art. they can have medical applications, too. Doctors are using them on patients to mark an area for future treatment – particularly for non-melanoma skin cancer such as basal cell carcinoma – but the inks can cause problems.
December 21, 2016
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Nanoparticle Technology Could Help Improve Safety and Efficacy of Biologic Drugs
Nature Nanotechnology has published a new article that shows preclinical results from a study conducted by Selecta Biosciences. Selecta is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company that develops targeted antigen-specific immune therapies for rare and grave diseases.
August 02, 2016
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Nanoparticles can travel from lungs to blood, possibly explaining risks to heart
Tiny particles in air pollution have been associated with cardiovascular disease, which can lead to premature death. But how particles inhaled into the lungs can affect blood vessels and the heart has remained a mystery.
April 26, 2017
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Nanoparticles Causing Air Pollution can also Affect the Heart
Air is polluted by small particles associated with cardiovascular disease, which can result in premature death. However, it still remains a mystery as to how particles inhaled into the lungs can affect blood vessels and the heart.
April 27, 2017
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Nanoparticles Could be Used to Target Bone Cancers in Large Mammals
At the University of Illinois, an engineer teamed up with a veterinarian to test a bone cancer drug delivery system in animals bigger than the standard animal model, the mouse. they chose dogs -- mammals closer in size and biology to humans -- with naturally occurring bone cancers, which also are a lot like human bone tumors.
July 26, 2016
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Nanoparticles Help Platelets Stick Together to Stop Bleeding
At this week's 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society researchers from University of Maryland, Baltimore County reported on the development of nanoparticles that can help speed up blood clotting. So far tested only on pig's blood, the goal of the research is to provide clinicians with a more effective way of treating internal bleeding.
August 24, 2016
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Nanoparticles reprogram immune cells to fight cancer
Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed biodegradable nanoparticles that can be used to genetically program immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells -- while the immune cells are still inside the body.
April 17, 2017
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Nanoparticles shaped like rods and worms could effectively deliver drugs, research suggests
When it comes to delivering drugs, nanoparticles shaped like rods and worms are the best bet for making the daunting journey to the centre of a cell, new Australian research suggests.
September 13, 2016
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Nanoparticles that speed blood clotting may someday save lives
Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Many methods for controlling external bleeding exist, but at this point, only surgery can halt blood loss inside the body from injury to internal organs.
August 22, 2016
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Nanoparticles to Stop Internal Bleeding Could Help to Save Lives
Stopping bleeding as fast as possible is vital to save lives when severe trauma has occurred on the highway or the battlefield. Several techniques are used to control external bleeding, however surgery is currently the only way to stop blood loss within the body from injury to internal organs.
August 23, 2016
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Nanoribbons in solutions mimic nature
Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) bend and twist easily in solution, making them adaptable for biological uses like DNA analysis, drug delivery and biomimetic applications, according to scientists at Rice University.
August 15, 2016
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Nanosensors could help determine tumors' ability to remodel tissue
MIT researchers have designed nanosensors that can profile tumors and may yield insight into how they will respond to certain therapies. the system is based on levels of enzymes called proteases, which cancer cells use to remodel their surroundings.
September 29, 2016
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Nanoscale computer model helps discover mechanisms that controls bone formation
An international, multidisciplinary research team, including an engineering professor at the University of Arkansas, has discovered a mechanism that controls the formation and function of plate-like nanocrystals that play a critical role in bone composition.
May 30, 2017
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Nanostraws sample a cell's contents without damage
Cells within our bodies divide and change over time, with thousands of chemical reactions occurring within each cell daily. this makes it difficult for scientists to understand what's happening inside. Now, tiny nanostraws developed by Stanford researchers offer a method of sampling cell contents without disrupting its natural processes.
February 21, 2017
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Nanosurface Created with Potential Applications in Medical Devices
A researcher from RMIT and collaborators have created a novel nanosurface to be used in medical devices and implants that will prevent contamination with lethal bacteria.
August 24, 2016
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Nanotechnology 3D manufacturing builds complex, bio-like materials
Washington State University nanotechnology researchers have developed a unique, 3-D manufacturing method that for the first time rapidly creates and precisely controls a material's architecture from the nanoscale to centimeters. the results closely mimic the intricate architecture of natural materials like wood and bone.
March 3, 2017
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Nanotechnology and Wireless Electronics Developed for new Type of Retinal Prosthesis
The nanotechnology and wireless electronics required for a new type of retinal prosthesis has been developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc.
March 14, 2017
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Nanotechnology based gene editing to eradicate HIV brain reservoir in drug abusers
Opiate abuse is a significant risk factor for HIV infection, and in combination they can have a devastating effect on the brain. Scientists at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine are studying new therapies that can short-circuit HIV infection and mitigate the damaging effects that opiate addiction has on the central nervous system.
February 15, 2017
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Nanotechnology enables powerful and portable sterilization equipment
For the first time, researchers have created light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on lightweight flexible metal foil.
November 15, 2016
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Nanotechnology engineers develop the 'potalyzer', a roadside saliva test for marijuana intoxication
This November, several states will vote whether to legalize marijuana use, joining more than 20 states that already allow some form of cannabis use. this has prompted a need for effective tools for police to determine on the spot whether people are driving under the influence. Cars stopped while police interview drivers
September 13, 2016
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Nanotechnology is making drugs more precise. But how?
If drugs could be targeted to exactly the right place in the body, we could probably do with significantly smaller doses -- and consequently fewer side effects. to allow for such precise delivery, we need tiny nanocarriers and even smaller nanotrackers to monitor them. Researchers in Finland are working on both of these.
October 30, 2016
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Nanotechnology platform leads to invention of glucose-sensing contact lens
Blood testing is the standard option for checking glucose levels, but a new technology could allow non-invasive testing via a contact lens that samples glucose levels in tears.
October 4, 2016
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Nanotubes that build themselves
Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have succeeded in producing nanotubes from a single building block using so-called molecular self-recognition. the tube can also change shape depending on the surrounding environment. the results can contribute to the future development of transport channels for drugs through the cell membrane.
April 13, 2017
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Nanovaccine could enhance cancer immunotherapy, reduce side effects
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering researchers have created a nanovaccine that could make a current approach to cancer immunotherapy more effective while also reducing side effects. the nanovaccine helps to efficiently deliver a unique DNA sequence to immune cells -- a sequence derived from bacterial DNA and used to trigger an immune reaction. the nanovaccine also protects the DNA from being destroyed inside the body, where DNA-cutting enzymes are pervasive, as well as outside of the body when exposed to warm temperatures while being stored or transported.
August 24, 2016
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Nanovesicles in predictable shapes
Beads, disks, bowls and rods: scientists at Radboud University have demonstrated the first methodological approach to control the shapes of nanovesicles. this opens doors for the use of nanovesicles in biomedical applications, such as drug delivery in the body.
August 25, 2016
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Neuron-integrated nanotubes to repair nerve fibers
Carbon nanotubes exhibit interesting characteristics rendering them particularly suited to the construction of special hybrid devices - consisting of biological issue and synthetic material - planned to re-establish connections between nerve cells, for instance at spinal level, lost on account of lesions or trauma.
June 26, 2017
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Neuron-Integrated Carbon Nanotubes to Repair Neuronal Damages
Carbon nanotubes display fascinating characteristics making them especially suited for the manufacture of special hybrid devices -- comprising of biological issue and synthetic material -- aiming to re-establish connections between nerve cells, for example at spinal level, lost due to trauma or lesions.
June 27, 2017
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'Neuron-reading' nanowires could accelerate development of drugs for neurological diseases
A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. the new nanowire technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.
April 11, 2017
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Neutrons provide the first nanoscale look at a living cell membrane
A research team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed the first-ever direct nanoscale examination of a living cell membrane. In doing so, it also resolved a long-standing debate by identifying tiny groupings of lipid molecules that are likely key to the cell's functioning.
May 24, 2017
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Nerve-wrapping nanofiber mesh promoting regeneration
A research team consisting of Mitsuhiro Ebara, MANA associate principal investigator, Mechanobiology Group, NIMS, and Hiroyuki Tanaka, assistant professor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, developed a mesh which can be wrapped around injured peripheral nerves to facilitate their regeneration and restore their functions.
February 28, 2017
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New active filaments mimic biology to transport nano-cargo
Inspired by micro-scale motions of nature, a group of researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology Madras and the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, in Chennai, India, has developed a new design for transporting colloidal particles, tiny cargo suspended in substances such as fluids or gels, more rapidly than is currently possible by diffusion. Fluid friction determines micro-scale inertia in fluid. this means, for instance, blood cells swimming within blood encounter roughly the same amount of drag that a human would experience attempting to swim through molasses.
January 10, 2017
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New Bionanotechnology Device Could Detect DNA Amplification at Nanoscale
Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a ubiquitous and simple technique used in molecular biology to amplify DNA segments into millions of copies. PCR is a significant method not only for basic research, but also in forensics, medical applications and diagnostics.
September 12, 2016
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New Brain Tissue Imaging Technique Allows Researchers Take Wider View of Molecules Within Cells
MIT researchers have developed a new technique for imaging brain tissue at multiple scales, allowing them to peer at molecules within cells or take a wider view of the long-range connections between neurons.
July 26, 2016
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New carbon nanomaterial pot several times deeper than any similar nanostructure
A novel, pot-shaped, carbon nanomaterial developed by researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan is several times deeper than any hollow carbon nanostructure previously produced. this unique characteristic enables the material to gradually release substances contained within and is expected to be beneficial in applications such as drug delivery systems.
August 05, 2016
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New carbon nanotube sensors can detect single protein molecules
for the first time, MIT engineers have designed sensors that can detect single protein molecules as they are secreted by cells or even a single cell.
January 24, 2017
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New Center to assess safety of engineered nanomaterials
Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs)–which are less than 100 nanometers (one millionth of a millimeter) in diameter–can make the colors in digital printer inks pop and help sunscreens better protect against radiation, among many other applications in industry and science. they may even help prevent infectious diseases. But as the technology becomes more widespread, questions remain about the potential risks that ENMs may pose to health and the environment.
August 29, 2016
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New class of materials could revolutionize biomedical, alternative energy industries
Polyhedral boranes, or clusters of boron atoms bound to hydrogen atoms, are transforming the biomedical industry. These manmade materials have become the basis for the creation of cancer therapies, enhanced drug delivery and new contrast agents needed for radioimaging and diagnosis.
February 2, 2017
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New Collaboration to develop Prototypes for Novel Technologies Derived from Cellulose Nanofibers
The Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry, LLC (WBI) and Paperlogic, a Southworth Company (Paperlogic), announce their collaboration to create and develop prototypes for a wide array of novel technologies derived from cellulose nanofibers (CNF).
March 8, 2016
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New drive for nanorobots in biological fluids
Nanorobots and other mini-vehicles might be able to perform important services in medicine one day for example, by conducting remotely-controlled operations or transporting pharmaceutical agents to a desired location in the body. However, to date it has been hard to steer such micro- and nanoswimmers accurately through biological fluids such as blood, synovial fluid or the inside of the eyeball.
February 13, 2017
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New gelatin devices that imitate the activity of the body in bone regeneration
Regenerative medicine is a discipline that is continually growing and encompasses a whole arsenal of therapeutic strategies, from recombinant proteins and stem cells right up to materials and matrices designed to release drugs and growth factors.
May 12, 2017
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New graphene MRI contrast agent shows no signs of toxicity
Graphene, the atomically thin sheets of carbon that materials scientists are hoping to use for everything from nanoelectronics and aircraft de-icers to batteries and bone implants, may also find use as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging
November 11, 2016
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New insights on the spin dynamics of a material candidate for low-power devices
Computers process and transfer data through electrical currents passing through tiny circuits and wires. As these currents meet with resistance, they create heat that can undermine the efficiency and even the safety of these devices.
May 22, 2017
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New lung 'organoids' in a dish mimic features of full-size lung
New lung "organoids"--tiny 3-D structures that mimic features of a full-sized lung--have been created from human pluripotent stem cells by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. the team used the organoids to generate models of human lung diseases in a lab dish, which could be used to advance our understanding of a variety of respiratory diseases.
May 12, 2017
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New material regrows bone
A team of researchers repaired a hole in a mouse's skull by regrowing "quality bone," a breakthrough that could drastically improve the care of people who suffer severe trauma to the skull or face.
March 8, 2017
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New mechanobiology technique to stop cancer cell migration
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University have developed a novel technique that stops cervical cancer cell migration. the research, published in Chem could open up new avenues in cancer treatment.
February 10, 2017
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New Method for Targeted Delivery of Drugs to Implants Using Magnetocaloric Effect
An innovative method to apply the therapeutic effect of heating or cooling the tissues using the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been developed by a group of Russian physicists in collaboration with their Swiss colleagues.
August 08, 2016
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New method using gold microstructures could effectively deliver drugs or DNA into cells
The ability to deliver cargo like drugs or DNA into cells is essential for biological research and disease therapy but cell membranes are very good at defending their territory. Researchers have developed various methods to trick or force open the cell membrane but these methods are limited in the type of cargo they can deliver and aren't particularly efficient.
March 24, 2017
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New microfluidic chip replicates muscle-nerve connection
MIT engineers have developed a microfluidic device that replicates the neuromuscular junction -- the vital connection where nerve meets muscle. the device, about the size of a U.S. quarter, contains a single muscle strip and a small set of motor neurons. Researchers can influence and observe the interactions between the two, within a realistic, three-dimensional matrix.
August 04, 2016
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New Microfluidic Device Could Facilitate Rapid Drug Tests
MIT researchers have invented a new method to accurately measure the growth of multiple individual cells at the same time.
September 7, 2016
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New microscope images single, living cells at better resolution and lower light dose
Computed tomography (CT) is benefitting from research to lower radiation dose, while maintaining or improving the quality of the images. Analogously, scientists at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the University of Chicago have developed a new microscope that doubles the resolution of images without exposing the sample to an increased amount of light or prolonging the imaging process (Optica, "Simultaneous multi-view capture and fusion improves spatial resolution in wide-field and light-sheet microscopy").
August 30, 2016
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New microscope reveals nanoscale structural dynamics in live cells
Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory and colleagues have unveiled a new microscope that can track the position and orientation of individual molecules in living cells--nanoscale measurements that until now have posed a significant challenge.
October 3, 2016
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New Microscopy Method Helps Capturing Nanometer-Scale Images of Structures in Biological Materials
Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin have developed a new technique to capture three-dimensional images of structures in biological materials at a much higher resolution compared to other existing methods under natural conditions.
September 12, 2016
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New Nano MRI Lamp May Help Overcome Limitations in MRI Diagnosis
A new technology platform, the Nano MRI Lamp, is capable of tuning the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals "ON" only in the vicinity of the targeted disease. this platform was developed by a research team led by Cheon Jinwoo at the Center for Nanomedicine, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS).
February 7, 2017
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New nano-implant could one day help restore sight
With high-resolution retinal prosthesis built from nanowires and wireless electronics, engineers are one step closer to restoring neurons' ability to respond to light
March 14, 2017
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New Nanobody Tool Used for Transferring Proteins
A team of researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have formulated a new technique by which proteins can be moved to a new location in a cell. the unique tool enables researchers to explore the function of proteins based on their position by using nanobodies. the tool can be used for a broad range of proteins and in varied areas of developmental biology. the research results have been published in the scientific journal eLife.
April 12, 2017
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New Nanofiber Fabrication Device offers Accurate Point-And-Shoot Capability
A portable, lightweight nanofiber fabrication device that could at some point in time be used to dress shoppers in customizable fabrics or dress wounds on a battlefield has been developed by Harvard researchers.
March 2, 2017
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New Nanofiber Matrix to Help Produce Improved Quality Stem Cells for Disease Treatment
Culturing a large number of healthy human stem cells may soon be possible using a matrix composed of gelatin nanofibers on a synthetic polymer microfiber mesh.
February 15, 2017
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New Nanoscale Technologies Enhance Imaging Results in Ordinary Microscopes
Chemists, biologists, and engineers from the University of Missouri have conducted research that could change the way scientists analyze cells and molecules at sub-microscopic (nanoscale) levels.
July 20, 2016
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New Nanosensors for Measuring Enzyme Levels, Help Choose Appropriate Cancer Treatments
An MIT research team has built nanosensors capable of profiling tumors and may help to discover how they will react to certain therapies. the system is designed according to levels of enzymes known as proteases, which cancer cells use to remodel their surroundings.
September 29, 2016
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New nanoparticle technology to decipher structure and function of membrane proteins
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have developed a nanoparticle technology that can be used to stabilise membrane proteins so that their structure can be studied in a lipid environment. the method, described in Nature Methods, makes it possible to access drug targets that previously could not be investigated and therefore potentially allows for the development of novel drugs, therapeutic antibodies and vaccines.
March 8, 2016
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New nanoparticle technology to decipher structure and function of membrane proteins
Researchers have developed a nanoparticle technology that can be used to stabilize membrane proteins so that their structure can be studied in a lipid environment. the method makes it possible to access drug targets that previously could not be investigated and therefore potentially allows for the development of novel drugs, therapeutic antibodies and vaccines.
March 8, 2016
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New Nanoparticle-Based Therapy can Transport Drug into Lung Cancer Cells Without Affecting Normal Lung Cells
Researchers with the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center successfully developed a synthetic polymer that can transport a drug into lung cancer cells without going inside of normal lung cells.
September 16, 2016
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New Nanoparticles Serve as Improved Contrast Agents for MRI
Scientists from the University of Basel have developed nanoparticles that have the potential to serve as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.
August 04, 2016
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New Optical Nanosensor Enhances Accuracy of Brain Mapping
Researchers report, in an article published in the recent issue of Neurophotonics, that a new optical nanosensor enabling more accurate measurement and spatiotemporal mapping of the brain is also capable of paving the path towards the design of future multimodal sensors and a wider range of applications. the journal is published by SPIE, the global society for optics and photonics.
March 3, 2017
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New optical nanosensor improves brain mapping accuracy, opens way for more applications
A new optical nanosensor enabling more accurate measurement and spatiotemporal mapping of the brain also shows the way forward for design of future multimodal sensors and a broader range of applications, say researchers in an article published in the current issue of Neurophotonics.
March 2, 2017
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New polymer warns of dangerous kidney disease
The advanced phase of acute kidney injury can be fatal in even one in two patients. Fortunately, now it will be possible to detect the disease in its initial stages, when treatment is still relatively simple and the prognosis good.
October 12, 2016
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New porous solids may lead to better drugs
An international team of researchers, led by Mark E. Davis at Caltech, has succeeded in making the first chiral molecular sieves. this discovery opens new areas of investigation in both chemistry and biology, and has broad implications for pharmaceutical companies and other specialized chemical manufacturers.
May 2, 2017
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New Prototype Lab-on-a-Chip Platform to Enhance Detection of Molecular Pathogens
A new prototype lab-on-a-chip platform has been developed by researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy & Immunology (Leipzig, Germany). this new platform provides versatile and easy detection of molecular pathogens.
March 27, 2017
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New protein bridges chemical divide for 'seamless' bioelectronics devices
Life has always played by its own set of molecular rules. from the biochemistry behind the first cells, evolution has constructed wonders like hard bone, rough bark and plant enzymes that harvest light to make food.
November 1, 2016
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New research delves into physical properties of nanoparticles for successful drug delivery
Nanoparticles are being studied as drug delivery systems to treat a wide variety of diseases. new research delves into the physical properties of nanoparticles that are important for successfully delivering therapeutics within the body, with a primary focus on size.
July 19, 2016
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New Research Explores Strategies to Optimize Nanoparticles for Delivery of Therapeutics
Researchers have been studying nanoparticles as drug delivery systems for treatment of different diseases.
July 19, 2016
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New research shows that proteins are 'virtually' knotted
Many of the processes essential to life involve proteins - long molecules which 'fold' into three-dimensional shapes allowing them to perform their biological role.
February 13, 2017
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New silicon structures could make better biointerfaces
A team of researchers from the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, the University of Illinois at Chicago and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have engineered silicon particles one-fiftieth the width of a human hair, which could lead to "biointerface" systems designed to make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat (Nature Materials, "Heterogeneous silicon mesostructures for lipid-supported bioelectric interfaces").
August 1, 2016
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New Study Reveals how Nanoparticle Shape Affects Intracellular Transport of Drug Release
A new study published in Nature Nanotechnology has answered a long-standing question that could lead to the design of better drug delivery vehicles: how nanoparticle shape affects the voyage through the cell.
September 13, 2016
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New study shows that iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit tumour growth
The intravenous iron-replacement product ferumoxytol and other iron oxide nanoparticles are being used for treating iron deficiency, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, and as drug carriers.
October 4, 2016
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New technique developed for effective dye removal and low-cost water purification
Organic compounds in wastewater, such as dyes and pigments in industry effluents, are toxic or have lethal effect on aquatic living and humans. Increasing evidence has shown that the organic contaminants discharged from electroplating, textile production, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals are the main reasons for the higher morbidity rates of kidney, liver, and bladder cancers, etc. Organic contaminants, especially methyl blue and methyl orange, are stable to light, heat or oxidizing agents and very difficult to remove by conventional chemical or biological wastewater treatment techniques.
July 19, 2016
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New Technique for Engraving Complex, Nanometric Patterns on Polymer Fibers
Scientists at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonic Materials and Fiber Devices, which is operated by Fabien Sorin, have developed a new technique for imprinting nanometric patterns on the outside and inside of polymer fibers. These polymer fibers may be useful in a number of applications, for instance, to produce optical effect, guide nerve regeneration, and ultimately create smart bandages and artificial tissues.
January 25, 2017
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New technique for the controlled introduction of substances through the cell membrane
Cells, the basic building blocks of life, are delimited by membranes--the cell's skin--which act as intelligent barriers that allow the entrance of selected materials and nutrients, while blocking the passage of unwanted chemicals, and unfortunately, also many drugs.
March 31, 2017
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New Technique to Create Water-Based 2D Inks for Biomedical Applications
A research team from the University of Manchester have developed a technique of developing water-based and inkjet printable 2D material inks, which could enable 2D crystal heterostructures to be moved from the laboratory into real-world products.
February 1, 2017
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New technology platform propels the use of 'organs-on-chips'
A research team led by scientists from Brigham and Women's Hospital has developed a novel technology platform that enables the continuous and automated monitoring of so-called "organs-on-chips" -- tiny devices that incorporate living cells to mimic the biology of bona fide human organs.
March 8, 2017
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New Thread-Based Diagnostic Platform Holds Promise for Advanced Implantable and Wearable Diagnostics
A team of researchers guided by Tufts University engineers have managed to combine nano-scale sensors, microfluidics and electronics into threads for the first time.
July 18, 2016
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New tool can help policymakers prioritize information needs for synthetic biology tech
New technologies are developed at a rapid pace, often reaching the marketplace before policymakers can determine how or whether they should be governed. now researchers from North Carolina State University and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have developed a model that can be used to assess emerging synthetic biology products, well before they are ready for the market, to determine what needs to be done to inform future policies.
January 17, 2017
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New tool offers snapshots of neuron activity
Many cognitive processes, such as decision-making, take place within seconds or minutes. Neuroscientists have longed to capture neuron activity during such tasks, but that dream has remained elusive -- until now.
June 26, 2017
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New tool to clean flow cytometry data
A*STAR researchers have developed a new bioinformatics tool called flowAI, which provides a more objective, efficient and intuitive solution to the quality control of data acquired via a common biological technique called flow cytometry.
November 30, 2016
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New Turnkey System to Provide Solutions for Nanoscience, Nanotechnology Applications
The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) with Oxford Instruments and the National Graphene Institute (NGI), is involved in a new collaborative project for the development of a commercial measurement system that can be used for various nanotechnology applications. the research organizations are based at the University of Manchester and has been partially funded by Innovate UK.
September 12, 2016
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New ultrasound-powered actuator to power micro robot
The quest to develop a wireless micro-robot for biomedical applications requires a small-scale "motor" that can be wirelessly powered through biological media. While magnetic fields can be used to power small robots wirelessly, they do not provide selectivity since all actuators under the same magnetic field just follow the same motion.
November 22, 2016
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New Versatile Method Helps Build Single Nanowire Extending from Specific Starting Point
A versatile method to pattern the structure of nanowires has been developed by a team of Hokkaido University researchers. this new method provides a tool that will aid the development of novel nanodevices.
September 13, 2016
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News from Quorum: the Agricultural Research Service of the Usda Uses a Quorum Cryo-sem Preparation System for the Study of Mites, Ticks and other Soft Bodied Organisms
Quorum Technologies, market and technology leaders in electron microscopy coating and cryogenic preparation products, report on the work of the Agricultural Research Service of the US Department of Agriculture where their PP2000 Cryo-SEM preparation system is in use to prepare soft bodied organisms including mites & ticks for study using cryo-SEM.
November 22, 2016
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News from Quorum: the Sainsbury Laboratory at the University of Cambridge uses Quorum Cryo-SEM Preparation System for Research in Plant Biology
Quorum Technologies, market and technology leaders in electron microscopy coating and cryogenic preparation products, report on plant biology research at the Sainsbury Laboratory, Cambridge UK, where their PP3010T Cryo-SEM preparation system is in routine use.
August 09, 2016
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No sugar coating, but sweet nonetheless
Complex neurotechnological devices are required to directly select and influence brain waves inside the skull's interior. Although it has become relatively easy to implement the devices, researchers are still faced with challenges when trying to keep them running properly in living organisms over time. But that could be changing now, thanks to a new method from Freiburg.
April 5, 2017
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Nominations invited for $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience
Northwestern University's International Institute for Nanotechnology (IIN) is now accepting nominations for two prestigious international prizes: the $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine and the $10,000 Kabiller Young Investigator Award in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine.
February 25, 2017
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Novel nozzle saves crystals
Scientists are interested in the spatial structure of proteins, as it reveals much about the workings of these biomolecules. this knowledge can lead to a better understanding of the functions of biomolecules and to tailored medicines.
March 16, 2017
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Novel 'repair system' discovered in algae may yield new tools for biotechnology
A new way of fixing inactive proteins has been discovered in an algae, which uses chloroplast extracts and light to release an interrupting sequence from a protein.
July 29, 2016
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Novel sensor investigates complex surface chemistry on nanostructures
Microfluidic platforms have revolutionized medical diagnostics in recent years. Instead of sending blood or urine samples off to a laboratory for analysis, doctors can test a single drop of a patient's blood or urine for various diseases at point-of-care without the need for expensive instruments.
December 22, 2016
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Novel technology platform enables continuous, automated monitoring of 'organs-on-chips'
A research team led by scientists from Brigham and Women's Hospital has developed a novel technology platform that enables the continuous and automated monitoring of so-called "organs-on-chips" -- tiny devices that incorporate living cells to mimic the biology of bona fide human organs.
March 8, 2017
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Novel, Non-Invasive Cancer Therapy Targets Specific Cancer Cells Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes
A staggering 1.7 million persons in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer in 2016, with 600,000 cases ending in death. University of Oklahoma researchers have collaborated to design a novel, non-invasive cancer therapy that could eliminate tumors without affecting the healthy cells in the body.
October 18, 2016
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Nylon fibers made to flex like muscles
Artificial muscles – materials that contract and expand somewhat like muscle fibers do – can have many applications, from robotics to components in the automobile and aviation industries. Now, MIT researchers have come up with one of the simplest and lowest-cost systems yet for developing such "muscles," in which a material reproduces some of the bending motions that natural muscle tissues perform.
November 23, 2016
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Nylon fibers made to flex like muscles
Engineers have found a simple and inexpensive new approach to creating bending artificial muscle fibers. Artificial muscles -- materials that contract and expand somewhat like muscle fibers do -- can have many applications, from robotics to components in the automobile and aviation industries.
November 23, 2016
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Misc. - O

Oddball enzyme provides easy path to synthetic biomaterials
Materials scientists have written the recipe on how to use an oddball enzyme to build new biomaterials out of DNA. the work provides instructions for researchers the world over to build self-assembling molecules for applications ranging from drug delivery to nanowires.
May 16, 2017
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Oddball enzyme provides easy path to synthetic biomaterials
Materials scientists have written the recipe on how to use an oddball enzyme to build new biomaterials out of DNA. the work provides instructions for researchers the world over to build self-assembling molecules for applications ranging from drug delivery to nanowires.
May 16, 2017
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Olympus BX53 microscope delivers outstanding brightness and true-to-life images for life science applications
Olympus BX53 Microscope with High-Luminosity LED Provides Bright, Sharp Images in Challenging Life Science Applications
June 6, 2017
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One step closer to personalized antibiotic treatment
Taking antibiotics to fight an infection won't necessarily solve your problems. Often, natural occurring bacteria in the gut harbor several resistance genes. this means that the gut bacteria may exchange genes with the infectious bacteria, resulting in antibiotic resistance. Therefore, knowing the resistome -- i.e. the pool of resistance genes present in the gut microbiota -- can improve treatment immensely.
February 10, 2017
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Origami of the cell
In the ancient Japanese art of origami, paper must be folded precisely and following a specific order to create the desired result -- say, a crane or lotus flower. it's a complex pursuit that requires keen attention to detail and utmost accuracy.
January 31, 2017
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Optical generation of ultrasound via photoacoustic effect
Limitations of the piezoelectric array technologies conventionally used for ultrasonics inspired a group of University College London researchers to explore an alternative mechanism for generating ultrasound via light, also known as the photoacoustic effect.
February 28, 2017
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Oxford Nanoimaging Report on how the Super-Resolution Nanoimager is Being Used at Micron Oxford, a Multidisciplinary Bioimaging Unit Applying Advanced Cellular Imaging Techniques.
Oxford Nanoimaging Limited manufacture and sell custom microscopes offering super-resolution and single-molecule capabilities to research users. the multidisciplinary bioimaging unit, Micron Oxford, are using the Nanoimager instrument to advance their cellular imaging techniques for both their facilities and research programs.
March 27, 2017
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Misc. - P

Painless microneedle patch could replace needles
It's only a matter of time before drugs are administered via patches with painless microneedles instead of unpleasant injections. But designers need to balance the need for flexible, comfortable-to-wear material with effective microneedle penetration of the skin. Swedish researchers say they may have cracked the problem.
December 12, 2016
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Paper pumps power portable microfluidics, biomedical devices
Biomedical engineering researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed inexpensive paper pumps that use capillary action to power portable microfluidic devices, opening the door to a range of biomedical tools.
March 8, 2017
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Penn State Acquires Cryo-Electron Microscope to Promote Materials Science and Biomedical Research
A team of researchers from Penn State University hope to obtain an advanced microscope that will enable them to "go deep", to promote the discoveries in materials science and biomedical research.
July 25, 2016
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Peptides as tags in fluorescence microscopy
Fluorescence microscopy visualizes the molecular elements of cells. Proteins of nerve cells, for instance, can be labelled using probes which are subsequently excited with light to fluoresce. In the end, the fluorescence signal is used to generate microscopic images of the real position, arrangement and number of proteins.
November 30, 2016
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'Persistent photoconductivity' offers new tool for bioelectronics
Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a new approach for manipulating the behavior of cells on semiconductor materials, using light to alter the conductivity of the material itself.
May 3, 2017
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PETA Science Consortium to Present Nonanimal Testing Approaches at Regulatory Science Summit
In Vitro Tests can Most Efficiently Assess Nanomaterial Toxicity
September 7, 2016
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Photoreactive compound allows protein synthesis control with light
Okayama University researchers control the timing and location of protein synthesis using a photoresponsive compound that is an inactive key molecule until it is activated by brief irradiation.
October 4, 2016
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Plant-made virus shells could deliver drugs directly to cancer cells
Viruses are extremely efficient at targeting and delivering cargo to cells. In the journal ACS Nano, researchers report they have harnessed this well-honed ability -- minus the part that makes us sick -- to develop virus-like nanoparticles to deliver drugs straight to affected cells.
February 15, 2017
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Portable device produces biopharmaceuticals on demand
For medics on the battlefield and doctors in remote or developing parts of the world, getting rapid access to the drugs needed to treat patients can be challenging.
August 1, 2016
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Possible reason for carcinogenicity of silica dust is found
Scientists from LPI RAS, Skoltech, and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology led by Skoltech Professor Artem Oganov and leading scientist of LPI RAS Yurii Uspenskii have found unusual properties of silicon nanoparticles.
November 9, 2016
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Powerful new technique developed at UCSB reveals the mechanical environment of cells in the living embryo
Whether building organs or maintaining healthy adult tissues, cells use biochemical and mechanical cues from their environment to make important decisions, such as becoming a neuron, a skin cell or a heart cell. Scientists at UC Santa Barbara have developed a powerful new technique that reveals for the first time the mechanical environment that cells perceive in living tissues -- their natural, unaltered three-dimensional habitat.
December 5, 2016
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Precise insight into the depths of cells
Is it possible to watch at the level of single cells how fish embryos become trout, carp or salmon? Researchers at Goethe University Frankfurt have successfully combined two very advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques. The new high-resolution light microscope permits fascinating insights into a cell's interior.
May 24, 2017
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Precision NanoSystems launches NanoAssemblr Scale-Up system to support production of novel medicines
Precision NanoSystems has launched the NanoAssemblr™ Scale-Up system to support the clinical development of nanomedicines. this latest addition to the NanoAssemblr range is designed for the manufacture of clinical trial material in GMP environments, and will support the production of novel medicines, including siRNA, mRNA and CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutics.
March 9, 2017
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Preclinical data on Selecta's novel immune tolerance platform published in Nature Nanotechnology
Selecta Biosciences, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing targeted antigen-specific immune therapies for rare and serious diseases, announced today that Nature Nanotechnology has published an article that presents preclinical results from Selecta's research which demonstrate the broad potential applicability of Selecta's novel immune tolerance platform.
August 02, 2016
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Programmable disorder - Stochastic algorithms at the molecular scale
Many self-organized systems in nature exploit a sophisticated blend of deterministic and random processes. No two trees are exactly alike because growth is random, but a Redwood can be readily distinguished from a Jacaranda as the two species follow different genetic programs. the value of randomness in biological organisms is not fully understood, but it has been hypothesized that it allows for smaller genome sizes--because not every detail must be encoded. Randomness also provides the variation underlying adaptive evolution.
November 29, 2016
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Programmable materials showing future potential for industry
New research has shown that honeycomb "cellular" materials made of a shape-memory polymer might be programmed for specific purposes, from shock-absorbing football helmets to biomedical implants.
November 28, 2016
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Protein cages for designing various catalytic reactions
Compartmentalization is a common strategy used by living organisms to create isolated reaction environments to protect reaction catalysts from undesired reaction partners in cells. Mimicking such compartment systems is a novel approach for developing new biohybrid materials as well as for understanding the complex cellular processes.
August 08, 2016
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Protein research: the computer as microscope
Using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. with high temporal and spatial resolution, they verified that a magnesium atom contributes significantly to switching the so-called G-proteins on and off.
January 16, 2017
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Protein with multiple duties
Freiburg researchers have discovered that the molecular barrel protein Mdm10 can carry out various functions for the development and maintenance of mitochondrial structure by binding to protein machines.
October 10, 2016
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Misc. - Q

Quantum dots illuminate transport within the cell
The quantum dots used by the researchers are particles of semi-conducting material just a few nanometres wide, and are the subject of great interest because of their potential for use in photovoltaic cells or computers.
March 21, 2017
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Misc. - R

Redesigning cells
It had been seven years since Fahim Farzadfard had last seen his family back home in Iran. Even after obtaining his green card in the middle of 2016, he had waited to finish his PhD before making the trip. Finally, last December, Farzadfard made a long-awaited visit to his hometown of Mashhad, Iran.
June 19, 2017
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Reliable Walk-away Petri Dish Media Filler
Compact in design - MEDIAJET from INTEGRA offers the unique flexibility to fill Petri dishes of various sizes, Petri dishes with two compartments or test tubes of various diameters and length.
December 6, 2016
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Research into Nanoparticle Activation Could Potentially Transform Cancer Treatment
Physicists at the University of Texas at Arlington have shown that using microwaves to activate photosensitive nanoparticles produces tissue-heating effects that ultimately lead to cell death within solid tumors.
October 12, 2016
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Research Leads to Liposomes for Efficient Delivery of Vinblastine-N-Oxide Prodrug
An innovative cancer-drug delivery system has demonstrated the potential to utilize the oxygen-deficient regions of solid tumors that render the growths to be immune to standard radiation and chemotherapy treatment.
April 5, 2017
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Research outlines cellular communication processes that make life possible
Researchers have discovered a mechanism of intercellular communication that helps explain how biological systems and actions -- ranging from a beating heart to the ability to hit a home run -- function properly most of the time, and in some scenarios quite remarkably.
August 30, 2016
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Research Reveals Inner Workings of Nanocages for Gold Particles
A sophisticated biological strategy takes place within living organisms. Free metal ions are being stored and transported via proteins assembled into highly ordered structures such as protein cages via a reaction biomineralization.
March 17, 2017
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Researcher pursues synthetic 'scaffolds' for muscle regeneration
The word "engineering" can bring to mind images of bridges, spacecraft and even particle colliders. But the human body could use assistance from engineers as well, especially when the natural processes that shape and govern our cells, tissues or organs need a helping hand.
December 20, 2016
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Researcher turns 'SARS mask' into a virus killer
A University of Alberta engineering researcher has developed a new way to treat common surgical masks so they are capable of trapping and killing airborne viruses. His research findings appear in the prestigious journal Scientific Reports.
January 5, 2017
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Researchers create 3D beating heart
Matters of the heart can be complicated, but York University scientists have found a way to create 3D heart tissue that beats in synchronized harmony, like a heart in love, that will lead to better understanding of cardiac health and improved treatments.
February 10, 2017
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Researchers create 3D printed tensegrity objects capable of dramatic shape change
A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a way to use 3-D printers to create objects capable of expanding dramatically that could someday be used in applications ranging from space missions to biomedical devices.
June 14, 2017
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Researchers create first significant examples of optical crystallography for nanomaterials
Nanocrystals have diverse applications spanning biomedical imaging, light-emitting devices, and consumer electronics. Their unique optical properties result from the type of crystal from which they are composed. However, a major bottleneck in the development of nanocrystals, to date, is the need for X-ray techniques to determine the crystal type.
May 18, 2017
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Researchers demonstrate spin effects in solution-based nanocrystals
Wet-chemically produced nanocrystals are becoming more and more powerful. They are already used in the background lighting of the latest generation of flat panel displays. In the future they will be used increasingly as active elements, which produce higher color brilliance. They are also used in other fields of application, e.g., for medical diagnosis and treatment.
June 7, 2017
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Researchers design an enzyme to synthetize carbohydrates
Sugar or carbohydrate synthesis is important for the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines and new drugs.
June 22, 2017
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Researchers develop 20 times faster biosensor
A DGIST research team led by Professor CheolGi Kim has developed a biosensor platform which has 20 times faster detection capability than the existing biosensors using magnetic patterns resembling a spider web.
April 21, 2017
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Researchers develop a 'molecular needle' using a simplified biological system
Minimalism is an increasingly popular lifestyle choice that encourages individuals to decrease the overall number of possessions owned and live more simply. According to minimalist philosophy, the reduction of unnecessary clutter enables one to live a more functional and purposeful existence. IMP-IMBA Group Leader and CSSB scientist Thomas Marlovits*, in collaboration with colleagues from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), discovered that a minimalist approach can also be applied to complex biological systems, such as the type III secretion system.
May 15, 2017
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Researchers develop Computer Model for Designing Nanocarriers to Improve Drug Delivery
A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has developed a computer model that will aid in the design of nanocarriers, microscopic structures used to guide drugs to their targets in the body.
August 05, 2016
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Researchers develop eco-friendly, 4-in-1 nanocatalyst
Brown University researchers have developed a new composite catalyst that can perform four separate chemical reactions in sequential order and in one container to produce compounds useful in making a wide range of pharmaceutical products.
April 24, 2017
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Researchers develop Method to Avoid Graphene Layers Overheating
In the future miniature sensors and drug dispensers could be implanted within the body to monitor and maintain the health of humans. These devices will be made from graphene, one of the world's lightest and strongest materials.
September 23, 2016
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Researchers develop methods to enhance piezoelectric sensing capabilities of devices
Piezoelectric sensors measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain or force and are used in a vast array of devices important to everyday life. However, these sensors often can be limited by the "white noise" they detect that can give engineers and health care workers false readings.
November 23, 2016
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Researchers develop Nanoarray Capable of Sniffing Out and Distinguishing Several Diseases
Before modern medical lab methods became available, doctors diagnosed certain diseases by smelling the breath of patient. Researchers have been attempting to develop analytical instruments that can imitate this sniff-and-diagnose skill.
December 22, 2016
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Researchers develop placenta-on-a-chip
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed the first placenta-on-a-chip that can fully model the transport of nutrients across the placental barrier.
July 25, 2016
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Researchers develop rapid screening method to select promising nanoparticles for medicine
The use of nanoparticles – small, virus-sized elements developed under laboratory conditions – is increasingly widespread in the world of biomedicine. this rapidly-evolving technology offers hope for many medical applications, whether for diagnosis or therapies. In oncology, for example, the growing body of research suggests that, thanks to nanoparticles, treatment will soon become more precise, more effective and less painful for the patients.
February 3, 2017
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Researchers develop Robust Strategy to Produce Rich Variety of Nanorods
A new approach for crafting one-dimensional nanorods from a variety of precursor materials has been developed by materials scientists. the system, based on a cellulose backbone, depends on the growth of block copolymer "arms" that help produce a compartment to serve as a nanometer-scale chemical reactor. Aggregation of the nanorods is prevented by the outer blocks of the arms.
September 16, 2016
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Researchers have developed a new class of artificial proteins
In the journal, Nature Communications, a team of Danish researchers reports that they have developed a new class of artificial proteins. In the long term, the results could lead to better treatment of cancer and diabetes.
August 09, 2016
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Researchers imitate molecular crowding in cells
Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. as reported in the academic journal Small ("Investigation of horseradish peroxidase kinetics in an "organelle like" environment"), the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.
March 1, 2017
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Researchers improve computer modeling for designing drug-delivery nanocarriers
A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has developed a computer model that will aid in the design of nanocarriers, microscopic structures used to guide drugs to their targets in the body. the model better accounts for how the surfaces of different types of cells undulate due to thermal fluctuations, informing features of the nanocarriers that will help them stick to cells long enough to deliver their payloads.
August 04, 2016
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Researchers invent 'smart' thread that collects diagnostic data when sutured into tissue
For the first time, researchers led by Tufts University engineers have integrated nano-scale sensors, electronics and microfluidics into threads - ranging from simple cotton to sophisticated synthetics - that can be sutured through multiple layers of tissue to gather diagnostic data wirelessly in real time, according to a paper published online July 18 in Microsystems & Nanoengineering.
July 18, 2016
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Researchers propose a new way of performing in vitro tests on nanoparticles
Before new nanoparticles or other nanomedicines can be injected into the human body, a whole series of tests must be conducted in the laboratory, then in living cells, and in the end on humans. But often the results obtained in vitro do not resemble what actually happens in the animal or human body. Thus, the researchers reconsidered the basis of the in vitro experimental design.
June 6, 2017
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Researchers push the limits of organic synthesis
A dendritic molecule is one that grows by branching in several directions from its center core. at each branching point, the molecule branches again into a new generation. These molecules can be used for a broad range of biomedical applications, including gene and drug delivery.
March 7, 2017
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Researchers quantify drug delivery from nanoparticles inside a cell
For the first time, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that the success of delivery of drugs from nanoparticles can be quantified inside a cell.
October 3, 2016
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Researchers report the first ever documented observation of the self-healing phenomena of graphene
With the first ever documented observation of the self-healing phenomena of graphene, researchers from Hyderabad, India, hint at future applications for its use in artificial skin.
March 21, 2017
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Researchers Study Effectiveness of Nanohyperthermia in Softening Tumors
Efforts to defeat cancers are often hindered by the mechanical resistance of tumors and collateral damage of standard treatments. However, a group of researchers from the CNRS, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Paris Descartes University, and Paris Diderot University have successfully softened malignant tumors by heating them.
January 3, 2017
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Researchers uncover mechanism behind formation of gold nanoclusters in protein environment
In living organisms, free metal ions are stored and transported through proteins assembled into highly ordered structures such as protein cages via a reaction called biomineralization. this sophisticated biological strategy has attracted the attention of biotechnologists who speculate that natural ion-storage protein cages can be used to grow metal nanoparticles with desired properties.
March 16, 2017
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Researchers use graphene to stimulate the body's immune response
IBM announced its researchers have identified a new way to trigger the body's immune response by using polymer-coated graphene sheets.
May 16, 2017
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Researchers Use Iron-Containing Nanoparticles to Significantly Reduce Onset, Severity of Cavities
The bacteria that live in dental plaque and contribute to tooth decay often resist traditional antimicrobial treatment, as they can "hide" within a sticky biofilm matrix, a glue-like polymer scaffold.
July 27, 2016
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Researchers use nanoparticles to break up plaque and prevent cavities
The bacteria that live in dental plaque and contribute to tooth decay often resist traditional antimicrobial treatment, as they can "hide" within a sticky biofilm matrix, a glue-like polymer scaffold.
July 26, 2016
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Researchers use nature's weaving formula to engineer advanced functional materials
For the first time, UNSW biomedical engineers have woven a 'smart' fabric that mimics the sophisticated and complex properties of one nature's ingenious materials, the bone tissue periosteum.
January 11, 2017
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Researchers watch biomolecules at work
Scientists at the University of Bonn have succeeded in observing an important cell protein at work. to do this, they used a method that allows to measure structural changes within complex molecules. the further developed procedure makes it possible to elucidate such processes in the cell, i.e. in the natural environment.
December 9, 2016
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Researchers watch biomolecules at work
Method development advance allows deeper insight into cellular processes
December 9, 2016
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Researching a new kind of energy input for micromotors
Dr. Juliane Simmchen is going to explore new paths in chemistry. Being awarded a "Freigeist" Fellowship by the Volkswagen Foundation over 844.000 Euro for the next five years, Dr. Simmchen will establish her own junior research team at the Chair of Physical Chemistry (Prof. Alexander Eychmuller) at TU Dresden.
October 5, 2016
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Misc. - S

Safe Delivery of Therapeutic Genes by DNA Barcoding
Researchers used small snippets of DNA as barcodes to develop a new technique for rapidly screening the capability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to particular organs of the body. this new technique succeeded in accelerating the development and use of gene therapies for Parkinson™ disease, cancer and heart disease.
February 8, 2017
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Scientists create a cellular guillotine for studying single-cell wound repair
While doing research at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Sindy Tang learned of a remarkable organism: Stentor coeruleus. It's a single-celled, free-living freshwater organism, shaped like a trumpet and big enough to see with the naked eye. And, to Tang's amazement, if cut in half it can heal itself into two healthy cells.
June 26, 2017
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Scientists create new cell-membrane-like material with potential for water purification and drug delivery
Materials scientists have created a new material that performs like a cell membrane found in nature. Such a material has long been sought for applications as varied as water purification and drug delivery.
July 20, 2016
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Scientists create new thin material that mimics cell membranes
Materials scientists have created a new material that performs like a cell membrane found in nature. Such a material has long been sought for applications as varied as water purification and drug delivery.
July 19, 2016
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Scientists create organs-on-chips for large-scale drug screening
Led by University of California - Irvine professor of molecular biology & biochemistry Christopher C.W. Hughes, the research team successfully established multiple vascularized micro-organs on an industry-standard 96-well plate.
February 8, 2017
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Scientists borrow from electronics to build circuits in living cells
Living cells must constantly process information to keep track of the changing world around them and arrive at an appropriate response.
May 25, 2017
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Scientists Develop Bioinspired Color-Shifting Nanoparticles for Commercial Use
Inspired by the varying colors that gleam off of beetle shells, scientists have developed color-shifting nanoparticles that can change hue even after being embedded into a material. A report on the new, inexpensive technique, which could lead to the production of easier-to-read sensors and anti-tampering tags, appears in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
June 15, 2017
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Scientists develop Nanoparticle-Based Method to Deliver Therapeutic Molecules into Cells
Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed an innovative method to deliver therapeutic molecules into cells. the method employs gold nanoparticles that are electrically activated, leading them to oscillate and bore holes in the outer membranes of cells and allowing key molecules, such as RNA, DNA, and proteins, to gain entry.
December 20, 2016
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Scientists develop new toolkit for exploring protein biology
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a broadly useful method to unmask new functional features of human proteins.
November 1, 2016
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Scientists develop painless and inexpensive microneedle system to monitor drugs
Researchers at the University of British Columbia and the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland have created a microneedle drug monitoring system that could one day replace costly, invasive blood draws and improve patient comfort.
July 25, 2016
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Scientists develop spectacles for X-ray lasers
An international team of scientists has tailored special X-ray glasses to concentrate the beam of an X-ray laser stronger than ever before. the individually produced corrective lens eliminates the inevitable defects of an X-ray optics stack almost completely and concentrates three quarters of the X-ray beam to a spot with 250 nanometres (millionths of a millimetre) diameter, closely approaching the theoretical limit.
March 1, 2017
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Scientists grow mini human brains
Scientists in Singapore have made a big leap on research on the 'mini-brain'. These advanced mini versions of the human midbrain will help researchers develop treatments and conduct other studies into Parkinson's Disease and ageing-related brain diseases.
July 29, 2016
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Scientists invent new way to see proteins in motion
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers developed a new imaging technique that makes X-ray images of proteins as they move in response to electric field pulses.
December 14, 2016
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Scientists make giant molecular cages for energy conversion and drug delivery
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin and AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research centre hosted in Trinity College Dublin, have created 'molecular cages' that can maximise the efficiency of converting molecules in chemical reactions, and that may in future also be used as sensors and drug-delivery agents.
June 29, 2017
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Scientists put a new twist on artificial muscles
In recent years, researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas and colleagues at the University of Wollongong in Australia have put a high-tech twist on the ancient art of fiber spinning, using modern materials to create ultra-strong, powerful, shape-shifting yarns.
September 27, 2016
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Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein
A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. with the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's research light source PETRA III, the scientists could watch just how small protein pieces, called nanofibrils, lock together to form a fibre.
January 23, 2017
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Scientists successfully create blood from skin cells
Researchers in Singapore have artificially generated new mouse blood and immune cells from skin cells. this is a significant first step towards the eventual goal: the engineering of new human blood cells from skin cells or other artificial sources.
November 21, 2016
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Scientists Use Computer Simulations to develop Graphene-Like Crystals of Salts
New computer simulations have explored the possibility that common rock salt (NaCl) may form graphene-like 2D crystals, a possiblity which has been theorized for some time.
August 1, 2016
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Scientists use light to control the logic networks of a cell
Proteins are the workhorse molecules of life. Among their many jobs, they carry oxygen, build tissue, copy DNA for the next generation, and coordinate events within and between cells. now scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a method to control proteins inside live cells with the flick of a switch, giving researchers an unprecedented tool for pinpointing the causes of disease using the simplest of tools: light.
January 5, 2017
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Scientists use magnets and nanoparticles to open, close gaps in blood vessels
The endothelial cells that line blood vessels are packed tightly to keep blood inside and flowing, but scientists at Rice University and their colleagues have discovered it may be possible to selectively open gaps in those barriers just enough to let large molecules through -- and then close them again.
June 8, 2017
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Second skin protects soldiers from biological and chemical agents
This material is the first key component of futuristic smart uniforms that also will respond to and protect from environmental chemical hazards.
August 03, 2016
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Selective sensing of harmful molecules with light
Surface plasmon resonance devices are the benchmark in optical sensing. they are used for detecting biomarkers of disease, discovering drugs, analyzing chemicals, ensuring food quality and safety, and detecting pollutants in our environment. SPR devices can detect molecules within a few hundred nanometres of their metal surfaces.
July 28, 2016
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Self-Assembling, Self-Propelling, and Self-Destructive Nanovesicle for Drug Delivery
Some of the favorable attributes of nanomedical systems are autonomous targeting and delivery of drugs at their location of action. At present, a group of Dutch Researchers have developed a nanomotor that includes an antitumor drug enclosed within a self-assembled, self-propelled stomatocytes, carried over the cellular membrane and delivered into the cell on receiving a chemical redox signal for disassembling the vesicle membrane.
May 31, 2017
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Self-propelled swimming nanodiamonds for biological applications
Sometimes nanoscale diamonds contain a specific type of impurity: a single nitrogen atom where a carbon atom should be, with an empty space right next to it, resulting from a second missing carbon atom. This nitrogen-vacancy (NV) impurity gives each nanodiamond special optical and electromagnetic properties.
June 19, 2017
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'Sensing skin' detects cracks, harmful chemicals in structures
Researchers have developed a multi-layered "sensing skin" to detect corrosive or otherwise harmful substances in structures. the skin can also detect cracks and other structural flaws that are invisible to the naked eye (Structural Health Monitoring, "A Functionally Layered Sensing Skin for Detection of Corrosive Elements and Cracking").
October 10, 2016
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Sensors detect disease markers in breath
A small, thin square of an organic plastic that can detect disease markers in breath or toxins in a building's air could soon be the basis of portable, disposable sensor devices. By riddling the thin plastic films with pores, University of Illinois researchers made the devices sensitive enough to detect at levels that are far too low to smell, yet are important to human health.
May 18, 2017
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Sharpshooting nanoparticles hit the target
Multi stimuli-responsive nanocapsules selectively deliver drugs to exactly where they are needed, say researchers. the researchers created the multifunctional nanocapsules by wrapping magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles inside a biocompatible polymer coat that could be tuned to respond to acidity or temperature. the team has already shown that the nanoparticles can selectively deliver the toxic antitumor drug doxorubicin to cancer cells.
September 22, 2016
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Silk proteins paired with renewable wood nanocellulose produces possibly the strongest artificial spider silk yet
Possibly the strongest hybrid silk fibers yet have been created by scientists in Sweden using all renewable resources. Combining spider silk proteins with nanocellulose from wood, the process offers a low-cost and scalable way to make bioactive materials for a wide range of medical uses.
May 17, 2017
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Silver atom nanoclusters could become efficient biosensors
Researchers have now managed to pinpoint what happens when light is absorbed by extremely small nanoclusters of silver atoms (Nature Communications, "Ultrafast coherence transfer in DNA-templated silver nanoclusters"). The results may have useful application in the development of biosensors and in imaging.
June 13, 2017
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Silver nanoparticles' protein 'corona' affects their toxicity
A senior fellow at the Faculty of Chemistry, MSU, Vladimir Bochenkov together with his colleagues from Denmark succeeded in deciphering the mechanism of interaction of silver nanoparticles with the cells of the immune system. the study is published in the journal Nature Communications.
August 30, 2016
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Simulating cellular sorting processes
A plant or an animal cell uses numerous processes to sort and assemble tiny building blocks into larger molecules, to rebuild molecules or to dissolve them. Such processes depend on interactions between various cellular components and are pre-programmed at least in some of the building blocks.
March 10, 2017
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Single cells lined up like ducks in a row
The higher the concentration of tumor cells in the bloodstream, the greater the risk of metastasis. The number of circulating tumor cells indicates how well a patient is responding to therapy. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a new microhole chip that enables cells to be identified and characterized reliably within minutes.
June 7, 2017
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Single-cell analysis pave way for more accurate cancer prognosis
For the first time, researchers have applied single-cell transcriptomics to colorectal cancer (CRC) -- the third most common cancer in the world -- and discovered that this method could lead to improved patient stratification and eventually, a more accurate prognosis of CRC patients
March 21, 2017
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SLCU research institute uses Quorum PP3010T Cryo-SEM preparation system for plant biology research
Quorum Technologies, market and technology leaders in electron microscopy coating and cryogenic preparation products, report on plant biology research at the Sainsbury Laboratory, Cambridge UK, where their PP3010T Cryo-SEM preparation system is in routine use.
August 10, 2016
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Slowly pulling proteins apart reveals unexpected path to stability
Proteins are long strings of amino acids jumbled together like earphones left inside of a pocket for too long. But while a protein's mess of intertwined knots may look haphazard, their specific folds are extremely important to their biological functions. Misfolded proteins are thought to be the genesis of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and cystic fibrosis, just to name a few.
August 09, 2016
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Smart graphene contact lenses bring wearable electronics to the eye
Several research projects are working on reinventing the contact lens as a smart electronic device that, for instance, works as a self-powered biosensor for various point-of-care monitoring and wireless biomedical sensing, which may detect in real time the pathogen, bacteria, glucose, and infectious keratitis present in tear fluid. One example is a recently developed sensor for diabetic and glaucoma diagnosis.
May 22, 2017
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Smart Stitches Send Data as they Heal Wounds
These Threads Could Send Health Info Wirelessly to your Doctor
July 19, 2016
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Sound waves create nanoparticle whirlpools to round up tiny signs of disease
Mechanical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a tiny whirlpool that can concentrate nanoparticles using nothing but sound. the innovation could gather proteins and other biological structures from blood, urine or saliva samples for future diagnostic devices.
January 26, 2017
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Specially-Engineered Nanoparticles Prevent Activation of the Immune System
The systemic administration of nanoparticles activates an inflammatory response because of the accumulation of blood components on their surface. this was demonstrated by a Houston Methodist-led research team, and this finding could help researchers to develop more efficient ways that will help prevent the activation of the immune system and direct therapies in patients in a more precise manner.
April 5, 2017
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Spermbots - microrobotics meets sperm cells
Bio-hybrid microswimmers are devices that move on a small scale and are a combination of biological and artificial components. the biological component can offer a biocompatible propulsion source, the cargo itself and additional features such as sensing.
May 3, 2017
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Spider silk demonstrates Spiderman-like abilities
Our muscles are amazing structures. with the trigger of a thought, muscle filaments slide past each other and bundles of contracting fibers pull on the bones moving our bodies. the triggered stretching behavior of muscle is inherently based in geometry, characterized by a decrease in length and increase in volume (or vice versa) in response to a change in the local environment, such as humidity or heat.
January 31, 2017
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Spreading and wicking of water droplets on nanostructured surfaces
Researchers in China performed an observation experiment with optical direct measurement was performed to investigate droplet spreading and capillary wicking on nanostructured surfaces fabricated by the hydrothermal synthesis method with various nanowire array types and nanowire sizes.
July 3, 2017
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Sprinkling of neural dust opens door to electroceuticals
University of California, Berkeley engineers have built the first dust-sized, wireless sensors that can be implanted in the body, bringing closer the day when a Fitbit-like device could monitor internal nerves, muscles or organs in real time. Because these batteryless sensors could also be used to stimulate nerves and muscles, the technology also opens the door to "electroceuticals" to treat disorders such as epilepsy or to stimulate the immune system or tamp down inflammation.
August 04, 2016
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State of the art on graphene-based biosensors
Biosensing is growing on importance. Nanomaterials and, more specifically, graphene-based platforms have excellent properties for biosensing. In addition, flexible, abundant, low-cost and green materials, such as plastic and paper, can enhance this technology. Graphene-based biosensors will lead to breakthrough solutions for the real world, although their commercialization will imply diverse technical, production and market issues.
December 16, 2016
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Static electricity can control nanoballoon actuator
Molecular sized machines could in the future be used to control important mechanisms in the body. In a recent study, researchers at University of California, Berkeley and Umeå University show how a nanoballoon comprising a single carbon molecule ten thousand times thinner than a human hair can be controlled electrostatically to switch between an inflated and a collapsed state.
October 12, 2016
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Stretching the boundaries of neural implants
Rubbery, multifunctional fibers could be used to study spinal cord neurons and potentially restore function
April 3, 2017
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Stretchy Optical Fibers for Implanting in the Body
Biocompatible fibers could use light to stimulate cells or sense signs of disease.
October 18, 2016
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Strong, steady forces at work during cell division
Biologists who study the mechanics of cell division have for years disagreed about how much force is at work when the cell's molecular engines are lining chromosomes up in the cell, preparing to winch copies to opposite poles across a bridge-like structure called the kinetochore to form two new cells.
October 20, 2016
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Study finds surface texture of gallium nitride affects cell behavior
Researchers at North Carolina State University have determined that the surface texture of gallium nitride (GaN) materials can influence the health of nearby cells. the work is significant because GaN is a material of interest for developing new devices that can control cellular behavior.
October 14, 2016
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Study points a way to better implants
Medical devices implanted in the body for drug delivery, sensing, or tissue regeneration usually come under fire from the host's immune system. Defense cells work to isolate material they consider foreign to the body, building up a wall of dense scar tissue around the devices, which eventually become unable to perform their functions.
March 19, 2017
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Study Reveals Potential of Silver Atom Nanoclusters to Become Efficient Biosensors
In recent years, the research community has been able to develop a type of very small nanoclusters comprising of only a few noble metal atoms bound to a DNA fragment by combining chemistry and nanotechnology. Such complexes are of great interest as a result of their optical properties.
June 14, 2017
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Success in the 3D bioprinting of cartilage
A team of researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy has managed to generate cartilage tissue by printing stem cells using a 3D-bioprinter. the fact that the stem cells survived being printed in this manner is a success in itself. In addition, the research team was able to influence the cells to multiply and differentiate to form chondrocytes (cartilage cells) in the printed structure.
April 28, 2017
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Sugar-coated nanomaterial excels at promoting bone growth
There hasn't been a gold standard for how orthopaedic spine surgeons promote new bone growth in patients, but now Northwestern University scientists have designed a bioactive nanomaterial that is so good at stimulating bone regeneration it could become the method surgeons prefer.
June 19, 2017
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Super-cold microscope Has super cool uses
While "go big" is the motto for many science initiatives, Penn State researchers are hoping a cutting-edge microscope will allow them to "go deep" to promote biomedical research and discoveries in materials science.
July 25, 2016
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Super-resolution 3-D microscopy images cells in unprecedented detail
A new ultra-high resolution "nanoscope" is capable of taking 3-D images of an entire cell and its cellular constituents in unprecedented detail, an advance that could reveal biological phenomena never before seen and bring new medical insights.
August 12, 2016
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Surface roughness accelerates liquid-liquid transition
Researchers at the University of Tokyo have found that transition between two liquid states, characterized by different local structures, in a single-component substance can be accelerated by rubbing the cell's surfaces, a widely used treatment method to align liquid crystal molecules in liquid crystal displays.
March 30, 2017
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Sustainable sensors to detect, predict muscle fatigue
It may be clammy and inconvenient, but human sweat has at least one positive characteristic - it can give insight to what's happening inside your body. a new study published in the ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technolog ("Wearable Sensor System Powered by a Biofuel Cell for Detection of Lactate Levels in Sweat")y aims to take advantage of sweat's trove of medical information through the development of a sustainable, wearable sensor to detect lactate levels in your perspiration.
July 28, 2016
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Symposium Papers Published in Nanomedicine
International Symposium on Functional Nanomaterials in Industrial Applications
November 4, 2016
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Synthetic Antivenom: Nanoparticles to the Rescue
Nanoparticles may find a new use as an antidote for the 4.5 million people who are bitten each year by snakes and bees. the team of researchers led by Jeffrey O'Brien in Kenneth Shea's lab at the University of California, Irvine used a directed evolution method to create a library of nanoparticles that could soak up and effectively deactivate snake and bee venom from human serum. Their results are reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society this month.
January 4, 2017
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Synthetic biological nanowires to conduct electricity
Scientists have genetically modified a common soil bacteria to create electrical wires that not only conduct electricity, but are thousands of times thinner than a human hair.
August 16, 2016
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Misc. - T

Tailored carbon nanomaterials could help treating neurological diseases
Tomi Laurila's research topic has many quirky names.
November 10, 2016
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Tailoring nanoparticles to evade immune cells and prevent inflammatory response
A Houston Methodist-led research team showed that the systemic administration of nanoparticles triggers an inflammatory response because of blood components accumulating on their surface. this finding may help researchers create more effective ways to avoid activating the immune system and more precisely direct therapies in patients.
April 4, 2017
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Taking materials into the third dimension
To create more efficient catalysts, sensing and separation membrane, and energy storage devices, scientists often start with particles containing tiny pore channels. Defects between the particles can hamper performance.
January 23, 2017
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Targeting neurons with nanoparticles
A research team in Italy has elucidated the mechanisms through which nanoparticles modulate bioelectric activity from single neuron to neuronal networks.
June 27, 2017
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Tattoo therapy could ease chronic disease
A temporary tattoo to help control a chronic disease might someday be possible, according to scientists at Baylor College of Medicine who tested antioxidant nanoparticles created at Rice University.
September 23, 2016
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Team develops polymer surface with living system-like autonomous unidirectional motion
A research group at the University of Tokyo and their collaborators have developed a nanosize surface and interface composed of synthetic polymer that can move autonomously in one direction like a motor protein involved in motion and transport in living organisms.
February 28, 2017
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The beginning of the end of order
Now, 50 years later, a group of physicists from Konstanz headed by Dr Peter Keim, were able to prove the Mermin-Wagner theorem by experiments and computer simulations - at the same time as two international working groups from Japan and the USA.
March 30, 2017
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The brighter side of twisted polymers
A strategy to produce highly fluorescent nanoparticles through careful molecular design of conjugated polymers has been developed by KAUST researchers ("Controlling photophysical properties of ultrasmall conjugated polymer nanoparticles through polymer chain packing"). Such tiny polymer-based particles could offer alternatives to conventional organic dyes and inorganic semiconductor quantum dots as fluorescent tags for medical imaging.
May 16, 2017
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The end of biotechnology as we know it
If there were no biotechnology, the world would stand still. "Biotechnologically derived drugs dominate therapy with eight of the top ten best-selling drugs are produced using biotech methods," says Prof. Nigel Titchener-Hooker from the University College London.
November 21, 2016
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The first glimpse of a single protein
Proteins are the tools of life. In future, scientists may be able to examine single molecules with an especially gentle method to determine how they are constructed, how they perform their functions in cells, and how they interact with potential drugs.
January 25, 2017
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The nuclear transport option
The molecular shuttles on which proteins hitch rides when passing in and out of the nuclei of human cells differ depending on those proteins' biological functions, RIKEN researchers have revealed (eLife, "Extensive cargo identification reveals distinct biological roles of the 12 importin pathways"). This discovery could eventually help scientists to develop new ways to treat cancer and other diseases.
June 16, 2017
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The properties of light can be controlled by means of nanostructures
A theoretical study based on computational simulations conducted by the UPV/EHU's Nano-bio Spectroscopy Research Group in collaboration with the Japanese research centre AIST, has shown that the intensity of ultraviolet light that is made to pass through a graphene nano-ribbon is modulated with a terahertz frequency. So we are seeing the opening up of a new field of research into obtaining terahertz radiation that has a whole host of applications.
March 8, 2016
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The role of the tunnel
The targeted incorporation of proteins into the membrane is a vital process for cell maintenance; these membrane proteins ensure the proper functioning of the cells metabolism, communication with its environment, and energy supply.
January 31, 2017
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Thermal Separation of Complex Polymers
The Postnova TF2000 is an advanced thermal field flow fractionation (TF3) system that provides a highly efficient method of separating and characterising complex polymer samples such as natural or synthetic rubbers, starches and paints from approximately 10 kDa up to 100 MDa and more in organic and aqueous solvents.
July 20, 2016
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Thread-based device could be sutured through tissues to gather real time diagnostic data
For the first time, researchers led by Tufts University engineers have integrated nano-scale sensors, electronics and microfluidics into threads - ranging from simple cotton to sophisticated synthetics - that can be sutured through multiple layers of tissue to gather diagnostic data wirelessly in real time, according to a paper published online July 18 in Microsystems & Nanoengineering. the research suggests that the thread-based diagnostic platform could be an effective substrate for a new generation of implantable diagnostic devices and smart wearable systems.
July 19, 2016
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Tilted microscopy technique better reveals protein structures
The conventional way of placing protein samples under an electron microscope during cryo-EM experiments may fall flat when it comes to getting the best picture of a protein's structure. In some cases, tilting a sheet of frozen proteins -- by anywhere from 10 to 50 degrees -- as it lies under the microscope, gives higher quality data and could lead to a better understanding of a variety of diseases, according to new research led by Salk scientist Dmitry Lyumkis.
July 3, 2017
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Tiny bioengineered blood vessel grafts aid delicate microsurgeries
Scientists have been working diligently to create engineered tissue implants to repair or replace damaged or diseased tissue and organs; but their success hinges on the ability to build a sturdy connection linking the implant's blood vessels and the patient's existing vasculature.
March 29, 2017
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Tiny cages could keep vaccines safe at high temperatures
Vaccines and antibodies could be transported and stored without refrigeration by capturing them in tiny silica 'cages', a discovery which could make getting vital medicines to remote or dangerous places much easier, cheaper and safer.
April 24, 2017
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Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method
University of British Columbia researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections.
February 14, 2017
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Tiny super magnets could be the future of drug delivery
Microscopic crystals could soon be zipping drugs around your body, taking them to diseased organs. In the past, this was thought to be impossible - the crystals, which have special magnetic properties, were so small that scientists could not control their movement. But now a team of Chinese researchers has found the solution, and their discovery has opened new applications that could use these crystals to improve - and perhaps even save - many lives.
November 14, 2016
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Tip-assisted Chemistry Enables Chemical Reactions at Femtoliter Scale
The Chemical Communications journal reviews the advances made towards the confinement of chemical reactions within small droplets. the focus of the article falls to the tip-assisted chemistry, a technique recently amended by the ICN2 Nanostructured Functional Materials Group.
November 16, 2016
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Tooth decay - drilling down to the nanoscale
With one in two Australian children reported to have tooth decay in their permanent teeth by age 12, researchers from the University of Sydney believe they have identified some nanoscale elements that govern the behaviour of our teeth.
September 7, 2016
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Translating the Power of Organometallic Catalysis to the Mitochondria of Living Cells
A research group from CiQUS (Centro Singular de Investigación en Química Biolóxica e Materiais Moleculares) report the first demonstration of a non-natural chemical reaction in a subcellular compartment.
September 7, 2016
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Translating the power of organometallic catalysis to the mitochondria of living cells
Thousands of chemical transformations are constantly occurring inside our cells. These processes are catalyzed by natural enzymes, substances primarily made of proteins which facilitate these reactions and allow them to take place at moderate temperatures. However, might we be able to design synthetic metallic compounds which could work as artificial enzymes, inducing chemical transformations not known in nature yet?
September 7, 2016
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Travelling through the body with graphene
For the first time researchers succeeded to place a layer of graphene on top of a stable fatty lipid monolayer. Surrounded by a protective shell of lipids graphene could enter the body and function as a versatile sensor.
September 28, 2016
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Misc. - U

UC San Diego Research Team Develops Ultimate Natural Sunscreen
UC San Diego's Chemists, Nanoengineers, and Materials Researchers might have just developed the ultimate natural sunscreen. They have created nanoparticles that imitate the behavior of natural melanosomes, melanin-generating cell structures that protect skin, eyes and other tissues from the destructive effects of UV radiation.
May 18, 2017
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UNAM Creates Nanoparticle-Based Edible Coating to Extend Shelf-Life of Food
An edible coating has been developed by UNAM researchers with the aim to extend the life of vegetables and fruits and preserve them for prolonged refrigeration. this coating with added purposeful ingredients could be applied to freshly cut foods.
September 28, 2016
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Uncovering new relationships, organizational principles in protein interaction networks
Proteins, those basic components of cells and tissues, carry out many biological functions by working with partners in networks. the dynamic nature of these networks -- where proteins interact with different partners at different times and in different cellular environments -- can present a challenge to scientists who study them.
March 8, 2017
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Ultrasound pulses activate release of drugs from nanoparticles
Biomedical engineers at Johns Hopkins report they have worked out a noninvasive way to release and deliver concentrated amounts of a drug to the brain of rats in a temporary, localized manner using ultrasound.
January 23, 2017
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Understanding the way liquid spreads through paper
Molecules move randomly, colliding with each other in continual motion. you can even smell this process at times; it's how perfume spreads across a room when the air is still. the process is termed diffusion and the theory of diffusion can be applied to liquid spreading through paper, too - a process at work in a range of everyday products, from ink pens to paper sampling patches for medical tests.
November 30, 2016
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Unique Collaboration to Accelerate 2D Materials Research and Graphene Commercialization
Thomas Swan & Co. Ltd. and the National Graphene Institute (NGI) have announced a unique collaboration at the EuroScience Open Forum in Manchester to produce new commercial options for graphene and a completely new range of 2D materials.
July 27, 2016
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Unlocking peptide potential
Peptides are naturally occurring molecules with excellent pharmaceutical properties. However, their therapeutic use has been limited by the relatively small number of natural peptide structures.
February 25, 2017
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Use of prefabricated blood vessels may revolutionize root canals
While root canals are effective in saving a tooth that has become infected or decayed, this age-old procedure may cause teeth to become brittle and susceptible to fracture over time. Now researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, have developed a process by which they can engineer new blood vessels in teeth, creating better long-term outcomes for patients and clinicians.
June 12, 2017
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Using molecules to de-tune nanodrums
Materials for pharmaceutical products are an expensive commodity, meaning appropriate caution is called for when it comes to synthesising new medications, for example. a precise measuring instrument is required in order to test or adapt the desired composition. a common measurement method to date has been infrared spectroscopy. However, the sample must first be prepared before it can be analysed. the pharmaceutical material can, for example, be dissolved in an aqueous solution.
March 13, 2017
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Using nanodiamonds to see smaller
Can you give an overview of LuciGem's technology for the illumination and tracking of small molecules using fluorescent diamonds and phosphorescent nanorubies?
April 7, 2017
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Using Nanopore Technology To Identify Proteins
According to a new study published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology, researchers can improve on conventional protein analysis methods by using tiny nanopores, which 'scan' the proteins as they pass through them.
May 31, 2017
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UTA Engineer Earns NSF Grant to develop Nanocomposite Hydrogel Bioinks for Printing 3D Tissues
The advent of 3D printing has led to many innovations in manufacturing, assembly and production.
August 30, 2016
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Utilizing tumor suppressor proteins to shape nanomaterials
A new method combining tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep successfully created hexagonal silver nanoplates, suggesting an efficient strategy for controlling the nanostructure of inorganic materials.
May 3, 2017
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Misc. - V

Vortex rings may aid cell delivery, cell-free protein production
Some of the world's most important discoveries -- penicillin, vulcanized rubber and Velcro, to name a few -- were made by accident. In fact, it's been said that upward of half of all scientific discoveries are by chance.
August 11, 2016
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Misc. - W

Waste not: Edible wax coating slicks liquids with ease
When we reach the end of a ketchup bottle, there's always a little left, stuck to the sides. a Colorado State University lab offers a fix: a nontoxic, nonstick coating that lets loose every last drop.
August 03, 2016
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Watching atoms race
By comparison, a blink lasts a lifetime -- atoms can rearrange themselves within one 350 quadrillionths of a second. as reported in the latest issue of the prestigious journal Nature, scientists at the Center for Nanointegration (CENIDE) at the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), together with their colleagues from the University of Paderborn, have been able to observe the movement of a one-dimensional material in real-time.
March 30, 2017
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Waters and Wyatt Collaborate to Advance Polymer Analysis and Biopharmaceutical Characterization Studies
Coupling of technologies delivers valuable information 5x faster than conventional size exclusion chromatography
June 2, 2017
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Wearable health monitor based on household paper
Paper electronics — putting flexible electronic sensors and other circuits on regular paper — have the potential to cut the price of a wide range of medical tools, from point-of-care diagnostic tests to portable DNA detectors.
February 16, 2017
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Wearable microscope can measure fluorescent dyes through skin
UCLA researchers working with a team at Verily Life Sciences have designed a mobile microscope that can detect and monitor fluorescent biomarkers inside the skin with a high level of sensitivity, an important tool in tracking various biochemical reactions for medical diagnostics and therapy.
September 27, 2016
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When proteins court each other, the dance moves matter
At every moment inside the human body, a carefully choreographed dance is being performed.
March 16, 2017
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What is happening inside nanocages for gold nanoparticles?
In living organisms, free metal ions are stored and transported through proteins assembled into highly ordered structures such as protein cages via a reaction called biomineralization. this sophisticated biological strategy has attracted the attention of biotechnologists who speculate that natural ion-storage protein cages can be used to grow metal nanoparticles with desired properties.
March 16, 2017
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Wyatt Technology Corporation Launches the ViscoStar III Online Viscometer for Polymer and Protein Characterization
Wyatt Technology, the world leader in instrumentation for absolute macromolecular characterization, announces the launch of the third generation of intrinsic viscosity detectors: the ViscoStar III.
October 19, 2016
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